Viggo on Todos Tenemos Un Plan

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The lie brings Augustín to the truth and the proximity to death, the possibility of death, brings him closer to life. - Viggo Mortensen

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Viggo on Todos Tenemos Un Plan

"I like the movie because it's not a clean story. All the characters are frustrated and resentful people."

Viggo Mortensen's Plan
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais Semanal
16 September 2012




"There's a saying in Spanish: Without risk there's no glory," Mortensen explained. "You can live a safe little life, but if you don't take a chance once in a while you'll imprison yourself. That's the whole point of our movie."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013




'This film, for instance, is a film noir but you go and ask a lot of people what film noir is and they cannot say or have a thousand different answers. To me, it´s a story where all the characters, even those who seem innocent, seem like failures: they all have remorse and regrets, they all make mistakes and they all have insecurities.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"What I liked right away, and continue to like very much, are the contradictions, the duality it has, not just between the twin brothers I play but also the scenery, the city, and the river."

Viggo Mortensen
Mortensen faces the "mental challenge" of playing both twin brothers in 'Todos tenemos un plan'
By - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zoe
Terra.es
9 August 2011




"What this film has that is interesting and original to me is that somehow the truth is arrived at through lying. The character Agustín lies. Obviously he does it when he acts as his brother Pedro, but to a certain extent, he's also lied as Agustín. In reality, he's never been Agustín. He's been the Agustín that he believed he should be, like many of us do in some way."

Viggo Mortensen - Agustín and Pedro (Production Notes)
translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Todos Tenemos Un Plan website
July 2012




'Agustín reaches the true essence of his brother (Pedro) much more now that he´s dead than before, when he was alive. Embodying him in front of everybody, he´s closer to his brother but also closer to himself. Finally he opens his eyes and accepts what he is and where he is and that river of his childhood. That river, that childhood he had left behind.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




'The lie brings Augustín to the truth and the proximity to death, the possibility of death, brings him closer to life.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"I was raised in Argentina until I was 11 and now I go back there a lot, at least twice a year. It's a country where I feel very comfortable and it represents an important period in my life. There is a scene where someone shouts at Agustin when he is masquerading as Pedro: 'You will never be like Pedro. You will never be from here.' That had a real resonance for me. It made me think of my own experience. You can't really go back to where you came from. I don't think any of us can."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




"In the end, he becomes almost another character," says Mortensen. "He accepts who he is: even though things are starting to go badly, he's at peace with himself."

Viggo Mortensen
'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




"I think that plans are not that different from dreams; they are like dreams with another [kind of] will, conscious dreams. People think that a plan fails or works, or comes to nothing, but it's not like that; plans change because we change, circumstances change."

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




EA: Do you relate more to Agustin or to Pedro?

VM: None of them, but while we were shooting, it would vary. If I was playing Agustín for a long time, I would miss Pedro. He was fun, he says what's on his mind and that makes him a very attractive character to play. But at the same time, it is a difficult person to see everyday or to live with. Then, If I was playing Pedro, I wanted to play Agustín and Ana agreed with me. I love them both very much. One character is more subtle than the other.

Viggo Mortensen Returns to his Roots with "Todos Tenemos Un Plan"
by Lydia Aquino
Entertainment Affair
2 April 2013




"Plans," shares Mortensen, "are like conscious dreams, longings, but they never come to be, and that has to do with the film being called that, but it doesn´t mean that they´ll be realised."

Viggo Mortensen Doubles As Twins In The Argentinean Todos Tenemos Un Plan
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Razón
5 September 2012




For Mortensen, the kind of actor who routinely challenges himself, who's been totally outspoken about doing his own thing, playing against, well, himself, was "fun," he said. He particularly loved Pedro's craziness, saying whatever was on his mind. "I think every family is dysfunctional, and some manage to control it better than others,"

Toronto Film Festival: Viggo Mortensen on his happy 'homecoming' playing twins in Spanish
Solvej Schou
Entertainment Weekly
10 September 2012




"The filming in Argentina was hard, because of the weather, but we were very lucky and miraculously finished on time. The encounter between the two brothers, which we're filming here, we knew that that was going to be complicated, because it was another challenge, a more technical challenge on the one hand, more mental, a puzzle, and I almost had more fear of that as an actor than of filming in the winter and on the river..."

Viggo Mortensen
Mortensen faces the "mental challenge" of playing both twin brothers in 'Todos tenemos un plan'
By - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zoe
Terra.es
9 August 2011




... how often do you get to kill yourself in a movie? I assume that's not very often.

Mortensen: (laughs) No, it was fun. What I like doing is to create that grey area of why do each of them do what they do? Why do they react in the way that they do? It's not all explained to you. I think it's a believable way to behave, but it leaves you with some questions

Interview: Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan
By Edward Douglas
Comingsoon.net
20 March 2013




Ana's movie, already a year and half from the time of its premiere, now is generally accepted as an interesting work, without the earlier prejudices. To me, it's a very original first work, a story well told. As is the case with all of Cronenberg's movies when they premiere, what happened to Ana's is what almost always occurs when stories don't follow "norms" in the rhythm, the denouement, the characterizations of the roles. The critics and the public whinny and prefer to punish the new instead of trying to take it in without prejudice. It happens, as you know, with literature and with all kinds of artistic efforts. With philosophy and the sciences as well. I'm not saying a work exists that could please everyone. That would be very boring. I'm referring to the fear, or at least the resistance that any different thought and/or unexpected vision often provokes. I've spoken with people who'd earlier bashed Ana's movie and who now, seeing it again, say they like it. When you can pay attention to the object or the story in your own way, according to your own experiences and without the distractions/psychological threats that the opinions of others sometimes bring, you're able to appreciate almost any vision of the world.

Viggo Mortensen
The Origin of Myths
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 March 2014


Last edited: 28 June 2014 13:07:39