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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

Sticking with Purgatorio and Ariel Dorfman after his comment that Viggo spotted an anomaly in the script, I thought it would be good to take a look back at the play. Unbelievably, it's been 7 years since Viggo took his courage in both hands and trod the boards at the Matadero Naves del Español in Madrid. As you can see from the the quotes below, it was a very challenging text…




What brought you to theatre? "Fear. I've done theatre because it frightens me. I'm attracted to everything that frightens me."

Viggo Mortensen: "I'm attracted to what scares me"
By Roció García - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
24 November 2011




"…when I met [Dorfman] in person, since he's Chilean, we were talking in Spanish and I asked him, out of curiosity, if there was a version in Spanish, and he said, "Well, yes, I have a version. A translation, and furthermore it would be interesting if you'd be interested in doing it, since you're bilingual, if you'd do it, Viggo, in Spanish first and we'll see what happens after that."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




Ariel says, more or less in jest, that it's a cursed play, that every time he tries to put it on in a, shall we say, legitimate theater, it doesn't work. Someone gets sick, something happens, somebody leaves, and there's been a long journey for us, too, before arriving here."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




'Sometimes, during rehearsals, I have thought that I've been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge…'

Viggo Mortensen
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




"…this script is complicated because it's not how people speak. I think that it's just as complicated to seem natural, conversational in a script by Lope de Vega, by Shakespeare. It's complicated!"

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




'Ariel Dorfman´s script is demanding, but it´s full of little gifts that keep coming to you to the extent that you are deciphering the text and physically absorbing it.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




"I learned more about acting and thinking on your feet in that play than in my last ten or fifteen years in filming," he says, seriously. "There's no saying cut, you just figure it out; it's like an hour and forty minutes long take. I really loved it, loved the connection with the audience."

Viggo's round-table at the Freud Museum
by Lucy Wiles
Felix Films
10 February 2012




"It's just two characters, and it's an hour and 45 minutes," he said, with no intermission. "Any mistake you make is live, and it can go off the rails," he said. "Also, in the script, there's a lot of repetition and a lot of strange things about time."

Viggo Mortensen interview
By Chris Brock
Watertown Daily Times
20 November 2011




"I find peace in Viggo´s eyes. Confronted with the giddiness of the text, you can take risks with him, walk the tightrope."

Carme Elías
Viggo Mortensen And Forgiveness
By Ulises Fuente - translated by Ollie and Rio
La Razón
1 November 2011




I put the script here, although I already know the text. I always have the script backstage. I have this owl with the bracelet in San Lorenzo colors; I touch the two eyes of the owl every night before I go on. I have a photo of San Lorenzo's first championship team in 1923, Father Lorenzo Massa, the Silesian who founded San Lorenzo, I have chocolate. I'm always eating...

Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




'I don't think there's so much difference between good acting in film and good acting in theatre. In general, depending on the size of the hall, it's true that in theatre you have to take into account adequate voice projection, but, ultimately, what matters is whether the spectator believes what the actor is doing or not.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




"You have to be honest about weakness and feelings of guilt. The good thing about any creative work, movie, story or poem, is that it asks you questions without asking you to think one way or another, and this play asks whether it is possible to forgive unconditionally, whether there are things that are so hurtful that they cannot be forgiven, and the answer I personally provide is that real forgiveness cannot set any conditions, be they what they may."

Viggo and Carme explore forgiveness
By Rosana Torres
El Pais
4 November 2011



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Andrés de Gabriel/Teatro Español.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

You may find it hard to believe, but it's been just over four years since Viggo braved the stage at El Matadero in Madrid for Dorfman's Purgatorio. In theatre there is nowhere to hide. There is no second take, the audience is just a few feet away eyeballing you and if you forget your words you just have to keep going until you pick them up again. It's an challenging experience Viggo that enjoyed very much and one I hope he'll return to one day.




What brought you to theatre? "Fear. I've done theatre because it frightens me. I'm attracted to everything that frightens me. It's not like in film, where you do a take and then you can do another and another. Theatre is just one live take that lasts an hour and 40 minutes, depending on the performance. It's a new adventure every night. If you get off track, you have to see how to get back."

Viggo Mortensen: "I'm attracted to what scares me"
By Roció García - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
24 November 2011




"Any mistake you make is live, and it can go off the rails," he said. "Also, in the script, there's a lot of repetition and a lot of strange things about time."

Viggo Mortensen interview
By Chris Brock
Watertown Daily Times
20 November 2011




"I learned more about acting and thinking on your feet in that play than in my last ten or fifteen years in filming," he says, seriously... I really loved it, loved the connection with the audience."

Viggo's round-table at the Freud Museum
by Lucy Wiles
Felix Films
10 February 2012




"[Dorfman] sent me a version of the play. It's a play that has been evolving. It was performed in a theater workshop, I think in Seattle, in the northwestern United States, for the first time and it's been attempted several times. Ariel says, more or less in jest, that it's a cursed play, that every time he tries to put it on in a, shall we say, legitimate theater, it doesn't work. Someone gets sick, something happens, somebody leaves, and there's been a long journey for us, too, before arriving here."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




Do you approach a character for the theatre in the same way you would if you were acting in a film?

Yes, always with a certain fear and preparing myself the best I can, paying a lot of attention. I don't think there's so much difference between good acting in film and good acting in theatre. In general, depending on the size of the hall, it's true that in theatre you have to take into account adequate voice projection, but, ultimately, what matters is whether the spectator believes what the actor is doing or not.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




Sometimes, during rehearsals, I have thought that I've been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge, but then the doubt, the insecurity go away and I keep enjoying what I´m learning from my colleague Carme Elías, and from our director, Josep María Mestres. Ariel Dorfman´s script is demanding, but it´s full of little gifts that keep coming to you to the extent that you are deciphering the text and physically absorbing it.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




"…this script is complicated because it's not how people speak. I think that it's just as complicated to seem natural, conversational in a script by Lope de Vega, by Shakespeare. It's complicated! And when you find it, you find the humour in a phrase or in the circumstances, in the moment...Then, yes. Then it begins to be more fun and you begin to understand. During rehearsals, even in some performances, there are moments in which we say, "Ah, that phrase also means this or it could..." Or, last night, we had quite a laugh there. Also, it's also possible...Or, at times, you cry at one point and during another performance, you don't. I don't know, because the thing is alive."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




"I find peace in Viggo´s eyes. Confronted with the giddiness of the text, you can take risks with him, walk the tightrope."

Carme Elías
Viggo Mortensen And Forgiveness
By Ulises Fuente - translated by Ollie and Rio
La Razón
1 November 2011




I put the script here, although I already know the text. I always have the script backstage. I have this owl with the bracelet in San Lorenzo colors; I touch the two eyes of the owl every night before I go on. I have a photo of San Lorenzo's first championship team in 1923, Father Lorenzo Massa, the Silesian who founded San Lorenzo, I have chocolate. I'm always eating...

Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




Yesterday we were at the Matadero watching Purgatorio, Ariel Dorfman's play starring Viggo Mortensen and Carme Elías. We enjoyed it very much. The two actors, towering, in my opinion, remained onstage, alone, without intermissions and with no company or props but a bed, a table and two chairs, for an hour and three quarters. It seems a luxury to me to be able to see a star like Mortensen onstage in Madrid, speaking Spanish (with an Argentinian accent; something that surprised some people, but not me, having already listened to many of his interviews in Spain)....

It seems incredible to me that the guy I had seen the day before in Freud´s skin in Cronenberg´s flick was the same actor we had less than a metre away (we were in the first row, facing the stage). He looked like another, completely different person. With another voice, other features, other movements...If this is not a huge actor, I don´t know who could be.

Purgatorio Review
By José Angel Barrueco - translated by Ollie and Rio
Globedia
28 November 2011




Viggo Mortensen is a better stage than film actor. And not because that medium is bad, but because the nearness of the spectator and the live performance allow one to appreciate more intensely the entire panoply of gestures and intonations that accompany his acting. From the sober, tough, unpleasant, and relentless interrogator of the first act, he transforms himself into the frightened, eager to please, somewhat conceited and competitive man he is in the second, when the roles change and he turns into the victim of a tyrant, also played to perfection by Carme Elías, who is at times playful and affectionate, other times inflexible and insensitive.

An Interpretive Reading
By María Martín - translated by Ollie and Rio
Diario Abierto
14 November 2011




...Viggo Mortensen is unsurpassable in humanity, contained pain and buried passion.

You and I make four
By Marcos Ordóñez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
7 November 2011




'[It's] been a tough but rewarding challenge after more than 20 years not doing a play. Tough subject, difficult script to memorize and present.'

Viggo Mortensen on Purgatorio
Viggo Mortensen Talks Working With Kristen Stewart in On the Road
by Allie Merriam
Buzz Sugar
29 November 2011



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Andrés de Gabriel/Teatro Español.

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Viggo-Works Reviews 'Purgatorio'


Source: viggo-works.com
Categories: Purgatorio


Our own intrepid Viggo-Works reporter and critic at large, Chrissie, has filed this review of Viggo's latest project, 'Purgatorio', currently running on stage in Madrid.

Quote:

Purgatorio: A Review

1purgco.jpg
© Chrissie. Used by permission.
by Chrissie


Housed in a former slaughterhouse the Matadero centre where the Naves del Español theatre is located can seem a dark and inhospitable place but perhaps that's appropriate for somewhere that still has "slaughtering of pigs" signs up on the wall. The doors opened at 8.20pm and everyone began taking their seats. The audience are sat on three sides of the stage and the stage is furnished with a bed, a table and two chairs. At the rear of the stage is a closed door with a panel in the middle. All of these have a steely theme running through them which continues through the lines on the stage floor and the lighting rig above it. This shining metal seems to envelop the inhabitant of the room where even lying on the bed they find themselves enclosed within the metal rim of the bedframe. It is as though they are imprisoned by these lines. It is a very stark but effective setting.

Viggo was already on stage dressed in a white coat that gave the appearance of a doctor. He was pacing along the lines on the floor and every now and again he would stand, with his back to us, and look through the panel on the door. At first I couldn't see Carme but then I was aware that she was in the far corner hidden amongst the darkness. Viggo went up to her and exchanged a few words before sitting down at the table and producing a clipboard file from the doctor's bag that was on the table. He began leafing through some of the pages, clearing his throat, breathing deeply and then he wrote a few things down on the paper. After that he did some more pacing around. He reminded me of a child trying to walk along the lines between paving stones.

As the last members of the audience were being seated there was an announcement that the play would start shortly, that mobile phones should be switched off and that there should be no flash photography. When Viggo put on the less-than-flattering glasses that his character has to wear I knew this was the start of the play I had been anticipating for a long time. Although I studied Spanish at school that was many, many years ago and I struggle with understanding spoken Spanish, so for two weeks prior to seeing Purgatorio I had been reading the book of the English script every day and the previous day I'd read it twice. It felt a little like cramming for an exam! My efforts to make myself as familiar with the text as I could paid off, as most of the time I found I could follow the actions on stage reasonably well. Occasionally I would get a little lost but it would soon get to a part that I recognised - for example, the scene where Carme begins to "meow" like a cat.

The tone of Viggo's voice was noticeably different when he was portraying the interrogator and when he was the one being interrogated. As the interrogator he was calm but firm and used a lot of facial expressions to convey what he thought about the answers Carme's character was giving to him. Carme is very dominant in these scenes and at times seems like she is the one doing the interrogating - such as when she asks the man whether he snores and later on when she asks him what he misses most and suggests that it has to be sex. For part of the time Viggo sat at the table and did some pretend note-taking. In some ways he's more of an observer in this first act as the lengthy speeches are made by Carme.

Carme slipped out of the door when the lights dimmed at the end of the first act. Loud music played and Viggo discarded the coat, stripped the bed, propped the mattress against the back wall and began ruffling up his previously slicked-back hair. He began counting and doing push-ups, followed by some bicycle exercises, before going back to push-ups as Carme entered the room in a white coat and with her long hair swept up in a bun. Viggo lay on the floor while Carme, in one of the few amusing moments, asked him whether he had finished or if he would like to run around the room a few times. When Viggo stood up his voice had changed and he moved with a confident swagger. By now his character is sure that he's done enough to be reincarnated and he smiles when his interrogator heaps praise upon him and seems flattered by what she's saying about him.

After Viggo had picked up the mattress from the back wall and remade the bed Carme asks him to sit down next to her so that she can read back one of his statements. At this point Viggo's character was still in a playful mood and couldn't resist continuing to tuck the side of the sheet in, with a mischievous smile on his face. However, his character completely changes when the suggestion is made that he could be sent back in time and be reincarnated as his murdered son. I don't know why but I was reminded of Frank Roberts and how he could be smiling and laughing one minute and then shouting and snarling the next. After getting down on his knees and pleading to come back as anything else the interrogator produces a vase from her bag which represents another discrepancy in the accounts he has given. It was during this part when he was talking about how sorry he was that he blamed his grandmother for breaking the vase and how he had visited her and saw that she was close to dying that I could see a tear starting to glisten in Viggo's eye. However, he may have overdone the emotion a little on this occasion as he had problems with his nose running afterwards. He kept trying to wipe his nose in his hand without making it too obvious. I felt like rushing down and handing him a tissue.

This was closely followed by one of my favourite moments in the script when we are back to the subject of snoring and Viggo's character is describing how he would watch his wife asleep and try to imagine what she was dreaming. It was a sensuous moment when he knelt on the bed showing how he would fly his hands over her body "like a shadow protecting her". Soon though his character's anger rises again as he discovers that he is being asked to help with his wife's repentance and that there is no way out for him until he achieves it. In a rage he accidentally knocks the vase to the floor where it shatters ... or at least it is supposed to shatter but on this occasion it didn't! A small piece broke off from the neck and the rest of it bounced across the stage towards the audience. Viggo's reaction was extremely fast and he ran across the stage and succeeded in catching the vase before it landed in somebody's lap. The following scene is where he gets down on his knees and picks up the broken pieces and after telling him to leave them as someone will clear them up later his interrogator then starts helping him. It was, therefore, a challenge for them to be faced with a very intact vase, a single piece that had broken off and what can only be described as a few bits that were the size of dust. However, they got through the scene of collecting the pieces and placing them into the doctor's bag without bursting into laughter, although I'm sure Viggo must have been suppressing a few giggles.

At the end of the second act the man leaves through the door and the woman is alone. The lights dim again and loud music is played. It is time for Carme to discard the coat and let her hair down as she once again waits for the arrival of her interrogator in his white coat and glasses. Viggo's voice was initially calm but it grew more forceful when he told Carme's character to get down on her knees. This scene eventually builds to an angry exchange as the man realises that the woman is not going to repent for killing his new bride. At one point the lights came up and it felt like Carme's character was explaining herself to you personally rather than the interrogator. When Viggo pinned her down on to the bed I knew that the play was close to the end - where the woman would look into her interrogator's eyes and recognise who he was. I'd read beforehand that they had changed the ending and for a moment I thought the characters were about to kiss. Surely they hadn't tried to bring a little happiness to the conclusion? No, there was no need to worry as the only thing that had changed was the wording with its mention of eternity. The man had discarded his coat and glasses to be dressed in penitent black like the woman and as the lights went down for the final time they were left facing each other in silence.

Before I attended the play I had seen some comments from people who found the experience long and boring. I suspected they weren't familiar with the source material and that perhaps some of them had gone merely to see Viggo - the actor of few words who suddenly had words tumbling out of his mouth faster than they could have ever imagined. I myself couldn't believe how quickly the time had gone and I found the play completely absorbing. I also didn't think that Viggo did too much gesticulating during the second act which has been a criticism some reviewers have made. He is portraying a restless man who is anxious to move on to the next stage in the process and without gestures I think he would look stiff and uncomfortable. It is an achievement to be able to cope with the text of this intense play and Viggo and Carme both do an outstanding job.

I am grateful that I had the opportunity to see Viggo's return to the stage and hopefully after the 23rd November they didn't have any further problem with unbreakable vases.

© viggo-works.com. Images © Chrissie/viggo-works.com.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo




With Viggo famous for his film acting, taking the risk of returning to the stage after all this time in Purgartorio could have landed him in well, purgatory, if not downright hell. But there have been very good reviews of the play and of Viggo's performance - remarkable for someone who hasn't walked the boards for more than 24 years since his award winning performance in Martin Sherman's Bent in Los Angeles, and the theatre has been packed out. With a quote from 2008, it's also a reminder how long Viggo has been thinking about the play which he has been passionate about seeing presented.




"I haven't done theatre in 20 years, and that terrifies me more than death."

Viggo on Purgatorio
Viggo Mortensen: first Good - and then goodbye?
By Kevin Maher
The Times
2 April 2009




"There's no take 2, no escape. You either remember your lines or you don't. It'll be a good challenge."

Viggo in Tokyo for the Alatriste premier talking about taking the stage
Chris Betros
Japantoday.com
5 December 2008




Do you approach a character for the theatre in the same way you would if you were acting in a film?

Yes, always with a certain fear and preparing myself the best I can, paying a lot of attention. I don't think there's so much difference between good acting in film and good acting in theatre. In general, depending on the size of the hall, it's true that in theatre you have to take into account adequate voice projection, but, ultimately, what matters is whether the spectator believes what the actor is doing or not.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




'Tough subject, difficult script to memorize and present.'

Viggo Mortensen on Purgatorio
Viggo Mortensen Talks Working With Kristen Stewart in On the Road
by Allie Merriam
Buzz Sugar
29 November 2011




Mr. Mortensen, 52, said that during rehearsals for "Purgatorio" he sometimes thought he "should have picked something easier."

"It's just two characters, and it's an hour and 45 minutes," he said, with no intermission. "Any mistake you make is live, and it can go off the rails," he said. "Also, in the script, there's a lot of repetition and a lot of strange things about time."

Viggo Mortensen interview
By Chris Brock
Watertown Daily Times
20 November 2011




"The most interesting part is that you clearly see how, both in our friends' lives and in the lives of people in the public spotlight, in politics, in legend and myth, mistakes and weaknesses always emerge," says Mortensen, and to illustrate it he brings up a fragment of a poem by Leonard Cohen: "There is a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in."

Viggo and Carme explore forgiveness
By Rosana Torres
El Pais
4 November 2011




"First you need to forgive yourself, then forgive others. Revenge over and over again is a kind of poison, even if saying so is quite justified."

Viggo on the message of Purgatorio
Viggo and Carme explore forgiveness
By Rosana Torres
El Pais
4 November 2011




"You have to be honest about weakness and feelings of guilt. The good thing about any creative work, movie, story or poem, is that it asks you questions without asking you to think one way or another, and this play asks whether it is possible to forgive unconditionally, whether there are things that are so hurtful that they cannot be forgiven, and the answer I personally provide is that real forgiveness cannot set any conditions, be they what they may."

Viggo and Carme explore forgiveness
By Rosana Torres
El Pais
4 November 2011




Sometimes, during rehearsals, I have thought that I've been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge, but then the doubt, the insecurity go away and I keep enjoying what I´m learning from my colleague Carme Elías, and from our director, Josep María Mestres. Ariel Dorfman´s script is demanding, but it´s full of little gifts that keep coming to you to the extent that you are deciphering the text and physically absorbing it.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011



Reviews


The third act, when the cursed lovers meet again, is a beauty. Carme Elías throws herself into the horrifying confession and reaches her emotional height because she captures the duality of this devastated and indomitable woman who wants to begin anew but would return to doing everything she'd done, and Viggo Mortensen is unsurpassable in humanity, contained pain and buried passion.

You and I make four
By Marcos Ordóñez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
7 November 2011




Viggo Mortensen is a better stage than film actor. And not because that medium is bad, but because the nearness of the spectator and the live performance allow one to appreciate more intensely the entire panoply of gestures and intonations that accompany his acting. From the sober, tough, unpleasant, and relentless interrogator of the first act, he transforms himself into the frightened, eager to please, somewhat conceited and competitive man he is in the second, when the roles change and he turns into the victim of a tyrant, also played to perfection by Carme Elías, who is at times playful and affectionate, other times inflexible and insensitive.

An Interpretive Reading
By María Martín - translated by Ollie and Rio
Diario Abierto
14 November 2011




Here is Elias, one of the great actresses of our stage; I was so close to her this time that, yet again, I was left astounded. The well-known film actor Viggo Mortensen does a magnificent piece of work, which starts from the moment he pretends to be the psychologist. He has a warm voice and a wealth of technique; he takes advantage of his Argentinian speech, especially in this false character, just as he does in the later ones.

Hatred and Forgiveness
By Enrique Centeno - translated by Ollie and Rio
Enrique Centeno Teatro Critica
9 November 2011




The fact is that Mortensen on film is very good; it's his thing. But let's not kid ourselves...the theatre is another world. It's very difficult. I think that I went because I'd already seen almost all the other shows on right now. But the man holds his own quite well. His propensity for raising his hand as if he were going to thrust a sword at someone, Aragorn style, makes me a little nervous, but otherwise, he does an excellent job.

Where I said Viggo (Mortensen), I say Diego (Alatriste)
By Juan Luis Sánchez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Decine21.com
25 November 2011




If Viggo Mortensen seems much more convincing, it´s because, to begin with, he manages to surf over the rhetorical encrustations in the text. It cannot be easy to say naturally things like "When they´ve extracted my true face from my most hidden interior." In his actor´s profile - what a novelty - an extreme sensuality, a latent danger and an intense purity coexist. No actor likes to be compared to others, but he makes me think of a cross between the power of the young Kirk Douglas (chin included) and the innocence of Woody Harrelson or John Savage. There´s a great sobriety in his work, although he, too, overuses gestures to express what he feels. For example, the tendency to hunch to show his fragility and the weight he is carrying looks affected and detracts from the power and the mystery.

You and I make four
By Marcos Ordóñez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
7 November 2011




This mirada oblicua* challenge, undertaken "poetically" at the Matadero del Español, was complicated by the difficulty of the text, a "flowering hell" halfway between a bolerazo** and Sartre, and by the vicissitudes suffered by the play since it was announced that it would open back in 2009, and which kept being postponed by various problems.

The actress who initially was going to star in it, Ariadna Gil, sitting between the author and the film director Agustín Díaz-Yanes, has been a privileged witness to "the tour de force" performance offered by Elías and Mortensen, the New Yorker raised in Buenos Aires, who occasionally failed to find "le mot juste."

The Aragorn of Lord of the Rings and Capitán Alatriste has managed to solve the omissions, we don't know if as a result of bilingualism or his own memory, with such stage presence, especially after the second scene, that it made it impossible to believe that 23 years have already passed since he set foot in a theatre.

Mortensen and Elías open in the Spanish "Purgatorio" to public acclaim
By Concha Barrigós - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
EFE
4 November 2011



As always, you will find all previous Quotables here in our Webpages.






© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Teatro Español.

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Viggo and Carme Elías on Radio


Source: RTVE.
Found By: Dom
Categories: Purgatorio
Many thanks to Dom for finding this podcast from RTVE:
Quote:

En días como hoy - Viggo Mortensen y Carme Elías, en el 'purgatorio'

Rehearsals - October 2011
Rehearsals - October 2011
Image Andrés de Gabriel.
© Teatro Español.

Viggo Mortensen y Carme Elías protagonizan el drama teatral Purgatorio, del autor argentino-estadounidense Ariel Dorfman, que se representa estos días en el Matadero del Español de Madrid. Los propios actores nos hablan de la obra, en la que se reflexiona sobre el perdón (24/11/11).








© Corporación de Radio y Televisión Española 2011. Images © Teatro Español.


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Last edited: 23 June 2018 13:50:04