Mahershala Ali, Viggo Mortensen strike up an unusual 1960s bromance in Green Book trailer

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Beyond Baroque Honors Viggo


Source: Beyond Baroque.
Found By: Chrissie
Thanks to Chrissie for bringing us the news that Viggo will be given the Alexander Garrett Award for Service to Beyond Baroque at a gala ceremony on 10 November 2018.







Ticket information will be coming soon at the Beyond Baroque website.




© Beyond Baroque. Images © Beyond Baroque.

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News and offer from Perceval Press


Source: Perceval Press.
Found By: ollie
Thanks to ollie for bringing us this news.
Quote:
Dreams Before Extinction
Dreams Before Extinction.
© Perceval Press.
Kavous Seyed is dead. We do not know if those responsible for his unlawful detention and murder will ever be held responsible. His work remains, however, and his compassion and brave work on behalf of endangered species in Iran will be continued by other activists, including scientists and artists like Naeemeh Naeemaei. In his honour, we offer the book of Naeemeh's remarkable paintings, Dreams Before Extinction, which includes a foreword by Kavous Seyed, free of any charge other than shipping cost, until our supply runs out (one per customer please).

Thank you for supporting his legacy and the animals he sought to protect.

Viggo Mortensen

© Viggo Mortensen. Images © Perceval Press.

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Perceval Press End of Year Sale - 40% off


Source: Perceval Press.
Found By: ollie
Many thanks to ollie for alerting us to another generous sale at Perceval Press.




Images © Perceval Press.

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REVIEW: Ramas Para un Nido


Source: BlogCritics.
Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Books & CD's

Our thanks to Iolanthe who found an nice review of the book by Richard Marcus here on Blog Critics.








Quote:

Book Review: ‘Ramas Para Un Nido’ by Viggo Mortensen.

If a photograph is a recording of a moment in time, a memory, than can a collection of photographs be said to be a collection of memories, or are they something more? Viggo Mortensen's newest book of photographs, Ramas Para Un Nido (literally translated as Branches for a Nest), published by Perceval Press, is a collection of pictures taken by the author at various times and locations over the past couple of decades.

However, the photos aren't arranged in any chronological, or geographical, order. In his introductory note to the collection of images he refers to it as a "distillation of isolated instances". Perhaps more telling are the quotes he's bookended his photos with, from the late Danish writer Klaus Rifbjerg before and the late American playwright Sam Shepard after.


  • And the moment you start a journey, you are on your way home. I travel to come home. I'm always on my way home. (translated from Danish) Rifbjerg.

  • I feel like I've never had a home, you know? I feel related to the country, and yet I don't know exactly where I fit in. There's always this kind of nostalgia for a place, a place where you can reckon with yourself. Shepard


I've deliberately crammed the two together for both the themes they express and how they relate to the images in the book. There's also the simple reason that, aside from the two paragraph forward mentioned above, and the dates and titles of the images, they represent the book's only text. Either Mortensen assumes we are aware enough to form our own opinions and don't have any need of words to do so, or he prefers to let the images stand alone and speak for themselves.

For when you look at any collection of images, be it photographs or paintings, you end up at them both singularly and collectively. It doesn't matter how the curator has displayed them in a gallery or an editor arranged them in a book, there will be those images which will stand out and form the strongest impression. In fact they may well be what causes you to decide there is a particular theme or thought behind what you have just seen.

By presenting his images in what at first appears to be a jumble, with sometimes decades or thousands of miles separating juxtaposed images, Mortensen has ensured we will see each photograph as a separate entity. On a couple of occasions he has placed pictures of similar subject matter side by each, the images of road kill for example, but upon examination of titles we see these were taken years apart and in different locations.

You think he might be breaking the pattern when you've find he's also clumped together a few shots from a trip to Nablus in the West Bank, but then you discover another from the same location somewhere else. However, from the variety of locations picture in the book, North Africa, North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, you do form the impression the photographer is a bit of a vagabond.

You could even go so far as to say the photos represent his search for that very mythical 'home' referenced in both the opening and closing quotes of the book. However, on close examination you'll see many of these photos are of people's home. From the fields their food is grown in, to the streets they walk down, to the shop windows they pass on their way to wherever they go each day. Everything we experience in our day to day life, the trees in a park, the graffiti on a wall, or an abandoned building are all part of our definition of home.

Home can be an abstract, some sort of philosophical underpinning which creates the values we hold dear, but it is also the prosaic and the mundane. Mortensen's photos show us those details of life we take for granted, those details which without our knowing it have shaped our definition of where we live, what we call home.

Instead of taking the typical tourist pictures of places like Palermo or Istanbul he shows us what the people see every day. There's nothing exotic or fancy about them, they are places just like anywhere else, just like our place. In Shepard's quote he talks about the nostalgia for a place called home. But nostalgia isn't reality, it's seeing the past through the lens of thinking it was better then things are today.

Mortensen's photos, individually and collectively, show us home for what it is. It's no great flag waving statement, it just is. A place we come from, where we shop, where we eat and where we go for walks in the street or the park. There's nothing glamorous about any of the photos in this book, but when you come down to it there's nothing really glamorous about home – its familiar and comfortable.

Ramas Para Un Nido is a collection of beautiful and simple photographs which will have you rethinking your notion of home and appreciating the simple beauty of the prosaic. Mortensen's eye for detail is astonishing, and it's this eye which manages to capture the little things in life which make up home.

© Richard Marcus. Images © Viggo Mortensen .

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

I confess I'm more than a tad over-excited by the news of a new Viggo photography book, Ramas Para un Nido. One thing is for sure, it won't be predictable. With Viggo all photography rules get broken (don't shoot into the sun, don't over expose, hold it steady…). Even the camera itself is often broken – when most of us would be packing it away for a journey to the camera repair shop, Viggo keeps shooting just to see if something interesting will happen. It always does.





The pictures in this book have been made with different cameras, techniques, and, unavoidably, with all the longing, love, laughter, doubts, and mistakes that have shaped my life so far.

Viggo Mortensen
Perceval Press
October, 2017



'In a way, I am a photographer even when I don't take pictures. I think it's an instinctive thing by now, a part of myself'.

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




He likes to sit in bars to listen, and he would love to go unnoticed as the least known of the regulars. But he almost never does. He seeks images, constantly, or images find him. And then, Viggo Mortensen takes out his professional camera and photographs at ease. He always has it ready, just in case. It could be a landscape, like when he went about the north of Argentina; it could be someone who catches his attention...

Viggo Mortensen - "Above all, I'm a Cuervo... And a greater pride does not exist"
By Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zooey
Gente
April 2010




Several of Viggo Mortensen's different faces can be seen in his photos, some more recognisable than others. In front of the large photograph Topanga 7 where golden green light moves across a profile like it was a reflecting water surface, he says in perfect Danish:

'This self-portrait I shot with a slow shutter speed. That way I became part of nature. You can see the blue sky through the brim of the hat and there are plants in my face. With that technique you can become one with the surroundings - the house, the wall, or nature.'

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




Recently, I'm doing digital photography almost exclusively. I have old cameras, two from 1903 which I sometimes also continue using.

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
20 Minutos
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
6 September 2012




'Two years ago, I spent a few days in Montana with Viggo while he was shooting Hidalgo, and I swear he was never without a camera. One moment he was slamming on the brakes to photograph a horse on a hill, and the next, he was slowing down to take a picture of a cloud.'

Tom Roston
Editorial
Premiere
November 2004




'I have a camera with a broken lens -- I was actually doing it two days ago in Montana. There were all these horses running and I was taking pictures and then the lens was just all screwed up. So I took it off. I don't know what it's going to look like. It's hopefully just going to be a good flow of shapes and color.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm 2002




Did you and Viggo Mortensen use homemade cameras?

We're not that renaissance. Viggo's got an old hasselblad that he takes forever to focus & shoot. But I must admit he's got some real talent behind the lens. . . not too bad in front either.

John Doe
John Doe finds Emily at a Crossroads
By Emily Strange
Emilystrange.com
June 2012




I've photographed a lot with Leica and Hasselblad cameras but last year I started using disposable cameras. They won't be available a short time from now so it was good to use the opportunity while I could and play with them. I often expose the pictures for a long time, shoot directly into the sun. A lot of interesting things happen when the light goes through these unclear plastic lenses. The photos become different. Sometimes I throw the cameras to the ground to loosen the lens a little bit, then interesting things happen. Then you check out the films and choose the best ones. I have an opinion of how I want them to be."

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




The artist uses multiple exposures, camera shake and long open shutter exposures coupled with extensive camera movement, to paint images onto the film emulsion.

Viggo Mortensen - Painting with Light
By Christopher Harrod
New Zealand Art Monthly
April 2004




He plays the camera like a musical instrument. It's a conversational kind of photography: it's Viggo telling you who he is with images. He looks at everything, believes everything has a meaning, and he shows you his pictures in the belief that seeing might reveals the hidden mysteries of everyday life.

Mark Power
The Salt Mine
3 September 2008




Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot,
Juxtapoz Magazine #19
1999




Viggo Mortensen's photographs can be explained as poetic; sometimes the focus is shallow, a lot of movement, light sometimes leaks into the pictures and makes weird influences.

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008
Morgunblaðið




ST: I was trying to figure out the process for those flares. I thought that burn came from the development process.

VM: No, it was in the camera. The wiring that advanced the film and activated the flash got messed up. I was fishing and dropped the camera and it got wet. When it dried out, it started doing that. I shot a roll, saw it and thought, "Oh, shit." But when I looked at them, I thought that some of them looked kind of interesting. So on the next roll, I tried moving the wire all the way to one side and the flares would go to that side. Then I moved it to the middle, the right, and on the bottom and shot maybe eight rolls of film before it stopped working altogether.

A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
By Scott Thill
20 September 2002
Source: Morphizm




When I see my own pictures, it's like seeing a movie. It is, for example a single moment in a film scene, that you remember. So is also the case with my pictures. I remember the places I've been to and can go there again through the pictures, Viggo says.'

Viggo on the sadanset exhibition
Kim Kastrup
Ekstra Bladet
16 October 2008




Not everything's a masterpiece, of course, not by a long shot. But when Mortensen's good, when he's firing on all cylinders, he has the ability to produce some truly breathtaking images. According to Dennis Hopper, it's because Mortensen's instincts "come from the right place, from the subconscious."

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
2003



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Viggo Mortensen.


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Last edited: 14 August 2018 11:18:24