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Viggo Mortensen talks directing debut 'Falling'; first look at family drama (exclusive)


Source: SCREENDAILY.
Found By: CoCo


Thanks to CoCo for the find.


Quote:

This week, Viggo Mortensen is heading to London to begin the editing process on Falling, his directorial debut.

0001fall.jpg
Image Caitlin Cronenberg.
© SCREENDAILY.
By TOM GRATER

This week, Viggo Mortensen is heading to London to begin the editing process on Falling, his directorial debut. The film, in which Mortensen stars with Lance Henriksen and Laura Linney (see an exclusive first look above), is about a conservative father who moves from his rural farm to live with his gay son's family in Los Angeles. The project is a very personal story, as Mortensen reveals in a catch-up with Screen.


"Both of my parents were ill. When my mother passed away, I was flying across the Atlantic after the funeral and I couldn't sleep, I was remembering things she had said that I hadn't thought of for years. The more I thought about my mother, the more I also thought about my dad, it became a back and forth between two characters and it became fictional, it wasn't them anymore," recalls Mortensen.

"That became the launching pad for a short story. I realised it was very visual, and if it was visual, it was a screenplay. I wrote it in two weeks and that was basically the screenplay we used. The route of it is my mother, and it becomes more about my father as it goes along. My father also passed away, two years after my mother," he adds.

Alongside his acting work, Mortensen has produced before, including on Ana Piterbarg's 2012 drama Everybody Has A Plan and Lisandro Alonso's western Jauja (he also produces Falling, with Daniel Bekerman and Chris Curling). Stepping into the director chair wasn't daunting, he says, because he could draw on watching "some very good ones [directors]" such as Peter Weir, Jane Campion and David Cronenberg.

Falling shot for 25 days in Canada and four days in California in March and April this year on a "very tight budget". Mortensen explains that everyone on the shoot "worked for the minimum [pay]", and that the money he made from the project has been reinvested into the production. "Unless this movie does unusually well someday, I won't make any money from it," he adds.

Financing

Mortensen would have preferred not to be in the film at all, he reveals, but having his name on the cast sheet was the only way to make it financially viable. "I would've preferred not to be in the movie, I have to say that, but to get it made one of the conditions was I had to act in it. I've been around for a long time as an actor, but if you haven't directed a movie you haven't directed a movie – I'm unproven and I'm lucky to get a chance," he says, adding that if he gets the opportunity to direct again, and he has to be in it for financial reasons, he'd rather "just do a scene or two".

London-based HanWay Films is overseeing international rights on the project and sealed a significant amount of territory deals during this year's European Film Market in Berlin, as Screen revealed. "It was more than we expected," admits Mortensen. UTA Independent Film Group is handling the US sale.

Mortensen hit the headlines earlier this month when he responded critically to the usage of an image of Aragon, the character he played in The Lord Of The Rings franchise, by Spanish far-right party Vox in a promotional tweet. The actor denounced the usage, calling it "ignorant" and "absurd".

Reflecting on that exchange, Mortensen says he "could have let it go" to avoid drawing publicity to Vox, but "sometimes it feels like you should call it out".
"These are the kinds of parties and movements that people like Steve Bannon are behind, it's a similar line of thinking, the rise of the irresponsible right. Vox are homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, anti-feminist, they essentially want to re-vindicate the Franco dictatorship. It's a dangerous thing," the actor explains.

© SCREENDAILY. Images © Caitlin Cronenberg.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe


Captain Fantastic is being broadcast on BBC 2 in the UK tomorrow night and although I have it on Blu-ray, I won't be able to resist watching. Which is just the excuse I need for some my favourite Fantastic quotes!



The clan's father isn't a superhero, but because he's played by Viggo Mortensen he's the next best thing.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
7 July 2016




‘Viggo demonstrates the aspirations of the movie, what kind of movie are you hoping to make, and for me, I can have no better faith than in Viggo Mortensen.’

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross Interview
Jason Gorber
Dorkshelf.com
14 July 2016




“Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her.”

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's Captain Fantastic’
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




Viggo Mortensen gets the role he may well have been born to play, not as a superhero, but as a super-dad determined to raise his kids on his own terms.... The inspired choice of casting Mortensen, a natural Papa Bear, who taps into both his physical strength and spiritual gentleness.

Peter Debruge
Variety
23 January 2016




Mortensen, looking his most mountain-man handsome, is winning and charismatic, walking on the knife's edge between principled and unhinged.

Brian Moylan
The Guardian
31 January 2016




The director sent Mortensen a huge box of books of recommended reading, including texts by Tom Brown, the renowned naturalist and author of Tom Brown's Field Guide to Wilderness Survival; linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky; and Pulitzer Prize-winning scientist and writer Jared Diamond, all of which he felt Ben would be intimately familiar with. “I thought that was a great way to frame some of the knowledge that this family would have, Ross says. “It turned out Viggo had read all the books already.”

Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




“...we had this two-day, one-night wilderness survival camp, with just the six of us kids and a guide, she said. “We each were given a knife and had to figure out how to survive. We had to track down our food, purify water, build a shelter. I love being outdoors, but this was pretty extreme.”

“We were building fires because in the forest it was so incredibly dark, Isler said. “All of a sudden, we heard these sounds and saw this shape coming toward us through the forest. It was Viggo, who said he wanted to bring us beef jerky and dried cherries. And we were all like, How in the world did you find us?’ ”

Tulsa teen actress Samantha Isler talks about her role in 'Captain Fantastic'
By James D Watts Jnr
Tulsa World
29 July 2016




‘I like gardening and I grow my own vegetables... I could say to Matt, If it's this time of year, this is how big the vegetables would be. This is what would grow in such a small clearing.” All those things you only see in passing, but it was important to him and to me that the way this family lives be completely credible.’

Viggo Mortensen goes 'extreme' in 'Captain Fantastic'
Josh Rottenberg
LA Times
30 June 2016




‘For Ben, you can alternate between what a great father and this guy's a maniac.’

Viggo Mortensen Goes Green: ‘I Trust Hillary About as Much as I Trust Donald Trump’
Marlo Stern
The Daily Beast
16 July 2016




He looks like the kind of guy who, yes, would worship Noam Chomsky, but he also looks like the kind of guy who would eat him for breakfast. It’s the ruggedly paradoxical, gentle-but-brute presence of Viggo Mortensen, more than anything else, that makes Captain Fantastic a twisting Rubik's Cube of blue and red.

Owen Gleiberman
Variety
13 July 2016




Making it endlessly watchable is Viggo Mortensen, here in his fully bearded, hippie-Viking mode.

Stephen Whitty
NJ.com
8 July 2016




“We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work.”

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




When he appears, caked in mud, looking like a kind of eco-Rambo, splashing barefoot through a river and cutting the heart out of a deer, you'll be thinking: Well, that's just Viggo Mortensen's life, isn't it?

Wild man Viggo Mortensen lets it all hang out in Captain Fantastic
Neala Johnson
Herald Sun
8 September 2016




“Just because it's not possible to be a perfect dad or to be Captain Fantastic, that doesn't mean it's not worth trying.”

In Captain Fantstic, Viggo Mortensen found more than a modern-day Mr. Mom’
By Michael O'Sullivan
Washington Post
15 July 2016




…the movie truly belongs to Mortensen; fierce and tender and tremendously flawed, he's fantastic.

Leah Greenblatt
Entertainment Weekly
7 July 2016




You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Wilson Webb/Bleecker Street.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

As this is still Sword Week (Sword Fortnight?) I thought we’d stay with the swash and buckle and go into battle with Aragorn. Helm’s Deep, Pelennor Fields, The Black Gate – shooting was often grim but Viggo gave it his all, doing everything the stunt guys did and losing a tooth along the way. When The Two Towers hit the movie screens I don’t think I breathed during the Battle of Helm’s Deep. Audiences had never seen anything like it. The stunt work was incredible and Viggo’s convincing performance was the magic that made it all so real. And who could ever forget him, single-handed, turning a rearing horse at the Black Gate while holding up a five foot sword?





'Viggo was working on this battle sequence,' recalls Elijah Wood of the film's ostensible action hero. 'He got hit in the mouth and broke his front tooth. It was literally gone, and he found it on the floor. He was like, 'Get me some superglue, we've got to keep going.' That clearly describes Viggo. Everyone was like, 'No, no, we have to get you to a dentist.' And he was actually angry that they stopped filming to take him to a dentist.'

Ringleader - Viggo Mortensen
By Ian Nathan
Empire
January 2002




Is it physically and emotionally draining doing such grand and elaborate battle sequences?

You kind of get withered, but you're doing it with a team so everyone's going for it. If everyone was sitting on their ass in the background, that would be one thing. But the way this movie was made, every button, every bit of embroidery, sword, knife, shoe, horse, and every bit of choreography appear 100 per cent. I've never seen that and I'm not sure I ever will again, to that degree. If you do get really tired, somebody will come lend you a hand. It was definitely a team job.

The One King
By Bryan Cairns
Film Review Yearbook (Special #49)
2004




“…when we did the charge of the Elves at Helm's Deep… it reminded me a lot of Kurosawa. In fact, I wanted to use Elvish commands. Using that language, and some of those fighting styles, made it feel a little like a Samurai movie. It was a hodgepodge of different fighting styles, and total mayhem.”

Hail To The King
By Lawrence French
Starburst #305
December 2003




[The Battle of Helm's Deep] takes place mostly at night, and it was so complex that we filmed for about four months of nights," Jackson continues, "Viggo was fantastic. He just threw himself into it tirelessly. Every night he'd come along and just fight some more.”

Michael Helms
"Awesome Towers"
Fangora Magazine #217
October, 2002




"He had no knuckles," laughs make-up man Perez. "He'd been virtually slaughtered by everyone because he would not let anyone do his rehearsals. All his knuckles were completely bruised and cut and God knows what else. Every time that he had a scene, I said, 'Okay, now where did they hit you?'"

Jose Perez
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




“I wanted to do as many stunts as possible myself. Luckily, over time, I became very friendly with the stuntmen. By knowing each other well, we could go faster and faster without hurting ourselves.”

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002



“…the amazing stunt team played the enemy at all times. The battle scenes are very elaborate, people going berserk night and day. Even in the background, thousands of people going completely nuts.”

Viggo Mortensen
By Simon Braund
Australian Empire magazine
January 2002




"We shot for three and half months straight of night shoots in the cold, wet weather. And that was pretty tough for everybody concerned. But it kind of drew everyone together at the same time. It created kind of a special bond with people who went through that together."

Viggo talking about The Two Towers
Ready for Round 2
By David P DeMar, Jr
Watertown Daily Times
15 December 2002




Were those battle sequences [for The Return Of The King] harder to shoot?

Yes, because I had to wear armour and chain skirts and the horse made it harder, too. The sword is heavy when you're riding a horse holding it. But it shouldn't be like Errol Flynn, it should be hard and look hard.

Viggo Mortensen
Total Film magazine
January 2004




In Return of the King, the sword Mortensen uses is different from what we've seen before. "It's a different kind of sword, since some of the fighting is different," explains Mortensen of the switch in weapons. "It's heavier. It's bigger, so it's a little harder to handle. It's mostly a two-handed sword and fighting one-handed is a little different than fighting with the other one, which is lighter, and moves through the air a little bit faster. But the advantage when you're going for broke with that slightly more massive sword is that once you get going with it, it does a lot of damage."

King Of The Ring
By Melissa J Perenson
Sci Fi magazine
February 2004




“As big a battle as the Black Gate is, or coming in with those reinforcements at the Pelennor Fields, is the conclusion of his psychological battle, when he confronts the dead. That is, in a way, his biggest struggle.”

Viggo Mortensen
By Jeffrey Overstreet, Steven D Greydanus, Bob Smithouser & Jeremy Landes
Looking Closer
5 December 2003




'I don't think Aragorn is naturally prone to fighting in the same sense that maybe Boromir was in the first story or Eomer is in this. He isn't, by nature, warlike.

The Elvish name his mother gives him at birth is Estel, which means hope. I think he basically has a sunny disposition, but it has been dampened over the years by what he has seen in the world. He is a skilled fighter who has taken on the fighting styles of the different places he has lived and fought in, but it's by virtue of necessity that he does it.'

Aragorn Explains the Whole Good-Evil Thing
By A. J.
E! Features
15 December 2002




On the very last day of shooting Aragorn fighting the orcs, Peter quietly gave Viggo an Uzi, loaded with blanks, for the last take.

Dan Hennah
Unsung Moments & Unseen Heroes of
The Lord of the Rings
Premiere
November 2004



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © New Line Productions, Inc.

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Viggo in Edition of The Purist


Source: The Purist Online.
Found By: Ollie
001pu.png 002pu.png 003pu.png 004pu.png 005pu.png 006pu.png 007pu.png
Thanks to ollie for surfacing this edition of The Purist featuring Viggo and 'Green Book'.


Click on Image to Enlarge.






© 2019 The Purist. Images © 2019 The Purist.

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Laura Linney Joins Viggo Mortensen’s Family Drama ‘Falling’


Source: Variety
Categories: Falling Movies


This news on Viggo's latest project (and his first turn as director) from Variety.


Quote:
91st Academy Awards - 24 February 2019
91st Academy Awards - 24 February 2019.
© Getty Images.
Laura Linney, Hannah Gross, and Terry Chen have joined the cast of Viggo Mortensen's family drama "Falling."

The movie will be Mortensen's directorial debut. He's also producing, wrote the screenplay, and is playing one of the two leading roles in a story about a son's relationship with his aging father. Production is currently underway in Toronto. It will also shoot in Los Angeles.

Mortensen will portray a man who lives with his male partner, played by Chen, and their adopted daughter in Southern California. Linney will play his sister and Gross will portray his mother. Lance Henriksen will play the father, a farmer whose attitudes and behavior belong to a far more traditional era and family model. He travels to Los Angeles for an indefinite stay with his family as he deals with memory loss.

"Falling" is produced by Daniel Bekerman of Scythia Films and Chris Curling of Zephyr Films together with Mortensen, who previously produced "Everyone Has a Plan," "Far From Men," and "Jauja" through Perceval Pictures. It is funded by Perceval Pictures, Ingenious Media, Falling, LLC, Scythia Films, Zephyr Films and Lip Sync Productions. Executive producers are Peter Touche and Stephen Dailey for Ingenious Media, Danielle Virtue and Brian Hayes Currie for Falling, LLC and Norman Merry for Lip Sync Productions.

HanWay Films is handling international sales and distribution, and UTA Independent Film Group is overseeing the US sale.

Linney has received Academy Award nominations for "You Can Count on Me," "Kinsey," and "The Savages." Mortensen has also earned Oscar nominations for "Green Book," "Eastern Promises," and "Captain Fantastic." Gross' credits include "Mindhunter," and Chen starred in "House of Cards."

Linney is represented by ICM Partners, Lighthouse Management & Media and Morris Yorn Barn Levine (Kevin Yorn), Chen by The Characters Talent Agency and Capstone Talent Management and Gross by ICM Partners and Authentic Talent and Literary Management.

© Variety. Images © Getty.


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Last edited: 9 June 2019 16:16:09