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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

This week has been Hidalgo Week – all these lovely photos of Viggo and TJ posted by Elizabeth remind us that Viggo just looked terrific in this film, despite being mostly upstaged by a horse with a big personality. Hidalgo is an old-fashioned easy-viewing film with a heart and a message about personal challenge, endurance and tolerance which, really, should have done much better at the box-office. As one member of the preview audience said, 'What's not to like about a forty-foot tall Viggo Mortensen?'.





There's a great deal to like about "Hidalgo," Disney's horse adventure film set in 1890. Besides an exciting story beautifully shot, there's the charming Viggo Mortensen, the inimitable Omar Sharif and Hidalgo himself, one of the most engaging animal characters outside a Disney cartoon.

And did I mention Viggo Mortensen?

Finding the History in "Hidalgo's" tall tale
By Cathy Schultz, Ph.D.
2004




"I found out a while back that I'm related to Buffalo Bill - distantly, on my mother's mother's side of the family," he says. "It's true: I went to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, and saw the records that prove the connection." Mortensen finds J.K. Simmons' performance as Buffalo Bill "terrific" - and it gave him an interesting opportunity to play in scenes with a distant relative.

Viggo Mortensen: The Straight-Shooting Star of the New Western
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys & Indians
April 2004




'I saw this picture with Diane Lane called A Walk on the Moon. And there was something about his performance in that film that told me that this guy could be Frank Hopkins. I hadn't seen the first Lord of the Rings before we cast him, but I figured anybody that could sell blouses to Diane Lane out of a truck could do anything.'

Joe Johnston
Staci Layne Wilson
American Western Magazine
March 2004




'It was one of those things that, once it's done, no matter how much you try, you can't recast it in your mind. He really became the character. People say that all the time, but with Viggo, it's really true. And all that stuff they say about him - "No-Ego Viggo,' "he's not a star, he's an actor,' - that is so true. He's such a class act.'

John Fusco
Viggo, Ego and Hidalgo
By Brett Buckalew
FilmStew.com, 2004




Viggo Mortensen is not about the words. He's about being... present. .......
......Mortensen's an actor I'm content just to watch: Those riven cheeks, taut against blade-sharp cheekbones, features that gift golden hour. He quietly inhabits the role of Frank Hopkins....

Ray Pride
Movie City News
4 March 2004




'Viggo Mortensen was an absolute joy to work with. He slept on the roof of his trailer with his saddle and bedroll. We had to constantly keep him late and call for him early and he never complained. He came with no entourage and drove himself to location. When his stunt man fell off the horse and jammed his elbow, Viggo did the stunt himself, riding bareback at full speed.'

Joe Johnston
Joe Johnston Sketchbook
Oct 2014




There's a part of the body that we weren't aware of called the 'nacho'. In other words, it's sort of right in the middle, it's not your, uh, you know, up front and it's not your...and that got pretty sore. We got a nacho pad, but it was a little too late.

Viggo Mortensen on riding bareback
'King' Star Returns To The Screen, Riding High
by Todd Camp
Star Telegram
6 March 2004




Is it true that you and your British co-star, Zuleikha Robinson, could have been killed while shooting Hidalgo?


That was scary! We were both riding this horse, and it just took off and headed for this really high wall. I knew that there were trucks and equipment on the other side, and two huge storage jars on top. I was sitting behind Zuleikha, just hanging on. Somehow we stayed on, but Zuleikha lost the reins and I jumped off and grabbed them, and miraculously no one - not even the horse - got hurt. We could easily have been killed. Zuleikha was giggling - I think the shock hit her later. It wasn't caught on camera, but it would have looked like a great special effect. It was unbelievable!

Our Kiss Was Just a kiss
By John Millar
Hot Stars
27 March 2004




"He wanted to eat a real locust," Johnston says. "The locust he eats is made out of sugar. He said, 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' "

Joe Johnston on filming Hidalgo
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post
2004




"It's based on a real person and a real horse," Mortensen says. "But we take some liberties, for a good reason. Myth-making is a way of dreaming out loud or dreaming in public. . . "

Viggo Mortensen
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post
2004




'A couple days ago, there was this hail. And everybody's just sitting there, kind of setting up the scene with clothing from 1890 and a herd of close to a thousand horses. And the waiting is almost like a ritual, like preparation for a religious moment where something might happen. You have words for the ceremony, the vestments, and all the elements and you're hoping that something good happens. So it's still interesting, the group getting together and doing it.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
by Scott Thill
Morphizm
2002




'It is good to have a movie that's old-fashioned and treats cowboys with respect. But all that can get lost when you get the 'Oh, I heard it's not true' comments. I can't believe that I had to spend half my time on the press tours dealing with that. My job became primarily to defend the movie's right to exist! It's a movie based on a true event, not a documentary. And it is a hell of a ride. That ought to be good enough - is for most movies - few of which can hold a candle to Hidalgo.'

Viggo Mortensen on the Frank Hopkins controversy
A Visit With Viggo
By Marianne Love,
Sandpoint Magazine
2004




'This is really very subversive coming out of Hollywood,' says Mortensen, pointing out how rare it is to see an active effort made to fairly portray Arab culture in mainstream films. 'We made a movie that's entertaining, it moves along, it's beautiful, it looks right, it's well cast - yet it contains so many more things in it, and it's done in a subtle way.'

Viggo Mortensen
Hidalgo: A Filmmaking Journey to the Middle East
By Zaki Hasan
Q-NEWS Magazine
2004




It takes a thoroughbred star like Mortensen to make the bond between man and horses believable, and to keep Hidalgo from straying too far into fields of corn.

From hobbits to horses
Jennie Punter
The Globe and Mail
5 March 2004




….as one woman at a preview screening said to her girlfriend looking up at the big screen: 'What's not to like about a forty-foot tall Viggo Mortensen?'

Cowboy and Mustang Meet Arabian Nights
John P. McCarthy
reeltalkreviews.com 2004



You will find all previous Quotables
here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Touchstone/Buena Vista Pictures.

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Viggo Mortensen-Mahershala Ali’s ‘Green Book’ Set for Awards-Season Release


Source: Variety.
Found By: Lindi
Categories: Green Book


Thanks to Lindi for the find.


Quote:

Universal has given road-trip drama “Green Book,” starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali, an awards-season release of Nov. 21.

001gbv.jpg
© Variety.
Production companies are Participant Media and DreamWorks Pictures. Peter Farrelly directs the movie, based on a true friendship that transcended race, class and the 1962 Mason-Dixon line.

Mortensen portrays an Italian-American bouncer with a seventh-grade education who is hired to drive a world-class pianist, played by Ali, on a concert tour from Manhattan to the Deep South. They must rely on the "Negro Motorist Green Book" to guide them to the few establishments that were then safe for blacks. Confronted with racism, danger — as well as unexpected humanity and humor — they are forced to set aside differences to survive and thrive.

Producers are Jim Burke, Charles B. Wessler and Farrelly along with Farrelly's fellow writers, Nick Vallelonga and Brian Currie. The drama is executive produced by Octavia Spencer, Participant's Jeff Skoll and Jonathan King, along with Cinetic Media's John Sloss and Steve Farneth, as well as Kwame Parker. Linda Cardellini co-stars.

© Variety. Images © Variety.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

When Kyle Lee of Box Office Prophets called Juaja 'one of the great westerns ever made, and possibly the most unusual' I realised I'd never thought of the film as a western, but all the elements of some of cinema's most iconic westerns are there – the wide open spaces in which people are almost lost, the taking of land from native peoples, the lurking threat of hidden violence, the search for someone missing in a hostile environment, the trying to hold on to the familiar when transplanted into another world. But Jauja is also so much more – a Quixotic journey through an environment where dreams and reality flow into each other and become something strange and wonderful. I think it's time to put the Bluray back in the player and see this magical and mysterious film again...





I've now seen Lisandro Alonso's captivating, unearthly Jauja four times, and I don't think I'm any closer to telling you what it's all about; the more I see it, the more puzzled I am. Alonso likes to traffic in the oblique — in the blank, mysterious spaces between the ostensible realities onscreen. That sounds like a lot of hooey, but watching Jauja, which is certainly one of the best films of the year, I never once doubted that I was in the hands of a master filmmaker.

Bilge Ebiri
Vulture
21 March 2015




The faint echo of The Searchers' plot should already make it clear that this is a deconstructed western (the relationship between man and his surroundings is where Alonso and Ford's westerns overlap). But it's one that, slightly reminiscent of Miguel Gomes' Tabu a couple of years before it, seems in dialogue with silent cinema, with its Academy (4:3 aspect ratio) format and rounded corners, as well as Viggo Mortensen's brilliant but largely wordless performance...

CineScope Blog
21 December 2014




Mustachioed, astride his horse in a cavalry uniform, sword in sheath and a splendid hat on his head, he is reminiscent of John Wayne in the early John Ford films.

Franck Nouchi - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Le Monde
19 May 2014




[Dinesen's] off the map even before he's robbed of his horse and most of his possessions; from the start he's destined to be lost in and swallowed up by nature, red in tooth and claw and utterly disinterested in the plight of insignificant humans... Like all of us, he's a rationalist who expects the world to work a certain way, and is helpless when it does not...

Matt Prigge
Metro (US)
20 March 2015




'Sometimes it was quite awkward and tiring to tramp around in that heavy greatcoat, wearing those slippery-soled riding boots, tripping over that saber. But I found that all of that helped me construct a sort of Danish Don Quixote, a man who has no idea how clumsy he seems in those landscapes, once he is off his horse.'

Mortensen plays a Danish engineer in Patagonia
by Pam Grady
San Francisco Chronicle
14 May 2015




'Dinesen is a surveyor and scientist, very northern European, very rational, everything has to have a logical explanation… And in that way my character is very determined – like if you are going to do a job, you might as well do it correctly, and in a timely fashion. And if someone says, 'Well, we're having tea at 4.30pm on Tuesday', you say, 'Well, I'll be there'. But it's Argentina, so whoever you were going to meet might turn up on Wednesday, or maybe he doesn't.'

Viggo Mortensen
Jauja: Interview with Viggo Mortensen
by Pamela Jahn
Electric Sheep
16 October 2014




"I find him an admirable character in a way," says the 56-year-old actor. "He's so obtuse, even when he doesn't know where he's going or why he's going or who he is, he still keeps moving forward. It's his stubbornness which I find both pathetic and endearing and, as I say, admirable."

Interview: Viggo Mortensen
Tobias Grey
The Financial Times
27 March 2015




As [Dinesen] progresses through this limbo-like landscape we watch him gradually transforming, Mortenson's weathered features becoming akin to the rocks surrounding him. As he emerges from within dark cracks, kneels to sip dripping streams or dozes underneath the stars, he melts into the environment, the boundaries of Dineson's self slowly eroding into the Patagonian dirt.

David James
wegotthiscovered.com
6 April 2015




The film is framed in a 4:3 aspect ratio and, most strikingly, sports rounded corners on its images. That relatively constricted vision (somehow the rounded corners highlight how quickly the world slips out of view as the camera pans) is offset by the incredible depth that Alonso and masterful cinematographer Timo Salminen produce in their shots. In the open desert, fading gradually from sharp clarity in the foreground to the soft blur of the horizon, the images seem to connote infinity...

Tomas Hachard
NPR
19 March 2015




...the landscapes remind us that 'Scope is not indispensable for evoking vastness: the tight parameters of these frames encourage us to imagine an infinity outside their edges. Rich colors suggest both dream and the artifice of Hollywood Westerns: deep blue clouds on a sky fading to yellow at its base resemble a painted backdrop; pools of golden firelight in a night shot are manifestly lit, as if on a studio set.

Jonathan Romney
Film Comment
19 March 2015




Sweating in layers of bulky long johns, and sporting a droopy, weeping mustache, Mortensen carries the film, his human grumbling and surprised, rageful violence conveying the sense of a nervous, basically average man caught on a journey into his own heart of darkness. Increasingly, as the other characters drop away, Mortensen has nothing to play against but nature and himself.

Mark Asch
Brooklyn Magazine
7 October 2014




'Dinesen is a man who seems to cope well with loneliness, but finally he becomes lost in it. He goes out in the desert trying to find his daughter, but in the end we realize that he is also tracking down his wife, his mother, all women and men in the world, his own childhood, his country and his death'

Viggo Mortensen
An Anarchist in the Closet
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Chrissie and Ollie
Pagina 12
27 October 201
3



We're as lost as Mortensen's protagonist, and we feel the weight of it acutely. The semi-flat steppes all look the same in every direction, and the minutes tick by, until eventually night falls and we lose our bearings completely.

Michael Atkinson
In These Times
18 March 2015




"There's a lot of entering and coming out of dreams, a lot of transitions in the movie… By the end of the story, you don't know if we're being dreamed, or if the characters are all dreamed, or if it's a dog's dream or the girl's dream. In a way, it doesn't matter. It's what it stimulates."

Interview with Actor Viggo Mortensen
Nick Chen
London Calling
7 April 2015




What kind of western ever gets us to ask these kinds of questions? One of the greatest, that's what kind. A true Hidden Gem.

Hidden Gems: Jauja
Kyle Lee
Box Office Prophets
31 May 2018



You will find all previous Quotables
here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © 4L Productions.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

It was lovely to see Viggo and David Cronenberg back together again at the Beaune International Thriller Film Festival, presenting two of their collaborations. It would be even lovelier to see them working together again! In the meantime, while we light our karma candles for a miracle, let's take a look back at that famous (infamous?) Cronenberg/Mortensen double act.





Scorsese and De Niro.
Fellini and Mastroianni.
John Ford and the Duke.
And now … David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen?

By Robert W. Butler, The Kansas City Star
16 Sept 2007




….exuding from their two films together is a sense of ideal alchemy, as if the sculptured physique and the Sphinx like face of the actor were made for the dry and morally complex thrillers of the Canadian film maker.

Sans Viggo, je n'aurai pas fait ce film
Les Inrockuptibles
Serge Kanaski and Julien Gester
12 November 2007




After two collaborations, they're as comfortable together as a pair of old shoes.

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient!" laughs Cronenberg. "And he's got a great chin."

David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




"I love Viggo - it really is a collaboration," Cronenberg says. "It's like a marriage. You might see two people together and not understand why they are, but they know. We know. We feel we can get the best out of each other."

Viggo's 'Promises'
By Sara Stewart
New York Post
26 Aug 2007




"I feel safe bringing things to David that weren't on the page, because he knows it's good for the movie to make people feel safe and like they are truly collaborators."

Cronenberg chuckled. "Yes, essentially I am very lazy, and I only hire people who will do all the work for me."

"And then he can take credit for it," Mortensen said, deadpan.

Mortensen, director discuss their noirish
Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 Setember 2007




So, do when you work with Viggo, is it like being in his skin the whole time?


Yes, that's true. I can tell you that one time the props guy came to me and said, "I'm going to ask you about this because you are Viggo, and Viggo is you—so it doesn't matter which of you I ask." He saw it.

David Cronenberg's existential promises
By Jennifer Merin, New York Press
14 Sept 2007




We really trust each other's sensibility. I did talk to a director once who said, "You know this guy Viggo you worked with? I sent a script to him, and he sent me notes!" I said, "Yeah? Well, were they good notes?" He looked at me like I was crazy.

'Dangerous Method' helmer talks working with Pattinson, Giamatti on 'Cosmopolis'
By Christy Grosz
Variety
13 December 2011




How did they work to create Mr. Mortensen's Nikolai, covered in tattoos and minimalist of motion?


"I just followed orders," deadpans Mr. Mortensen, 48. "And I just told him to do whatever he wanted," says Mr. Cronenberg, 64.

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




When I read interviews about History of Violence, the interviews really emphasized the degree to which you two collaborate. Tell me, how do you two work together?

DC:
It's a total lie. I do everything, Viggo does nothing. I do all the work. But he pays me to say that he does a lot of stuff.

VM: Also to say that I'm thoughtful and considerate.

Talking Eastern Promises with David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen
By Sara Maria Vizcarrondo
Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007




"In the movie," said Cronenberg, "Viggo was wearing Armani. We don't allow him on the street like that, because he can't carry off the class when he's being himself."

Mortensen, director discuss their noirish
Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 September 2007




David Cronenberg said that you and Freud both had a mischievous sense of humor.


He said that? That's nice. I see that in him too.

Viggo Mortensen
How Viggo Mortensen Got Inside Sigmund Freud's Head
By Rachel Dodes
The Wall Street Journal: Speakeasy
18 November 2011




What was it that got you interested in A Dangerous Method? Was it mostly working again with Cronenberg, or the psychological theme? Or both?


Firstly, working with David Cronenberg again. Secondly, the bait that David threw my way, in the form of an elaborate system of undergarments that Sigmund Freud was reputed to have employed on some of his summer excursions deep into the Alps. They included an elaborate system of miniaturised pulleys and wires that assisted in muscular stimulation for the steeper climbs. I was allowed to wear these undergarments in all scenes whether I was climbing or not.

Viggo Mortensen
Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




"I think my cast has great need of psychoanalysis, which is why I cast them actually, to introduce them gently to the idea that they needed help, a lot of help….And you can see they are much better people. Before they were messes. When I found them, they were neurotics, hopeless," Cronenberg said to great laughter.

Mortensen played along. "Now we dress ourselves," he retorted.

Venice Film Festival Press Conference
Cronenberg 'cures' cast in Freud-Jung drama
Rssbroadcast.com
2 September 2011




"I just go back to work with David and he fills up all my neuroses…"

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Press Conference Diaries: It's game on for the stars of A Dangerous Method
Ben Kaplan
National Post
10 September 2011




DC:
As I look at his nose, it appears much more Freudian than it used to.

VM: It's getting bigger, isn't it?

DC: Yeah, it is.

Cronenberg and Mortensen - Dangerous Minds
Shortlist.com
10 February 2012




Would you say you enjoy a similar intellectual relationship as Freud and Jung have on that epic first 13-hour date-slash-conversation?

Mortensen: We can have a conversation about baseball statistics as readily as we could have about psychoanalysis.

Cronenberg:
We are readers, and we do get excited when we say, "Oh, I read that same book!" and things like that, so there is that intellectual connection.

Mortensen:
I think one of the things about you that I most like, other than just the exchanges we have intellectually and just the silly jokes we sometimes enjoy, is the fact that, each time you're making a movie, you get as excited as I do or more so about the subject. . . . You have the eternal beginner attitude. Which I think is a great thing to have for an actor, for a director, anybody.
If you enjoy what you're doing, no matter how serious the subject matter, I think you feel that when you watch the movie. I think you watch this movie — and I'm subjective because I'm in it — but I think you can see we had a good time making it.

David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen talk about 'A Dangerous Method'
By Ann Hornaday
Washington Post
12 December 2011




VM: Well, is there anything else? It's onerous to talk to me, I know.

DC: It's torment. I actually had to take some codeine pills before we
started.

A Conversation Between David Cronenberg And Viggo Mortensen: The Interview
Transcribed by Patches
28 Sept 2007



You will find all previous Quotables
here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Hanway/Lago.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

I watched Appaloosa again recently and kept thinking that while I regret that there was never an Eastern Promises 2, I regret even more that Cole and Hitch never rode out together again for the last two of the Appaloosa books that I enjoyed reading so much. Viggo makes one heck of a cowboy. As one critic said recently, nobody moseys like Viggo Mortensen. Heck, he's even related to Buffalo Bill...




"I found out a while back that I'm related to Buffalo Bill - distantly, on my mother's mother's side of the family," he says. "It's true: I went to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, and saw the records that prove the connection." Mortensen finds J.K. Simmons' performance as Buffalo Bill "terrific" - and it gave him an interesting opportunity to play in scenes with a distant relative.

Viggo Mortensen: The Straight-Shooting Star of the New Western
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys & Indians
April 2004




Indeed Mortensen, one of the few Danes who can get away with a cowboy hat (in Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III and Hidalgo), looks so much like a man from the Golden West, it's a wonder he isn't attached to remakes of everything from High Noon to Carry On Cowboy.

A History of Violence is David Cronenberg's Western
Kim Newman
Empire Magazine
March 2006




'The cowboy 'ethic' has as much in common ideally with the Medieval Knight or Lakota warrior or Samurai warrior in that you can be an individual, be independent minded and allow other people to have their individual experience too! It can be that way.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004




When there's action to be had, Mortensen looks like a real pro. He's got the cowboy drawl down pat; shoots a Colt .45 with confidence; delivers sharp one-liners like a kinder, gentler Clint Eastwood; and has a great seat on a horse. Even when the movie gets a little slow--and it does, a 3000-mile desert race will do that to a movie--Mortensen's onscreen appeal saves the day.

Hidalgo
Leigh Johnson
Hollywood.com




It's not as if we haven't seen movies like "Hidalgo" before -- the cowboy, the horse, the hat -- and yet there's something fresh about it all the same. Part of it comes from Viggo Mortensen, an actor who has the measured pace and steady gaze of a Cooper or a Stewart.

Wild West to wild Mideast
Mortensen saddles up as former cowboy racing across desert
Mick LaSalle
Chronicle, 5 March 2004




While [Hidalgo] can waver from itself, Mortensen is steadfast like a throw back to the old school smoldering actors that paraded about the prairies, years ago; sexy and very iconic American cowboy.

Hidalgo review
Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review
2004




Not only did Rex Peterson serve as trainer, but also adviser to Mortensen on cowboy attitudes - to the point that a joke on the set called Viggo "Rex, Jr".

Hidalgo - Production Notes
Touchstone Pictures
2004




Viggo Mortensen follows a classic cowboy code in the Western "Appaloosa": Speak softly and carry a big honkin' gun.

Mortensen Packs a Big Gun
By David Germain
Associated Press
17 September 2008




Are there two more stronger, silenter types in modern movies than Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen? Each of these actors are a throw back to the days when cowboy stars were manly men who mean what they say and only say what they mean and nothing else.

Richard Crouse
CTV.ca
6 September 2008




"There are film buffs and story buffs who like the apparent simplicity [of a Western]. Although in a movie like this you can see that, yes, there is silence and there's an easy pace at times punctuated by dramatic tension, but in that silence, if it is well acted, and it is a good Western, which I think this is, then that silence is full of complicated things and a lot of subtext."

Viggo Mortensen Talks 'Appaloosa'
Premier Magazine
By Karl Rozemeyer
19 September 2008




...Holding one's body still in front of a movie camera while also giving the sense of a mind in motion is a specialized art, one with few masters. Paul Newman comes to mind, notably in his later career, as does Robert Duvall, a perennial movie cowboy who will surely wish that Appaloosa had come his way. And now, it would seem, there is Mortensen, who steals this film by doing nothing much more than lean against doorways and bar counters. Like Harris, Mortensen is a great listener, and good listeners—in life and in movies—barely move. That quality is just right for the role of Hitch, whose life hangs on Cole's next word and slightest gesture. It's an old truth, and not just about westerns: When the talking stops, the dying begins.

Chuck Wilson
Village Voice
17 September 2008




Mortensen said he was hooked by the dynamics between the two men. They love each other, said Harris, even if they might never say those exact words. It's a deep, complex friendship, though don't expect it to unravel like the one between the cowboys in Brokeback Mountain.

Said Mortensen: "They cut those scenes."

Appaloosa: TIFF press conference diaries
by Mark Medley
National Post
September 05, 2008




Mortensen comes off best. Not only does he seem like a genuine artifact of the late 19th Century, his plain-spoken charisma is well-suited to the western genre. ….But with or without that fantastic mustache, Mortensen should certainly do another western, soon. Preferably he should do one with a real sense of danger to go along with all the neat, tidy, highfalutin' honor and decency.

Michael Phillips
Chicago Tribune
2 October 2008




You will find all previous Quotables
here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.


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Last edited: 14 November 2018 09:47:41