Mahershala Ali, Viggo Mortensen strike up an unusual 1960s bromance in Green Book trailer

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo



Well - what a week it's been! My Quotable cup has been running over. There has been so much to read and listen to that I thought a round up from interviews and reviews would be in order. It is, of course, a personal choice of favourite quotes from a week that has informed me, amused me, given new insights into how Viggo works and much to think about from his (as always) deeply considered thoughts on A Dangerous Method and the birth of Psychoanalysis.





The man has never disappointed us.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir - translated by Dom
4 September 2011




It was a stroke of inspiration to cast the virile, hyper-secure Mortensen as the godfather of neurosis.

Enertainment Weekly
Owen Gleiberman
10 September 2011




Mortensen is instantly Sigmund Freud without a shadow of a doubt.

Brad Brevet
Rope of Silicon
10 September 2011




"Who would have imagined that Freud was so charismatic? But the film makes you realize that he had to have been."

Michael Barker's comment to Scott Feinberg after seeing the film
Hollywood Reporter
5 September 2010




Mortensen has never seemed so relaxed in a difficult role; he is the charming papa one hates to overthrow but knows one must.

Richard Corliss
Time
2 September 2011




- he can slip himself into the scenery with a "Don't mind me, here in my Sigmund Freud getup" naturalness.

Stephanie Zacharek
Movieline
2 September 2011




"I was completely trapped by the emotional and complicated human relationships in the film. Bodies and thoughts, words and life choices are interwoven, although the latter are "contaminated" by the social conventions."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine - translated by Ollie
September 2011




One of the other attractions of the project was collaborating with David Cronenberg again, but in a movie that's very different from what's usual in his films.

VM: That's what everyone in the world tells me, that this time there's no blood or exploding heads. What they haven't understood is that they are exploding, but in a more symbolic way.

"Freud was a great public relations person"
By Alex Vicente
Público.es - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
4 September 2011




"A bond that has pushed me to give my utmost."

Viggo talking about Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine - translated by Ollie
September 2011




"Apparently, this film is more traditional, more formal. This is only an appearance, if you watch it closely. He's an author. He invites you each time to think further. In my previous film with David, it was more the gesture that mattered for my character (Eastern Promises). Here it's the words. The word "is" the body language."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir - translated by Dom
4 September 2011




"The Freud in the story is not the Freud most people are accustomed to, the very thin, disease-ridden old man," he explains. "He was 50 and quite robust."

Mortensen believed he could pull him off, and so did the director. "That's the magic of casting," Cronenberg quips. "It's a black art."

'A Dangerous Method': David Cronenberg's Mild Manner and Outrageous Movies
By Stephen Galloway
Hollywood Reporter
7 September 2011




"...if you get too weighed down with the idea that you are doing something important, that you are playing someone of significance, your probably not gonna do a good job of it - you're certainly not going to have much fun."

Viggo at the Venice Film Festival Press Conference
Flicks and Bits
4 September 2011




"In the past I've worked in scenes with physical violence, intense but like a metaphor of what was happening in the mind of the characters I was playing", says Mortensen. "Instead, in this case, everything was happening in the mind of the protagonists. To work in order to bring into focus the world of Sigmund Freud has been like working through a filter through which I could explore"

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine - translated by Ollie
September 2011




As controversial and revolutionary as [Freud's] thought was, he nevertheless had the ability to deeply engage others, to make them feel like an integral part of his vision. He was very seductive and charming, the kind of man who knew how to draw people in and persuade them to share his viewpoint."

Viggo Mortensen
A Most Beautiful Mind
L'Uomo Vogue
September 2011




What aspects of Sigmund Freud related to you as a person and as an actor?


In principle, at least the way I read it, the most positive aspect of what Freud had a large hand in pioneering was the idea of listening to people, in a particular way. Why I say positive is because I think it's one of the most loving things you can do, just to listen to somebody.

TIFF ADM Press Conference
Flicks and Bits
10 September 2011




"No, I didn't feel the need to undergo analysis to prepare for this film. For me, Freud was as much an artist as a scientist - he thought so himself - so I tried to capture the complexity of the artist."

Viggo Mortensen
A Most Beautiful Mind
L'Uomo Vogue
September 2011




"I think one thing you see in the movie is that their intellectual positions weren't so vastly different. It was really a question of pride. They behaved as childishly as the patients they were trying to help."

Viggo at the Venice Film Festival Press Conference
Cronenberg 'cures' cast in Freud-Jung drama
Rssbroadcast.com
2 September 2011




"It's essentially about people who are very intelligent, ambitious to be remembered and make their mark and also may be vulnerable to the point of being paranoid. David doesn't shy away from the academic."

Viggo Mortensen
'A Dangerous Method': David Cronenberg's Mild Manner and Outrageous Movies
By Stephen Galloway
Hollywood Reporter
7 September 2011




"We are in tune in considering cinema as the meeting point between painting, philosophy, literature and social analysis; a careful exploration of the outer and inner aspects."

Viggo talking about Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine - translated by Ollie
September 201
1



"I think my cast has great need of psychoanalysis, which is why I cast them actually, to introduce them gently to the idea that they needed help, a lot of help...."

Mortensen played along. "Now we dress ourselves," he retorted.

Cronenberg at the Venice Film Festival Press Conference
Cronenberg 'cures' cast in Freud-Jung drama
Rssbroadcast.com
2 September 2011



"We can do some doll therapy if anyone's interested..."

Viggo talking about 'Sigi' the Freud doll in San Lorenzo colours
at the Venice Film Festival ADM Press Conference
2 September 2011




"I have no idea what this jersey is. Viggo just told me it would wind David up."

Keira Knightly on wearing a Montreal Canadians sweater at the Press Conference
TIFF Press Conference Diaries: It's game on for the stars of A Dangerous Method
Ben Kaplan
National Post
10 September 2011




"It's over," he said of his relationship with Cronenberg. "This film was the last straw."

Viggo Mortensen joking at TIFF
TIFF Press Conference Diaries: It's game on for the stars of A Dangerous Method
Ben Kaplan
National Post
10 September 2011



As always, you will find all previous Quotables here in our Webpages.

© Viggo-Works.com/Iolanthe. Images © Hanway/Lago.

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Translation of the Italian Article

Translation by Ewa
Source: bestmovie.it
Many thanks to Ewa for translating the interview that appeared at the Italian site Best Movie:
Quote:

Mortensen: "The secret of Freud? The cure through love"

admps09.jpg
© Hanway/Lago.
Viggo Mortensen appears with the coat of arms of San Lorenzo de Almagro on his jacket, even the red blue knitted bag, in which the actor carries his personal belongings, is dedicated to the Argentine club, of which he is a passionate fan. The grey suit and the blue shirt highlight his placid and bright eyes. He is proud to be a part of the cast of A Dangerous Method directed by David Cronenberg, in which Aragorn of the Lord of the Rings interprets Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis.

BM: Referring to the title of the movie, do you follow a precise method in recitation?
Viggo Mortensen: For the part of Freud I have certainly used another approach than for previous roles. But in general I always like to ask the same simple question: What happened from the moment in which this person was born until his death or up to the present moment if he is still alive. Undoubtedly this is very interesting research and definitely very useful. In the case of Freud it was necessary to understand, beyond the psychoanalysis, the historical period in which things happened and the social and cultural context the doctor worked in, in that Vienna was by then the capital of the Austrian Hungarian Empire.

BM: Does an actor also experience a sort of transfer with his own personality, like in the relationship between therapist and patient?
Viggo Mortensen: After working on a film some colleagues complain: I suffered; I couldn't do anything than to take a backpack home, it ruined my marriage. To me nothing similar happens. It's not that I'm not attached to my work ... sometimes in the past when my son Henry looked at me while I was studying a part and when he got angry with me in certain moments I came back to myself realizing, for instance, that I was speaking with a strange accent; but I told him to not worry about it. In general learning a role implies a positive and incredibly useful transfer to me, it's a pretext to learn a lot of new things and to watch the world from another perspective. It was the same now with interpreting Freud.

BM: What do you think about Freud's work?
Viggo Mortensen: I believe Freud wanted to find a way, a method exactly, that allows people to confess without being punished, proposing therefore a cure through love. I think there is no greater form of love in a person's confrontations than listening. Whether it concerns a child, a lover or an enemy...Listening is the first level of love. If you are a good actor, you are a good listener; and this applies also to directors.

BM: It's the third time you've worked with Cronenberg, after A History of Violence and Eastern Promises. How has your relationship changed in this time?
Viggo Mortensen: Cronenberg is a great listener, very attentive to details. Working on a film with him means we are spending a lot of time together. Our relationship has improved over the years. Telling a story about psychoanalysis and about two psychoanalysts of the calibre of Freud and Jung meant there was a risk to make something boring; full of long dialogues and words, but it was the opposite. I enjoyed the carefully worked out details of it, I was very involved on an emotional level, as well as in the conversations I had with the other actors, especially with Fassbender.

BM: Have you already met psychoanalysis in your personal life or as an actor?
Viggo Mortensen: Sure, in reality I think it's present in the life of all of us. The way we read a book, how we relate to the family, how we watch a movie ...today everything has something to do with the new ideas introduced by Freud and Jung. Why do things happen? Why do I behave like that? Why am I so angry? These are questions that we accept nowadays as natural and spontaneous; but this wasn't the case in the period of the two doctors. The new science by Freud was born more or less in the same years as the cinema and both revolutionized the vision of the world, creating something new that didn't exist before. However, some twenty years ago, for a short term, I was in analysis myself. I found it an interesting and useful journey.

BM: Where are we going to see you next?
Viggo Mortensen: In On The Road (by Walter Salles, after a novel by Jack Kerouac) where I am interpreting Old Bull Lee. In the beginning I was not convinced of being able to attach myself to this personality, which is also what happened with the first proposition to take the part of Freud; but the directors assured me, telling me that I had the right approach. There's a link between Freud and Old Bull Lee: others look at them with admiration; they want to learn from them.
©Editoriale Duesse S.p.A. - Image: Hanway/Lago

© Editoriale Duesse S.p.A. Images © Hanway/Lago.

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"Freud was a great public relations person"


Source: publico.es.
Found By: Dom, translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe

Many thanks to Ollie, Rio and Zoe for translating the Viggo interview which appeared at Publico.es:
Quote:

Interview with Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen, ayer en Venecia
Viggo Mortensen, ayer en Venecia.
© AFP.

First thing in the morning after the well-received screening of A Dangerous Method, the acclaimed biography of Freud and Jung that David Cronenberg has brought to Venice, Viggo Mortensen shows up with a San Lorenzo emblem on his lapel. He adores his team to the point that he once dedicated a tango to them. "In Spain, I prefer Real Madrid, although almost all my friends are for Barça. The one I can´t stand is Mourinho. You have my permission to publish that," says the actor. Mortensen, known as much or more for his soccer passion as for his exhaustive preparation before acting any role, now confronts the challenge of being believable in the skin of the father of psychoanalysis.

You said that you work "filling holes" in the biography of your characters. You research what happened between their birth and the first page of the script. Did it happen the same way with Freud?

Of course. The only difference with respect to the fictional characters was that this time I had more material at my disposal to give me an idea. I visited Pribor, his birthplace, which is now located in the Czech Republic, and spent a lot of time in Vienna walking around the places Freud must have frequented. I went to his house and scoured the bookshops, buying his books. It never worried me that it was a real character, maybe because I play him as a middle-aged man and not during his last years, which is where the image we all have in our mind of the bearded old man comes from. In the film, Freud is about 50 [the same age as the actor, who will be 53 next October].

What did you discover about your character that you didn´t know before?

I discovered that he was a great teacher, for instance. He was a very generous guy who made anyone listening to him believe that they could also have reached the same conclusions. I would say he was a great public relations person and very intelligent. He´s also a very contradictory character, revolutionary about certain things and very old-fashioned about the rest. Freud dressed in the same kind of clothes worn at the end of the 19th century. He never adapted himself to fashion. His home was also decorated in an old-fashioned way. Except for his study, maybe because he developed his theories there.

You say in the film, "In a hundred years, what I propose still won´t be understood." Is Freud still being misunderstood?

In spite of being practiced much more than in other times, there still are a lot of people who don´t understand his theories. Psychoanalysis was born as a confession without punishment, without negative consequences. Unlike Jung, Freud didn´t believe that it was a cure, but a way to become aware about our neurosis, to be able to moderate or correct behaviours that end up being harmful for us and those around us. It was a way for desire and self-control to make peace.

One of the other attractions of the project was collaborating with David Cronenberg again, but in a movie that's very different from what's usual in his films.

That's what everyone in the world tells me, that this time there's no blood or exploding heads. What they haven't understood is that they are exploding, but in a more symbolic way. As a filmmaker, Cronenberg makes you look at the world from his perspective, which is what you expect from any true auteur. In the hands of another director, it could have been a very boring film. In the three movies I've filmed with David (A History of Violence, Eastern Promises, and A Dangerous Method), something pretty strange happens to me. There are movies I like from the first scene, but with Cronenberg's, that never happens to me. During the first ten minutes, his movies always make me feel profoundly uncomfortable. It takes me a while to decide if I'm believing what he tells me, if I'm liking it or not. Until, suddenly, I'm caught up and I can't escape.

Can acting also be a form of therapy?

Any artistic discipline can be therapeutic. Everything depends on the way you approach your work. I'm not clear that mine is, although yes, it always interests me a lot to get to the origin of things to prepare my roles. On the other hand, film is especially psychoanalytical, perhaps because film and psychotherapy were born at the same time. If you look at the program of this festival, you'll understand that without Freud, not one of these films could be screened. Take a look at the plots and you'll see that the vast majority have something to do with his way of treating neurosis.

You paint, take photographs and write. Do you do it to detoxify yourself from film?


Don't you believe it. All those things are just as stressing as film. In addition, I have a tendency to always leave things for another day. Before I make the first mark on a canvas, it always ends up seeming much more urgent for me to have another cup of tea [laughter]. And then I only have 45 minutes left before some other appointment, so I've already made myself late to begin with...

You're known for supporting the left. Now that you live in Madrid, are you happy about what has happened with the indignados?

I completely support 15-M.* What the movement demands makes a lot of sense. The truth is that the PP's [Partido Popular's] drive is so strong right now that it's hard to believe they won't come into power. But the way Esperanza Aguirre and his government handled the situation seemed very clumsy to me. It would have been more intelligent to have been less restrictive. The only thing they achieved was for it to go on even longer. In any case, I didn't demonstrate. I would have liked to be there, but I happened to be in Argentina filming when everything happened.

[* Translators' note: The 15-M Movement, also called the Indignados (The Movement of the Outraged) is a citizen's movement formed on May 15, 2011 after a series of non-violent demonstrations in Spain with the intention of promoting a more participatory democracy, distanced from PSOE-PP bipartisanship [tr. note: current governing political parties] and the domination of banks and corporations, as well as a true separation of powers and other measures to improve the democratic system. (Translated from Wikipedia.es)]

© Publico.es . Images © Hanway/Lago.

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Viggo Mortensen Interview - A Dangerous Method


Source: Tribute.ca.
Found By: Dom and Morag
Thanks to Dom and morag for finding this nice interview from Tribute.ca:
Quote:
ADM016SW.jpg
© Hanway/Lago.

Taking direction from David Cronenberg is nothing new for Viggo Mortensen. The two previously collaborated on A History of Violence and Eastern Promises, and return to the Toronto International Film Festival this year with the historical drama A Dangerous Method. The film tells the story of the complicated relationship between famed psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud (Mortensen) and his associate, Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender).

Mortensen sat down with Bonnie Laufer of Tribute to talk about why he loves working with Cronenberg, smoking cigars on set in true Freud style, and his hopes for a sequel to Eastern Promises.

© 2011 Tribute Entertainment Media Group.

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Images from Arrival at TIFF Gala







Images © Getty.


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Last edited: 14 August 2018 11:18:24