Quotable Viggo 2019

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Quotable Viggo: 19 May 2019

This week's Quotable is a round-up of reporters' first encounters with Viggo. Some are thoughtful, some quirky and witty, all giving their impressions of meeting a man who is just as likely to turn up with a gift of chocolates and talk about the latest book he's read, as actually get down to answering their questions directly. Some are clearly awed by the encounter, and maybe more than a little seduced…



© Hey U Guys.


Meeting the Madrid-based poet, actor, photographer, editor and publisher in this place and under these circumstances feels something akin to encountering an albino bison in a veal pen. He seems to be a soul meant to wander the earth in search of universal truth, not discuss Hobbit movies over canapés with journalists.

On interviewing Viggo in a posh hotel
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen is pressing me to eat a croissant from a large basket sitting on a table in front of him. It is certainly the right hour for them – most actors would draw the line at 8.30am interviews – but whoever imagined that arthouse cinema's most visibly rugged outdoors man would start his day with effete French pastries? This is the man whose chosen set souvenir from Lord of the Rings was his horse! He looks relieved when I take one; nobody need now be embarrassed.

Viggo Mortensen gets dirty to play a 'wolf dad' in Captain Fantastic
By Stephanie Bunbury
Sydney Morning Herald
2 September 2016




Viggo Mortensen has come bearing pancake mix. We are curbside at the tiny airport in Syracuse, New York, on a truly dreary day (even by Syracuse standards), and within seconds of hopping into his rented Ford Fusion, I learn two things about him: He's the kind of guy who picks you up at the airport, and he's the kind of guy who brings presents. Pancake mix is a delicacy in upstate New York. "Do you like maple syrup?" Because he brought me some of that, too. He's prepared a gift bag.

Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016




In the flesh, his inscrutability gives off an electric hum. He is soberly dressed - grey suit, sensible shirt - and speaks in hushed, gravelly tones. If you didn't know, and of course you do, you might mistake Mortensen for a visiting academic or a writer.

Understated A-lister Viggo Mortensen tells our reporter about his new cult hit 'Captain Fantastic' - and why it's impossible to be the perfect parent
by Ed Power
Irish Independent
31 August 2016




He… presents me with two large chocolate squares, one wrapped in pink paper that has a handwritten "Venezuela" on it, and another in orange paper that has a handwritten "Indonesia".

I am not sure whether he handwrapped them himself or whether they came from a hand-wrapped chocolate shop. I imagine him travelling the world with a suitcase of wrapped chocolates.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




Barefoot and clad in a pair of sweats that have seen better days, Viggo Mortensen walks over to introduce himself. His hands and arms are covered with names and phone numbers he has scribbled on himself after checking his answering machine. And his hair is tousled and flecked with tiny bits of paint. None of this can hide Mortensen's deadly good looks.

Viggo Artist & Actor
By Jae-Ha Kim
Cleveland Plain Dealer
Los Angeles, CA 1 April 1999




'Viggo! Viggo! I chant in my head, my heart racing faster, fever burning, face flushed with anticipation. Then it dawns on me. I'm a freakin' journalist, for Chrissakes…

Viggo, we love you, yeah yeah yeah
By Michelle Devereaux
Totonto International Film Festival
September 2006




I'm a middle-aged father of two and I'm sitting in Wellington's Duxton Hotel eyeing Viggo Mortensen's bum. If a man's wife tells him often enough what a privilege it is to meet Mortensen, what physical perfection he is, what a sex god, this is what happens.

To thine own self be true
By Guy Somerset
NZ Listener
6-12 June 2009




Barefoot, carrying a coffee plunger of water and sporting a United Nations badge on his jacket, Hollywood star Viggo Mortensen wandered into his own press conference as though he were planning to sit on the back lawn.

A Barefoot Viggo Lords It Over The Fans
By James Gardiner
New Zealand Herald
29 November 2003




Viggo Mortensen stacks his case and suit protector neatly in the corner of the room. The precision of the movement is entirely in keeping with an angular formation of razor cheekbones and sharp suit. We probably shouldn't be surprised the Danish-American-Argentine has this travelling thing down.

The Mad Men
Tara Brady
The Irish Times
10 February 2012




If you were to analyse a Mortensen interview, you might conclude that Viggo is keen on deflection. He's certainly happier asking questions rather than answering them, and talking about his friends rather than his work in A Dangerous Method

Interview: Viggo Mortensen, actor
Scotsman.com
9 February 2012




Here's the thing about Viggo Mortensen: I could listen to this man speak on just about any topic for hours. His voice is both passionate and hypnotic. It's impossible not to be engaged when he's speaking because he presents himself with, somehow, both a welcome calmness and a focused intensity at the exact same time. It might be magic. I suspect it is magic.

Viggo Mortensen Will Hypnotize You With His Intensity As He Dissects What's Wrong With Our Polarized Country
By Mike Ryan
Uproxx
7 November 2016




An encounter with Viggo is sitting on a porch, drinking a bombilla of mate and watching time pass in such a way that every now and then new reflections, inquiries, ways of looking at things arise. It can take a whole season. Watching many skies pass by.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




Following the press Q&A, as he left the stage, he paused, looked at the huge 'Viggo Mortensen' image on the screen behind him, and said, 'You spelled my name wrong…' There was a horrified moment as the organisers checked in panic – then he smiled, 'No, just kidding….'

Viggo after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012

Quotable Viggo: 12 May 2019

One thing I admire about Viggo (amongst several hundred others) is that he really does try to live in the moment. Maybe it’s his insatiable curiosity, maybe it’s the fact that he’s always been aware that life it short, but paying attention to the moment, enjoying it or learning from it, maybe recording it, has always been his way. It’s the springboard of his creativity but it’s also why he is such a present and powerful force, influencing and drawing in everyone who meets him.



© Getty Images.


“We may not know why we’re here, or where we’re going after we die, but if you’re here, you might as well be here. And being here means paying attention, I think.”

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008




Mortensen likes sotto voce details; he gives his attention to instants that would otherwise have passed by unobserved, or more significantly, unregistered - things that in a literal sense were simply there for him because he was there for them - things that would have easily passed by as all else passes by, as we ourselves finally do.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




"I think five minutes can be an eternity if it's well used, you know."

Viggo Mortensen
The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




Where are you from?

At the moment I’m from here.

Viggo Mortensen - Man of the Week
By Einar Falur - translated by Ragga
Morgunblaðið
30 May 2008




Viggo extracts a big moleskin notebook from his backpack, like a naturalist's notebook, a logbook, in which he notes down his thoughts and everything that passes through his mind with a big, tangled handwriting like the rigging of a schooner.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




‘In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It’s really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, “OK, this is where I am. I don’t have any choice at the moment. Let’s make the most of it.”’

Viggo Mortensen’s Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




“People today are much less present in spite of being hyper-connected. You see people in the street absorbed in their cell-phone; there’s plenty of time for that message. What’s more important than now?”

Viggo Mortensen: "The feeling of the absurd is something that's constant with me"
By Ima Sanchis - translated by Ollie and Zoe
La Vanguardia
8 October 2015




“Life is so short! I tell myself frequently to “Go slow to go fast”, to remind me to take my time in order to sample as many things as possible.”

Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




“A photo, a painting, a poem or music that we use to express our experience is not the main thing, but what you are expressing. How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.”

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




“Even though many people seem to be not interested in art or in things like nature or life itself, we must force ourselves to remember, we must force ourselves to be deep in life."

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
July 2008
Source: Panorama First




What keeps you awake at night?

Yesterday and tomorrow, but I eventually fall asleep because neither exists.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
by Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010



"Great artists," writes critic Kevin Powers, "tell us the task is to train and polish the attention within the brilliance of our small shipwrecks. Viggo does that both insistently and obsessively."

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003




How long would he like to live?

"Forever." Without hesitation.

Really? Wouldn't you get bored?

"There's no excuse to be bored," Mortensen says. "Sad, yes. Angry, yes. Depressed, yes. Crazy, yes. But there is no excuse for boredom, ever."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine, January 2004

Quotable Viggo: 4 May 2019

Last week's Captain Fantastic Quotable got me thinking about Viggo's own childhood, which was also unusual and adventurous in its own way. And despite all the roving around and the rootlessness we can say, along with Viggo, that 'the end result hasn't been so bad'.



Viggo aged 8 with his father.
© unknown



One of my first memories as a boy was realizing that animals die and therefore people do. It seemed very unfair to me and I'm sure that I traumatized my parents with these questions.

Viggo Mortensen: Film and Soccer Activist
By Horacio Bilbao - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarín.com
27 November 2014




As a child he was a loner, which is unsurprising considering his peripatetic lifestyle. "I wrote stories and did a lot of drawing," he says. "It's why I'm comfortable being by myself and why I yearn for it at times.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




When Viggo was 7, his parents sent him to boarding school in Argentina. "It was a strict school, isolated in the foothills of the mountains," he said. "Other than holidays, I really didn't see my parents. The other kids were miserable, always crying or wetting their beds. But I was pretty self-sufficient. So I guess it must have suited me."

Back in the saddle 'Rings' hero Mortensen is riding high with 'Hidalgo'
By Nancy Mills
Daily News
25 February 2004




"…I was always running away. I did that a lot. [Another time] when I was a child, about two-and-a-half, I crawled out of bed and across the road and crawled into someone's house on a Sunday morning. I was in the kitchen playing with all the pots and pans, and they called my parents, who had been calling the police. I think they said: 'You are missing someone, and he is here playing with our kitchen knives.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'According to my mother I never went anywhere as a child without a pencil, and I drew all the time. Recently she gave me a notebook with some of my old drawings. I especially noticed one I drew when I was 7 - it was rather wild. On the top it said: 'Little Red Riding Hood', and then there were a lot of oil colours mixed together, almost abstract. I really liked it. But across the drawing it said with a red pen - and underlined: VERY BAD! Some teachers still think that is motivating...'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




The sound of cars and buses passing by on half-flooded streets quiets me; it´s something that makes me remember with absolute clarity my childhood in Buenos Aires and long afternoons in the countryside. Muddy paths, the grey rampart that advances relentlessly and swallows the sky, the threat of something big, powerful, unstoppable. Rain is the universal music - along with the contribution of the wind through a forest or punishing an open window, the roar of the rivers, the sea.

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




"I climbed this sort of cliff—I am sure it wasn't really very high, I was just clambering up. I thought it was really fun. Then I got to the top and I realized how high I was. I freaked out and I was, like, screaming and crying for my dad. He woke up and had to come and get me down. It was probably not very high but it seemed very big to me then."

Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




"Every once in a while you do something really dumb when you're a kid and you realize when you're an adult that that's dangerous, but.. you know.. There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show
2004




When he was 11 his parents divorced, and he moved with his mother and two younger brothers to upstate New York, near the border with Canada.... "my brothers and I spoke only Spanish. But you quickly adapt. I somewhat replaced it with French. We were not that far from Quebec, so I [replaced] my football team with the Montreal Canadians hockey team, which has the same colours".

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




"We arrived in Northern New York near the Canadian border, and there were no Spanish-speaking people at all, one black person in the whole county, some French-Canadians, and no tradition of football. It was just completely different. But when you're kids, you adapt very quickly. Within a month or two, I knew all the swear words."

Viggo Mortensen on leaving South America
I've taken on too much...
By James Mottram, The Independent / UK.
23 October 2007




…as an adolescent, he felt comfortable behind the lens of a camera. Mortensen says he started taking pictures as a teenager, although he wasn't "really serious about it." For him, the camera not only offered a sense of control over his surroundings but a kind of veil to help him feel invisible from a world he found both intimidating and inspiring.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"I was 12 or 13 when a friend of mine encouraged me to be an actor, something that had never crossed my mind. I was then living in New York and didn't know anybody. I went up on stage and read the first paragraph from David Copperfield. The only thing I heard before closing the book and fleeing from that inconceivable torture was 'Louder, louder.' And here I am!"

Viggo Mortensen: "The older I get, the more tired I get of Hollywood."
By Rocío Ayuso
El Pais
8 October 2016




"I didn't have friends when I was little that I know now - there wasn't any sense of continuity like that," Mortensen says. "But I got to see a lot of things and learn a lot of things. And I learned to rely on my imagination, and on myself."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'Now I see things in hindsight and what I learned in those years is what has made me who I am today. And, even though I recognize that I'm a rather strange guy, I don't think the end result has been so bad.'

Viggo Mortensen on growing up in Argentina
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
30 August 2006


Quotable Viggo: 27 April 2019

Captain Fantastic is being broadcast on BBC 2 in the UK tomorrow night and although I have it on Blu-ray, I won’t be able to resist watching. Which is just the excuse I need for some my favourite Fantastic quotes!



Image Wilson Webb.
© Bleecker Street.



The clan’s father isn’t a superhero, but because he’s played by Viggo Mortensen he’s the next best thing.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
7 July 2016




‘Viggo demonstrates the aspirations of the movie, what kind of movie are you hoping to make, and for me, I can have no better faith than in Viggo Mortensen.’

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross Interview
Jason Gorber
Dorkshelf.com
14 July 2016




“Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that’s happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her.”

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City’s ‘Captain Fantastic’
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




Viggo Mortensen gets the role he may well have been born to play, not as a superhero, but as a super-dad determined to raise his kids on his own terms.... The inspired choice of casting Mortensen — a natural Papa Bear, who taps into both his physical strength and spiritual gentleness…

Peter Debruge
Variety
23 January 2016




Mortensen, looking his most mountain-man handsome, is winning and charismatic, walking on the knife’s edge between principled and unhinged.

Brian Moylan
The Guardian
31 January 2016




The director sent Mortensen a huge box of books of recommended reading, including texts by Tom Brown, the renowned naturalist and author of ‘Tom Brown’s Field Guide to Wilderness Survival; linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky; and Pulitzer Prize-winning scientist and writer Jared Diamond, all of which he felt Ben would be intimately familiar with. “I thought that was a great way to frame some of the knowledge that this family would have,” Ross says. “It turned out Viggo had read all the books already.”

Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




“...we had this two-day, one-night wilderness survival camp, with just the six of us kids and a guide,” she said. “We each were given a knife and had to figure out how to survive. We had to track down our food, purify water, build a shelter. I love being outdoors, but this was pretty extreme.”

“We were building fires because in the forest it was so incredibly dark,” Isler said. “All of a sudden, we heard these sounds and saw this shape coming toward us through the forest. It was Viggo, who said he wanted to bring us beef jerky and dried cherries. And we were all like, ‘How in the world did you find us?’ ”

Tulsa teen actress Samantha Isler talks about her role in 'Captain Fantastic'
By James D Watts Jnr
Tulsa World
29 July 2016




‘I like gardening and I grow my own vegetables... I could say to Matt, “If it’s this time of year, this is how big the vegetables would be. This is what would grow in such a small clearing.” All those things you only see in passing, but it was important to him and to me that the way this family lives be completely credible.’

Viggo Mortensen goes 'extreme' in 'Captain Fantastic'
Josh Rottenberg
LA Times
30 June 2016




‘For Ben, you can alternate between what a great father and this guy's a maniac.’

Viggo Mortensen Goes Green: ‘I Trust Hillary About as Much as I Trust Donald Trump’
Marlo Stern
The Daily Beast
16 July 2016




He looks like the kind of guy who, yes, would worship Noam Chomsky, but he also looks like the kind of guy who would eat him for breakfast. It’s the ruggedly paradoxical, gentle-but-brute presence of Viggo Mortensen, more than anything else, that makes “Captain Fantastic” a twisting Rubik’s Cube of blue and red.

Owen Gleiberman
Variety
13 July 2016




Making it endlessly watchable is Viggo Mortensen, here in his fully bearded, hippie-Viking mode.

Stephen Whitty
NJ.com
8 July 2016




“We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work.”

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




When he appears, caked in mud, looking like a kind of eco-Rambo, splashing barefoot through a river and cutting the heart out of a deer, you’ll be thinking: Well, that’s just Viggo Mortensen’s life, isn’t it?

Wild man Viggo Mortensen lets it all hang out in Captain Fantastic
Neala Johnson
Herald Sun
8 September 2016




“Just because it’s not possible to be a perfect dad or to be Captain Fantastic, that doesn’t mean it’s not worth trying.”

In ‘Captain Fantstic,’ Viggo Mortensen found more than a modern-day ‘Mr. Mom’
By Michael O'Sullivan
Washington Post
15 July 2016




…the movie truly belongs to Mortensen; fierce and tender and tremendously flawed, he’s fantastic.

Leah Greenblatt
Entertainment Weekly
7 July 2016



Quotable Viggo: 21 April 2019

As a little Easter Treat, this week is Anecdote Week. Nothing short or pithy (or new) here! All of these are stories about encounters with Viggo and they are all longstanding favourites of mine.



© Cinematografo.


In the diner, he asks for the time. (He doesn't wear a watch says. Ninety minutes later, we pull up to the departure gates at the airport. I begin to say goodbye. But no, Mortensen is coming in with me. Way earlier in the day, in our first ten minutes together, I mentioned that I forgot my driver's license and that some drama ensued at LaGuardia Airport. He's coming in with me to make sure I get on my flight. He thinks maybe he'll know one of the TSA agents, but when we get to security, he knows no one. Nor do they know him.

The TSA cop wants to know what I was doing in Syracuse for just eight hours. She thinks I'm a drug dealer. At this, Viggo starts to laugh. I tell her I'm a writer and had to interview someone. "Huh." She looks Mortensen up and down. "Are you famous or something?"

On the other side of the security rope, Mortensen couldn't be happier
Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016




A really nice box-office clerk (I’m not naming names) at a downtown Madrid theater discovers that Viggo Mortensen, whose girlfriend, a famous Spanish film star, was acting in a version (very poor, to be sure) of a famous play which was playing right there, has come to buy a ticket.

Quite possibly, Mortensen could have asked his partner for an invitation and that would have been that. Instead, he insisted on paying like any regular guy. The box-office clerk recognised him, and smiling, gave him a guest ticket. “How much do I owe you?” said Mortensen in his cheerful Argentinian accent. “No, no, nothing, you are invited,” answered the box-office clerk. The Hollywood star thanks her cordially, goes, and ten minutes later returns with an ice cream for the box-office clerk! He insisted that she should take it, although she said she was on a diet, so he sweetened her afternoon. Anyway, when I grow up, I want to be Viggo Mortensen.

Where I said Viggo (Mortensen), I say Diego (Alatriste)
By Juan Luis Sánchez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Decine21.com
25 November 2011




An interesting photo made by Viggo Mortensen. We were shooting a very rarely photographed "Ghost Dance" by our amazing tribe members who participated in the film. Viggo, a renowned still photographer, had forgotten his camera that day and asked our unit stills photographer, Richard Cartwright, if he might borrow a camera and some color neg film. The unit photographer gave Viggo his Hasselblad panoramic camera... the 15 perf 35mm version. Viggo snaked around the set with the shutter open and he was amazing to watch. His movements were very similar to that of the Native American Ghost Dancers and he captured these incredible handheld abstract time exposures. Absolutely amazing. Fast-forward about 6 months and my phone rings. Viggo is on the other end and invites me to a gallery show featuring some Native American photos, music and poetry that he has authored during the making of "Hidalgo". When I arrive at the gallery, I see the show is entirely composed of marvelously printed images from the ghost dance... amazingly saturated and 8 feet wide. Stunning! At the show, I run into Richard, who loaned Viggo his camera to shoot these same stills. I ask him; "Did Viggo borrow only one roll of film?" Yes... only a single roll. Well, the show was comprised of 16 photographs that were double wide (15 perfs instead of 7) which meant that the collection represented nearly every photo that Viggo shot that day. 16 of the 18 total exposures from the single film roll. Mind blowing.

Shelly Johnson, Hidalgo cinematographer
Instagram
23 March 2017




Viggo Mortensen's temporary headquarters during the Toronto Film Festival were bare except for one corner, where there was a sculpture assembled from a plastic grocery-store bag draped over a tripod.....While Mortensen used the restroom, I tried to decide if the bag-on-tripod sculpture was a comment on our throwaway culture or a meditation on the relationship between art and reality. Turns out it was his luggage.

"Want to see my luggage?" Mortensen asked, emerging from his hand-washing and following my gaze to the "sculpture." "Let's see what's in here," he added, removing underwear, several T-shirts - one with fishing records on it, another emblazoned with "Bring Our Troops Home" - and a United Nations flag from the bag. "I travel light."

Renaissance man jousts with career-changing role
By Chris Hewitt,
Twin Cities
28 September 2005




Even Mortensen's memories of early childhood are deeply spiritual. He tells me about the time he crawled into the woods and fell asleep. "I was sleeping under a tree, and it was very peaceful," he says. "And then a dog started barking, and that's how my parents found me."

You are always escaping, I say.

Yeah, he says. He calls his mother - on my cell phone, because he doesn't have one - to double-check his recollection. "Hi, it's Viggo. Sorry to be calling so late," he says. "Oh shit. You're in the middle of it? That's funny. Is it the tape? [She was watching a tape of The Two Towers.] O.K., sorry, it's just a quick question and then I'll let you get back to what you're doing. Remember there were a couple of times I ran away? And the time the dog came and found me in the woods? How old was I then? About one and a half. O.K. But, anyway, the dog came and found me and I was sitting under a tree? Happy? Sleeping, right?"

Big look of consternation.

"I was sitting in the middle of the woods crying? I thought I was sleeping. Are you sure?"

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Bloom tells a story that occurred when the Rings crew returned to New Zealand in the summer of 2002 for sound dubbing and pickups for The Two Towers. "I flew over just to visit Viggo," says Bloom, who had heard that Mortensen was organising a reunion dinner. He, Mortensen and Henry, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler (who plays Arwen), and members of the crew took a bus to the countryside. After dinner, Bloom and Henry went for a walk and noticed how beautifully the moon was shining on a nearby river.

"We ran back and said, 'Everyone's got to see this.'" Bloom recalls. "I was having a Viggo moment - running out, getting people to come and check out the moon." Some decided to wade into the river, but Mortensen suggested the more perilous task of crossing the river. "I'm like, 'F*** off,' and he says, 'Come on.' So were barefoot, waist-high in water, walking on these little rocks to get to the other side and I'm doing it because I'm an idiot and I'm following his lead. Because he's an idiot. And because he's amazing," Bloom laughs. "I can't believe how much this is going to make it sound like I'm in love with the guy."

Orlando Bloom
The Hero Returns
by Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




One last thing that I wish to report is a small anecdote concerning someone. One of my charming girlfriends, attached to the press core assisting all of the DVDrama personel, yesterday was herself helped by a hero and not the least of which since it was Mr. Viggo Mortensen, alias the sensual Aragorn of the Lord of the Rings, about whom we are still having numerous fantasies since the first showing of Peter Jackson's trilogy. Present in Cannes to support David Cronenberg's film, A History of Violence, in which he proves once again his immensity talent, he went to the private evening gathering that followed the premiere screening, which was exactly where my girlfriend was, whose dress suddenly caught fire as she walked down the centre of an avenue edged with small candles. An accident which could have transformed itself very quickly into a catastrophe if the courageous Viggo hadn't intervened immediately, gently throwing himself on her to help extinguish the first flames that could have become a conflagration. Reassuring and concerned he next took lengthy care of her. After this summer the King of Tolkien, Viggo, is today the King of Cannes…

Viggo the Hero
DVDrama, Cannes Film Festival Report
17 May 2005




I order a margarita. He orders a whiskey and a beer. The waiter sees a notepad on the table and his celebrity antennae pop up like Ray Walston’s extraterrestrial ones in My Favorite Martian.

”So just who is interviewing who?” the waiter asks us. This is a formality. He’s pretty sure that this is the guy from The Lord of the Rings. I start to reply, but Mortensen holds up his hand. “She has just set the world record for the longest distance windsurfed by a human being,” he says, tilting his head in my direction.

”No!” the waiter gasps.

”She windsurfed from Hawaii to the mainland,” he continues. “Sure, there was a boat that followed her, and she slept at night, but still. That’s what, how many miles?” He looks at me.

”Um, thirty-seven hundred?” I say. I have no idea.

”And not even a man has done that yet,” Mortensen tells the waiter. “Isn’t that cool?”

The waiter asks me to sign a menu.

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




We wander our way to the Japanese garden, where the cherry blossoms bloom and sit on a steep grass bank. As is his wont wherever and whenever possible, Viggo wears no shoes. He spots an oval-headed balding man, with wisps of gray hair, walking with two younger women.

"Is that Arthur Miller?" he whispers. "Wait till we see his face."

We watch, and even before we see his face, we agree that there is something about the way this man walks that is not the way we somehow know Arthur Miller would walk. And the women are somehow not the women Arthur Miller would walk with in a Japanese garden.

"Let's just say it was," Viggo says, and by this I don't think for a moment he is suggesting that we should conspire to lie about it. Just that, with some willpower and a creative refusal to join the dots and draw a line we will no longer be able to cross, we can delay even this small disappointment and keep alive our moment in the park with Arthur Miller a little while longer.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004


Quotable Viggo: 7 April 2019

As this is still Sword Week (Sword Fortnight?) I thought we’d stay with the swash and buckle and go into battle with Aragorn. Helm’s Deep, Pelennor Fields, The Black Gate – shooting was often grim but Viggo gave it his all, doing everything the stunt guys did and losing a tooth along the way. When The Two Towers hit the movie screens I don’t think I breathed during the Battle of Helm’s Deep. Audiences had never seen anything like it. The stunt work was incredible and Viggo’s convincing performance was the magic that made it all so real. And who could ever forget him, single-handed, turning a rearing horse at the Black Gate while holding up a five foot sword?



© New Line Productions Inc.


'Viggo was working on this battle sequence,' recalls Elijah Wood of the film's ostensible action hero. 'He got hit in the mouth and broke his front tooth. It was literally gone, and he found it on the floor. He was like, 'Get me some superglue, we've got to keep going.' That clearly describes Viggo. Everyone was like, 'No, no, we have to get you to a dentist.' And he was actually angry that they stopped filming to take him to a dentist.'

Ringleader - Viggo Mortensen
By Ian Nathan
Empire
January 2002




Is it physically and emotionally draining doing such grand and elaborate battle sequences?

You kind of get withered, but you're doing it with a team so everyone's going for it. If everyone was sitting on their ass in the background, that would be one thing. But the way this movie was made, every button, every bit of embroidery, sword, knife, shoe, horse, and every bit of choreography appear 100 per cent. I've never seen that and I'm not sure I ever will again, to that degree. If you do get really tired, somebody will come lend you a hand. It was definitely a team job.

The One King
By Bryan Cairns
Film Review Yearbook (Special #49)
2004




“…when we did the charge of the Elves at Helm's Deep… it reminded me a lot of Kurosawa. In fact, I wanted to use Elvish commands. Using that language, and some of those fighting styles, made it feel a little like a Samurai movie. It was a hodgepodge of different fighting styles, and total mayhem.”

Hail To The King
By Lawrence French
Starburst #305
December 2003




[The Battle of Helm's Deep] takes place mostly at night, and it was so complex that we filmed for about four months of nights," Jackson continues, "Viggo was fantastic. He just threw himself into it tirelessly. Every night he'd come along and just fight some more.”

Michael Helms
"Awesome Towers"
Fangora Magazine #217
October, 2002




"He had no knuckles," laughs make-up man Perez. "He'd been virtually slaughtered by everyone because he would not let anyone do his rehearsals. All his knuckles were completely bruised and cut and God knows what else. Every time that he had a scene, I said, 'Okay, now where did they hit you?'"

Jose Perez
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




“I wanted to do as many stunts as possible myself. Luckily, over time, I became very friendly with the stuntmen. By knowing each other well, we could go faster and faster without hurting ourselves.”

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002



“…the amazing stunt team played the enemy at all times. The battle scenes are very elaborate, people going berserk night and day. Even in the background, thousands of people going completely nuts.”

Viggo Mortensen
By Simon Braund
Australian Empire magazine
January 2002




"We shot for three and half months straight of night shoots in the cold, wet weather. And that was pretty tough for everybody concerned. But it kind of drew everyone together at the same time. It created kind of a special bond with people who went through that together."

Viggo talking about The Two Towers
Ready for Round 2
By David P DeMar, Jr
Watertown Daily Times
15 December 2002




Were those battle sequences [for The Return Of The King] harder to shoot?

Yes, because I had to wear armour and chain skirts and the horse made it harder, too. The sword is heavy when you're riding a horse holding it. But it shouldn't be like Errol Flynn, it should be hard and look hard.

Viggo Mortensen
Total Film magazine
January 2004




In Return of the King, the sword Mortensen uses is different from what we've seen before. "It's a different kind of sword, since some of the fighting is different," explains Mortensen of the switch in weapons. "It's heavier. It's bigger, so it's a little harder to handle. It's mostly a two-handed sword and fighting one-handed is a little different than fighting with the other one, which is lighter, and moves through the air a little bit faster. But the advantage when you're going for broke with that slightly more massive sword is that once you get going with it, it does a lot of damage."

King Of The Ring
By Melissa J Perenson
Sci Fi magazine
February 2004




“As big a battle as the Black Gate is, or coming in with those reinforcements at the Pelennor Fields, is the conclusion of his psychological battle, when he confronts the dead. That is, in a way, his biggest struggle.”

Viggo Mortensen
By Jeffrey Overstreet, Steven D Greydanus, Bob Smithouser & Jeremy Landes
Looking Closer
5 December 2003




'I don't think Aragorn is naturally prone to fighting in the same sense that maybe Boromir was in the first story or Eomer is in this. He isn't, by nature, warlike.

The Elvish name his mother gives him at birth is Estel, which means hope. I think he basically has a sunny disposition, but it has been dampened over the years by what he has seen in the world. He is a skilled fighter who has taken on the fighting styles of the different places he has lived and fought in, but it's by virtue of necessity that he does it.'

Aragorn Explains the Whole Good-Evil Thing
By A. J.
E! Features
15 December 2002




On the very last day of shooting Aragorn fighting the orcs, Peter quietly gave Viggo an Uzi, loaded with blanks, for the last take.

Dan Hennah
Unsung Moments & Unseen Heroes of
The Lord of the Rings
Premiere
November 2004

Quotable Viggo: 24 March 2019

How about a bit of ‘swash and buckle’ this week from the ‘King of Swords’? Twice he’s swashed his way across the screen, as Aragorn and Alatriste. He even carried a sword through Jauja and took part in Daniel McNicoll’s documentary ‘Reclaiming the Blade’. I confess that I would have loved to have seen him in many more… so I’m nominating our coming Viggodom week as sword week!



© Estudios Piccaso / Origen Producciones.


Bob Anderson once called Mortensen as good a fencing student as he'd ever instructed.

A History Of Defiance
By Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




…the first day [on LOTR] I met the fight choreographer, Bob Anderson, who's been around a long time - he taught Errol Flynn to fence and represented the UK at the Olympics. I went into this room and there were all these stunt people standing there and screaming and yelling. He had them all pumped-up and he stood me in front of them and said "Okay, go!" And they all started running at me, and I was like, "Holy shit!" He said "stop" and they all stopped. Then he told me: "This is what you're going to be dealing with so let's get to work..." He gave me a sword and it was just, like, crazy for two days. The first thing I did on camera was swordplay and I liked it. It was fun.

The Ranger - Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn
by Martyn Palmer
Total Film magazine, 2002




Even before I spoke a single word of dialogue, I was forced to confront the physicality of my character. It was probably helpful to do something physical before speaking. More than for any other character, Aragorn's actions speak for him. His choices, the decisions he makes, his physicality, his body, tell you a lot about him. He's a man who throws himself into situations. Which is why it was good to begin my work with a swordfight.

Viggo Mortensen
Official Movie Guide




Mortensen's facility with the sword became immediately apparent. "The people who were teaching him said that he was insanely talented," says Miranda Otto, who plays the Lady Eowyn, who falls for Aragorn. "There's one scene [at the end of] the first film where a knife is thrown at Aragorn, who clocks it with his sword. One of the stunt guys who was meant to be his double said, 'I've been practicing that and I've never been able to [hit the knife] once, and Viggo hits it on the first take. I hate him.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"He got this reputation as an eccentric because he would carry his sword around, but I found it quite inspiring. There was a glimmer in his eye - he was aware of how other people were perceiving him - but he really reawakened in me a sense of the possibilities of what it can be as an actor enjoying a role."

Sean Astin
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today, 2001




"I remember one time a cop in New Zealand, where we were filming, stopped me because I was walking out of my apartment in the middle of the night carrying a huge sword. I guess it was an alarming sight, but I was just walking to work. "

Viggo Mortensen
Rings Actor Lives Warrior Role
Chicago Sun Times, 2001




"It was very important to me to make everything as believable as possible. That's why, even when I was exhausted, I always fought with the [heavy] steel sword rather than the lighter one," he explains. "I wanted to make sure the fight scenes were realistic. I shouldn't be able to just throw my sword around like Errol Flynn did, especially when I'm really tired. It should be hard to fight with it! Even when I was just walking around, I'd still wear the steel sword because it was heavier and it affected the way I moved."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




One day he suggests we go to a beautiful place he knows, Huntington Botanical Gardens, in Pasadena. He picks me up in his hybrid, clearing a scattering of CDs and a small ornamental dagger of Henry's from the passenger seat. Only later, when we park, do I notice the full-size fencing sabre across the shelf by the back window.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




It is the return to the big screen of the king of swords in modern cinema in a film that summarizes the five novels published on the character.

Alatriste
The Soul of Viggo (El Alama de Viggo)
By Miguel Juan Payan, Accion magazine, April 2005
translated by Chrissie




In the darkness, Alatriste's sword glows like Luke Skywalker's lightsabre. By day, his steel blade would be the envy of The Three Musketeers.

Alatriste: The Great Spanish Hero
By Carlos Maranon - translated by Margarita
Cinemania
September 2006




I remember a practice session with Bob [Anderson] which was attended by several highly experienced fencers who were my opponents, including one who was internationally ranked. This man was attacking me with some ferocity when Bob suddenly halted the practice. He asked him to come closer, that he wanted to ask him something. Bob wasn't feeling well at that time; he had a lot of problems with his health, and was seated in a chair. He wasn't able to fight with us to show us how he wanted to put the sequences together. He remained seated, watching the practice, occasionally giving us instructions with absolute calmness and authority. He didn't miss a single detail. He asked the fencer if he felt comfortable. He said yes. Bob asked him if he wouldn't feel a little more comfortable if he slightly changed the way he held the sword, a matter of a centimeter. The swordsman said it wasn't necessary, that he'd done it that way for many years, and quite successfully. So Bob grabbed a sword that he had on the table beside him and asked the guy to put himself en garde. "Are you ready, sir?" asked the master fencer. "Yes, always," said the swordsman with a small smile, probably thinking that Bob was joking. "Are you really ready?" "Yes, sir." With a light but very quick movement of his wrist, Bob struck the man's sword, and it flew some 10 meters. The swordsman stood there amazed and a little upset. We were very still, amazed..

Warrior Geniuses Sought For 2012
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevuelos
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
17 January 2012




'Enrico Lo Verso was there, a great discovery for this film, a tall guy who plays the baddie, and Unax Ugalde and Viggo. They were rehearsing and I saw it: they were sweating like pigs, he insulted them and beat them with a stick..."You're a sissy, this isn't done like that! You would have been killed already, you son of a bitch! Come on, do it again!!, Do you want to kill?. You can't kill s**t!!. You're a mug!!' Do not expect "ornate postures" in the duel scenes, because you're looking for the right moment to move in (for the kill), because if you make your move too early you'll lose. That's what Bob Anderson transmitted to the actors, that's how it was done in the Golden Century.'

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Talk About Alatriste at the Alatriste y su mundo exposition
By Luthien 66 (transcription) - translation by Paddy
4 April 2006




'I was behind the cameras, a privileged spectator watching hundreds of riders charge again and again against the loyal Spanish infantry and Viggo in the front line, his head uncovered and sword in hand, defending his life and that of his comrades… Even on the days when he is not filming, he dresses [for the role] and stays away, with his sword in his hands, thinking. And that's how he is, the bastard. Immense.'

Arturo Pérez Reverte
El Semanal, July 2005-08-04
Translated by Elessars Queen




... Mortensen... has already entered into cinematic folklore as one of the great screen swordsmen of our time.

The Reluctant Hero,
by Douglas Andrews
Sunday Express 2002




“Now, Viggo, you speak seven languages, you write poetry in three languages, Danish, Spanish and English, you ride horses superbly and you’re a great swordsman and all our womenfolk are in love with you… do you understand how annoying you are?”

Radio interview with Richard Glover
ABC Sydney
24 March 2009



Quotable Viggo: 16 March 2019

So – ‘Falling’ is underway. Viggo finally creating a story for us on film instead of in a photograph, or in a poem, or in paint. Finally creating in a medium that combines everything both written and visual. Because Viggo is an artist through and through, an intense observer of the world with a seemingly unending interest in everything, and because he has the ability to assimilate and produce new creative insights from his experiences, the only surprise is that it’s taken so long.



© Victoria Looseleaf.


This man must know something, a man who walks round the forbidden forests of the human nature with impunity, stirring up the bowels of everyday life with his curious eyes and his restless hands; who transforms everything he experiences, everything he sees, into a complex art, neither bad nor good, just different and universal at the same time.

He lives his way and gets entangled in whatever he finds in his path. Then, he gives it back transformed into a sort of abstract personal experience that he quietly shares with those who want to get closer.

Viggo's Other Look
Diario de León
by María Dolores García - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




...Viggo extracts a big moleskin notebook from his backpack, like a naturalist's notebook, a logbook, in which he notes down his thoughts and everything that passes through his mind with a big, tangled handwriting like the rigging of a schooner.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




An encounter with Viggo is sitting on a porch, drinking a bombilla of mate and watching time pass in such a way that every now and then new reflections, inquiries, ways of looking at things arise. It can take a whole season. Watching many skies pass by.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




Mortensen has a disposition towards an archaeology of emotions, of things that are buried, weathered but surviving along with the rest of us

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




I'm an observer. An artist. But I think that all people are artists. You go walking down the street and hear something that a person says and already you're imagining something about the life of that person. Then, someone is speaking on their phone in the line at the bank and he says, "No mom, that's not going to fall down" and hangs up. And you've already invented a complete story about who he's speaking to, who or what is going to fall down. The way you pay attention is already an artistic activity..

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




'Inspiration is a notion, an impulse that has its own shape, before you stumble onto it. If you're in too much of a hurry, you try to tell it what it is, instead of having it tell you what it is. And I think if you do that, you're gonna miss out.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen ('80) Remembers
By Macreena A. Doyle
St. Lawrence University, 2003




Like all writers, I write many different things, but you always create using your own life, even if everything is imaginary on the page. As much as you invent a totally distinct world, there’s always something of yourself, even if you don’t realize it. I contribute my experiences as a person who’s travelled all over and has had a somewhat unusual bond with language. Canciones de invierno [Winter Songs], for example, has things that seem to be very true and very much mine, and they aren’t. Maybe the writings where I hide or invent myself are more my own than those that are directly autobiographical.

Viggo Mortensen - All of Us are Mestizos
by Carlos Shilling – translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Zoe
LaVoz
November 2010




“All great artists reveal themselves more in their work than in interviews. Every time Viggo's in front of the camera or picks up a pen or a canvas or a camera, he's opening the door to his heart. This is where he's telling you the secrets of his life . . . Viggo cannot strike a fake note. I say with absolute experience that if he doesn't believe it, he won't do it.”

Philip Ridley, Director
The Reflecting Skin and The Passion of Darkly Noon
The Telegraph




His work is a trace of his own adventure, lived openly and exploratively, with curiosity and a constant sense of surprise.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




“He is a connector, the agent who brings people and ideas and feelings together in ways that transcend customary forms of expression and measures of success.”

Daniel F. Sullivan
St. Lawrence University
March 1, 2003




“He allows the art to move through him like a vessel…”

Robert Galarza
Find 4 Change and AMFM Fest co-director talking about Viggo being awarded the 4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award
The Wrap
23 May 2013




"To me the movies that I'm in or a painting or a drawing or a poem that I've made, a photograph, they are all journals in a way, a living diary," said Mortensen. "Everything's about that, valuing what's been and where I am now based on the accumulation of those experiences."

Viggo Mortensen On 'The Road' And The Importance Of Human Connections
By Todd Hill
Staten Island Advance
27 November 2009


Quotable Viggo: 2 March 2019

Along with all the multitude of other things that he does, Viggo has written several movie scripts over the last few years and now, finally, one is going into production with him directing, acting and producing. It's going to be an exciting year for us at V-W watching Falling coming to fruition! In his career, Viggo has had the experience of working with three with fellow actor/directors: Sean Penn, Ed Harris and Matt Ross. So how did Falling come into being, how does he feel about directing and what does he think an actor/director needs to succeed?



© Hanway/Lago/Sony.


Given his interest in visual art, it is no surprise that Mortensen is also planning to direct… 'I would like to try it. I like photography, and I like actors, and I like the process, the collaborative aspect of it.'

The Telegraph Interview with Viggo
The Telegraph.
26 March 2013




"Viggo is a person who always thinks in terms of the scene. He pays a lot of attention to the take and to what goes on. He also thinks about the film from an outside point of view. It´s incredible how much work he does."

Jauja actor Esteban Bigliardi
Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10
May 2013




"I think that directing, when I see people who do it well, like David Cronenberg or Matt Ross, is a full-on job. I'd like to try directing a movie. I've been a photographer for a long time, and a writer, and I like storytelling. That's my main attraction to working in the movies, I'm looking for stories that I wanna see in a movie theater. If I'd read Captain Fantastic and for whatever reason had not been available, I still would've been anxious to see the movie. It's a complete artistic universe, telling stories in the movies and I like actors. There's a lot of directors that I think aren't particularly interested in actors or their process, but I'm, I'm fascinated by the different ways that actors approach their work."

Oscar Nominee Viggo Mortensen Credits Actresses Like Meryl Streep with Making Him Want to be an Actor
By Lynn Hirschberg
W Magazine
25 January 2017




"It can be beneficial to be directed by an actor, as was the case with Matt Ross, but the mere fact that your director is also an actor does not guarantee that he or she will be especially sensitive to your needs as a performer or be more able to guide you more efficiently than non-actor directors will. It goes back to what kind of actor you are. Actors who are accustomed to paying attention to other actors, and to adjusting their performance to what their fellow actors bring to the scene, tend to be very good at directing other actors, at finding just the right way to put them at ease and get the most out of their abilities. Actors who do not really show much interest in other actors, and are unlikely to adjust their performance according to what other actors contribute, are not likely to be that helpful when they are directing them."

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen on 'Captain Fantastic,' acting with kids, and finding happiness in North Idaho
The Spokesman-Review
13 January 2017




Trying to get a handful of films off the ground as a director since the mid-'90s, and learning from all the great writers and directors he's worked with, Mortensen finally succeeded with Falling. A contemporary portrait of a father in his 80s, in the early stages of dementia, and his son, in his 50s, the film will employ flashbacks to examine "a lifetime of not really seeing eye to eye," in the characters' conflicted relationship, with Mortensen playing the son.

Viggo Mortensen Reflects On The Twists & Turns Of His 'Green Book' Journey As He Preps His Directorial Debut
By Matt Grober
Deadline
26 January 2019




The idea for FALLING came to me as I was flying across the Atlantic after my mother's funeral. I couldn't sleep; my mind was flooded with echoes and images of her and our family at different stages of our shared lives. Feeling a need to describe them, I began to write down down a series of incidents and snippets of dialogue I recalled from my childhood. The more I wrote about my mother, the more I thought of my father. By the time we landed, the impressions I'd been writing down had evolved to include conversations and moments that had not actually happened, parallel story lines that felt right somehow, that widened my perspective. It seemed as though these invented sequences allowed me to get closer to the truth of my feelings for my mother and father than any straightforward enumeration of specific memories could. What I ended up with was a father-son story called 'Falling', about a fictional family that shares some traits with ours. I had the basic structure of what eventually became the present screenplay.

Viggo Mortensen
Perceval Pictures




"Every filming experience shows you how to make a movie and, at times, how not to make a movie. Every movie story-telling effort can teach you things if you pay attention… Both David Oelhoffen and Lisandro Alonso are meticulous and resourceful artists. It was a pleasure and an education to work for them, and I found both stories to be admirably original. If I ever do direct a movie, I hope I'll be able to do it as well as David and Lisandro have.

Viggo-Works Interview
A Minute with Viggo Mortensen
30 January 2015




You have worked with many different directors, from Peter Jackson and David Cronenberg to Jane Campion and Gus Van Sant. In your opinion, what does it take to make a good director?

In my first movie, Witness, I was amazed by the organized and calm way that Peter Weir shot the film and how he listened to his actors' opinions. I really had fun. Since then I've realized that most of the time it's not like that.

Inside Viggo Mortensen's Mind
By V Vergou - translated by Iraeth
Athinorama
5 April 2007




"There is an ease and a relaxed atmosphere on the set with David [Cronenberg]. He knows that that is a good atmosphere to have. It's good to have someone who is an ally. If a director shows that he too is puzzling his way through it, that helps you feel like a collaborator, like an ally."

Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




For Mortensen, the idea of directing is "an unknown, a big challenge—probably even more of a stretch than playing Tony Vallelonga was."

Viggo Mortensen Reflects On The Twists & Turns Of His 'Green Book' Journey As He Preps His Directorial Debut
By Matt Grober
Deadline
26 January 2019




"Viggo has such a confident and assured vision for his debut as a writer-director, that he has the full support of the market. We are delighted to have such great partners for the film."

Gabrielle Stewart, Hanway Films
Viggo Mortensen's directorial debut 'Falling' sparks deals for HanWay
by Tom Grater
Screen Daily
11 February 2018


Quotable Viggo: 23 February 2019

With the Oscars taking place tomorrow, I thought it would be interesting to go back through all the reviews I've collected down the years and see how often awards and Oscars are mentioned, which makes for a bumper Quotable! Here are just a few of them and, most interesting of all are the pictures like The Road, A Dangerous Method and even one mention for Appaloosa, where critics thought nominations were certain but, alas, were wrong. Give that man an Oscar already! But Oscar or not, we at V-W know Viggo is 'the premier actor in the business' (Dan Olsen, below).



Image Frazer Harrison.
© Getty.



Power to Viggo, stick it to the Oscars!

Why Viggo Mortensen Deserves to Win the Oscar for Best Actor
By Zack Sharf
Indiewire
16 February 2017




With any luck, Mortensen will get an Oscar nomination for his wonderfully soulful performance. As a real-life renaissance man (Mortensen is also a painter, author, photographer, and musician) with an intellectually rebellious streak, it's a role he was born to play, and it's hard to imagine any other actor who could pull it off with his level of sincerity and authenticity.

Green Book
Jonathan Kim
Huffington Post
15 July 2016




It's a powerful and moving performance, the kind that lands an Oscar nomination, which could happen for the actor next January if enough people see this enjoyable film.

Green Book
John H Foote
Thecinemaholic.com
2 August 2016




Mortensen, in particular, is absolutely incredible here, completely disappearing into the role and making a very, very strong play for the Lead Actor prizes come awards season. It's the best he's been since probably Eastern Promises, bringing Tony to nuanced, three-dimensional life.

Green Book
Jack Blackwell
One Room With A View
15 October 2018




...a career best turn by Viggo Mortensen... I really can't say enough about the work Viggo Mortensen… In a perfect world, he would be in the Best Actor conversation for the Oscars.

Captain Fantastic
Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com
7 July 2016




By most accounts, the race has boiled down to "Manchester By the Sea" star Casey Affleck, winner of over 30 awards this season, and Denzel Washington, a last-minute threat for "Fences" who most recently won the SAG Award.

But Viggo doesn't just deserve to be in the frontrunner conversation with them — he deserves to win. With Ben Cash, he finds a way to undercut our expectations of him as an actor, and he becomes more vulnerable on screen than we've ever seen him before.

Captain Fantastic
Why Viggo Mortensen Deserves to Win the Oscar for Best Actor
By Zack Sharf
Indiewire
16 February 2017




This is a Viggo you don't think of when you think of Viggo. I will be very surprised if I don't see his name among the Best Supporting Actor nominatees next year (unless the studio decides to bump him to Best Actor and kinda f**k Fassbender). There should also be an honorary Oscar involved for Best Cigar Smoking, for his ever-present stogies.

A Dangerous Method
Joshua Miller
Chud.com
21 October 2011




Potential Oscar nods are in order for a jaw-dropping Keira Knightley and the ever-flawless Viggo Mortensen.

A Dangerous Method
Jesse Hawthorne Ficks
San Francisco Bay Guardian
26 September 2011




The richly gifted Fassbender is steely, restrained, and flat-out magnificent as the ambitious Jung who places science and family before love. And as the cigar-smoking Freud, Mortensen -- sporting a nose prosthesis -- all but steals the picture with his knowing gaze and wry insights. In fact, his character injects an unexpected and delicious humor. This duo will surely be mentioned come Oscar time.

A Dangerous Method
Erica Abeel
Huffington Post
11 September 2011




Knowing the Academy voters' conservative tastes, I don't think "Dangerous Method" is Oscar-caliber as Best Picture, but its three main actors should receive nominations for their work: Fassbender and Keira Knightley in the lead categories and Viggo Mortensen in the supporting one.

A Dangerous Method
Emanuel Levy
Emanuellevy.com
3 September 20011




Mortensen caps off a trilogy of perfect performances for Cronenberg (and is the film's best bet for award nods, we imagine).

A Dangerous Method
The Playlist
2 September 2011




Mortensen is long overdue for an Oscar win and if this film doesn't earn him that honor, there really is little justice (or sense) in the Academy voting system. Hearing the cast and crew talk about the actor's strict dedication to the part is downright inspiring.

The Road
Kofi Outlaw
Screenrant
24 November 2009




When I left the Sala de Proyección after seeing this marvel, I did it with the conviction that this film would be one of the Hollywood Academy's important options for this year's Oscars. But the nominations announced this week make no sense to me when faced with a handful of films that in all cases don't even come close to surpassing the merits of The Road. The ways of Hollywood are inscrutable, leaving a great Viggo Mortensen out of the running in an especially unjust way.

The Road
Javier Lacomba Tamarit
Il Multicine
2 February 2010




Mortensen's performance as the lead is simply unforgettable and a sure lock for an Oscar nomination.

The Road
Filmblogger
TheFilmBlogger.com
19 October 2009




Viggo Mortensen delivers an Oscar-worthy performance as a man whose humanity and strength of will must outlast the end of civilization.

The Road
Peter Howell
Toronto Star
13 September 2009




The look in Viggo's eyes secures his nomination, I feel confident. It's going to take a lot of wry grins, curmudgeonly scowls, and other baked ham recipes for any other actor to match the depths this role fathoms.

The Road
Ryan Adams
Awards Daily
October 2009




It may be premature, but I think that Viggo Mortensen's work in this tough, relentlessly grim but ultimately humanistic picture should get a serious consideration comes Oscar time.

The Road
Emmanuel Levy
Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




If Mortensen fails to win an Academy Award nomination, voters should be censured. He embodies all the prerequisites: loving but strict father, terrified traveler, warrior by necessity. And he plays them with such conviction, you want him watching your back if the apocalypse should ever occur.

Joan Vadeboncoeur
Syracuse.com
1 December 2009




Just look at how skinny and dirty Viggo is in the picture -- give that man an award, 30 seconds of acceptance speech time and a sandwich.

The Road
IFC.com comment about the publicity photos
19 August 2008




Mortensen's Oscar-class performance as Everett Hitch was masterful as a poetic yet fierce officer of the law. He "spoke softly," but his big stick was an 8-gauge shotgun……Playing Hitch, Mortensen is horrifically convincing as a cool customer who is not only intelligent but quick on the gun and knows when to pick his battles.

Appaloosa
Parimal M. Rohit
Buzzine.com
19 September 2008




Here is my personal take on the Oscar-nominated performances I believe will survive the "test" of time:

As driver/hitman Nikolai Luzhin, Viggo Mortensen not only mastered the Russian accent and dare to bare much more than his soul… Mortensen played Nikolai as a real person (living in a very raw London, thanks to David Cronenberg's direction) and his idealization of this character other actors have similarly played to over-the-top results in many crime stories is among the best in the genre, ever.

Eastern Promises
The top 10 opinions: Performances that won't won Oscars...
Johnny Alba
The Oscar Igloo
7 February 2008




From the way his shoulders are set to the way he lights and smokes his cigarette, everything about Mortensen's Nikolai is convincing. Any clip from the bath house scene would make the best darned Oscar clip ever.

Eastern Promises
Daniel Feinberg
zap2it.com
23 December 2007




It may very well be the best performance of his career thus far, topping even his recent work in another Cronenberg thriller, A History of Violence. Someone, nominate this man for an Oscar already!

Eastern Promises
Jason Turer
Cornell Daily Sun
14 Sept 2007




Most noticeably, Viggo Mortensen as the quietly timid yet dangerously terrifying mob driver Nikolai, gives an Oscar caliber performance of both restrained humility and fear. When you look into Mortensen's eyes, you're convinced that he's come to terms with the fact that he's condemned to eternal damnation and is living his life accordingly. His performance is chilling and mesmerizing, perhaps the greatest of his career.

Eastern Promises
Jake Hamilton
That movie guy Blog
10 Sept 2007




The beating pulse of the movie comes from Bello and Mortensen, both of whom are award worthy. Viggo might have had a haircut since his middle-earth days, but he's lost none of his power. Look into his eyes, you'll see his soul.

A History of Violence
Paul Greenwood
Future Movies
29 September 2005




'Viggo Mortensen probably gave the best performance I have seen in a motion picture in as long as I can remember in A History of Violence .... Bill Hurt got a nomination for a rather bizarre, overly done performance in that film, but Viggo Mortensen is probably the premier actor in the business.'

A History of Violence
Dale Olson, publicist
Oscar, You Insensitive Lout
by Sara Vilkomerson, New York Observer,
February 2006



Quotable Viggo: 16 February 2019

I loved Vicky Roach’s comment in the Sunday Telegraph (first quote below). With Viggo at the wheel (in a car as in life) you can sit back and relax. Like Nikolai he’s not just a ‘driver’. It’s not about getting from A to B, it’s about the journey, the scenery and coming across the unexpected so that you just have to stop and capture the moment in a photograph. He’s been in more road movies than most, been a Driver three times (in Eastern Promises, Green Book and Vanishing Point) driven buses in Captain Fantastic and in A Walk on the Moon. Heck, he’s even worked as a truck driver in real life. So, what’s it like to be on the road with Viggo and does he make a good back-seat driver?



Image Julian Broad.
© 2006 by the Hearst Corporation.



A road movie with Viggo Mortensen at the wheel? Even at this early point, you know you can sit back and relax.

Vicky Roach
The Sunday Telegraph
19 January 2019




Tell me if this is right: do you still drive the car you bought 20 years ago?

"It's a truck and it works very well."

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008




"I'd like to learn more about how to fix engines," he says. "I have a 1948 pickup truck, and that's a very simple engine. But today, I think you need to be some kind of specialist."

The Great Dane
By Phoebe Eaton
Men's Vogue
March 2008




As a grown up [Viggo] returned to Denmark and he has lived there several times and among other things worked as a carpenter and lorry driver in Copenhagen and as a waiter at 'Jan Hurtigkarl', and for a short period of time he also earned his living as a truck driver in Esbjerg Harbour.

In Esbjerg?

'I had a girlfriend, a really nice girl, who I wanted to live close to. She lived in Outrup.'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S Magazine
August 2001




Before, you were saying you are an optimist by nature. What are you doing to protect the environment and prevent the planet from becoming what it is in the movie?

Everything that's in my hands. I have a hybrid car, the first Prius that came out on the market; it still works great. My son shares it with me. I recycle everything I can. I try not to waste natural resources or to pollute. Small things that if done every day, serve to make a better world.

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Interview: "This film has made me feel closer to my father"
By Laura Sacksville - translated by Ollie, Rio and Sage
Cuore
13 February 2010




Two years ago, I spent a few days in Montana with Viggo while he was shooting Hidalgo, and I swear he was never without a camera. One moment he was slamming on the brakes to photograph a horse on a hill, and the next, he was slowing down to take a picture of a cloud.

Editorial
Premiere
November 2004




Viggo Mortensen is one of those few people who doesn't hesitate whether to stop his car or not when passing through an interesting place, or in order to see a friend, or to help anyone in need. "If you are in New Zealand -- he says -- and you are filming a movie, and you drive your car, and you pass through an interesting place and say ' well, I have to come back one day to see it'. NO. You should stop your car at that moment and see it now, although you are a bit late to work, because maybe you are not going to have another chance to see it. As human beings we think so much of 'we'll do it later', or ' I'll call you tomorrow', 'I'll visit you another day', ' I'll read this book next year'. But maybe you don't read it. Maybe you are not interested in reading it the next year. Maybe you are dead ".

Viggo Mortensen finds Alatriste in Curueño
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
Diario de León
20 March 2005





VM: Rabbits sometimes run out in front of your car, right? Well, I hit this rabbit on this lonely road in the South Island and I wanted to make sure it was dead. If it wasn't, I'd put it out of its misery. And it was quite dead, so I thought, 'Well, why waste it?' And so I made a little fire and ate it.

Q: Is this something that you thought Aragorn would have done?

VM: As he was driving down the road and if he hit a rabbit? Yeah, he might. If he was hungry, I guess.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




'The sound of cars and buses passing by on half-flooded streets quiets me; it´s something that makes me remember with absolute clarity my childhood in Buenos Aires and long afternoons in the countryside.'

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




"When I returned [to Argentina], at age 37, I got off the plane and I went downtown to look for my places. The little park where I played soccer with my friends, for example. I found different things: there was a McDonald's, new immigrants. But the sounds, the smells were the same. I rented a car and took off for everywhere. I went as far as La Pampa, I don't know…It was a lot of fun to stop in any location, take photos, talk to people. I came back because I had unfinished business."

Viggo Mortensen: "Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
By Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Zooey
Gente
25 August 2009




‘[Henry’s] learning to drive now, and I've been trying to teach him to drive, but as soon as he learned a little bit about it and got out the manual he started being very critical of me. And now I feel really nervous around him. I mean, in the car, he's like "Turn signal!", you know. And I'll park and he'll look out and he'll measure it, "You're a foot and a half away from the curb." It's really nerve racking: I'm bumping into cars. It's horrible. But then when he drives - he's got his permit - I'm even worse off. I'm a terrible passenger. So I'm sitting there all the time thinking he's going to hit the parked car and all that. I'm just..I dunno..I never knew that cars were so dangerous. But he'll be alright. He's good. He's much more careful than I am and he's really a good kid.’

Late Night with David Letterman
David Letterman Show
New York
March 2004




Some Sundays, if he's not trout fishing, he'll just get in the car and drive, which is a thing to do in New Mexico, with its jagged, primeval landscapes and pendulum-swing microclimates…

The road is something of a comfort zone. His son was fixated on all things Nordic, and so he indulged them both with a winter trip around Iceland in what felt like one never-ending snowstorm, intrigued by the steaming volcanic landscape. "It was like, it could blow any time!" says Mortensen, laughing.

The Great Dane
By Phoebe Eaton
Men's Vogue
March 2008




We break up; collect nicely all our stuff, all orange peelings, bottle tops, and plastic glasses, and head back to his car, a Dodge Ram 2.500 pick-up diesel. On the dashboard lies dried flowers and what seems to be an Indian rosary, in the CD player is fusion music (new age and jazz), and Viggo Mortensen puts on a classic ranger hat. He seems to be very much at ease, as he sits here well above the driving lane and like a pinball navigates us through the brutal traffic.

'I love driving. Just to drive and drive and drive out of the road. Suddenly you can think again. Like when you are wandering in a hardwood or in the mountains or stand in a big, cold, mirroring lake, fishing. Then you are close to being happy - and what more can a man want.'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S Magazine
August 2001




In Mortensen’s view, the journey is always more entertaining than the destination anyway.

The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009


Quotable Viggo: 9 February 2019

I thought that this week we'd take a look at what Viggo loves about movies and acting. Despite all the rigors of promoting films and the endless interviews (Green Book is proving an exceptionally long haul), despite the fact he could pursue at least four other successful careers as an artist, he is still an actor, still looking for great stories, still looking for the magic. And soon he'll be telling another great story as Writer, Director and Actor.



© John Harris.


'My goal is just to make movies, whether they're big or small, that I'd like to see 10 years from now. That's sort of the way I gauge it.'

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




"I started thinking about acting about a year before I actually tried it," he says. "I just started watching movies in a different way, not just as entertainment. I started to really think about the ones that got to me, the ones that transported me so that, when I walked out of the theater, I'd be surprised. I'm really not in the desert? Or the 18th century? And I started to wonder what's the trick, how does a movie do that to you, technically? I wanted to try and figure that out."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




"I'm sort of old-fashioned in that I don't think a movie is fully realized until people have paid a few bucks to go into a room and sit down together, with strangers," he said. "I think there's something about that that's different. You can sort of simulate that in your house, but there's something about the movie house, the movie theater, that I think is valuable. I hope it never completely goes away."

How Viggo Mortensen learned to be captain of 6 kids onscreen
Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
8 July 2016




"Everything begins with stillness, with silence. Movies are light and time. Before the movie begins, there is darkness and nothing is happening. When the movie starts, the clock starts, and we see."

Viggo Mortensen, the Unlikely Leading Man
New York Times
By Thessaly La Force
15 October 2018




"I could have done one big-studio movie after another if the goal was to stay as visible as possible, to make as much money as possible. I guess, because of my temperament, I didn't want to. I wouldn't have been telling good stories. The challenge would have always been to try not to make a total ass of myself, even though I knew the story was really stupid."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




"I think, any good story, the dramatic part of the story, what makes it interesting, why you'd want to go see it, why you'd want to talk about it afterwards--comes from those moments or periods of time, whether it suddenly happens or it's a gradual realization, that things are not what they seem."

Viggo Mortensen
Capone has a GOOD chat with Viggo Mortensen about politics, THE ROAD, APPALOOSA, and THE HOBBIT!!!
Ain't it Cool News
3 December 2008




"Every film capable of "seducing" me… represents a stage in my development as an actor", says the actor. "But also as writer, painter, editor, poet and photographer. Although I can no longer separate my interests one from the other. Nowadays I need to have strong motivations to accept a new film project. I look for fascinating stories to tell."

Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine – translated by Ollie
September 2011




"You put it out there, you promote it, but I can't predict what you or anyone else is going to think of it. I just know if it's a story I want to tell. And, maybe this sounds selfish, but however it turns out, I've still had the great experience of researching it, and studying it, and doing it, and that's the most valuable thing to me. Because that knowledge I've gained — that's something I keep. That's mine."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




"I can always count on the benefits of asking the question: "What happened between the cradle and page one for this character?" And that answer is endless, you know? It's as big an answer and as complicated and layered an answer as you want it to be. And I never stop working at that."

Viggo Mortensen
VIGGOOOOOAL!
Scott Feinberg's awards season analysis
andthewinneris.blog.com
20 December 2007




'There are many talented individuals in this art form, but if there is one thing I have learned during the thirty years that I have been working as an actor in the movies it is that there is always a surprise around the corner. Stories and performances you would not expect to work, full of moments of rare beauty, humor, and inspiration. As an audience member, every time the lights go down and the images begin to dance in front of me, I am hoping for that kind of story, those sorts of moments.'

Viggo Mortensen
One-on-one interview with 'On the Road's' Viggo Mortensen
By Steven Lebowitz
Examiner.com
6 April 2013




"…when I was watching the reel of clips, going back to the mid-eighties, I just went on a journey personally about where I was at the time. I'd look at Patricia Arquette [in 'The Indian Runner'] or Diane Lane [in 'A Walk on the Moon'] or how Al Pacino was in that moment [in 'Carlito's Way'], and just the things that happened that are beyond technical explanations, that magical thing that has to do with a leap of faith. And people go, 'How did you get to that place?'

And honestly, in some cases you don't know, we were lucky it happened. You just hope those things happen once in a while."

Viggo talking about the Telluride Film Festival Tribute
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Grown Man in an Era of Boys'
Jay A. Fernandez
Risky Biz
12 September 2009




"…it's like an invocation, an invitation to magic, to the unexplained, to let the unexpected to enter into our lives."

Viggo Mortensen
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today
2001




"That's a perfect universe, movies. It has everything."

Viggo Mortensen - For The Good Of The People
By Elliot V Kotek
Moving Pictures
Winter 2008-2009

Quotable Viggo: 19 January 2019

Now we're once again in Awards Season, I thought it would be great to take another look at why Viggo received so many nominations in 2016-17 when his performance took a small budget, under-the-radar film into the Oscar spotlight with Matthew Ross's wonderful Captain Fantastic. Could Ben Cash possibly be further from Tony Lip?



Image Wilson Webb © Bleecker Street.


Viggo Mortensen overcomes every intrusion of doubt with a performance that is informed, inspired, ideological and overwhelming. He's so sensational that he makes the film's title come true with no strings attached.

Super-Dad: 'Captain Fantastic' Enthralls the Senses and Engages the Mind
By Rex Reed
The Observer
5 July 2016




The clan's father isn't a superhero, but because he's played by Viggo Mortensen he's the next best thing.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
7 July 2016




Mortensen is outstanding in the film giving one of those rare performances that deserve the term breathtaking.

John H Foote
Thecinemaholic.com
2 August 2016




...The beauty of the film lies in its refusal to paint Ben as a deluded tyrant or principled pioneer. He doesn't have two faces — thanks to the script, as well as Mortensen's squirrely brilliance, he has hundreds.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
Evening Standard
9 September 2016




Mortensen sets about captaining this ship so well, with such fine shadings of distant grief, self-reproach, humility when it's necessary, defiance when it's not, that you can't imagine anyone else in the role, and wouldn't want anyone else near it.

Tim Robey
The Telegraph
8 September 2016




I really can't say enough about the work Viggo Mortensen. He's able to give this character so much life that you're under his spell; whether you agree or disagree with Ben's view of the world and outlook on raising his children. We see the best and worst of him, with Mortensen showcasing that brilliantly.

Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com
7 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen gets the role he may well have been born to play, not as a superhero, but as a super-dad determined to raise his kids on his own terms.... The inspired choice of casting Mortensen — a natural Papa Bear, who taps into both his physical strength and spiritual gentleness — shows through best when interacting with the kids, though the actor also shines when forced to defend his choices to others.

Peter Debruge
Variety
23 January 2016




Every now and then, a movie comes along that plays out almost entirely on a gifted actor's face; you feel as if you could watch the whole thing in quiet close-up, and catch every nuance of the story. I think of Cate Blanchett in "Blue Jasmine," Brie Larson in "Room," Denzel Washington in "Flight," to name just a few — and now, Viggo Mortensen in "Captain Fantastic."

Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
14 July 2016




Mortensen gives the performance of his life in the film's final act, visibly aching, filled with callously crushed desires and a deep well of sorrow.

James Robins
The Listener (NZ)
3 October 2016




At the heart of it all is the ever-brilliant Viggo Mortensen. Ben is a complex character that has every fragment of thought etched into Mortensen's expression. He's taken a hold of this character unlike any since Aragon. He embodies Ben perfectly, and the film can't be imagined without him.

By Amie Cranswick
Flickeringmyth.com
9 September 2016




Mortensen imbues Ben with such an easy, thoughtful, virile confidence that it is easy to see why his wife Leslie (Trin Miller) and children would think that hiding in the forest with him seems like the best possible option.

John Lui
Straits Times
12 July 2016




Mortensen, a spellbinding leading man who's got as firm a grip on the audience as his character does on his brood. He sells and sells and sells, and we buy, buy, buy; every idea Ben projects onto his kids, even the zany ones, sound perfectly logical when spoken by a voice so even and wise and alluring. He's so convincing that when he finally comes to the realization that he may actually be a much bigger threat to his children's health and safety than capitalism, smartphones or even Kanye West and the Kardashians, our hearts break for him.

Bernard Boo
wegothiscovered.com
11 July 2016




With any luck, Mortensen will get an Oscar nomination for his wonderfully soulful performance. As a real-life renaissance man (Mortensen is also a painter, author, photographer, and musician) with an intellectually rebellious streak, it's a role he was born to play…

Jonathan Kim
Huffington Post
15 July 2016




It's the ruggedly paradoxical, gentle-but-brute presence of Viggo Mortensen, more than anything else, that makes "Captain Fantastic" a twisting Rubik's Cube of blue and red.

Owen Gleiberman
Variety
13 July 2016

Quotable Viggo: 12 January 2019

All I’m going to say is, BAFTA voters and Academy Members, please take note…



© Universal.


Viggo Mortensen, as far as I’m concerned, could do a Rubix cube on screen for two hours and I’d still want to watch him, the guy is that good.

Metal Gear Solid Movie: Eight Actors Who Could Play Solid Snake
By Liam Hoofe
Flickering Myth
15 September 2017




Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of CAPTAIN FANTASTIC
Silverscreenriot.com
Matt Oakes
22 June 2016




Philip Seymour Hoffman, certainly one of the great actors of our time, told us in a Venetian hallway of the Hotel Excelsior how he regarded Viggo Mortensen as one of the masters of the profession. A point of view that is totally shared.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




Mortensen, perhaps the only actor alive who could play Sigmund Freud, William Burroughs and a Middle-earth king...

Uday Bhatia
Live Mint
11 September 2015




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




Viggo Mortensen is one of the most fascinating stars in contemporary cinema. The image of his penetrating gaze and wide jaw seems to have traversed all the corners of the globe and of Planet Cinema.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




“...what was surprising to me about working with him is that I could never catch him acting. He doesn't have any false moments."

Matt Ross
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




When it comes to cutting an effortless master like Viggo Mortensen, what can I say besides you’re just trying to pick the best of the best and make sure it all hangs together in the right way. He makes it look easy.

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




Good acting isn’t just about showboating speeches, about also about tiny vocal inflections and precise body language. Mortensen’s got it nailed.

Robert Horton
Seattle Weekly
27 November 2018




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




"He is methodical, exacting in his work, he carries out meticulous labors to do something that looks true, and projects it. He is like Robert Mitchum or William Holden, the class of actors whose work seems effortless."

Ray Loriga
Chiaroscuro: Viggo, Light And Dark
By Rocio Garcia - translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
El Pais
26 June 2009




Mortensen is one of the most diverse, least mannered but most overlooked actors working in Hollywood.

Emanuel Levy
emanuellevy.com
1 Sept 2007




“Viggo's … a real artist. He cares about what speaks to him. He doesn't care about how much he's paid, doesn't care where he lives, doesn't care how nice the hotel is. He's a horse. I feel like he could go all day, work all day and he's polite and creative and generous. That made it easy. Not only is he physically gifted, he’s graceful and tough.”

Garret Dillahunt
Fred Topel
CraveOnline
20 March 2009




Mortensen, who radically rejects any clichés and stereotypes, has become one of the most interesting and idiosyncratic actors of his generation. And incidentally, so to speak, a world star of cinema.

Venniale Tribute publicity
August 2014




‘I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011

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Last edited: 17 November 2019 02:52:17