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Viggo Mortensen talks directing debut 'Falling'; first look at family drama (exclusive)


Source: SCREENDAILY.
Found By: CoCo


Thanks to CoCo for the find.


Quote:

This week, Viggo Mortensen is heading to London to begin the editing process on Falling, his directorial debut.

0001fall.jpg
Image Caitlin Cronenberg.
© SCREENDAILY.
 
By TOM GRATER

This week, Viggo Mortensen is heading to London to begin the editing process on Falling, his directorial debut. The film, in which Mortensen stars with Lance Henriksen and Laura Linney (see an exclusive first look above), is about a conservative father who moves from his rural farm to live with his gay son's family in Los Angeles. The project is a very personal story, as Mortensen reveals in a catch-up with Screen.


"Both of my parents were ill. When my mother passed away, I was flying across the Atlantic after the funeral and I couldn't sleep, I was remembering things she had said that I hadn't thought of for years. The more I thought about my mother, the more I also thought about my dad, it became a back and forth between two characters and it became fictional, it wasn't them anymore," recalls Mortensen.

"That became the launching pad for a short story. I realised it was very visual, and if it was visual, it was a screenplay. I wrote it in two weeks and that was basically the screenplay we used. The route of it is my mother, and it becomes more about my father as it goes along. My father also passed away, two years after my mother," he adds.

Alongside his acting work, Mortensen has produced before, including on Ana Piterbarg's 2012 drama Everybody Has A Plan and Lisandro Alonso's western Jauja (he also produces Falling, with Daniel Bekerman and Chris Curling). Stepping into the director chair wasn't daunting, he says, because he could draw on watching "some very good ones [directors]" such as Peter Weir, Jane Campion and David Cronenberg.

Falling shot for 25 days in Canada and four days in California in March and April this year on a "very tight budget". Mortensen explains that everyone on the shoot "worked for the minimum [pay]", and that the money he made from the project has been reinvested into the production. "Unless this movie does unusually well someday, I won't make any money from it," he adds.

Financing

Mortensen would have preferred not to be in the film at all, he reveals, but having his name on the cast sheet was the only way to make it financially viable. "I would've preferred not to be in the movie, I have to say that, but to get it made one of the conditions was I had to act in it. I've been around for a long time as an actor, but if you haven't directed a movie you haven't directed a movie – I'm unproven and I'm lucky to get a chance," he says, adding that if he gets the opportunity to direct again, and he has to be in it for financial reasons, he'd rather "just do a scene or two".

London-based HanWay Films is overseeing international rights on the project and sealed a significant amount of territory deals during this year's European Film Market in Berlin, as Screen revealed. "It was more than we expected," admits Mortensen. UTA Independent Film Group is handling the US sale.

Mortensen hit the headlines earlier this month when he responded critically to the usage of an image of Aragon, the character he played in The Lord Of The Rings franchise, by Spanish far-right party Vox in a promotional tweet. The actor denounced the usage, calling it "ignorant" and "absurd".

Reflecting on that exchange, Mortensen says he "could have let it go" to avoid drawing publicity to Vox, but "sometimes it feels like you should call it out".
"These are the kinds of parties and movements that people like Steve Bannon are behind, it's a similar line of thinking, the rise of the irresponsible right. Vox are homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, anti-feminist, they essentially want to re-vindicate the Franco dictatorship. It's a dangerous thing," the actor explains.

© SCREENDAILY. Images © Caitlin Cronenberg.

Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Media Quotable Viggo

One thing I admire about Viggo (amongst several hundred others) is that he really does try to live in the moment. Maybe it’'s his insatiable curiosity, maybe it’'s the fact that he’'s always been aware that life it short, but paying attention to the moment, enjoying it or learning from it, maybe recording it, has always been his way. It’s the springboard of his creativity but it'’s also why he is such a present and powerful force, influencing and drawing in everyone who meets him.





“We may not know why we’'re here, or where we’'re going after we die, but if you’'re here, you might as well be here. And being here means paying attention, I think.”

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008




Mortensen likes sotto voce details; he gives his attention to instants that would otherwise have passed by unobserved, or more significantly, unregistered - things that in a literal sense were simply there for him because he was there for them - things that would have easily passed by as all else passes by, as we ourselves finally do.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




"I think five minutes can be an eternity if it's well used, you know."

Viggo Mortensen
The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




Where are you from?

At the moment I’'m from here.

Viggo Mortensen - Man of the Week
By Einar Falur - translated by Ragga
Morgunblaðið
30 May 2008




Viggo extracts a big moleskin notebook from his backpack, like a naturalist's notebook, a logbook, in which he notes down his thoughts and everything that passes through his mind with a big, tangled handwriting like the rigging of a schooner.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




‘In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It’s really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, “OK, this is where I am. I don’'t have any choice at the moment. Let’'s make the most of it.”’

Viggo Mortensen’s Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




“People today are much less present in spite of being hyper-connected. You see people in the street absorbed in their cell-phone; there’'s plenty of time for that message. What’'s more important than now?”

Viggo Mortensen: "The feeling of the absurd is something that's constant with me"
By Ima Sanchis - translated by Ollie and Zoe
La Vanguardia
8 October 2015




“Life is so short! I tell myself frequently to “Go slow to go fast”, to remind me to take my time in order to sample as many things as possible.”

Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




“A photo, a painting, a poem or music that we use to express our experience is not the main thing, but what you are expressing. How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.”

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




“Even though many people seem to be not interested in art or in things like nature or life itself, we must force ourselves to remember, we must force ourselves to be deep in life."

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
July 2008
Source: Panorama First




What keeps you awake at night?

Yesterday and tomorrow, but I eventually fall asleep because neither exists.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
by Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010



"Great artists," writes critic Kevin Powers, "tell us the task is to train and polish the attention within the brilliance of our small shipwrecks. Viggo does that both insistently and obsessively."

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003




How long would he like to live?

"Forever." Without hesitation.

Really? Wouldn't you get bored?

"There's no excuse to be bored," Mortensen says. "Sad, yes. Angry, yes. Depressed, yes. Crazy, yes. But there is no excuse for boredom, ever."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine, January 2004



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Getty Images.

One Does Not Simply Use Aragorn for Spanish Far-Right Propaganda


Source: Vice News


From Vice News.


Quote:

It wasn’t so long ago that Benito Mussolini’s granddaughter was squaring off with actor Jim Carrey over his sketches of her dead, fascist grandpa. Now, it’s Viggo Mortensen's turn

001vox.jpg
Image Richard Shotwell/Inv....
© AP.
 
The next installment of Hollywood Actors Feud With Far-Right European Politicians has begun.

It wasn't so long ago that Benito Mussolini's granddaughter was squaring off with actor Jim Carrey over his sketches of her dead, fascist grandpa. Now, it's Viggo Mortensen's turn. He's famous for playing Aragorn in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy — and apparently now the platform of Spain's nationalist Vox party.

Last week, Vox tweeted an image of Aragorn with the Spanish flag and the party's emblem on his cloak. He was standing with his sword drawn before a horde of the party's enemies: leftist, LGBTQ, and feminist groups. The tweet was captioned with the text: "Let the battle begin! #ForSpain."

Vox's platform is nationalist and gives a special place of pride to the Spanish flag. Its leaders vow to essentially "make Spain great again" — and want to abolish laws on gender violence and repeatedly wage other attacks on women's and LGBTQ rights.

Mortensen, who lives with his wife in Madrid, was not pleased with his most iconic character being used for far-right propaganda purposes. He was perhaps even angrier than Aragorn was when Boromir died — so mad, in fact, that he drew a weapon mightier than the sword.

"One must be quite ignorant to think that the use of Aragorn's character in the film trilogy 'The Lord of the Rings' to promote the electoral campaign of a xenophobic right-wing party like Vox would be a good idea," Mortensen wrote in a Tuesday letter to the Spanish newspaper El País.

He continued: "It is even more ridiculous to use the character of Aragorn, a polyglot statesman who advocates knowledge and inclusion of the various races, customs, and languages of Middle-earth, to legitimize an anti-immigrant, anti-feminist and Islamophobic political group. I would laugh at this clumsiness, but Vox has entered the Congress with 24 seats. It is not a joke, and we must be attentive and proactive, as is Aragorn in the Tolkien saga."

Mortensen is correct: Vox saw a decent political surge in Spain's election. In 2016, the party gathered just 0.2% of the vote. In the last election, that jumped to 10.3%. Before then, Spain had, in a relative sense, avoided the resurgence of far-right mainstream politics seen in other parts of Europe.

Social scientists said that's because the fascist dictatorship of Francisco Franco is still fresh in Spaniards' minds.

© Vice News. Images © AP.

Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Media Quotable Viggo


Last week's Captain Fantastic Quotable got me thinking about Viggo's own childhood, which was also unusual and adventurous in its own way. And despite all the roving around and the rootlessness we can say, along with Viggo, that 'the end result hasn't been so bad'.





One of my first memories as a boy was realizing that animals die and therefore people do. It seemed very unfair to me and I'm sure that I traumatized my parents with these questions.

Viggo Mortensen: Film and Soccer Activist
By Horacio Bilbao - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarín.com
27 November 2014




As a child he was a loner, which is unsurprising considering his peripatetic lifestyle. "I wrote stories and did a lot of drawing," he says. "It's why I'm comfortable being by myself and why I yearn for it at times.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




When Viggo was 7, his parents sent him to boarding school in Argentina. "It was a strict school, isolated in the foothills of the mountains," he said. "Other than holidays, I really didn't see my parents. The other kids were miserable, always crying or wetting their beds. But I was pretty self-sufficient. So I guess it must have suited me."

Back in the saddle 'Rings' hero Mortensen is riding high with 'Hidalgo'
By Nancy Mills
Daily News
25 February 2004




"…I was always running away. I did that a lot. [Another time] when I was a child, about two-and-a-half, I crawled out of bed and across the road and crawled into someone's house on a Sunday morning. I was in the kitchen playing with all the pots and pans, and they called my parents, who had been calling the police. I think they said: 'You are missing someone, and he is here playing with our kitchen knives.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'According to my mother I never went anywhere as a child without a pencil, and I drew all the time. Recently she gave me a notebook with some of my old drawings. I especially noticed one I drew when I was 7 - it was rather wild. On the top it said: 'Little Red Riding Hood', and then there were a lot of oil colours mixed together, almost abstract. I really liked it. But across the drawing it said with a red pen - and underlined: VERY BAD! Some teachers still think that is motivating...'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




The sound of cars and buses passing by on half-flooded streets quiets me; it´s something that makes me remember with absolute clarity my childhood in Buenos Aires and long afternoons in the countryside. Muddy paths, the grey rampart that advances relentlessly and swallows the sky, the threat of something big, powerful, unstoppable. Rain is the universal music - along with the contribution of the wind through a forest or punishing an open window, the roar of the rivers, the sea.

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




"I climbed this sort of cliff—I am sure it wasn't really very high, I was just clambering up. I thought it was really fun. Then I got to the top and I realized how high I was. I freaked out and I was, like, screaming and crying for my dad. He woke up and had to come and get me down. It was probably not very high but it seemed very big to me then."

Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016



"Every once in a while you do something really dumb when you're a kid and you realize when you're an adult that that's dangerous, but.. you know.. There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show
2004




When he was 11 his parents divorced, and he moved with his mother and two younger brothers to upstate New York, near the border with Canada.... "my brothers and I spoke only Spanish. But you quickly adapt. I somewhat replaced it with French. We were not that far from Quebec, so I [replaced] my football team with the Montreal Canadians hockey team, which has the same colours".

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




"We arrived in Northern New York near the Canadian border, and there were no Spanish-speaking people at all, one black person in the whole county, some French-Canadians, and no tradition of football. It was just completely different. But when you're kids, you adapt very quickly. Within a month or two, I knew all the swear words."

Viggo Mortensen on leaving South America
I've taken on too much...
By James Mottram, The Independent / UK.
23 October 2007




…as an adolescent, he felt comfortable behind the lens of a camera. Mortensen says he started taking pictures as a teenager, although he wasn't "really serious about it." For him, the camera not only offered a sense of control over his surroundings but a kind of veil to help him feel invisible from a world he found both intimidating and inspiring.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"I was 12 or 13 when a friend of mine encouraged me to be an actor, something that had never crossed my mind. I was then living in New York and didn't know anybody. I went up on stage and read the first paragraph from David Copperfield. The only thing I heard before closing the book and fleeing from that inconceivable torture was 'Louder, louder.' And here I am!"

Viggo Mortensen: "The older I get, the more tired I get of Hollywood."
By Rocío Ayuso
El Pais
8 October 2016




"I didn't have friends when I was little that I know now - there wasn't any sense of continuity like that," Mortensen says. "But I got to see a lot of things and learn a lot of things. And I learned to rely on my imagination, and on myself."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'Now I see things in hindsight and what I learned in those years is what has made me who I am today. And, even though I recognize that I'm a rather strange guy, I don't think the end result has been so bad.'

Viggo Mortensen on growing up in Argentina
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
30 August 2006


You will find all previous Quotables here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © unknown.

Your May Reminders


Categories: Calendar: Viggo


Again ... Better late then never!

Click on image to enlarge.




© viggo-works.com. Images © Getty.


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Last edited: 15 May 2019 09:08:43