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Quotable Christmas Quiz - The Answers


Found By: Iolanthe

Here are the answers to last week's Quotable Quiz, I hope you had a lot of fun quessing them! How many did you manage to get?





Who said?

"He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Answer: Matt Ross (Captain Fantastic)


"I was terrified during improvisation that he might ask me something about Nietzsche, like, 'What do you think about the Ubermensch?' The night before he arrived, I spent hours Wikipedia-ing Jean-Paul Sartre and others just in case he threw me a curveball."

Answer: Sam Riley (On the Road)


"Come on, we've all been Viggo-tized before."

Answer: Michael K Williams (The Road)


"I'm really honoured and privileged to introduce to you a man of conviction, of compassion, intelligence, artistic integrity, a great actor and a fine citizen of the world, a man I'm proud to call my friend : Viggo Mortensen."

Answer: Ed Harris introducing Viggo at the Deauville film Festival


"He was the chocolate crack dealer."

Answer: Renée Zellweger (Appaloosa)


"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."

Answer: David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises)



"He is so brilliant he makes me sick."

Answer: Elijah Wood (LOTR)




What's the missing word?


Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like Santa Claus to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Answer: Santa Claus


"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Answer: vertigo


Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Answer: whiskers



...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker 'Blouse Man' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film…

Answer: Blouse Man


Viggo Mortensen, as far as I'm concerned, could do a Rubix Cube on screen for two hours and I'd still want to watch him, the guy is that good.

Answer: Rubix cube


Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The Soviet Bloc."

Answer: Soviet Bloc


Which Movie?


"Next day my agent calls me and said, 'He loves you. You got a part.' 'Oh really? What's the part?' He goes, 'I don't know exactly, but it's a part. You're in the movie,'" Mortensen said….

…."And of course the movie comes out the next fall or whatever, and I told my family, 'Friday.' And I'm not in it. I'm not in the credit, nothing," Mortensen laughed.

Answer: Purple Rose of Cairo


"It was a crew of about ten people walking over the rocks. We were all tired but we had a lot of fun. By nightfall, since we were 150 km from the internet and telephones, we made a little fire, an asado, we talked... It was a family experience."

Answer: Jauja



…during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies.

Answer: Carlito's Way



'I was supposed to be handing him tools and he'd say 'Hand me a whatever,' and I didn't know what the hell he was talking about.'

Answer: Witness (building the barn with Harrison Ford)


"When you see the character sitting alone, he's like a monk. It's like you've given up things of this world for other purposes, to serve something bigger than you. It just happens to be something scary."

Answer: Eastern Promises


'My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth.'

Answer: Crimson Tide



What/who is it?

"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge."

Answer: Eight-gauge shotgun in Appaloosa


…honestly folks, how can anyone… NOT want to build a hut in it?? I mean, even just for the summertimes, you know?

Answer: Viggo's beard



"It was like a compulsive thing after a while," the actor explains. "I felt like it was unlucky not to have it, so I would sneak it in. It became this game to see if I could keep getting away with it." He did--until the last day of shooting, when his finnish friend fell out...on camera. Says Mortensen, with just a touch of mischievous pride: "David saw it and was appalled."

Answer: Plastic trout (while filming A History of Violence)


He wasn't afraid or worried about the lights, camera, or anything. He was totally calm. You know that comic strip Andy Capp? That guy with his hat? I just think of him like that. He would just be there like, 'Whatever.''

Answer: TJ ('Hidalgo')


"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."

Answer: Viggo's LOTR action figure



And finally, who did Viggo give his San Lorenzo socks to?

In the last minutes of the program, I took off my boots to give him the San Lorenzo socks I was wearing and I think I told him that he'd have to look for the shorts himself. He also accepted that gift with a lot of dignity and in an extremely generous spirit. If he thought that I was an idiotic Cuervo, he didn't say so.

Answer: Maradona



You will find all previous Quotables
here.



© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © New Line Cinema.

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Quotable Christmas Quiz


Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Media Quotable Viggo



It's nearly Christmas so it must be time for the annual Quotable Quiz. As usual, this is just for fun! Keep the answers to yourself and I will print them next weekend so you can see how you've done. Some are easy but there are a few very tricksy ones there! Have a wonderful Christmas, all of you.




[SIZE=1]© New Line Cinema[/SIZE]


Who said…

"He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."



"I was terrified during improvisation that he might ask me something about Nietzsche, like, 'What do you think about the Ubermensch?' The night before he arrived, I spent hours Wikipedia-ing Jean-Paul Sartre and others just in case he threw me a curveball."



"Come on, we've all been Viggo-tized before."


"I'm really honoured and privileged to introduce to you a man of conviction, of compassion, intelligence, artistic integrity, a great actor and a fine citizen of the world, a man I'm proud to call my friend : Viggo Mortensen."



"He was the chocolate crack dealer."



"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."



"He is so brilliant he makes me sick."



What's the missing word?

Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like ***** ***** to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
20 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita




"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little *******," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016



Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful ********.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker '****** ***' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film…

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015




Viggo Mortensen, as far as I'm concerned, could do a ***** **** on screen for two hours and I'd still want to watch him, the guy is that good.

Metal Gear Solid Movie: Eight Actors Who Could Play Solid Snake
By Liam Hoofe
Flickering Myth
15 September 2017




Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The ****** ****."

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008



Which Movie is this?

"Next day my agent calls me and said, 'He loves you. You got a part.' 'Oh really? What's the part?' He goes, 'I don't know exactly, but it's a part. You're in the movie,'" Mortensen said….

…."And of course the movie comes out the next fall or whatever, and I told my family, 'Friday.' And I'm not in it. I'm not in the credit, nothing," Mortensen laughed.



"It was a crew of about ten people walking over the rocks. We were all tired but we had a lot of fun. By nightfall, since we were 150 km from the internet and telephones, we made a little fire, an asado, we talked... It was a family experience."



'…during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies.'




'I was supposed to be handing him tools and he'd say 'Hand me a whatever,' and I didn't know what the hell he was talking about.'



"When you see the character sitting alone, he's like a monk. It's like you've given up things of this world for other purposes, to serve something bigger than you. It just happens to be something scary."



'My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth.'



What/who is it?

"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge."



…honestly folks, how can anyone… NOT want to build a hut in it?? I mean, even just for the summertimes, you know?



"It was like a compulsive thing after a while," the actor explains. "I felt like it was unlucky not to have it, so I would sneak it in. It became this game to see if I could keep getting away with it." He did--until the last day of shooting, when his finnish friend fell out...on camera. Says Mortensen, with just a touch of mischievous pride: "David saw it and was appalled."



'He wasn't afraid or worried about the lights, camera, or anything. He was totally calm. You know that comic strip Andy Capp? That guy with his hat? I just think of him like that. He would just be there like, 'Whatever.'''



"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."



And finally, who did Viggo give his San Lorenzo socks to?

"In the last minutes of the program, I took off my boots to give him the San Lorenzo socks I was wearing and I think I told him that he'd have to look for the shorts himself. He also accepted that gift with a lot of dignity and in an extremely generous spirit. If he thought that I was an idiotic Cuervo, he didn't say so."



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © New Line Cinema.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe


After my last Two Faces of January Quotable there was a comment that critics always end up saying that his latest performance is the best thing he's done in years. So – just to tease you – I've rounded a few of those up, along with a couple of outstanding comments from earlier roles because they just couldn't be left out. What do you think Viggo's best ever performance is? Or does he just get better and better with every role?






Captain Fantastic


...this is a thoughtful examination of the fragility of any idyll under pressure from the imperfect world outside. But all of it is anchored and, like the family itself, dominated by Mortensen's Ben, who's both the hero and the villain. Caring but dictatorial, idealistic but often blind, he's a fascinating figure and, in bringing him to life, Mortensen gives his best performance yet.

Helen O'Hara
Empire Magazine
18 August 2016



Loin Des Hommes

...filmmaker David Oelhoffen's more significant achievement is in the casting of a never-better Mortensen, who possesses the sort of face that conveys volumes in virtual silence and the similarly expressive French Algerian actor Kateb.

Michael Rechtshaffen
LA Times
1 May 2015



Two Faces of January


Soaking up the highlights of Ancient Greece, Chester MacFarland resembles a spick-and-span palace. In fact, as becomes apparent, he's a ruin. Every time he gets drunk another partition collapses; when he sobers up, the grand edifice dazzles again.

It's the best thing Mortensen has done in years.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
London Evening Standard
16 May 2014



A Dangerous Method


It's possible that in lusting after Mortensen all these years, we've taken his talent for granted. Of course, we really didn't know how talented he was until he started working with Cronenberg. This is the best thing Mortensen's ever done. His slow, paunchy, hairy Freud has a cavalier authority and a capacity for drollery. He's also seductively wise in a way that makes both Fassbender and Knightley, as very good as they are, also seem uncharacteristically callow. I don't know where Mortensen found this physical and psychological heaviness, this expressive inexpressiveness, but now isn't the time to start a diet.

Wesley Morris
Boston Globe
23 December 2011



Todos Tenemos Un Plan


If you, for some reason, want to watch Viggo Mortensen watching Viggo Mortensen take a bath, then, my friend, your luck is in – as the renowned star of The Lord of the Rings franchise turns in one of the finest performances of his career, taking on the role(s) of identical twins in Ana Piterbarg's intense, if somewhat unfulfilling drama Everybody Has a Plan.

Stefan Pape
Heyuguys.co.uk
28 May 2013



The Road

It's hard not to be drawn in by the sunken, haunted weariness of Mortensen's face, especially when he's doing some of the best quiet, understated work of a long career built on quiet, understated work. Mortensen's laconic strength has always well served the hero who knows how unlikely a happy ending is, and yet keeps pushing ahead.

Locke Peterseim
Redblog
Redbox.com
26 May 2010



Appaloosa

While many might not appreciate this slow and slightly revisionist western, I'm going to put it up there with "Open Range" and "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" as one of best. Go to see Ed Harris kick tail, but stay for one of Viggo Mortensen's best performances.

Coop Cooper
The Small Town Critic
1 October 2008



Good

An extremely powerful World War II drama about a man at a crossroads, forced to make almost impossible choices between friendship and survival. It's the best work Viggo Mortensen has done.

Jeffrey Lyons
NBC/Lyons and Bailes Reek Talk
October 2008



Eastern Promises

As Nikolai, Mortensen is nothing short of remarkable, completely disappearing into his heavily-tattooed character and speaking in both Russian and flawlessly accented English. Hardly a cardboard villain, Nikolai is easily the most compelling character in the movie. In spite of earlier scenes of furious — and chillingly callous — violence, he nevertheless gains some of the audience's sympathies as he compellingly presents his internal conflict with subtlety and nuance, often using only his eyes. It may very well be the best performance of his career thus far, topping even his recent work in another Cronenberg thriller, A History of Violence. Someone, nominate this man for an Oscar already!

Jason Turer
Cornell Daily Sun
14 Sept 2007



Alatriste


Viggo Mortensen carried the role of Diego Alatriste y Tenorio to perfection. Right down to small but highly effective ways of expressing an emotion, Mortensen's portrayal of this 17th century Spanish soldier-turned-mercenary is his best work to date topping even his stellar performance in the 2004 release of Hidalgo.

Egyptian Theatre Premiere of Captain Alatriste Glitters, Deserved Goya Best Director Award
by Kriss Perras Running Waters
Malibu Arts Review March 2007



A History of Violence

Hands down, this is the best performance that Viggo Mortensen has given in a film yet. He is just breath-taking in the film......Viggo's acting here reminds me of vintage Harrison Ford, before... whatever happened to him. Think WITNESS or maybe even THE FUGITIVE. He's just very very good. He's not an actor counting the motions for a scene, but his eyes are alive, you can see fear and desperation in his face as he acts, you also see a resoluteness to do what has to be done. It's kinda perfect.

Harry
Ain't it Cool News
28 September 2005



The Lord of the Rings


The king who returns in "The Return of the King" is Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), the Ranger originally known to the hobbits as Strider, but of the royal line dating back to the first war against Sauron, in which the One Ring was taken and lost. The character of Strider/Aragorn grows in stature as the books go along, from a stout-hearted vagabond to a great leader in battle, to (finally) the noble monarch born to rule wisely and well. Mortensen's performance follows that same arc; given the time and space by Jackson to build his character in all its nuance, he becomes Aragorn to the life.

ROTK
Jim Lane
Sacramento News and Review
December 2003



GI Jane


Doing his best to steal the film, however, is Mortensen, who is simply terrific as the Master Chief who brings everyone to the brink and uncharacteristically loses it when a mock prisoner interrogation with Jordan gets out of hand. This fine actor has been an arresting presence in numerous films in recent years, but he cuts such a strong profile here that he may finally have found his breakthrough role.

Todd McCarthy
Variety
7 August 1997



Carlito's Way

Viggo Mortensen (A History of Violence), in a small role, manages to steal a scene from Pacino without ever getting out of his chair.

Ken Dubois Ultimate Edition DVD Review
Reel.com
October 2005



The Indian Runner

Arquette is perfectly cast, her natural aura of gentle goodness and purity making what follows all the more horrific to watch. At Dorothy's admonishment- "Frank don't talk like that!" - Frank switches. If we weren't so caught up in the film itself, we would be in awe of Mortensen's skill here. His acting is breathtaking, as he builds from disappointment through hurt to a mean sarcasm - "Did I say the wrong thing?" that turns quickly to simmering anger - "Is it that we're strangers? We're not strangers". He is genuinely frightening to watch, the whole scene feels as if we are onlookers at a real-life domestic dispute. By the time Dorothy tells him "I don't know what you're talking about. Let's eat", he is ready to explode.

Why I love… Viggo Mortensen's Frank in The Indian Runner
Rowan Righelato
The Guardian
27 September 2013



You will find all previous Quotables
here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Wilson Webb/Bleecker Street.

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Ed Harris has some interesting comments on Appaloosa


Source: Cowboys & Indians.
Found By: Iolanthe
Iolanthe brings us this little snipper from a nice interview with Ed Harris from Cowboys and Indians .
Quote:
appweb3.jpg
© New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.
C&I: Ten years ago you made Appaloosa, an adaptation of the first in the Cole and Hitch series of western novels by the acclaimed novelist Robert B. Parker. The movie has your imprint all over it, as star [playing Virgil Cole opposite Viggo Mortensen's Everett Hitch], director, and co-writer with your friend Robert Knott. Tell us a bit about the experience of making it.

Harris: I guess it was 10 years ago. Well, I think that Appaloosa is a really good story that we made in a more classical vein than most westerns are filmed today. It felt genuine to me from the horse tack, guns, and other weapons to the historic--style buildings and what was inside them, along with the other set designs and props. It was really fun doing it. We all paid such attention to detail, and all that attention really paid off.

This was the first book in the Cole and Hitch series. My daughter and I were doing a horseback riding trip in Ireland, and I brought the book along on the trip. I think I had just finished the third chapter and was so taken by the characters and story that I called my agent to see if it might be available to option.

C&I: New York Times film critic A.O. Scott had this to say about the film: "One important gunfight goes by so quickly and anti-climactically that even Everett remarks on how fast it was over. 'That's because the folks knew how to shoot,' Virgil says, offering an implicit defense of Mr. Harris's crafty and unassuming approach to filmmaking."

Harris:
There you go. I think my directing was unassuming, although I don't know how crafty it was. But it sure was fun making the movie.

C&I: Appaloosa has also been called a violent period western, as Virgil and Everett make their living as gunmen for hire. But, on another level, it is a relationship movie about the two characters.

Harris:
My buddy and bestselling writer Robert Knott and I co-wrote the screenplay, and I really felt that we captured the relationship that Parker put on the page between those two cowboys. I gave the book to Viggo at the Toronto [International] Film Festival in 2005 when we were there for A History of Violence. There was no one else I really wanted to do the film with, and I certainly never considered anyone else. I just thought he and I would make a strong partnership on screen.

I think Cole and Everett would be a great twosome to have on a well-made television series. We would have done a sequel to Appaloosa, but Viggo didn't want to play to same character twice. He's really a great and creative guy and I'd love to work with him again. He can talk all day long. ... You won't get that from me. ...

Parker wrote four books in the series, and then Robert took over after he passed away and wrote another four or five. I'm really proud of Robert; he's my best buddy who works his butt off to keep the series going.

© Cowboys & Indians. Images © New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.

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Radio Interview from February


Source: Radio8Ball.
Found By: Chrissie
Not quite news, but here is a little snippet from Radio8Ball that passed us by during the Captain Fantastic promotions - a radio interview with Viggo and singer-songwriter Veda Hille.

Thanks to Chrissie for the heads up!
Quote:
viggosw018.jpg
© radio8ball.
From ANDRAS JONES: Welcome to the first of a set of 8 from the Radio8Vault. Some of these will complete conversations from our first 8 episodes and some will provide context for the material we'll be covering in the next 8. Today's was recorded on February 22, 2017 with singer-songwriter VEDA HILLE. Back then I was trying to produce R8B as a web series in my apartment in Olympia. I'd been trying to get Viggo on the show for years. We worked together back in the late 80's on a film called "Tripwire". After the shoot I introduced him to my agents, one of whom is still his manager. We all re-connected when "Captain Fantastic" premiered at the Seattle International Film Festival, which led to this. Listen close. You'll hear the birds in the background.
Andras Jones, Lynn Rawlins & Viggo Mortensen at The Seattle International Film Festival 2017

© Radio8Ball. Images © Andras Jones/Radio8Ball.


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Last edited: 14 January 2018 14:24:20