Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Media Quotable Viggo

I loved Ariel Dorfman's comment this week about Viggo querying his text in Purgatorio. It's so very Viggo isn't it? That depth of knowledge, his constant attention to detail, his desire to ensure that whatever he appears in is the best it can possibly be. Once he's committed he is a power house of information and ideas, from badgering Cronenberg about Freud's cigars to persuading Perez-Reverte that Alatriste came from Leon. It's a dedication that has been greatly admired and drawn on by fellow creatives over the years.





During a production of his play Purgatorio, Dorfman was challenged by the actor Viggo Mortensen, who was insistent about a line of dialogue: "This doesn't make sense!" he kept repeating. "He wouldn't let me go," Dorfman says. And Mortensen was right. The actor was able to teach Dorfman something about his own play. "You learn, if there's no aggression in an artist exchange." If an actor or editor is generous and open, the writer can gain something.

Ariel Dorfman: 'Not to belong anywhere, to be displaced, is not a bad thing for a writer'
By Andrew Madigan
The Guardian
9 May 2018




'We really trust each other's sensibility. I did talk to a director once who said, "You know this guy Viggo you worked with? I sent a script to him, and he sent me notes!" I said, "Yeah? Well, were they good notes?" He looked at me like I was crazy.'

David Cronenberg
'Dangerous Method' helmer talks working with Pattinson, Giamatti on 'Cosmopolis'
By Christy Grosz
Variety
13 December 2011




"Viggo was a central collaborator in terms of his ideas about the script. He had wonderful and insightful ideas about everything, including adding his own original music to the film. For me, he exemplifies a very high level of artistry and integrity. That is one of the things that made him my first choice to play Ben, Physically and temperamentally, he was absolutely right."

Director Matt Ross
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




'He comes to the role with such fierce dedication and so many ideas. We invited him into the editing room later in the process and he had a very complete memory of what he had done and what had been shot and asked us very challenging questions about why we had chosen one approach over the other. He was a very good extra eye in the editing room and I was glad we were able to spend some time with him there.'

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




'He thinks 24 hours a day about the film; he is insatiable when thinking ideas, dialogues, suggestions for enhancing the images, the work of the group in general, and with the other professional and nonprofessional actors who acted with him in different scenes from the movie. I was very lucky that he liked the story.'

Lisandro Alonso
Nueva voz: Lisandro Alonso y el cine de los hombres solos
El Deber
28 December 2013




'…this is a thing I knew about Viggo -- once he commits, he's committed. He's incredibly loyal to the project, to the character, to the movie. Once he committed there was never any going back; it was full on, "Let's do research of the Viggo kind" -- which is very deep, to say the least. He'd send 25 emails of Freud's cigars, you know, with pictures going back and forth: "What kind were they?" "How many did he smoke a day?" "What shape were they?" "What strength?" "Would he have ever varied the kind during the course of the day, or did he always smoke the same kind?" "Could he afford them?" "Were they expensive?" You know, it went on and on and on.'

David Cronenberg Discusses His Dangerous Method
by Luke Goodsell
Rotten Tomatoes
23 November 2011




"You would think, 'Of course Cronenberg was drawn in by the tattooing,' but it was almost not there," says the director. "In the original script, tattooing was just alluded to. Viggo discovered a set of books called Russian Criminal Tattoo and a doc called Mark of Cain, which was about the tattooing subculture in Russian prisons, and when I saw them my mind was blown completely."

Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




"Viggo's one-man research engine helped mould David's thinking about the script, and fed into the script in a great way. It informed our whole process."

Paul Webster
Eastern Promises Production Notes
20 August 2007
Source: Focus Features




'He called me once to talk about certain aspects of his character and history, such as Alatriste's birthplace. I had never detailed it in any of the five novels published up until now, but Viggo was interested in the fact. 'In Old Castile,' I responded. 'Could it be Leon?' he asked after thinking about it for a while. 'It could,' I responded. So then he went to Leon and walked about covering it inch by inch, remaining in each town, in every bar, talking with whoever happened to be in front of him. In effect, he finally concluded that Alatriste was Leonese. And he said it with such conviction that even I didn't question or argue the point.'

Arturo Pérez Reverte: Alatriste
El Semanal, July 2005-08-04
Translated by Elessars Quee
n



'I went to the Prado Museum, which I had visited many times, but now I saw the paintings in a different light, searching for the character, so I'd call Tano (the director) at 2 am and tell him, "listen, I found this painting by Góngora". Viggo makes a face and changes his voice to imitate Díaz Yanes: 'Okay, let me explain it to you. You're an idiot.' But nothing. I saw the characters in those painting."'

Viggo Mortensen: Alatriste
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




'I worked with him 12 years ago on horses, we rode together down by the Mexico border in Arizona while working on Young Guns 2. He played a small role [in which] he rides along with Billy Peterson, who played Pat Garret. He plays John W. Poe, a historical bounty hunter who pursued Billy the Kid. We had all these young actors playing historical figures and I had all this research available. But it was Viggo who had this tiny little role, who just kept coming to me and saying [things like], 'You know, I was doing some research and copper was really big at that time and they were making copper rifle scopes. I think that Poe would've made his own scope, you know, as a bounty hunter to personalize his tool of the trade.' Then he would come back and say, 'What was Poe's relationship with John Chisum? Did he have any cattle interests...?' So when I heard that he was interested in the role [of Hopkins] I anticipated that kind of commitment to research and sure enough, days after he was cast he called me and said, 'Who do you know on Pine Ridge reservation and can I go there?' Within a week he was out with these Lakota horsemen and riding with them, and on a long ride to Wounded Knee."'

John Fusco
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




When Mr. Jackson telephoned Mr. Mortensen, whose work he admired, the conversation did not seem to go well.

"Knowing Viggo now, his conversation was incredibly Viggo-like, but at the time it was incredibly off-putting," Mr. Jackson said. "He was asking about the character: how long has he lived with the elves? Where are his parents? If I didn't know the answer, I'd make it up. There would be this terrible long silence, and I didn't know if the phone had disconnected or not, and then he'd ask another question and there would be 30 more seconds of silence."

"At the very end of the call, I thought it had gone very badly, that he wasn't going to do the role," Mr. Jackson continued. "I was thinking, `What are we going to do now?' as I was waiting for the call to end, and then there was another long silence and Viggo said, `I guess I'll see you on Tuesday.' "

Peter Jackson on offering him the part of Aragorn
The Man Who Would Just As Soon Not Be King
By Sarah Lyall
New York Times
2003




"Viggo commits himself to a project with the same intensity as the filmmakers - which is rare for an actor," the director says. "After the end of a long day's shooting, when all the other cast would be either in bed or in the bar, Fran Walsh and I would be home grappling with the script for the next week's shooting. At midnight, a nine-page handwritten memo would come rattling through the fax from Viggo, outlining his thoughts about that day's work and the next few days to come. He would suggest passages from the book we should look at. This wasn't an exception - over 15 months it became the rule. In the small hours, it was actually comforting to know there was somebody else out there grappling with the same nightmare that we were."

Peter Jackson
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




'He is absolutely dedicated to the process,' says Ridley Scott. 'He was constantly revisiting me with questions and notes and suggestions, none of which I ever got tired of.'

Ridley Scott on GI Jane
Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond
US Magazine #236, 1997




"…with Viggo you don't just get a violin, you get a whole symphony orchestra."

David Cronenberg
RT talks Eastern Promises
By Sara Schieron, Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007



You will find all previous Quotables
here.



© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Hanway/Lago.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Media Quotable Viggo

This week we are going to have a feast of philosophy. Things to ponder and live your life by from a man who really knows how to ponder and lives his life really well…





"…I think that having the courage to be oneself is the most difficult thing in the world. The most essential and also the most magnificent."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




"We may not know why we're here, or where we're going after we die, but if you're here, you might as well be here. And being here means paying attention, I think."

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008




'Don't ever be afraid to ask the question, "why?", or as most small children do, to repeat that question as many times as you receive an unsatisfactory answer. Inquiring minds are essential to a healthy society, and to making an individual art out of living.'

Viggo Mortensen
SLU Commencement Address
May 21, 2006




What keeps you awake at night?

Yesterday and tomorrow, but I eventually fall asleep because neither exists.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
by Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010




He understands why, in dire times, you'd be tempted to "set your house on fire and never answer the phone again, but it would be better to ask yourself: How can I be most useful to this world? Not that I'm some f****** genius."

Viggo Mortensen (free radical)
Twenty one reasons to dig Viggo Mortensen
by Allison Glock
GQ Magazine 2003




"I think five minutes can be an eternity if it's well used, you know. There are periods of time that are gems, but you don't have to go into a blizzard in South Dakota or into the rain forests of New Zealand or the middle of the Sahara. You can find that just walking down the street."

Viggo Mortensen
The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




"One of the best pieces of advice I ever got was from a horse master. He told me to go slow to go fast. I think that applies to everything in life. We live as though there aren't enough hours in the day but if we do each thing calmly and carefully we will get it done quicker and with much less stress."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




'When I'm awake, I dream of perfection. It's not about reaching it, I'm aware that it is not possible. My concern is to seek it, to try very hard to shoot the perfect movie, to have the perfect marriage, to paint the perfect painting – above all to know that it will never work out. What counts is the will, not the achievement of the goal.'

Viggo Mortensen
I Have A Dream
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by CoCo and Techadmin
Zeit magazine
23 July 2015




"For a long time now, I've been certain of one thing: there are more things that connect me to others than there are things that divide us. We should be able to all understand each other. I've proved it."

I wouldn't look the Alatristes of today in the eye
By Oskar L. Belategui, translated for V-W bu Margarita
Hoy Sociedad
3 September 2006




"Even though many people seem to be not interested in art or in things like nature or life itself, we must force ourselves to remember, we must force ourselves to be deep in life."

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




'Mother Nature is the first school. She makes you wise if you watch her. '

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




'I feel at home in many places, and with time, I learned that in life it is more important who you are, what you do and how you feel than where you are.'

Viggo Mortensen Under The Spotlight
Selecciones Magazine
March 2009
Translated for V-W by Graciela




It's the endlessly entertaining, often ridiculous, sometimes admirable, sometimes embarrassing attempts that some people make to find some meaning in their lives that make life worth living.

What I've learned – Viggo Mortensen
By Kal Fussman
Esquire
22 April 2015




"I think it was Robert Louis Stevenson who said this, it was about meandering through a career, or the arts in general, without seeming to have a deliberate plan. He said, 'To travel hopefully is better than to arrive, and the true success is in the labor.' That's a great line, 'To travel hopefully.' That's what I'd like to do."

Viggo Mortensen
The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003




What do you believe in above all else?

"In everything. I believe in everything! However, it makes my life so complicated" (laughs)

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
Elle Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




You will find all previous Quotables
here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Emily Berl/Getty Images.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe
Categories: Media Quotable Viggo

In the past Viggo has talked a lot about all he has learned from other actors – those he has seen on screen and those he worked with in his early career. And, as he continuously points out, he is still learning. But as an actor he also generously gives and many actors have said that they have learned a lot from him or that he has been a mentor to them. As he says in his own words in the last quote, acting is - for him - a 'team sport'.





Comments about Viggo:


"Viggo is such an amazing guy. He's the gentlest, kindest person you'll ever meet. All the 'family' members got along but I think the strongest bonds that were made were between the kids and Viggo. He would come on set every day with different books for all the kids to read. I ended up having about 10 books that I've never gotten around to reading. He really is a generous, amazingly kind man."

Nicholas Hamilton
Captain Fantastic and the Sundance Kid
By Matthew Lowe
Filmink.com
20 January 2015




"I think everybody finds Viggo to be a bit of a mentor because he's becoming a kind of—and certainly this is nothing that he would want—but I think he's becoming a kind of iconic figure in terms of how you should be an actor. Just your demeanor, your seriousness, but your sense of humor and the kind of research you do and your professionalism, and your loyalty to the project and to the people who are creating the project."

David Cronenberg
On the Analyst's Couch with David Cronenberg
Jenni Miller
GQ Magazine
21 November 2011




Bloom didn't skip a beat in saying fellow Lord of the Rings co-star Viggo Mortensen is the actor he's worked with who's had the most influence on his career....

"Viggo Mortensen had the biggest impact on me in terms of approach, dedication, intention, and artistic outlook and I'm nowhere close to how good he is as an artist and I wouldn't even put myself in the same category as an actor." said Bloom.

Orlando Bloom
Entertainment Weekly
10 October 2013




'Viggo came late to the project, but he brought a dedication and an understanding of the role that became an example, particularly to the younger cast members. You have to remember that this was Orlando Bloom's first movie. Not only was Viggo valuable in his performance, but he was valuable as a leader of the cast.'

Barrie Osborne
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan, Empire, December 2004




Who have you learnt the most from working with?

Viggo Mortensen, in terms of he way he approaches a scene, his commitment to the people he's working with and his follow-through in support of the film that he's made.

Karl Urban: I had 14 weeks of intense training to get fit for Dredd
By Andrew Williams
Metro
7 September 2012




"...he really reawakened in me a sense of the possibilities of what it can be as an actor enjoying a role."

Sean Astin
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today, 2001




'He's a very interesting guy. He writes poetry. He takes photographs. He's very artistically rich. I just tried to watch him and learn as much as I could.'

Michael Fassbender on meeting Viggo
Michael Fassbender Explores A Dangerous Method with Movie Fanatic
by Joel D Amos
Moviefanatic.com
25 November 2011




"Viggo is generous, he is constantly bringing small gifts. That must be a result of his education and the numerous trips he takes. And when you act with him in a scene, even when his part is done, he stays close to the camera in order to help you. We function very differently, especially in the way we channel our energy. He is always calm, and speaks softly. I have a more brutal side. I learned a lot from knowing him."

Vincent Cassel
Viggo Mortensen the Insatiable
Studio Magazine
By Sophie Benamon
November 2007



Viggo on other actors:

'I discovered [The Passion of Joan of Arc] when I was 20. I didn't know very much about movies, I wasn't even an actor: I wasn't yet measuring all of Dreyer's esthetic innovation and radicalism, but it still had a crazy effect on me. The story, the way it's told, but especially her, Falconetti: her modern way of acting, her immediacy. Whatever moment you're watching the film, she's there.'

Viggo talking about Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc
"It's women who made me want to be an actor."
By Clélia Cohen - translated by Donna Marie
Vanity Fair (France)
June 2014




'I would say there's two roles that I would have liked to play and that I came within a hair's breadth of playing. One was right in the beginning, Greystoke—to play Tarzan. The other was the Willem Dafoe part in Platoon. The thing is, I didn't have the experience to deal with the consequences of being in a big studio movie playing a lead. I wouldn't have kept learning. I've been lucky to learn by playing all kinds of roles and watching all kinds of really good cinematographers, actors, and directors for many years before people were even aware of me in terms of audience.'

Viggo Mortensen, King of The Road
By Michael Mechanic
MotherJones.com
23 November 2009




"The real trigger for me was the film that everyone was talking about when I was twenty: The Deer Hunter, particularly Meryl Streep. What an inspiration! All the actors in that movie are amazing, no doubt; but there's something about Meryl Streep in that movie that makes me identify with her. I don't know why, something mysterious that you can't put your finger on, but which haunts you deeply, and for a long time..."

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"I loved working with Al Pacino. He was unusually generous for someone in his position. He has a very open mind, and a very open heart."

Viggo Mortensen
Uncut
November 2007




Viggo talking about Omar Sharif:

"Not only was I working with this wonderful actor I knew best from Lawrence of Arabia - we were working in some of the same locations in Morocco where they shot parts of that movie 40 years ago. That was an amazing experience for me," Mortensen says. "I mean, to be working there with the man himself, Omar Sharif, was great just in terms of being a witness to film history.

"But it was even better to get to know that man as a human being. He's a very generous, extremely professional actor. It doesn't take more than a few minutes to tell that he's also a genuinely intelligent, well-read person. And he's got this aura about him that's beyond anything a lighting designer or a cameraman can do. He just has a certain gleam in his eye ... and that smile of his. He's so in the moment and so alive. He just radiates a love of life."

Mortensen wishes they'd had even more scenes together. "But I think the relationship between our two characters is a good one, a unique one. It shows how two very different cultures can connect."

Viggo talking about Omar Sharif
Viggo Mortensen: The Straight-Shooting Star of the New Western Hidalgo Talks about Movies, Myths, Cowboys, and Codes of Honor
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys & Indians
April 2004




"I accepted [the part of Lucifer], in part because I had always wanted to work with Christopher Walken," the actor says while sitting on the sofa's edge. His face lights up when saying Walken's name. It's evident that Christopher Walken is a cult actor for many young actors nowadays. "I would do any movie with him, no matter what [it was]."

On "The Prophecy'
Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995




'Watching Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington was pretty interesting; to be at several scenes when they're arguing in speeches and stuff. I'd say that's fun to watch those actors go at it like a sporting event and I had a front row seat. '

Viggo Mortensen on Crimson Tide
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
By Carnell
Carpe Noctem magazine #15
1999




'[Harrison Ford] was most of all professional. Conscientious. Interesting to study. I had the greats before me: Peter Weir, above all, with his calmness and efficiency. In the evening, when I came back from my wandering, they let me watch the rushes. Witness was an idyllic experience.'

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"If I've learned anything these past years it's that everyone is in some way your superior. Every movie I've made has confirmed the fact that this is a team sport."

AFI Fest: Viggo and The Road
The Bloggomist: The Local Boy
Evil Monito Magazine
17 November 2009




You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Bleecker Street.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

It was lovely to see Viggo and David Cronenberg back together again at the Beaune International Thriller Film Festival, presenting two of their collaborations. It would be even lovelier to see them working together again! In the meantime, while we light our karma candles for a miracle, let's take a look back at that famous (infamous?) Cronenberg/Mortensen double act.





Scorsese and De Niro.
Fellini and Mastroianni.
John Ford and the Duke.
And now … David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen?

By Robert W. Butler, The Kansas City Star
16 Sept 2007




….exuding from their two films together is a sense of ideal alchemy, as if the sculptured physique and the Sphinx like face of the actor were made for the dry and morally complex thrillers of the Canadian film maker.

Sans Viggo, je n'aurai pas fait ce film
Les Inrockuptibles
Serge Kanaski and Julien Gester
12 November 2007




After two collaborations, they're as comfortable together as a pair of old shoes.

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient!" laughs Cronenberg. "And he's got a great chin."

David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




"I love Viggo - it really is a collaboration," Cronenberg says. "It's like a marriage. You might see two people together and not understand why they are, but they know. We know. We feel we can get the best out of each other."

Viggo's 'Promises'
By Sara Stewart
New York Post
26 Aug 2007




"I feel safe bringing things to David that weren't on the page, because he knows it's good for the movie to make people feel safe and like they are truly collaborators."

Cronenberg chuckled. "Yes, essentially I am very lazy, and I only hire people who will do all the work for me."

"And then he can take credit for it," Mortensen said, deadpan.

Mortensen, director discuss their noirish
Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 Setember 2007




So, do when you work with Viggo, is it like being in his skin the whole time?


Yes, that's true. I can tell you that one time the props guy came to me and said, "I'm going to ask you about this because you are Viggo, and Viggo is you—so it doesn't matter which of you I ask." He saw it.

David Cronenberg's existential promises
By Jennifer Merin, New York Press
14 Sept 2007




We really trust each other's sensibility. I did talk to a director once who said, "You know this guy Viggo you worked with? I sent a script to him, and he sent me notes!" I said, "Yeah? Well, were they good notes?" He looked at me like I was crazy.

'Dangerous Method' helmer talks working with Pattinson, Giamatti on 'Cosmopolis'
By Christy Grosz
Variety
13 December 2011




How did they work to create Mr. Mortensen's Nikolai, covered in tattoos and minimalist of motion?


"I just followed orders," deadpans Mr. Mortensen, 48. "And I just told him to do whatever he wanted," says Mr. Cronenberg, 64.

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




When I read interviews about History of Violence, the interviews really emphasized the degree to which you two collaborate. Tell me, how do you two work together?

DC:
It's a total lie. I do everything, Viggo does nothing. I do all the work. But he pays me to say that he does a lot of stuff.

VM: Also to say that I'm thoughtful and considerate.

Talking Eastern Promises with David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen
By Sara Maria Vizcarrondo
Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007




"In the movie," said Cronenberg, "Viggo was wearing Armani. We don't allow him on the street like that, because he can't carry off the class when he's being himself."

Mortensen, director discuss their noirish
Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 September 2007




David Cronenberg said that you and Freud both had a mischievous sense of humor.


He said that? That's nice. I see that in him too.

Viggo Mortensen
How Viggo Mortensen Got Inside Sigmund Freud's Head
By Rachel Dodes
The Wall Street Journal: Speakeasy
18 November 2011




What was it that got you interested in A Dangerous Method? Was it mostly working again with Cronenberg, or the psychological theme? Or both?


Firstly, working with David Cronenberg again. Secondly, the bait that David threw my way, in the form of an elaborate system of undergarments that Sigmund Freud was reputed to have employed on some of his summer excursions deep into the Alps. They included an elaborate system of miniaturised pulleys and wires that assisted in muscular stimulation for the steeper climbs. I was allowed to wear these undergarments in all scenes whether I was climbing or not.

Viggo Mortensen
Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




"I think my cast has great need of psychoanalysis, which is why I cast them actually, to introduce them gently to the idea that they needed help, a lot of help….And you can see they are much better people. Before they were messes. When I found them, they were neurotics, hopeless," Cronenberg said to great laughter.

Mortensen played along. "Now we dress ourselves," he retorted.

Venice Film Festival Press Conference
Cronenberg 'cures' cast in Freud-Jung drama
Rssbroadcast.com
2 September 2011




"I just go back to work with David and he fills up all my neuroses…"

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Press Conference Diaries: It's game on for the stars of A Dangerous Method
Ben Kaplan
National Post
10 September 2011




DC:
As I look at his nose, it appears much more Freudian than it used to.

VM: It's getting bigger, isn't it?

DC: Yeah, it is.

Cronenberg and Mortensen - Dangerous Minds
Shortlist.com
10 February 2012




Would you say you enjoy a similar intellectual relationship as Freud and Jung have on that epic first 13-hour date-slash-conversation?

Mortensen: We can have a conversation about baseball statistics as readily as we could have about psychoanalysis.

Cronenberg:
We are readers, and we do get excited when we say, "Oh, I read that same book!" and things like that, so there is that intellectual connection.

Mortensen:
I think one of the things about you that I most like, other than just the exchanges we have intellectually and just the silly jokes we sometimes enjoy, is the fact that, each time you're making a movie, you get as excited as I do or more so about the subject. . . . You have the eternal beginner attitude. Which I think is a great thing to have for an actor, for a director, anybody.
If you enjoy what you're doing, no matter how serious the subject matter, I think you feel that when you watch the movie. I think you watch this movie — and I'm subjective because I'm in it — but I think you can see we had a good time making it.

David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen talk about 'A Dangerous Method'
By Ann Hornaday
Washington Post
12 December 2011




VM: Well, is there anything else? It's onerous to talk to me, I know.

DC: It's torment. I actually had to take some codeine pills before we
started.

A Conversation Between David Cronenberg And Viggo Mortensen: The Interview
Transcribed by Patches
28 Sept 2007



You will find all previous Quotables
here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Hanway/Lago.

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Report from the Glenn Gould Prize Event


Found By: Topaz


Our mega thanks to Topaz who attended this event and brings us this report.


Quote:
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© Topaz.
Well, I'm back... (to quote Sam). Had a rather wonderful Friday the 13[SUP]th[/SUP], I must say! Met my good friend Buttercup and went to the Glenn Gould Foundation press conference announcing Jessye Norman as the recipient of this year's award. Viggo had quite a long speech introducing the other 8 members of the jury, and describing the process of reaching consensus as to who the winner should be. Each of the jurors also spoke, some very eloquently, and there were a few questions from the audience. Then Foday Musa Suso (from Gambia/USA) played a performance on the kora, a 21-string plucked African lute, an instrument his family had invented hundreds of years ago. The music was rhythmic and at times kind of hypnotic, and rather beautiful. He also sang with it at times. It went on for a good ten minutes, and I found myself really savouring the experience of being in the Galleria of the Royal Conservatory, with its high ceiling and its glass walls through which you could see the pale grey sky and the branches of the trees lining Philosophers' Walk, listening to the African music which this man charmed from his instrument, and sharing this magical experience with Viggo and Howard Shore.... :)

The event took about an hour, after which time they whisked off Viggo into the elevator. I think the days when people could easily talk to him after something like this are unfortunately long gone! But Howard Shore was still around so I got to talk to him for a bit – that was really nice. I had recently heard and liked very much his new song cycle L'Aube (The Dawn) for mezzo-soprano and orchestra which was premiered by the Toronto Symphony last October.

I will try to write in more detail what was said at the event – it may take me a while, so please be patient.

In the evening I went to the concert the Glenn Gould Foundation put on at Koerner Hall "in honour of the jury". I sat in the balcony above the stage, which actually gave me a pretty direct view of Viggo where he ended up sitting in one of the side loges. But at the start he and the whole jury were on stage, and again he spoke for a while. He also read two poems!

The first was "The Journey" by Mary Oliver: https://peacefulrivers.homestead.com/maryoliver.html#anchor_14788

The second was his own Hillside! :) Yes! We got a Viggo poem!

"We underestimate damage
done to the sky
when we allow words
to slip away
into the clouds..."

The concert featured Alma Deutscher, a 13-year-old child prodigy from England, who played a number of her own compositions on the piano and the violin. A fine musician, who played beautifully and captivated the almost full-house audience. Viggo seemed to enjoy the concert, which went from 8 p.m. to 10:30 (with a good half-hour of speeches at the start).

© Topaz. Images © Topaz.


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Last edited: 26 May 2018 12:00:18