Quotable Viggo

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Quotable Viggo 2017

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Quotable Viggo: 30 December 2017

Here are the answers to last week's Quotable Quiz, I hope you had a lot of fun quessing them! How many did you manage to get?



© New Line Cinema


Who said?

"He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Answer: Matt Ross (Captain Fantastic)


"I was terrified during improvisation that he might ask me something about Nietzsche, like, 'What do you think about the Ubermensch?' The night before he arrived, I spent hours Wikipedia-ing Jean-Paul Sartre and others just in case he threw me a curveball."

Answer: Sam Riley (On the Road)


"Come on, we've all been Viggo-tized before."

Answer: Michael K Williams (The Road)


"I'm really honoured and privileged to introduce to you a man of conviction, of compassion, intelligence, artistic integrity, a great actor and a fine citizen of the world, a man I'm proud to call my friend : Viggo Mortensen."

Answer: Ed Harris introducing Viggo at the Deauville film Festival


"He was the chocolate crack dealer."

Answer: Renée Zellweger (Appaloosa)


"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."

Answer: David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises)



"He is so brilliant he makes me sick."

Answer: Elijah Wood (LOTR)




What's the missing word?


Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like Santa Claus to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Answer: Santa Claus


"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Answer: vertigo


Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Answer: whiskers



...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker 'Blouse Man' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film…

Answer: Blouse Man


Viggo Mortensen, as far as I'm concerned, could do a Rubix Cube on screen for two hours and I'd still want to watch him, the guy is that good.

Answer: Rubix cube


Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The Soviet Bloc."

Answer: Soviet Bloc


Which Movie?


"Next day my agent calls me and said, 'He loves you. You got a part.' 'Oh really? What's the part?' He goes, 'I don't know exactly, but it's a part. You're in the movie,'" Mortensen said….

…."And of course the movie comes out the next fall or whatever, and I told my family, 'Friday.' And I'm not in it. I'm not in the credit, nothing," Mortensen laughed.

Answer: Purple Rose of Cairo


"It was a crew of about ten people walking over the rocks. We were all tired but we had a lot of fun. By nightfall, since we were 150 km from the internet and telephones, we made a little fire, an asado, we talked... It was a family experience."

Answer: Jauja



…during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies.

Answer: Carlito's Way


'I was supposed to be handing him tools and he'd say 'Hand me a whatever,' and I didn't know what the hell he was talking about.'

Answer: Witness (building the barn with Harrison Ford)


"When you see the character sitting alone, he's like a monk. It's like you've given up things of this world for other purposes, to serve something bigger than you. It just happens to be something scary."

Answer: Eastern Promises


'My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth.'

Answer: Crimson Tide



What/who is it?

"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge."

Answer: Eight-gauge shotgun in Appaloosa


…honestly folks, how can anyone… NOT want to build a hut in it?? I mean, even just for the summertimes, you know?

Answer: Viggo's beard



"It was like a compulsive thing after a while," the actor explains. "I felt like it was unlucky not to have it, so I would sneak it in. It became this game to see if I could keep getting away with it." He did--until the last day of shooting, when his finnish friend fell out...on camera. Says Mortensen, with just a touch of mischievous pride: "David saw it and was appalled."

Answer: Plastic trout (while filming A History of Violence)


He wasn't afraid or worried about the lights, camera, or anything. He was totally calm. You know that comic strip Andy Capp? That guy with his hat? I just think of him like that. He would just be there like, 'Whatever.''

Answer: TJ ("Hidalgo")


"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."

Answer: Viggo's LOTR action figure



And finally, who did Viggo give his San Lorenzo socks to?

In the last minutes of the program, I took off my boots to give him the San Lorenzo socks I was wearing and I think I told him that he'd have to look for the shorts himself. He also accepted that gift with a lot of dignity and in an extremely generous spirit. If he thought that I was an idiotic Cuervo, he didn't say so.

Answer: Maradona

Quotable Viggo: 23 December 2017

It's nearly Christmas so it must be time for the annual Quotable Quiz. As usual, this is just for fun! Keep the answers to yourself and I will print them next weekend so you can see how you've done. Some are easy but there are a few very tricksy ones there! Have a wonderful Christmas, all of you.



© New Line Cinema

Who said…

"He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."



"I was terrified during improvisation that he might ask me something about Nietzsche, like, 'What do you think about the Ubermensch?' The night before he arrived, I spent hours Wikipedia-ing Jean-Paul Sartre and others just in case he threw me a curveball."



"Come on, we've all been Viggo-tized before."


"I'm really honoured and privileged to introduce to you a man of conviction, of compassion, intelligence, artistic integrity, a great actor and a fine citizen of the world, a man I'm proud to call my friend : Viggo Mortensen."



"He was the chocolate crack dealer."



"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."



"He is so brilliant he makes me sick."



What's the missing word?

Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like ***** ***** to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
20 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita




"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little *******," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016



Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful ********.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker '****** ***' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film…

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015




Viggo Mortensen, as far as I'm concerned, could do a ***** **** on screen for two hours and I'd still want to watch him, the guy is that good.

Metal Gear Solid Movie: Eight Actors Who Could Play Solid Snake
By Liam Hoofe
Flickering Myth
15 September 2017




Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The ****** ****."

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008



Which Movie is this?

"Next day my agent calls me and said, 'He loves you. You got a part.' 'Oh really? What's the part?' He goes, 'I don't know exactly, but it's a part. You're in the movie,'" Mortensen said….

…."And of course the movie comes out the next fall or whatever, and I told my family, 'Friday.' And I'm not in it. I'm not in the credit, nothing," Mortensen laughed.



"It was a crew of about ten people walking over the rocks. We were all tired but we had a lot of fun. By nightfall, since we were 150 km from the internet and telephones, we made a little fire, an asado, we talked... It was a family experience."



'…during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies.'




'I was supposed to be handing him tools and he'd say 'Hand me a whatever,' and I didn't know what the hell he was talking about.'



"When you see the character sitting alone, he's like a monk. It's like you've given up things of this world for other purposes, to serve something bigger than you. It just happens to be something scary."



'My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth.'



What/who is it?

"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge."



…honestly folks, how can anyone… NOT want to build a hut in it?? I mean, even just for the summertimes, you know?



"It was like a compulsive thing after a while," the actor explains. "I felt like it was unlucky not to have it, so I would sneak it in. It became this game to see if I could keep getting away with it." He did--until the last day of shooting, when his finnish friend fell out...on camera. Says Mortensen, with just a touch of mischievous pride: "David saw it and was appalled."



'He wasn't afraid or worried about the lights, camera, or anything. He was totally calm. You know that comic strip Andy Capp? That guy with his hat? I just think of him like that. He would just be there like, 'Whatever.'''



"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."



And finally, who did Viggo give his San Lorenzo socks to?

"In the last minutes of the program, I took off my boots to give him the San Lorenzo socks I was wearing and I think I told him that he'd have to look for the shorts himself. He also accepted that gift with a lot of dignity and in an extremely generous spirit. If he thought that I was an idiotic Cuervo, he didn't say so."

Quotable Viggo: 17 December 2017

After my last Two Faces of January Quotable there was a comment that critics always end up saying that his latest performance is the best thing he's done in years. So – just to tease you – I've rounded a few of those up, along with a couple of outstanding comments from earlier roles because they just couldn't be left out. What do you think Viggo's best ever performance is? Or does he just get better and better with every role?



Image Wilson Webb.
© Bleecker Street.



Captain Fantastic


...this is a thoughtful examination of the fragility of any idyll under pressure from the imperfect world outside. But all of it is anchored and, like the family itself, dominated by Mortensen's Ben, who's both the hero and the villain. Caring but dictatorial, idealistic but often blind, he's a fascinating figure and, in bringing him to life, Mortensen gives his best performance yet.

Helen O'Hara
Empire Magazine
18 August 2016



Loin Des Hommes

...filmmaker David Oelhoffen's more significant achievement is in the casting of a never-better Mortensen, who possesses the sort of face that conveys volumes in virtual silence and the similarly expressive French Algerian actor Kateb.

Michael Rechtshaffen
LA Times
1 May 2015



Two Faces of January


Soaking up the highlights of Ancient Greece, Chester MacFarland resembles a spick-and-span palace. In fact, as becomes apparent, he's a ruin. Every time he gets drunk another partition collapses; when he sobers up, the grand edifice dazzles again.

It's the best thing Mortensen has done in years.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
London Evening Standard
16 May 2014



A Dangerous Method


It's possible that in lusting after Mortensen all these years, we've taken his talent for granted. Of course, we really didn't know how talented he was until he started working with Cronenberg. This is the best thing Mortensen's ever done. His slow, paunchy, hairy Freud has a cavalier authority and a capacity for drollery. He's also seductively wise in a way that makes both Fassbender and Knightley, as very good as they are, also seem uncharacteristically callow. I don't know where Mortensen found this physical and psychological heaviness, this expressive inexpressiveness, but now isn't the time to start a diet.

Wesley Morris
Boston Globe
23 December 2011



Todos Tenemos Un Plan


If you, for some reason, want to watch Viggo Mortensen watching Viggo Mortensen take a bath, then, my friend, your luck is in – as the renowned star of The Lord of the Rings franchise turns in one of the finest performances of his career, taking on the role(s) of identical twins in Ana Piterbarg's intense, if somewhat unfulfilling drama Everybody Has a Plan.

Stefan Pape
Heyuguys.co.uk
28 May 2013



The Road

It's hard not to be drawn in by the sunken, haunted weariness of Mortensen's face, especially when he's doing some of the best quiet, understated work of a long career built on quiet, understated work. Mortensen's laconic strength has always well served the hero who knows how unlikely a happy ending is, and yet keeps pushing ahead.

Locke Peterseim
Redblog
Redbox.com
26 May 2010



Appaloosa

While many might not appreciate this slow and slightly revisionist western, I'm going to put it up there with "Open Range" and "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" as one of best. Go to see Ed Harris kick tail, but stay for one of Viggo Mortensen's best performances.

Coop Cooper
The Small Town Critic
1 October 2008



Good

An extremely powerful World War II drama about a man at a crossroads, forced to make almost impossible choices between friendship and survival. It's the best work Viggo Mortensen has done.

Jeffrey Lyons
NBC/Lyons and Bailes Reek Talk
October 2008



Eastern Promises

As Nikolai, Mortensen is nothing short of remarkable, completely disappearing into his heavily-tattooed character and speaking in both Russian and flawlessly accented English. Hardly a cardboard villain, Nikolai is easily the most compelling character in the movie. In spite of earlier scenes of furious — and chillingly callous — violence, he nevertheless gains some of the audience's sympathies as he compellingly presents his internal conflict with subtlety and nuance, often using only his eyes. It may very well be the best performance of his career thus far, topping even his recent work in another Cronenberg thriller, A History of Violence. Someone, nominate this man for an Oscar already!

Jason Turer
Cornell Daily Sun
14 Sept 2007



Alatriste


Viggo Mortensen carried the role of Diego Alatriste y Tenorio to perfection. Right down to small but highly effective ways of expressing an emotion, Mortensen's portrayal of this 17th century Spanish soldier-turned-mercenary is his best work to date topping even his stellar performance in the 2004 release of Hidalgo.

Egyptian Theatre Premiere of Captain Alatriste Glitters, Deserved Goya Best Director Award
by Kriss Perras Running Waters
Malibu Arts Review March 2007



A History of Violence

Hands down, this is the best performance that Viggo Mortensen has given in a film yet. He is just breath-taking in the film......Viggo's acting here reminds me of vintage Harrison Ford, before... whatever happened to him. Think WITNESS or maybe even THE FUGITIVE. He's just very very good. He's not an actor counting the motions for a scene, but his eyes are alive, you can see fear and desperation in his face as he acts, you also see a resoluteness to do what has to be done. It's kinda perfect.

Harry
Ain't it Cool News
28 September 2005



The Lord of the Rings


The king who returns in "The Return of the King" is Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), the Ranger originally known to the hobbits as Strider, but of the royal line dating back to the first war against Sauron, in which the One Ring was taken and lost. The character of Strider/Aragorn grows in stature as the books go along, from a stout-hearted vagabond to a great leader in battle, to (finally) the noble monarch born to rule wisely and well. Mortensen's performance follows that same arc; given the time and space by Jackson to build his character in all its nuance, he becomes Aragorn to the life.

ROTK
Jim Lane
Sacramento News and Review
December 2003



GI Jane


Doing his best to steal the film, however, is Mortensen, who is simply terrific as the Master Chief who brings everyone to the brink and uncharacteristically loses it when a mock prisoner interrogation with Jordan gets out of hand. This fine actor has been an arresting presence in numerous films in recent years, but he cuts such a strong profile here that he may finally have found his breakthrough role.

Todd McCarthy
Variety
7 August 1997



Carlito's Way

Viggo Mortensen (A History of Violence), in a small role, manages to steal a scene from Pacino without ever getting out of his chair.

Ken Dubois Ultimate Edition DVD Review
Reel.com
October 2005



The Indian Runner

Arquette is perfectly cast, her natural aura of gentle goodness and purity making what follows all the more horrific to watch. At Dorothy's admonishment- "Frank don't talk like that!" - Frank switches. If we weren't so caught up in the film itself, we would be in awe of Mortensen's skill here. His acting is breathtaking, as he builds from disappointment through hurt to a mean sarcasm - "Did I say the wrong thing?" that turns quickly to simmering anger - "Is it that we're strangers? We're not strangers". He is genuinely frightening to watch, the whole scene feels as if we are onlookers at a real-life domestic dispute. By the time Dorothy tells him "I don't know what you're talking about. Let's eat", he is ready to explode.

Why I love… Viggo Mortensen's Frank in The Indian Runner
Rowan Righelato
The Guardian
27 September 2013


Quotable Viggo: 9 December 2017

Two Faces of January is on TV this week with a 4 star rating and seeing it in the listings has reminded me how much I need to see this film again. Viggo gives a powerhouse performance (as does his suit) and Amini is masterly in the way he steadily builds up the tension and dependency between the three lead characters. We loathe and pity them at the same time. We root for them while trying to remind ourselves that we really shouldn't. All that and fabulous locations too!



© StudioCanal/Working Title.


Was it a thrill when Viggo came on board?

Yes! And a big surprise. I went to see him in Spain and one of the things I remember is the feeling that I was auditioning for a movie star. I expected to be kept waiting for days, but it went completely opposite of what I'd imagined. First, he phoned to make sure I was alright as soon as I'd arrived at my hotel, he walked to my hotel to meet me and took me out to dinner. He paid. He wouldn't let me pay. That's just an example of what a kind and gracious man he is.

Hossein Amini
Viggo Mortensen & Kirsten Dunst Open Up About New Movie, Paparazzi & Being Boring
By Dorri Olds
The Blot Magazine
26 September 2014




"He became almost like a partner, sort of a patron saint to the whole movie. That allowed me to go and get the financing."

Hossein Amini
New director turns to an old favorite, '2 Faces of January'
By Pam Grady
San Francisco Chronicle
1 October 2014




"Viggo is a gorgeous man, so it wasn't that difficult to have chemistry with Viggo. He's really funny, which a lot of people wouldn't expect, and we had a really good time together."

Kirsten Dunst
London Premier Interview
Press Association
14 May 2014




After Viggo Mortensen committed to playing Chester MacFarland, Amini slightly tweaked his conception of the character. "Viggo looks heroic and there's an element of Gatsby in the character, which doesn't exist in the book so much," says the British-Iranian Amini. "I love that element of striking, handsome, charismatic men who are destined to be defeated somehow; Chester struck me as that sort of character, whereas in the book he is a little more wasted from the very beginning."

"The Two Faces of January" - Production Notes
StudioCanal
February 2014




"[Hossein Amini's] process is one of the best experiences I've ever had. "He got us altogether for a month, month and a half, to talk about the script. We could work out these things before shooting and ask questions about the characters. He was really open to changes that we felt were necessary. It was incredible for a director who has spent twenty years fine tuning his script to open up that process to us. It allowed us to work more smoothly and be more invested."

Viggo Mortensen
Press Conference
Cinema Chords
14 May 2014




"Chester is kind of a slob, all sweaty and paranoid; he's crazy from the start, really."

Viggo Mortensen
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




"He's got a lot of hidden fears. It's a real banquet for an actor."

Viggo Mortensen explains rooting for the bad guy in 'The Two Faces of January'
By Chris Lee
Entertainment Weekly
26 September 2014




'...it's part of his con, the look, he wants to look like he came from money and all that. I don't think his origins are those clothes that you see.'

Viggo Mortensen on "Lord of the Rings" — and playing an American at last
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon
24 September 2014




"It was kind of fun to speak with an atrocious accent. He's speaking in a muddle of Greek and Italian; that was sort of a funny little touch."

Viggo Mortensen
The many faces of Viggo Mortensen
By Karl Quinn
Sydney Morning Herald
5 June 2014




'...they lie, steal, cheat, murder - they deserve any bad thing that happens to them. But as an audience member you find yourself cheering them on. You want them to get away with everything. You want them to get away from the cops, you want them to get away with the girl, with the money. It's a contradictory thing, it's a strange thing, but it's a dynamic that happens a lot, at least to me as an audience member. When a movie, a film noir thriller, works I want the bad guy to get away with it.'

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Two Faces Of January
Adam Miller
Entertainmentwise
15 September 2014




"Viggo really embraces the ugly side of characters… not a lot of stars do."

Dave McNary
Variety
22 June 2014




"There was a brotherhood of masculinity then," Mortensen says with measured admiration. "Those men, they prized self-sufficiency. You cared about how you presented yourself, drunk or sober; I love those pictures of guys, working-class guys, going to a ballgame in suits and hats. But there's another side, too. There was a certain intolerance of foreigners. And if you yourself had any kind of leanings or unusual interests — jazz, say — you could be a little suspect, too... It was interesting to look at all that, my father's generation, through a magnifying glass."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




Soaking up the highlights of Ancient Greece, Chester MacFarland resembles a spick-and-span palace. In fact, as becomes apparent, he's a ruin. Every time he gets drunk another partition collapses; when he sobers up, the grand edifice dazzles again.

It's the best thing Mortensen has done in years.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
London Evening Standard
16 May 2014




The voice on the phone is husky, familiar, and just a little menacing. "I was told to call this number," the speaker says. I give a little shudder before realising it's Viggo Mortensen, calling as planned to talk about his new film, The Two Faces of January. Phew.

The many faces of Viggo Mortensen
By Karl Quinn
Sydney Morning Herald
5 June 1014


Quotable Viggo: 2 December 2017

Viggo has been busy preparing for Green Book we all know what that means – a humungous amount of deep and varied research. Viggo has always said that this is the best part of his job. He loves learning about new things, visiting new places, immersing himself in the life of the character he's playing. He goes much further than most actors, often taking things to awesome lengths that have become legendary in the business. The only thing that defeated his research methodology was wily old Lucifer…



© Focus Features.


Carlito's Way

'…it's not just in the viewing that there are no small parts, but there are no small roles in terms of preparation, either. I ended up spending a long time in East Harlem where there are a lot of Puerto Ricans, and listening day and night to the music. I found a wheelchair that was from 1974, which is the one you see. I left Manhattan with a big collection of salsa music from the early '70s, and I think I bought the entire catalog of Fania, a record company. I went back to Los Angeles and I made dinner in the wheelchair, wheeling around. By the time I got there I was completely ready and I had a lot of fun. It might as well been a whole movie, because each character is the whole movie for the person playing the character.

Viggo talking about Carlito's Way
10 Lessons on Filmmaking from Viggo Mortensen
Filmmaker Magazine
3 November 2016



The Passion of Darkly Noon

For his role as a mute in 1995's The Passion of Darkly Noon, Mortensen remained silent throughout filming. "I only heard him speak after the shoot was over, and then only to say, 'Thanks everybody, so long.' He'd make clicking noises in the back of his throat to communicate," recalls costar Brendan Fraser. Mortensen refused to break character even to settle his hotel bill. "The concierge probably didn't speak English, and here's Viggo gesturing with his hands and pointing, scribbling on a pad. And I think Viggo eventually got 50% off the bill. If you know Viggo, it makes perfect sense. In a way, he transcends the acting."

Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
2002



GI Jane

One thing to remember is that all the actors did go through the brutal training themselves, except for Viggo Mortensen. He trained alone a lot earlier than his fellow actors. He spent a considerable amount of time observing actual training sessions and talked to several active and retired Navy Seals. Most of the supporting cast were angry with him that he didn't go through the grueling training, with the exception of Moore, but in the end, that's exactly what Mortensen wanted so that the actors who have a reason for not liking his character.

Demi Moore Displays Sheer Will and Determination as 'G.I. Jane' Turns 20 Years Old!
By Rick Rice
mxdwn.com
22 August 2017



A Perfect Murder

'I played a painter and I needed to have all of this artwork around me, so I asked if I could do some paintings myself. I just went crazy. I couldn't sleep. I did about 45 paintings in two weeks.'

Viggo Mortensen on A Perfect Murder
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
by Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
1998



The Lord of the Rings


BE: I heard that you showed up on the set with a copy of the 13th-century Icelandic Völsunga Saga.

VM: Yeah. I was on the plane to New Zealand, thinking, God, what have I done? Once I got off the plane, I went to the bookstore and got a copy of the Völsunga Saga and a couple other things that I was pretty sure I'd need. And then I had a friend send me whatever I could remember that I had on the bookshelf at home. It wasn't as if all the elements of the book were unfamiliar to me, given my background. Tolkien even took the names of the dwarves right out of Nordic texts.

Veni, Vidi, Viggo
By Bilge Ebiri
Yahoo Internet Life magazine
23 November 2001



Hidalgo

I worked with him 12 years ago on horses, we rode together down by the Mexico border in Arizona while working on Young Guns 2… So when I heard that he was interested in the role [of Hopkins] I anticipated that kind of commitment to research and sure enough, days after he was cast he called me and said, 'Who do you know on Pine Ridge reservation and can I go there?' Within a week he was out with these Lakota horsemen and riding with them, and on a long ride to Wounded Knee."

John Fusco
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004



A History of Violence

Mortensen's commitment translated to a collection of artifacts he purchased in the Midwest on his travels, which included ducks and a bank in the shape of a fish head that says 'fishin' money' on it and is set on the diner's cash register, posters of Birds of North America, some landscapes, a small ceramic eagle and other animal sculptures for his daughter's room which he thought Tom's character would have in his home."

Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit


Alatriste

'He called me once to talk about certain aspects of his character and history, such as Alatriste's birthplace. I had never detailed it in any of the five novels published up until now, but Viggo was interested in the fact. 'In Old Castile,' I responded. 'Could it be Leon?' he asked after thinking about it for a while. 'It could,' I responded. So then he went to Leon and walked about covering it inch by inch, remaining in each town, in every bar, talking with whoever happened to be in front of him. In effect, he finally concluded that Alatriste was Leonese.'

Arturo Pérez Reverte
El Semanal - Translated by Elessars Queen
July 2005



Eastern Promises

"You say, 'Well, where's Viggo today?' " says David Cronenberg, recalling the conversation that happened more than once on the London shoot, last year, of the exceptionally fine new thriller, Eastern Promises. "And they say, 'Oh, he's in St. Petersburg.'

"And you say, 'What!? I thought he was at the hotel.' "

Star's Eastern Immersion Impresses His Director
By Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
16 September 2007



Good

"I wanted to go to Auschwitz, which I did, and I was looking around. I'd found a map that showed all the places where the camps were. I went to every single one. I drove like a maniac, day after day, and sometimes it was difficult to find them. People don't want to talk about it so much, and in most cases, there's just a plaque. The thing that was valuable was just standing there. It was spring, there were flowers, and the sky was blue. You sit on the grass and yes, you're moved by all these things and the ghosts that you can feel. I was thinking about the guards, the prisoners, the kids... but there were things that I didn't expect. It's hard to explain, but it just keeps opening and opening, and you can never stop learning."

Viggo Mortensen
Play It As It Lays
By Philip Berk
Filmink
April 2009



The Road

While he was on a tour doing publicity for another movie, Mortensen would sneak off and talk to homeless people, whose survival-oriented existence paralleled that of his character. "Every major city around the world, there are people that live outside, and they have the same concerns as our characters," he said. "How am I going to get food? How am I going to stay dry? How am I going to keep people from stealing my stuff or hurting me? You can't get any more basic than that."

Viggo Mortensen: 'Road' Warrior
Mortensen talks about playing a father in the post-apocalyptic 'The Road.'
By Sam Adams
18 November 2009



A Dangerous Method

Once he committed there was never any going back; it was full on, "Let's do research of the Viggo kind" -- which is very deep, to say the least. He'd send 25 emails of Freud's cigars, you know, with pictures going back and forth: "What kind were they?" "How many did he smoke a day?" "What shape were they?" "What strength?" "Would he have ever varied the kind during the course of the day, or did he always smoke the same kind?" "Could he afford them?" "Were they expensive?" You know, it went on and on and on.

David Cronenberg Discusses His Dangerous Method
by Luke Goodsell
Rotten Tomatoes
23 November 2011



Two Faces of January

I was mainly interested in what kind of generation [Chester] was from. I spoke with my father's friends, men who came of age during the Great Depression and served in WWII, like Chester. And that informed how he'd wear his clothes, how he'd speak, his gestures and his attitude towards women. The one thing about these men that I found most interesting was that, even at their most downcast, their appearance was paramount. Every day, they ironed their shirts and smoothed their hair, no matter what.

Actor Viggo Mortensen
Vanessa Keys
Sunday Style Magazine
13 June 2014



Jauja

What past did you invent for this Captain Dinesen?


I took things from another Dinesen. A writer and adventurer who also went to the New World at the end of the 19th century. A hunter, he was the father of Isak Dinesen whose real name was Karen Blixen. I took things from my grandfather, my father's accent and since I know something about the history of Denmark and Argentina, I could link them.

Viggo Mortensen: Film and Soccer Activist
By Horacio Bilbao - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarín.com
27 November 2014



Loin des Hommes

'I've walked I don´t know how many kilometers, from alley to alley, going up and coming down thousands of steps around the Casbah and the old European neighborhoods, letting myself be drawn towards a nameless destination, going forward or retracing my steps according to noises and colors, mental associations, memories, questions I was asking myself. Everything perfect, everything inconclusive, everything valuable, the city came into me, and I into it.'

Viggo on preparing to film in Morocco
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013



Captain Fantastic


The director sent Mortensen a huge box of books of recommended reading, including texts by Tom Brown, the renowned naturalist and author of 'Tom Brown's Field Guide to Wilderness Survival; linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky; and Pulitzer Prize-winning scientist and writer Jared Diamond, all of which he felt Ben would be intimately familiar with. "I thought that was a great way to frame some of the knowledge that this family would have," Ross says. "It turned out Viggo had read all the books already."

Cannes Press Kit
May 2016



And Finally…


The Prophecy

'Lucifer? Ah...that was fun, but difficult, because the truth is that I couldn't prepare the role the way that I usually do...going to Lucifer's house or meeting him or meeting his family.'

"If they give me a Salvadorian script, I'm game."
By Isabela Vides - translated by Margarita
La Prensa Grafica
7 March 2007
La Prensa Grafica

Quotable Viggo: 19 November 2017

Having just made a herculean effort to tidy my garden up ready for the winter and facing an afternoon sprucing up the house and cooking ready for visitors, I've been thinking. I could do with Viggo. Forget acting, art, poetry and all that stuff. Viggo is a man who cooks, grows his own vegetables and vacuums. Every house should definitely have one…



© Bleecker Street.


"I like to write and paint and make music and go walking on my own and garden. In fact, gardening is probably what I enjoy doing more than anything else."

Really? Anything else?

He looks at me, his gaze is quite level. "I like gardening a lot."

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




Are you a keen gardener?


I always have plants — even if I'm staying in a hotel for an extended period, I tend to get plants and find a way to keep them growing depending on how much light the room gets.

60 Seconds - VIGGO MORTENSEN
Metro.
2 February 2017




'Viggo was there early enough that he planted the entire garden and that's a real garden.'

Matt Ross describing Viggo adding to the Captain Fantastic set
'Captain Fantastic': Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen and the perils of off-the-grid fatherhood
by Michelle Lanz
The Frame
7 July 2016




'…I could say to Matt, "If it's this time of year, this is how big the vegetables would be. This is what would grow in such a small clearing." All those things you only see in passing, but it was important to him and to me that the way this family lives be completely credible.'

Viggo Mortensen goes 'extreme' in 'Captain Fantastic'
Josh Rottenberg
LA Times
30 June 2016




Walking calms me down and sets my body and mind in motion. And gardening. Planting trees and seeing how they're doing a year later. It's like visiting your friends. Actually, I usually plant seeds from the places where I go. Maybe it's not legal, but hey, they are gifts from nature that I find in my pocket.

Viggo Mortensen: "The older I get, the more tired I get of Hollywood."
By Rocío Ayuso - translated by Ollie and Zoe
El Pais
8 October 2016




PA: O.K., Vig, give me a gardening tip. What do I do if I have snails eating all of my strawberries?

VM: Put little bowls of beer down for them.

PA: What does that do?

VM: They crawl in there and drown. They probably die happy. Beer is better for the environment than pellets.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
By Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine
June 1995




"I like to live dangerously. Last night I was quietly at home, cooking a meal of chicken, onions and garlic, Cuban style, and then here I am today facing a pack of journalists."

Viggo Mortensen Talks About "Jauja" and "Far from Men"
By Martin Dale
Variety
7 December 2014




"I'm not sure that you'd like my cooking. It's not at all conventional ..."

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"When I called Viggo, he said, 'Pick me up at 8." I get there and he cooks. He's a Renaissance man. He paints, he acts, he writes poetry, you could bounce a quarter off of him and he cooks the way our mothers cook -- from scratch."

Mark Ordesky
Valiant Effort: A Late Substitution, Viggo Mortensen Dived into Rings.
By Irene Lacher
LA Times
21 December 2002




"I love to cook," he admits. "When we did Lord of the Rings, I'd help cook these big Thanksgiving feasts on the set."

The Renaissance Man adds, "I do all the trimmings plus even make pies."

Viggo Starring In Different Sort Of Psychological Thriller
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun-Times
8 December 2011




This myth of the poor lonesome cowboy, the guy who has no need of others to be happy, is it really a trick to attract women?

On the contrary! Each time I have tried to charm them with my poetic cowboy side, it's ended in total failure. To seduce a woman, food is more effective than poetry. I love to make complex dishes. That always works!

Viggo Mortensen
Grazia Magazine
Translated by Chrissiejane
December 2009




'I'm a bit frantic in the kitchen though. I'm calm while I'm doing it, but I'm pretty restless in that regard.'

Viggo Mortensen
Play It As It Lays
By Philip Berk
Filmink
April 2009




"Some might say I am a better cook than I am a painter," says Mortensen and laughs out loud.

From Movies To Photos
By Jette Hansen - translated by Rosen
Morgenavisen, Jyllands-Posten
19 October 2008




Do you have a cleaning lady?

No, I do that all by myself. I don't even own a dishwasher. If you wash off plates and cups by hand, it has something meditative. It's like that with the fishing. The spirit is directed toward an action, one relaxes and begins to perceive things at the edge of view.

To do the Dishes has Something Meditative
Celebrity
14 April 2007




I understand that you're very neat.


Well, I'm very messy in a lot of ways, but there are two things I always do: wash my clothes and wash my dishes, and even though everything might be messy, it's clean.

Like David Beckham.

He must be neater than I am. Do I look like a disaster? The truth is that I wash everything all the time.

Viggo Mortensen: "When Mourinho speaks, you don't know if he's calculating or crazy."
By Gloria Scola ? translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
ABC.es
5 September 2011




'I even vacuum...'

Viggo Mortensen
"It was a big, brutal mess"
By Leif Kramp - translated by Doreen
Kino
9 May 2007




"Viggo is terrifying. He sends you a handwritten letter, all decorated and painted, and when he arrives at your house for dinner he's an intolerable guy: he cleans the fish and picks up the dishes. My wife is fascinated, and she compares the two of us. Damn, what's a guy supposed to do? The bar is set very high."

The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007


Quotable Viggo: 12 November 2017

So The Lord of the Rings might be getting a TV adaption? If it happens, heaven help whoever plays Aragorn as there are mighty boots to fill. In the minds of – well – pretty much everybody, Viggo IS Aragorn, even while presenting a reluctant side of Aragorn which didn't appear in the books and which Tolkien never imagined. He made Aragorn into the Hero we all wanted to walk Middle-earth with. Whether Tolkien's Aragorn or not Tolkien's Aragorn, Viggo brought Middle-earth's King in Waiting to life in a way that can hardly be matched. Who will ever again find that intensity, grace, swordsmanship and – on set and off – inspiring leadership?



© New Line Productions Inc.


Mortensen is Aragorn!

'The Lord of the Rings' is Getting a TV Adaptation
By Sheryl Oh
Film School Rejects
6 November 2017




Why is Viggo Mortensen's portrayal of Aragorn in The Lord of the Rings trilogy so good? It could be his immersion in J. R. R. Tolkien's original novels: He can speak knowledgeably on why Aragorn carries a bow, although it's not directly mentioned in the original text. Or it could be his complete dedication to the role: During filming, Mortensen went everywhere with his sword, even to restaurants. Or it could be his overall intelligence: When he first read The Lord of the Rings (on the plane down to New Zealand, after he was brought in as a last-minute replacement), he was struck by the echoes of Beowulf and ancient Icelandic sagas. Once he had landed, he bought a pile of the books Tolkien himself had used as sources. 'I made it a classroom in mythology and literature,' he says - and he turned Aragorn into an uncommon film hero, one with genuine mythic resonances across the centuries.

Hot Actor - Viggo Mortensen
By G. E.
Rolling Stone (U.S.)
September 2003




'Ultimately, you create your own luck. Fate does step in. When we ended up with Viggo, fate was dealing us a very kind hand. Viggo, in hindsight, was the one person who was perfect for this film. He came out of nowhere, and suddenly there was Aragorn.'

Peter Jackson
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004




There is something other-worldly about Mortensen that makes him so suited to playing the dashing Aragorn who, along with Russell Crowe's toga-hero Maximus in Gladiator, has already entered into cinematic folklore as one of the great screen swordsmen of our time.

The Reluctant Hero,
by Douglas Andrews
Sunday Express 2002




"I read an article that said, 'Finally, someone's found the niche for Viggo Mortensen: the rugged hero who has a deep intellect and a great humanity. That's what Aragorn is, because Viggo has brought that to it. He's very like that as a human being."

Bernard Hill
It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




Picture Han Solo without the wisecracks mixed with and Indian scout mixed with Sir Lancelot stirred together with the leadership and loyalty of a leader we all wish we had. In the dictionary under the term "Star making performance" there should be a photo of Viggo as Aragorn.

FOTR
Nick Nunziata
CHUD
December 2001




Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn carries himself with the perfect air of strength, compassion, and quiet nobility that you expect from someone who you would be willing to follow into battle.

The Two Towers review
efilmcritic.com
Brian McKay
22 December 2002




As Aragorn, Viggo Mortensen's weathered face brings his character an intensity and life that the book's extensive backgrounding never did; his threadbare regality is more eloquent than any exposition.

The Two Towers review
Russel Swensen
LA Weekly
20 December 2002




Towers belongs to Mortensen, an actor of considerable range who makes Aragorn's moral and romantic dilemmas seems amazingly plausible and immediate.

The Two Towers review
Louise B. Hobson
Calgary Sun
18 December 2002




Mortensen as much mobilizes this cast of thousands externally as he does within the narrative, and plays the true-hearted hero with enough gravity to make Aragon believable without slipping into parody Prince Valiant clichés.

The Two Towers review
Todd Gilchrist
FilmStew.com
18 December 2002




A few of the characters seem even richer, more profound than Tolkien's own conception. Viggo Mortensen finds an astonishing stillness and poise at the heart of Aragorn (he's a bit of a stiff in the novel). This deep love of peace is what drives him to fight, a paradox which makes him more kinglike than any other character.

The Two Towers review
Suzi Feay
The Independent on Sunday
15 December 2002




The dashing Mortensen never lets his audience down in his representation of this rugged warrior, a leader of men who endure one battle after another, testing not only their valor but also their very existence.

Return of the King review
Diana Saenger
Reeltalkreviews.com
December 2003




As the capstone to one of the single greatest achievements of modern motion-picture history, The Return of the King is generally peerless - Viggo Mortensen's Aragorn, the King of the title, is inescapably Shakespearean in the meaty thrust and parry of his role...

Return of the King review
Marc Savlov
The Austin Chronicle
19 December 2003




I really don't know what happened myself, but I lost myself completely in the role. I am a man who likes to withdraw into solitude and take long hikes in the woods and mountains. So was Aragorn. We fitted perfectly together.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004




'Viggo just became so synonymous with Aragorn that it was hard to see him as Viggo again and not Aragorn. I have never witnessed an actor enter the spirit of a role as he did.'

Peter Jackson
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004


Quotable Viggo: 4 November 2017

I confess I'm more than a tad over-excited by the news of a new Viggo photography book, Ramas Para un Nido. One thing is for sure, it won't be predictable. With Viggo all photography rules get broken (don't shoot into the sun, don't over expose, hold it steady…). Even the camera itself is often broken – when most of us would be packing it away for a journey to the camera repair shop, Viggo keeps shooting just to see if something interesting will happen. It always does.



© Viggo Mortensen


The pictures in this book have been made with different cameras, techniques, and, unavoidably, with all the longing, love, laughter, doubts, and mistakes that have shaped my life so far.

Viggo Mortensen
Perceval Press
October, 2017



'In a way, I am a photographer even when I don't take pictures. I think it's an instinctive thing by now, a part of myself'.

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




He likes to sit in bars to listen, and he would love to go unnoticed as the least known of the regulars. But he almost never does. He seeks images, constantly, or images find him. And then, Viggo Mortensen takes out his professional camera and photographs at ease. He always has it ready, just in case. It could be a landscape, like when he went about the north of Argentina; it could be someone who catches his attention...

Viggo Mortensen - "Above all, I'm a Cuervo... And a greater pride does not exist"
By Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zooey
Gente
April 2010




Several of Viggo Mortensen's different faces can be seen in his photos, some more recognisable than others. In front of the large photograph Topanga 7 where golden green light moves across a profile like it was a reflecting water surface, he says in perfect Danish:

'This self-portrait I shot with a slow shutter speed. That way I became part of nature. You can see the blue sky through the brim of the hat and there are plants in my face. With that technique you can become one with the surroundings - the house, the wall, or nature.'

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




Recently, I'm doing digital photography almost exclusively. I have old cameras, two from 1903 which I sometimes also continue using.

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
20 Minutos
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
6 September 2012




'Two years ago, I spent a few days in Montana with Viggo while he was shooting Hidalgo, and I swear he was never without a camera. One moment he was slamming on the brakes to photograph a horse on a hill, and the next, he was slowing down to take a picture of a cloud.'

Tom Roston
Editorial
Premiere
November 2004




'I have a camera with a broken lens -- I was actually doing it two days ago in Montana. There were all these horses running and I was taking pictures and then the lens was just all screwed up. So I took it off. I don't know what it's going to look like. It's hopefully just going to be a good flow of shapes and color.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm 2002




Did you and Viggo Mortensen use homemade cameras?

We're not that renaissance. Viggo's got an old hasselblad that he takes forever to focus & shoot. But I must admit he's got some real talent behind the lens. . . not too bad in front either.

John Doe
John Doe finds Emily at a Crossroads
By Emily Strange
Emilystrange.com
June 2012




I've photographed a lot with Leica and Hasselblad cameras but last year I started using disposable cameras. They won't be available a short time from now so it was good to use the opportunity while I could and play with them. I often expose the pictures for a long time, shoot directly into the sun. A lot of interesting things happen when the light goes through these unclear plastic lenses. The photos become different. Sometimes I throw the cameras to the ground to loosen the lens a little bit, then interesting things happen. Then you check out the films and choose the best ones. I have an opinion of how I want them to be."

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




The artist uses multiple exposures, camera shake and long open shutter exposures coupled with extensive camera movement, to paint images onto the film emulsion.

Viggo Mortensen - Painting with Light
By Christopher Harrod
New Zealand Art Monthly
April 2004




He plays the camera like a musical instrument. It's a conversational kind of photography: it's Viggo telling you who he is with images. He looks at everything, believes everything has a meaning, and he shows you his pictures in the belief that seeing might reveals the hidden mysteries of everyday life.

Mark Power
The Salt Mine
3 September 2008




Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot,
Juxtapoz Magazine #19
1999




Viggo Mortensen's photographs can be explained as poetic; sometimes the focus is shallow, a lot of movement, light sometimes leaks into the pictures and makes weird influences.

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008
Morgunblaðið




ST: I was trying to figure out the process for those flares. I thought that burn came from the development process.

VM: No, it was in the camera. The wiring that advanced the film and activated the flash got messed up. I was fishing and dropped the camera and it got wet. When it dried out, it started doing that. I shot a roll, saw it and thought, "Oh, shit." But when I looked at them, I thought that some of them looked kind of interesting. So on the next roll, I tried moving the wire all the way to one side and the flares would go to that side. Then I moved it to the middle, the right, and on the bottom and shot maybe eight rolls of film before it stopped working altogether.

A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
By Scott Thill
20 September 2002
Source: Morphizm




When I see my own pictures, it's like seeing a movie. It is, for example a single moment in a film scene, that you remember. So is also the case with my pictures. I remember the places I've been to and can go there again through the pictures, Viggo says.'

Viggo on the sadanset exhibition
Kim Kastrup
Ekstra Bladet
16 October 2008




Not everything's a masterpiece, of course, not by a long shot. But when Mortensen's good, when he's firing on all cylinders, he has the ability to produce some truly breathtaking images. According to Dennis Hopper, it's because Mortensen's instincts "come from the right place, from the subconscious."

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
2003

Quotable Viggo: 28 October 2017

Finally the Blu-ray Special Edition of Sean Penn's The Indian Runner has been released and I hope it will give a new lease of life to an outstanding film that barely raised a ripple on its release. Multi-layered, frightening, thought provoking and at times deeply moving, it's full of outstanding performances from Viggo, David Morse, Valeria Golino, Patricia Arquette, Charles Bronson and Sandy Dennis. It's time it was appreciated by a wider audience.



© Westmount.


As moody and volatile as the problematic Frankie, "The Indian Runner" starts off with a killing and sustains a threat of possible violence throughout even its gentlest episodes. That threat is especially evident in the presence of Mr. Mortensen, a magnetic actor capable of both scary outbursts and eerie, reptilian calm. (Mr. Penn's own acting style is strongly echoed in this performance.) It is some measure of Mr. Mortensen's savage, mocking ferocity that in a final confrontation with Dennis Hopper, who plays a bartender given to in-your-face philosophizing, Mr. Hopper seems easily the tamer of the two.

Janet Maslin
New York Times
20 September 1991




Over at his place Sean had a really interesting book of photographs from the sixties by Dennis Hopper-just plain ordinary folks across the country. There was a picture of a guy at a diner, with his hair up in the air, wearing a white shirt with the cigarettes rolled up in the sleeve and a tattoo on his arm. And Sean said, 'That's Frank!' Then Sean calls me and says, 'I got the television on here, it's HBO, and there's a movie on called Fresh Horses, and there's this actor in it . . . '

Don Phillips
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly (UK: Faber and Faber, US: Canongate US, 2004)




'Seeing his face and his expression, I knew it was him. I was praying for such a wonderful actor. I wasn't disappointed.'

Sean Penn
Viggo Mortensen: The magician of The Lord of the Rings
by Aurelie Raya
Paris Match
8 January 2004




'I had always thought of Frank as a barking dog that bites,' Penn says, 'so I asked Viggo to spend some time with a friend of mine who's a Hell's Angel who knows the world and also is a fighter - not that there's a lot of fighting in the movie, but I felt that he should know it and be able to feel that physical confidence.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premier
October 1991




Facially, Mortensen looks like a cross between Sam Shepard and echt movie villain Lance Henriksen, a suggestion enhanced by his character's myriad jailhouse tattoos (applied in hours-long makeup sessions) and the unperiodlike leather brace on his right hand and wrist, which he wears constantly and removes only immediately before shooting. Word on the set is that Mortensen busted a knuckle and sprained his wrist during rehearsals for a fight scene, but when asked about the injury, his eyes take on a demonic glint.

'Sean Penn,' he says, 'bit me.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premiere
October 1991




"Charles Bronson I didn't get to know extremely well but I liked him; in fact, there's a version of the scene where I go to my parents' house at the beginning of the story. It was a really interesing scene with Charles and Sandy Dennis playing really well. In fact Charles delivered some of the best acting I've ever seen. Shame it didn't make the movie, but I could understand Sean's reasons. He thought my character should be more messed up. But it was a scene that was very awkward; I was high, and was really insulting. It was horrible, but also fascinating."

Viggo Mortensen
Uncut
November 2007




… it's the brothers who hold the screen. Mortensen, working in hot colors, and Morse, working in gray, deliver sensational performances.

Peter Travers
Rolling Stone




Sean had decided that Viggo and I were going to rehearse for two weeks, but we were only going to rehearse our big scene in the bar. So he had a bar set up in a gymnasium where we could shoot baskets but also really do our work. And during those two weeks, I have a feeling it was harder for Viggo, because Sean identified more with the role of Frank, and he would really try to push him to do certain things. But Viggo just kept holding back. He never really did the scene in those two weeks.... I think Sean was still a little nervous going into the bar scene. Then I remember a real struggle for what was going to happen, what the moments were going to be between the two of them. And something happened, it crystallized, and suddenly Viggo was on fire.

David Morse
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly (UK: Faber and Faber, US: Canongate US, 2004)




Deploying that unsettling stare and those bacon-slicer cheekbones for the first time, he creates a memorably feral, seductive and unpredictable lost soul with a capacity to switch from charm to menace in an instant that brings to mind a young Kirk Douglas.

The Indian Runner Film Review
By Jeff Robson
Eye for Film
14 September 2011




'When you feel his anger brewing - and it comes out of nowhere, like a freak storm-you want to duck for cover. Sometimes the alarm dissipates; in my favorite scene from the film, he startles a neighbor who has called at his door, yanking her Elvis t-shirt over her face while an inquisitive old coot looks on. Mortensen oscillates between drowsy menace and raucous mania, making you unsure of the scene's intended tone, and of him; it recalls Jack Nicholson's infamous diner scene in Five Easy Pieces, only without the comforting hint of showmanship...'

On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007




This is room 202, practically at the top of the stairs, which has been dressed as Frank's crash pad. Mortensen walks in and surveys its detritus. He takes a washcloth from the room's sink, folds it, and drapes it over the railing at the foot of the bed...no, not just yet. First, he goes to the bottle of Southern Comfort that sits on the dresser, lies on the bed, and puts the bottle between his legs to open it. Then he splashes some sour mash on the washcloth and re-drapes it. With his thumb over the top, he sprinkles more over the sheets and replaces the bottle. Finally, he ponders the room's Bible: Should it go over the bed? No. Under the pillow? No.

Then he seems to get an idea: he grabs his switchblade, inserts it as a bookmark, and places the Bible on the bed. There.

Viggo's attention to detail on set
Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premier,
October 1991




'Hopefully what will come across is that he does things he does because he's pure, pure good and pure bad,' explains Mortensen. 'I mean, compared to me and most people I know - we kind of have little controls and little ways of limiting our behaviour and our reactions to people. Frank doesn't really do that.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premier
October 1991




The fact that Frank is more than a bit of a bastard and yet the audience still feels for him? That's testament to the quality of Mortenen's work here.

The Indian Runner Blu-ray Review
DVD Talk
25 October 2017




"I remember Sean saying to me on about the sixth week of shooting," Indian producer Phillips recalls, "'Don, Viggo's going to be a humongous star.'"

Don Phillips
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"He's not a good actor, he's a great ****ing actor," Hopper says. "I'm not a fan of Sean's other two movies, but this is a hell of a movie. Don't live another day without seeing it. Mortensen is it. He's the real deal."

Dennis Hopper
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004


Quotable Viggo: 22 October 2017

So Viggo has had another birthday and is a year older and wiser. Time to share some pearls of wisdom from the last 6 years, although, to be honest, I think he's always been something of a wise old soul!



© Europa Press. Images © Marc Arias.


"I don't know if where you are born is where you belong. I was born in New York City but I belong in Argentina and Denmark and New Zealand and Russia and South Dakota (where he filmed Hidalgo). Home is not where you are, it's how you are."

When war forges an unlikely bond
by Helen Barlow
The West Australian
23 July 2015




'When I'm awake, I dream of perfection. It's not about reaching it, I'm aware that it is not possible. My concern is to seek it, to try very hard to shoot the perfect movie, to have the perfect marriage, to paint the perfect painting – above all to know that it will never work out. What counts is the will, not the achievement of the goal.'

Viggo Mortensen
I Have A Dream
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by CoCo and Techadmin
Zeit magazine
23 July 2015




'It's the endlessly entertaining, often ridiculous, sometimes admirable, sometimes embarrassing attempts that some people make to find some meaning in their lives that make life worth living.'

What I've learned – Viggo Mortensen
By Kal Fussman
Esquire
22 April 2015




'People today are much less present in spite of being hyper-connected. You see people in the street absorbed in their cell-phone; there's plenty of time for that message. What's more important than now?'

Viggo Mortensen: "The feeling of the absurd is something that's constant with me"
By Ima Sanchis - translated by Ollie and Zoe
La Vanguardia
8 October 2015




'I love to connect with people, I prefer it rather than being in conflict with them. For that, you have to try to understand others, you have to take time to listen to each other, to live together, to travel and see other cultures.'

Viggo Mortensen: "I know that I will be able to watch Far From Men again in 20 years and still be proud of it."
By Daniel Leblanc - translated by Donna Marie
Premiere (France
13 January 2015




'I think that you have to be able to speak without fear, that one can, and at times must, name things, facts, freely speak your mind. Free discussion without fear of anyone or anything. We can disagree, but we need to try to learn what's going on, what others think - everyone - in order to maintain a more or less sensible conversation, a healthy dialogue.'

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




'In a social sense, the idea of encouraging open dialogue for child to think for themselves is not unfamiliar. It's something I believe in, it's something I've done with my own son. There's going to be surprising results, because once they think for themselves, they can turn around and say, well, you're full of shit!'

Viggo Mortensen
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross Interview
Jason Gorber
Dorkshelf.com
14 July 2016




'I kind of — politely, of course — reject the notion that some people are artists and some people are not. I know that children up until a certain age, they don't make the distinction between artist and non-artist. All kids do theater — they don't need a director, they don't need take two, they just do it. They believe it completely.'

10 Lessons on Filmmaking from Viggo Mortensen
Filmmaker Magazine
3 November 2016




'Creative expression is social change. Wear your feelings on everything you do. It will help people open up their minds and see themselves and their communities in new ways.'

Actor Viggo Mortensen urges expression
by Kaci Yoder
Desert Sun
7 July 2013




'One of the best pieces of advice I ever got was from a horse master," he tells me. "He told me to go slow to go fast. I think that applies to everything in life. We live as though there aren't enough hours in the day but if we do each thing calmly and carefully we will get it done quicker and with much less stress.'

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




"There's a saying in Spanish: Without risk there's no glory," Mortensen explained. "You can live a safe little life, but if you don't take a chance once in a while you'll imprison yourself."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013




"In the past, I might have believed that my actions and feelings were inherited from the impulses of my ancestors - warriors, pirates, peasants, adventurers, painters, survivors in terrible circumstances - anything that would have seemed interesting to emulate in the accounts that have tried to make up an exclusive fabric of biological links I'd have with the Mortensens, Rasmussens, Gambles, Atkinsons, Chapmans, Codys or any other angel or devil of our family that has left a mark on his time. But now I believe that all of us are unprecedented individuals, potentially dangerous animals, creatures of brain and bone who can tame themselves or be tamed, who can learn to get along with others - or not."

Viggo Mortensen
Against Hopelessness
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Perceval Press
10 February 2013




'We are the stories we tell about ourselves, the stories we tell about others, the stories we read about everyone and every thing.'

Viggo Mortensen's heroes
Ethan Gilsdorf,
Boston Globe
3 March 2012

Quotable Viggo: 8 October 2017

I thought I'd stick with A History of Violence this week and move away from the reviews to quotes related to the casting and filming. HOV was the start of Viggo's collaboration with Cronenberg and a film which finally opened critics eyes to Viggo's range as an actor. The film is, indeed, a 'complex piece of music' which rewards you with new insights every time it's watched.



© New Line Productions Inc.


'It's like a great thoroughly satisfying and complex piece of music to me, this movie.'

Viggo Mortensen
Teen Hollywood
2005




Olson said he pictured Mortensen in the role of Stall, something the actor found "flattering and disturbing at the same time." Just to keep the star in line, Cronenberg told him Olson hadn't really written the role for him. "You were second to Brad Pitt."

Cannes Press Conference
National Post Cannes Review, by Chris Knight
17 May 2005




He's got the sort of quintessential type of American look to him. He reminds me of Kirk Douglas sometimes in darker films that he did.

Josh Olson on Viggo Mortensen
Interview with Jock Olson
by Rebecca Murray
About.com.
August 2005




"Viggo's my kind of actor," smiles Cronenberg… "He is a maniac for detail, which I love. He is very focused and obsessed with details of how his character would move, speak and dress. It's really quite spectacular to watch him work and to interact with him," says the director, who admits, that after two weeks of working closely with Mortensen, they felt like brothers.

David Cronenberg, Director
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




'It felt good to shed my hero's costume'

Viggo Mortensen
The Anti-Hero
by Renaud Baronian
Metro 18 May 2005




"The challenge in preparing and playing Tom Stall was to be thoroughly honest and specific with behaviour, to lie as truthfully as possible. But that's what actors are always ideally trying to do anyway."

Viggo Mortensen
V-Life magazine
Jan 2006




"Viggo is not pompous or pretentious. He doesn't arrive with an entourage. He's grounded, quirky, and observant. He is artistic. I deeply appreciate that since I basically arrive on the set with my shovel in hand and go to work as well. And I love it when someone else does that."

William Hurt
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




William Hurt killed me. He's so into what he is doing that it's extreme. He'd say, "Viggo! You're laughing again!"

I was trying so hard to be in the shadows. I wasn't laughing, but he could see that there were tears in my eyes.

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo and Cronenberg talking about the dangers of filming the fight scenes
Listening in: David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortenson introduce AHOV at Tiff
Next Projection.com
14 January 2014




'......even though emotionally there was a lot of difficult days on the set, you know, uncomfortable. There was always a lot of joking going on. It was a lot of fun making this movie. He has a very good sense of humour, maybe a very dark sense of humour, [laughs] but a good one.'

Viggo Mortensen - Cannes Interview
ARTE TV
By Lionel Julien, transcription by Chrissie
16 May 2005




"I'd wanted to work with him Indian Runner. He's holy and ridiculous. I've never worked with anyone so determined to create an interesting character. He's a good human being, and he's very, very hot."

Maria Bello
ThebookLA.com
January 2005




'[Cronenberg] continues what he's always done, which is taking people apart, almost like they were a machine or an engine, but now more taking their brains apart than their bodies, I suppose. It's more a psychological autopsy and the results are always a little disturbing. Not because he's disturbing, but because we are. As an audience and as a subject.'

Viggo Mortensen, Actor, poet, photographer
Philip Matthews
New Zealand Listener
March 18-24 2006




'The Stall family is monstrous because it's too normal. That effort to make everything work well, of being extra careful...there's always a little power game. There's a great deal beneath what one appears to be as a parent, a couple, a son. The effort to conceal that is disturbing.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Other Mortensen
By Mariana Enriquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
Página 12,
20 November 2005




In the end, do you think that this is ultimately a hopeful movie ?


Maria Bello: I think it's whatever anyone thinks it is. But for me, that day...we'd spent three months together and it did feel like a family. David said, 'I don't know what this scene is going to be. You guys have been in these characters for three months; you figure it out. When he walks in the door you'll know.' And it's true. As soon as we heard the door slam, Ashton (Holmes), Heidi (Hayes) and I kind of jumped and just immediately like welled up, all of us. And to look up and see his sweet face, this man who we've loved for three months, as Viggo and as this character, to be so unsure and to still love this person, yes I think there is a hopefulness in that.

Maria Bello on working with Viggo
JoBlo.com, by Thomas Luepp
27 September 2005




'Viggo Mortensen probably gave the best performance I have seen in a motion picture in as long as I can remember in A History of Violence .... Bill Hurt got a nomination for a rather bizarre, overly done performance in that film, but Viggo Mortensen is probably the premier actor in the business.'

Dale Olson, publicist
Oscar, You Insensitive Lout
by Sara Vilkomerson, New York Observer,
February 2006




"I dunno, maybe I'm channeling some barbaric ancestor or something."

Viggo Mortensen on his convincing performance
E online
22 Sept 2005


Quotable Viggo: 23 September 2017

I caught A History of Violence on TV a few of nights ago and even though it was already halfway through I just couldn't turn over. Viggo is mesmerizing as Tom/Joey and both Viggo and the film garnered such high praise from critics that I couldn't resist a HOV review quotable. It finishes with my favourite review quote of all time from Mark Kermode. And so say all of us.



© New Line Productions Inc.


...Viggo Mortensen plays a small-town American paterfamilias, equal parts Marlboro Man and Terminator...

A Nice Place to Film, but Heavens, Not to Live
Manohla Dargis
New York Times
11Sept 2005




... Mortensen's collaboration with Cronenberg is a wonder - it's difficult for me to imagine many actors who would be receptive to such a singular idea, let alone be able to put it into such vivid relief.

Kent Jones
Cinema Scope Magazine
Summer 2005




A History of Violence is right up there with The Shawshank Redemption for me; I've watched parts or all of it close to a dozen times on cable, never failing to marvel at the eight-minute showdown between Mortensen's character of Tom Stall and his loopy bro' Richie (William Hurt).

Validation for Viggo
Filmstew
Richard Horgan
22 January 2008




If you see this film twice, you'll see two different performances from Viggo, and that's the real genius of the movie. The first time through, you're watching him the same way his family is, accepting him as Tom Stall, loving family man, quiet and kind and nearly invisible. But when you see it a second time, you'll see Joey Cusack lurking behind those eyes, pushing through even in the moments before the thugs bring violence back into his life.

Moriarty
Ain't it Cool News
29 September 2005




Mortensen's power comes directly from his eyes. They speak much more than any line he delivers in the film and offer an astounding glimpse into the psyche of his character.

Christopher Childs
Twitchfilm.net
31 May 2005




If anyone has ever been more perfectly cast than he is here as Tom Stall, I haven't seen the film. His performance is the tricky switch on which the entire History flips. His star turn is a master class in minimalism and exactly what the movie needs at every juncture.

Nathaniel Rogers
Film Experience
September 2005




Viggo Mortensen is transfixing as a heroic diner owner who may not be all that he seems........ in splendid brooding, bomb-ticking form.

Tom Long
Detroit News
23 September 2005




Even before Tom proves himself a capable man when danger lurks, there's something about Mortensen -- or is it something he does as an actor? -- that makes the audience think, "No. There has to be more to this guy."

Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle
23 September 2005




His features themselves seem to evolve, soft at first and then growing hard, progressing (regressing) from cherubic choirboy to flinty-eyed thug and back again.

Rick Groen
The Globe and Mail
23 September 2005




He is an ordinary man, and vengeful gangsters have turned up in his home town, claiming to recognize him from the bad old days. He claims they are mistaken. And it is to Mortensen's credit that, despite the movie's giveaway title, we still can't be certain until he reaches breaking point. The scene which confirms the truth is a masterclass in understatement - it's a shot rather than a scene, the merest flicker on Mortensen's face, but you couldn't say it wasn't dynamite. The actor nailed it on his first stab; Cronenberg knew instantly that there was no need for take two.

On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007




Viggo Mortensen succeeds in presenting this human schizophrenic with those innocent blue eyes that can equally hide infinite cruelty.

Cronenberg's Violence
GLZonline Cannes Review, by Gidi Orsher, translated by Natica
May 2005




Sex and violence, allure and repulsion, the rifle-toting homesteader and the killer - they all nestle somewhere to varying degrees in human nature, just as they do in Mortensen's haunting performance.

Jim Ridley
Nashville Scene
29 September 2005




Hands down, this is the best performance that Viggo Mortensen has given in a film yet. He is just breath-taking in the film…

Harry
Ain't it Cool News
28 September 2005




One of the great strengths of this movie is the performances. Viggo's got a lot of his plate here, playing a character almost constantly at war with himself, and he nails it. There's no stupid tricks, where he changes his hairstyle or something when he goes back to being Joey. It's all done with the set of his shoulders, and his walk, and the look in his eyes, and it's chilling.

Anton Sirius
Ain't it Cool News
15 September 2005




There's something he's doing with his voice in this movie that gets to the character in such a subtle yet important way, little mannerisms that reveal secrets - or hide them. For all of Cronenberg's precise direction, for all the right notes hit by Harris, Holmes, and William Hurt in a brilliant late-arrival role, for the bravery of Olsen's screenplay not to work itself out in such expectedly simple ways, it's Mortensen's performance that slaps us the hardest in this movie. With the smallest of moves, the most understated of plays, he connects us to Tom in ways few actors could. And it's this connection that allows 'Violence' to run so very deep, to shake us to the bone, to wake us up and get us asking questions.

David Cornelius
EFilmcritic.com
1 October 2005




Fantastic performance from Viggo Mortensen.....he is absolutely a brilliant actor, he is the Robert de Niro of his generation, the Marlon Brando of his generation, the man is a genius.

Mark Kermode
BBC Radio Five Live
30 September 2005

Quotable Viggo: 17 September 2017

This week I thought I'd take a look back at Loin des Hommes, a film I've frustratingly still not seen as a Region 2 DVD with English subtitles has never been released. A hauntingly beautiful and thoughtful film in which Viggo plays to all his strengths and which showcases his amazing facility with languages.



© One World Films.


Looking for a non-french actor I thought of Viggo Mortensen, I was connected with him through the Spanish role, I've seen him in a Spanish film called Captain Alatriste and I knew he could speak perfect Spanish. I didn't know he could speak any language on earth, but I always had his face in my mind for this character, it actually helped me to write the script.'

2015 Tribeca Film Festival Interview: David Oelhoffen
By Lia Fietza
Indiwood
25 April 2015




'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




Mortensen acts in French, Arabic and a bit of Spanish as well. Is there nothing he cannot do?

Paul Byrnes
Sydney Morning Herald
31 July 2015




'It was one of the easiest decisions I ever had as far as accepting a part. I felt fortunate that it had been offered to me.'

Viggo Mortensen
More Than a Movie: 'Far from Men' Tells Important Human Story
By David Onda
Xfinity
24 April 2015




'Sometimes I asked people I met on the street or in the cafes about things that could help me to finish building the character in the film we are soon going to shoot in the Atlas mountains. Specific things about phrases or historical references in our script - trying out my very limited Arabic vocabulary, mixed with the French that I'm refining for the shoot - but in general just seeking out human contact, to go along touching, even if it was only ephemeral brushing against, the history of the many cultures that have passed through this city. The character that I'm going to play grew up here and I want to imagine his childhood and adolescence as best I can. I've always liked research like this, letting places, the weather, people and my own physical condition inform the adventure.'

Viggo on preparing to film while in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




Whereas some actors have yet to master their native tongue, in this touchingly humane performance, Mortensen convincingly adds French to the already impressive list of languages he can speak onscreen

Peter Debruge
Variety
30 August 2014




'He's lived with the ugly side of people and has decided to distance himself from everything - violence, corruption, conflict, the evil side of things. He wants to do good, teaching Arab children to read. I understand that impulse, but no one can flee forever because life is finally going to seek us out.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Camus has the ability to plunge into the grey areas"
By José Manuel Cuéllar - translated by Ollie and Zoe
ABC.es - Hoy Cinema
2 October 2015




'We always thought with Viggo Mortensen that Daru's character was very close to Camus himself, a Camus who would have stayed in Algeria, with no Nobel prize and literary success, a Camus who would have become a teacher.'

Interview: 'Far From Men' Director David Oelhoffen
Fliks
by Steve Newall
13 October 2015




Mortensen has a heroic presence but he is also unafraid of conveying an almost feline grace. There are moments in this film when he reminded me of the young Gary Cooper, and of Steve McQueen, two other actors who convincingly integrated sensuality and masculinity. These are qualities he shares with Kateb, and when they are together on screen their interaction is absolutely riveting.

Christos Tsiolkas
The Saturday Paper
31 July 2015




"It's a story that shows that people can overcome prejudices they didn't even know they had. Both men have to make an effort to understand something that they thought they knew and in the end they are more alike than different."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"The title applies to Daru at the beginning, to the way he lives, keeping away from people as a way to protect himself... but the story catches up with all of us,
At the end of the film the title no longer applies to Daru, because he comes back to where people are, but rather to Mohammed, who goes into the unknown into the wilderness."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




In "Far From Men," Viggo Mortensen, his sharply planed face weathered and solemn, plays a man who looks as if he were quarried right out of the hard red-rock earth.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
30 April 2015




Far from Men often suggests a less defiant cover of The Defiant Ones, yet it's a must-see for Mortensen's characteristically wonderful performance. One of the most subtly physically tactile of great actors, he masterfully dramatizes the war between the said and the unsaid.

Chuck Bowen
Slant Magazine
22 April 2015




Nobody moseys like Viggo Mortensen. In The Road, Appaloosa, Jauja, and the new French Western Far From Men, the erstwhile Aragorn masters the tricky art of being a figure in the landscape. When it comes to traipsing either purposefully or desperately across the widescreen frame, he's several lengths ahead of the competition...

Adam Nayman
AV Club
30 April 2015

Quotable Viggo: 9 September 2017

This week we've been enjoying a daily treat showcasing all the different kinds of men Viggo has played in various films. He's been a 'good' man, a 'mercenary' man, a 'two-faced' man and a 'mystery man'. So what kind of man is Viggo when he's not being somebody else?



© ACN.


"…a man of mystery, for sure - that's rule No. 1."

Diane Lane
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"…a man of many passions."

Charlize Theron
Beautiful Dreamer
By Holly Millea
Elle (U.S.)
October 2009




"…a man of his word."

Ed Harris
Appaloosa
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys and Indians magazine
October 2008




"…a man who's at once utterly carefree and mercurial yet also deeply resolute."

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"…a man possessed of both great creative integrity and strong, lucid political conviction."

David Newsom, Author of "Skip'
ReadySteadyBook.com
Mark Thwaite, March 10 2006




"…a man of depth, charm and, above all, generous."

Top Men - Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Graciela
Glamour
September 2006




"…a man's man [who] believes intellectually the words coming out of his mouth."

Matt Ross
Why Viggo Mortensen Deserves to Win the Oscar for Best Actor
Indiewire.
16 February 2017




"…a man who quotes British philosophers and Adam Sandler in the same breath".

History Teacher
By Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
19 August 2005




"…a man who walks round the forbidden forests of the human nature with impunity, stirring up the bowels of everyday life with his curious eyes and his restless hands."

Viggo's Other Look
Diario de León
by María Dolores García - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




"…a man from another time…"

Chris Bumbray
Jo Blo
26 January 2016




"…a man who would not be king."

Viggo on locusts, life and kissing Liv Tyler
By Molly Woulfe
Northwest Indiana Times thetimesonline.com
3 August 2004




"..a man of the hills, the woods, the angry sea."

Viggo Mortnensen
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013


Quotable Viggo: 2 September 2017

We've been looking at some fantastic suits this week so of course my Quotable is about… T-shirts. You can say a lot with a T-shirt and, as we know, Viggo is a man who always has a lot to say. Sometimes it's a political statement, sometimes it's supporting his beloved San Lorenzo or the Habs, sometimes it's just a bit of fun with a crew. But one way or another his T-shirts regularly make the press.



© C-Span/Frazer Hamilton/Avisen.dk/Indigo Musica y Sonido/Unknown


"Want to see my luggage?" Mortensen asked, emerging from his hand-washing and following my gaze to the "sculpture." "Let's see what's in here," he added, removing underwear, several T-shirts - one with fishing records on it, another emblazoned with "Bring Our Troops Home" - and a United Nations flag from the bag. "I travel light."

Renaissance man jousts with career-changing role
By Chris Hewitt,
Twin Cities
28 September 2005




At a recent press conference, Mortensen appeared in a T-shirt reading "No More Blood For Oil," while Urban's jacket sported a peace symbol. When asked about their fashion statement Mortensen softly but adamantly made his views clear.

Viggo Mortensen
The Fellowship vs. The Empire
By Giovanni Fazio
The Japan Times, 2003




"One of the reasons why I support Dennis Kucinich is this…," said the actor.

Mortensen then pulled open his button-down shift to reveal a black t-shirt with the word "Impeach" emblazoned across the front.

Viggo supporting Dennis Kucinich
New Hampshire Presidential Primaries
January 2008




"I saw Viggo Mortensen on the "Charlie Rose Show" wearing a T-shirt — "Impeach, Remove, Jail" — that made me think, "Oh, Viggo Mortensen — he's a serious political thinker." (Laughs.) It just takes three words to make you a serious political thinker. ..."

Howard Zinn
Howard Zinn tells us about Obama, Viggo and his love of eggs
ByJoe Garofoli
San Francisco Chronicle
28 February 2009




Viggo Mortensen is lying on the floor when the photographer and journalist enter the Palæfløjen in Roskilde. The place the King of Denmark used as a residence from 1536 when he was away from home. So maybe the King has returned? Or maybe it is a deeply focused artist who obstinately stays on the floor when the press interrupts him.

He wears a T-shirt, jeans and socks. The latter with big holes. On the chest of the red T-shirt it says "Hungary". It is a gift from the crew he worked with in Hungary when he made the movie Good.

From Movies To Photos
By Jette Hansen - translated by Rosen
Morgenavisen, Jyllands-Posten
19 October 2008




"These characters, the father and his son, in spite of seeming to be very cold, in fact, beneath the rags they wear, happen to have San Lorenzo t-shirts," says the actor, and laughs.

Viggo talking about The Road
In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010




'I met Maradona once on Susana Giménez' program.... The idea was that his arrival would be a surprise at the end of the broadcast, but someone got excited and told me a few hours before going to the station. I took with me in my pocket a CASLA t-shirt with "10" and gave it to him during the program. I told him that there was a gap in our lineup because of injuries (maybe it was Walter Montillo that was hurt, I don't remember now) and that the following day, since we were playing against River, maybe he would like to join us. The idol took it very well and Susana, who's a Cuervo, laughed too.'

Viggo Mortensen
In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




'I have enough shirts to field a whole San Lorenzo team…'

Viggo Mortensen Q&A
By Richard Deitsch
Sports Illustrated magazine
5 August 2004
Sports Illustrated magazine




We heard a rumor that Aragorn is also a big Habs supporter – did you really wear a Canadians T-shirt under your armor while filming The Lord of the Rings trilogy?

I did – I wore it quite a bit, actually. I'll always look to see if the shirt peeks out on screen but I've never been able to see it.

The Last Word : Viggo Mortensen
Canadiens Magazine
8 December 2009




…in Asturias, Madrid, Salamanca, El Álamo or Tarifa he was seen signing autographs and wearing a black T-shirt in which you could read the name of León in big letters. Not even Fitur (important tourist industry exhibition) has done so much for this land... his presence over here has been a great help for the name of León to appear at every website in the five continents, thanks to pictures such as this one. Not even the UPL (regionalist party of León) ever dreamt of a better ambassador!

With León In His Heart
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno, Diario de León, 18 April 2005
translated by Paddy




Throughout the shoot, each time Mortensen went to visit his mother, he'd purchase T shirts sporting various types of fish logos, swimming in turbulent streams. On each visit, he purchased more until soon, nearly the entire crew was garbed in fish T shirts. Fish Fridays became an event.

A History of Violence
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




'I had a running joke with the crew of the movie "cause I'm a Canadians fan, ' he says with a hint of glee. 'I was raised in northern New York on the St Lawrence across the river from Kingston and I always liked Montreal. I made the mistake one day, I wasn't thinking, and I walked in wearing a Montreal T-shirt. The crew saw me and said "Holy sh-t, whatya doing!' And then I realized, God, all these guys are wearing f-ckin' Maple Leaf caps every f-ckin' day.

'So every Thursday I didn't just wear a Montreal T-shirt, I wore a red Montreal hockey jersey.'

Viggo Mortensen
Interview: Viggo Mortensen, By Ingrid Randoja
Famous, September 2005




In a lot of the snapshots that people have taken of the famous actor, he appears with some unusual t-shirts. As a good photographer and painter, and used to communicating through images, these t-shirts become his most direct message, carried to where it can be recognised and interpreted.

One of León called Viggo
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
Diario de León
29 April 2005


Quotable Viggo: 20 August 2017

In something to cheer our day, yesterday, we had '16 Times Aragorn Was Hotter Than the Fires of Mount Doom'. Only 16 :lol:? Time for another Aragorn Quotable. I figure that we can never have too many! So enjoy, once again, some old favourites about 'the dishiest bloke ever to have donned a crown'.



© New Line Productions Inc.


Eyes ablaze and sword aglint, Mortensen proved a captivating warrior who stirred the hearts, souls and in many cases the loins of the first blockbuster film's audiences. The very first moment he is glimpsed-silently sitting in the shadows inside the Prancing Pony inn, his eyes shielded by the hood of his cloak-signalled the arrival of a New Hollywood Hero, a dynamic man of mystery, action and romance. Tall, graceful, handsome, athletic, charismatic-these are qualities that Mortensen has always possessed, but before this had never projected them with such vigour.

The New Hollywood Male
By Charles Gant
Arena Homme Plus #18
December 2002




"From the moment that I saw him onscreen," says Otto, "I thought, 'Shit, he looks incredible. Here's a character I don't have to pretend to be in love with.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




Picture Han Solo without the wisecracks mixed with and Indian scout mixed with Sir Lancelot stirred together with the leadership and loyalty of a leader we all wish we had. In the dictionary under the term "Star making performance" there should be a photo of Viggo as Aragorn. The only thing keeping him from becoming the next HUGE leading man is if he decides he doesn't want to be. Women will love him and men will too. To top it off, he has a terrific (but brief) scene of incredible romance.

FOTR
Nick Nunziata
CHUD
December 2001




I spent the duller sections thinking about how flaxen-haired Legolas looks like a Milky Bar hippy as he pings his egg-slicer-strong arrows at the barbarous monsters. I also drifted off looking at Viggo Mortensen: has a more virile, dynamic actor ever appeared on the silver screen?

TTT
Sukhdev Sandhu
The Daily Telegraph
December 18, 2002




Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn easily dons the mantle of epic hero that used to be worn by Charlton Heston, and he's a lot sexier.

TTT
Christopher Tookey
The Daily Mail
December 20, 2002




Aragorn has the slinky swagger and dreamy stubble that make him look like a legend created by Tolkien, Sam Shepard and Ralph Lauren.

ROTK
The New York Times
Triumph Tinged With Regret in Middle Earth
Elvis Mitchell
December 16, 2003




This is Return of the King though, and Viggo is that king. Throughout all three films, this has been a journey of responsibility for Aragorn as he grows to accept the destiny for which he was born. Viggo is noble, Viggo is powerful, Viggo is resplendent. He's a young Sean Connery but with a grittier style. More than anyone else, this is Aragorn's film.

ROTK
Film Hobbit
Cinemablend.com
16 December 3003




I am being seduced by royalty. And not your garden variety Windsor, either. Admittedly, he looks more like a gypsy in his earthy tunic repaired to within an inch of its life, his hands and nails bearing the ingrained grit of a farmer. But he's a king all right: the King, the Lord of Men. He is Aragorn, son of Arathorn, and any minute now he's going to reach out one of those taut brown arms, lift me up on his trusty steed and whisk me away from all this...

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph
23 November 2003




The fiery passion that blazes in his eyes can do what no extra-large popcorn can: sustain a grown woman through six-plus hours of viewing pleasure for the past two years. It has been a torrid, if one-sided, affair, though I suspect many others have fallen for his unwashed charms.

On Viggo as Aragorn
It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




You can have your wee hobbits and wizened wizards. Give me the man who would be king. Rough-hewn Aragorn is as manly as they come as he slays loathsome orcs and woos elf princess Arwen, whispering sweet nothings into her pointy ears.

It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
16 December 2003




Casually dropping his name into conversations with the girls over the past 48 hours has produced more gasps, heaving bosoms and sighs of jealousy than a Lotto win.

"I'm a poet" - Rings star Mortensen
By Josie McNaught
Sunday Star-Times
2003




....even sitting in a plastic chair under the unflattering glare of fluorescent, in a drab office at Miramar Productions' headquarters in New Zealand, Viggo Mortensen is by far the dishiest bloke ever to have donned a crown.

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph
2003




The biggest impression, though, comes from one of the lesser-known players: Viggo Mortensen stuns as the tormented, destiny-shucking warrior Aragorn, exuding a bravery that will make men admire him and an intensity that will make women want to hop into his leather jerkin. (Let's just hope he doesn't inspire a resurgence in Renaissance Faire fashion.)

FOTR
Tor Thorsen
Reel.com 2001




Viggo wears his beauty so carelessly and deflects flattery with a wry head-on-the-side smile of modesty. These two acting kings are both terrific once more in The Return of the King.

Ian McKellen
"The White book", Mckellen.com
July 15, 2003




When Star asked the actor what he makes of being called a sex symbol, he joked, "I think you should ask Orlando Bloom that question!" Mortensen, it seems, considers himself more geeky than sexy: "They call me the 'Dork of New York'," he says.

Could Viggo Mortensen Be The Perfect Man?
By Nathan Cooper & Mike Glynn
Star, 2003

Quotable Viggo: 12 August 2017

Ah, Appaloosa. Viggo with his goatee and dapper clothes, the big honking gun, Ed Harris and his big black hat, and so much strong silent stuff the West has never been so… well… west. Heck, Viggo even rode off into the sunset. A film hugely short-changed at the box-office despite two of the best actors in the business getting together and riding the hell out of the Western genre. How is that even possible given these fantastic reviews?



© New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.


While many might not appreciate this slow and slightly revisionist western, I'm going to put it up there with "Open Range" and "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" as one of best. Go to see Ed Harris kick tail, but stay for one of Viggo Mortensen's best performances.

Coop Cooper
The Small Town Critic
1 October 2008




Everett says very little and spends a lot of time just watching the other characters, so Mortensen's performance resides almost entirely in his eyes, which register tiny, unmistakable nuances of surprise, suspicion and amusement.

These are what make the movie worth watching

A O Scott
International Herald Tribune
18 September 2008




Viggo steals the picture. His always fresh and relaxed expressions, with dark subtexts dancing just below the surface, never cease to astound me.

Rex Reed
The New York Observer
17 September 2008




...Holding one's body still in front of a movie camera while also giving the sense of a mind in motion is a specialized art, one with few masters. Paul Newman comes to mind, notably in his later career, as does Robert Duvall, a perennial movie cowboy who will surely wish that Appaloosa had come his way. And now, it would seem, there is Mortensen, who steals this film by doing nothing much more than lean against doorways and bar counters. Like Harris, Mortensen is a great listener, and good listeners—in life and in movies—barely move. That quality is just right for the role of Hitch, whose life hangs on Cole's next word and slightest gesture. It's an old truth, and not just about westerns: When the talking stops, the dying begins.

Chuck Wilson
Village Voice
17 Septmeber 2008




But while the story is compelling, and the scenes lush, none of that compares to the performance given by Mortensen. He is, simply, Hitch. There is not one moment that seems like acting, or where he seems like anything other than his character. Mortensen's performance is flawless – so real that the film seems more like a look into the past, rather than a fictional slice of entertainment. You can see his power, his strength, and his intelligence as easy as you can see the all-prevalent dusty wind.

Monika Bartyzel
collider.com
8 September 2008
Early Films




Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen, two of my favorite actors today, had the on-screen chemistry that every filmmaker dreams of. Rugged, badass and tough lawman who just flat out kicked ass through the whole film.

Troy
Moviewiseguys.com
6 September 2008




…if you want to know what the film's "about," above and beyond the story (which is a deliberate but well-constructed yarn in its own right), it's "about" the relationships that certain men build, where they form a partnership that supercedes everything else, a code that exists that is more binding than law. It's about the way that code changes everything else they do. And when you're making a movie about that, and it stars Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen, and Harris is directing which means that there's all the room in the world for these two to just act the shit out of every unspoken silence, every action beat unfolding as a duet between these two serious badasses. This film is all about the soul behind the gunslinger, and it's verrrrry subtle stuff.

Moriarty
Ain't it Cool news
5 October 2008




Are there two more stronger, silenter types in modern movies than Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen? Each of these actors are a throw back to the days when cowboy stars were manly men who mean what they say and only say what they mean and nothing else.

Richard Crouse
CTV.ca
6 September 2008




Their bond is easily one of the best portrayed in the entire Western canon. Viggo Mortensen's Hitch outdoes Val Kilmer's role as Doc Holliday, something I wouldn't have thought possible. And the interactions between these two extremely efficient killers and decent men is movie-making magic.

Crimecritics.com
9 January 2009



….a perfect, dryly comic Viggo Mortensen.

Tom Hall
The Back Row Manifesto
6 September 2008




With his chiseled, windburned, mustachioed face, Mortensen is a dead ringer for men you'd see in an actual frontier photo. Because Hitch is the archetypal man of few words, Mortensen delivers a wonderfully nuanced, subtle performance; one sad glance speaks volumes more about Hitch's devotion to Cole than any soliloquy could.


Jim Vejvoda
IGN
18 September 2008




"Mortensen is wonderful. He's one of the best actors at not doing anything and making you watch him all the more."

Ty Burr
Boston Globe: Take 2
October 2008




Viggo Mortensen only gets better and better each time you see him, and as Everett Hitch there isn't a complaint to be had.

Brad Brevet
Rope of Silicon
2 October 2008




Harris and (especially) Mortensen are the magic that makes this movie work so well, film fans can only hope, based on their chemistry here and in "A History of Violence," they are given many more opportunities to work together. They're right up there with DeNiro and Pesci as one of the screen's best team.

Edward Havens
Filmjerk
23 September 2008

Quotable Viggo: 5 August 2017

We've had some lovely photos of Viggo with animals this week. Of course we know how much he loves horses and dogs, but he's also worked with bees, has a thing about crows and has had some close encounters with moose and bears. And then there is the interview with the Sunday Times where the interviewer is side-swiped by both football and a rat-a-roo…



© Terry Richardson


"W.C. Fields said don't work with kids or animals, I guess because they'll upstage you or drive you crazy," said Viggo Mortensen, with a soft chuckle. "But I've always enjoyed it."

Viggo Mortensen
How Viggo Mortensen learned to be captain of 6 kids onscreen
Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
8 July 2016




'There are images of forests, mountains and animals. Everything is connected. We are related to the animals and we are also in a way animals ourselves.'

Viggo on the sadanset exhibition
Kim Kastrup
Ekstra Bladet
16 October 2008




Viggo Mortensen quietly lounges in his suite at a Beverly Hills, Calif., hotel talking about his recent film and looking relieved to not answer yet another Lord of the Rings question… He perks up when asked about his bond with four-legged companions.

"They ground you and calm you," he says. "They're just so admirable for their loyalty."

Hollywood Actor Shares His Love For Animals
By Kyra Kirkwood
Dog Fancy
March 2006




…everyone had a camera, and the room was full of the sounds of flashes and clicks.

I hadn't brought a camera, but I had brought a dog, so the crowds parted for me. They had to, because Chloe would have shimmied past them and knocked them aside if not. I don't know what had gotten into her, but she was bee-lining, it seemed, toward Viggo. Perhaps if she too could not resist his magnetic pull.

Chloe pulled me all the way to Viggo, and when he saw her his tired face lit up. Hey, I thought, that look was supposed to be saved for me… Not once did Viggo look at me, or admire my tall Italian boots or my frilly French blouse. Not once did we lock eyes (his eyes were as blue as the sea!) or fall in love. No, it seemed my fantasy man had fallen in love with Chloe.


When Your Dog Gets to Kiss Viggo Mortensen and You Do Not
By Lee Harrington
|The Bark
16 February 2011




"It's like working with any creature – horse, dog or bee. If you're calm you won't get kicked, bitten, or stung." Did he get stung? "No," he says with a small smile. "I was lucky. And I made my own honey. I've still got a couple of jars."

Viggo on working with bees
Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




…when Mortensen buys a horse, you just know it's because, somehow, the animal spoke to him, that he had to have it.

Lone Star
by Peter Ross
Sunday Herald
2004




"TJ had a strong personality. He was smaller than the other horses and like a dog he thought he was BIG. Like the dachshunds that run around chasing big dogs. He's very smart. He's good at pretending he didn't hear you. He's very lazy. He definitely had a personality! I thought, "This is going to be a chore!" But we got to know each other and he's a smart animal. You're not going to be able to lie to that horse. You need to ask nicely. '

Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, Mar '04




It takes a thoroughbred star like Mortensen to make the bond between man and horses believable, and to keep Hidalgo from straying too far into fields of corn.

From hobbits to horses
Jennie Punter
The Globe and Mail
5 March 2004




The two horse team was getting a little fidgity. Viggo Mortensen walked over to the horse nearest him and started caressing its right flank slowly, and repeated it over and over, while talking to Renee, standing in the buckboard. The horse relaxed along with it's teammate. .........

Filming Appaloosa
Blogengeezer
24 October 2007




Sitting casually, hanging out on the bench, seems ideal. But there is a problem. There are rats. Many of them. They are running back and forth between the bushes, over the footpath, and it is impossible to ignore them.

"Wow. They're bold," he says, incredulously. A couple of Brazilians pass by. "Hey - I could ask them who they played in the World Cup final."...

...Minutes later, he returns. "Yeah, in the final it was Brazil against Holland. I didn't really give a sh** but I was rooting against Brazil - I grew up in Argentina." But Brazil has never met Holland in a World Cup final: it was the semifinal in 1994. No matter, he's still impressed by the rats.

"Whoa! Did you see that one? That was a rat-a-roo. Is it a herd of rats, a flock of rats? Maybe it's a swarm."

Another one tumbles past. "That one has a bad back. He's old - that's sad." Having a conversation about anything else proves impossible. "I don't remember seeing that many rats here," he says. "They're twice as big as the rats in Los Angeles. That one was like a possum'.

The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
30 November 2003




"A change of light, a sunset, a sunrise. Things you may never see again. You grasp those moments. You don't see a bear in the wild and walk on, thinking: Oh, I'll see another bear. You just wait and watch."

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




Have you had any dangerous encounters with animals?

I've been very close to bears before, and moose and elk. Wolves I've seen fairly close. I've never been attacked by a bear or a wolf. People don't think of a moose as dangerous but they can be vicious. They're very strong. Especially a mother — a moose-cow. I've had a moose-cow charge me but I was far enough away that I got out of there. I've also inadvertently been between a grizzly bear and its cub, but again, I was near my car and I got in and drove away.

60 Seconds - VIGGO MORTENSEN
By James Mottram
Metro
2 February




Viggo Mortensen didn't want to miss out on Election Day while filming his latest flick, "A History of Violence,'' in Canada so he staged a polling station on the set. People Maggie reports that the "Lord of the Rings" hottie rigged up a mock voting booth and producer Chris Burns used his dog, Rosie, to monitor the voters. Not surprisingly, cast and crew voted for John Kerry though the write-in candidate, Rosie the canine, made a strong showing in second place. Have these people never heard of absentee ballots?

Own Private Idaho
Boston Herald
5 November 2004




"When you were a kid, what'd you want to be when you grew up?"

"A crow was probably what I wanted to be most of all."

"Really? Why is that? What is it about crows?

"They're survivors. They can live anywhere. They're very self-sufficient. They're very resourceful. They're adaptable."

"That sounds like you."

"Yeah!" he laughed.

Viggo Mortensen: Making peace with the camera
By Tracy Smith
CBS
11 December 2016

Quotable Viggo: 22 July 2017

With the announcement that Jodie Whittaker is the next Doctor Who, I started thinking again about Good, where Jodie played opposite Viggo in a deeply thought-provoking film that took a very long time and a great deal of sacrifice to get off the ground. Playing against type, Viggo brought a huge amount of integrity and sincerity to Halder, a weak and indecisive man who wants to be good, who tries to be good, but who becomes increasingly ensnared by one of history's most evil regimes.



Image Larry Horricks.
© Good Films.



"There's a new Viggo Mortensen movie out and all is right with the world. It's called Good and, as usual, he gives a mesmerising performance."

Jeffrey Lyons
Reel Talk
December 2008




"I was starting out in acting 25 years ago, and was in London on what was only my second audition. I didn't get the part, but while I was there I saw a play 'Good' with Alan Howard, and it made a strong impression. When the opportunity to play the role on film came along, I thought it an interesting way to make a circle out of the experience some quarter century later."

Viggo Mortensen
Emmanuel Levy
Emmanuel Levy.com
24 November 2008




"I like the title. It's intelligent. It lets the audience think for itself a bit. If you wanted to be really obvious, it would be Good?, or "Good" in quotation marks. The movie doesn't steer you that much. It shows you some lives, parts of some lives, and I think it leaves a certain amount open to debate, I like that there's something to talk about afterwards."

Viggo Mortensen - For The Good Of The People
By Elliot V Kotek
Moving Pictures
Winter 2008-2009




Why Viggo Mortensen?

Viggo Mortensen is an extraordinary actor. I had seen him in A History Of Violence, directed by David Cronenberg, in which he plays a man haunted by ghosts from his past. In Good he is a mirror image of it, his character is becoming the ghost he will be. He has the perfect biotype to play a German. He has a sweet kind of masculinity, almost fragile and these characteristics are very important to convince the audience about his choices, even though these choices will take him to an abyss.

Vicente Amorim (Director)
Rede CBN radio interview
3 June 2006
Translated by Claudia




"The thing about whoever played Halder is he had to have a sense of integrity and goodness. That's something I've always thought of (Mortensen) and something I'd been told by people who knew him — that he was a really lovely guy."

Jason Isaacs
Feb 2009




'I brought [from Germany and Poland] a lot of books, editions that would have been from that time. Poets from the 18th and 19th centuries, and Scandinavian writers. And my glasses; I found some frames that were made back then. My pocket watch. Little things. I like collaborating with the props and set designers, to feel like I'm involved in the character's life.'

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008




"My goal was not to think about history, and what we know about this period, but to think about this situation and each moment. Why does John Halder do the things that he does? He's not one thing or the other. He's not good or bad. He's somewhere in between, we all are."

Viggo Mortensen
Play It As It Lays
By Philip Berk
Filmink
April 2009




"He's maddening at times. He goes from being very passive and stumbling, and thinking it doesn't seem a big deal, until finally he's got the uniform on and denial kicks in. It's an accumulation of all of these compromises. He can't run away from it any more and then he crumbles. And at the root of it he has been seduced by flattery."

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'…maybe there's an element of them having seen me in another movie and going, 'Oh, he's going to do something at some point'. And, it's not. He just keeps going down, down, down. '

Viggo Mortensen talking about reactions to 'Good'

Capone has a GOOD chat with Viggo Mortensen about politics, THE ROAD, APPALOOSA, and THE HOBBIT!!!
Ain't it Cool News
3 December 2008




"I wanted to go to Auschwitz, which I did, and I was looking around. I'd found a map that showed all the places where the camps were. I went to every single one. I drove like a maniac, day after day, and sometimes it was difficult to find them. People don't want to talk about it so much, and in most cases, there's just a plaque. The thing that was valuable was just standing there. It was spring, there were flowers, and the sky was blue. You sit on the grass and yes, you're moved by all these things and the ghosts that you can feel. I was thinking about the guards, the prisoners, the kids... but there were things that I didn't expect. It's hard to explain, but it just keeps opening and opening, and you can never stop learning."

Viggo Mortensen
Play It As It Lays
By Philip Berk
Filmink
April 2009




In the electrifying Good, my favourite film of the festival, Viggo Mortensen, who has proved he can play anything, surprised the hell out of audiences, who emerged stunned.

Rex Reed
Toronto Film Festival Review
New York Observer
September 2008




Viggo Mortensen is extraordinary! He gives a restrained, soulful, haunting performance that makes the movie.

Scott Feinberg Los Angeles Times (The Envelope)
October 2008




'If there's anything that this movie maybe says it's "Pay attention. Pay attention."'

Viggo Mortensen
Capone has a GOOD chat with Viggo Mortensen about politics, THE ROAD, APPALOOSA, and THE HOBBIT!!!
Ain't it Cool News
3 December 2008

Quotable Viggo: 16 July 2017

This week I thought I'd string together some publicity, promotion and poster quotes – something Viggo takes extremely seriously despite the exhausting round of interviews, Q&As and flashlight bulbs. Remember the Magical Mystery Tour? The 'Big Fat Head' poster (we've had a lot of those this week…)? When the filming's stopped Viggo's work on the film just carries on… and on…



© Touchstone / Buena Vista Pictures.


Viggo Mortensen, a one-man publicity machine for "Captain Fantastic," walked his handsome self into the crowd, the focal point for many a woman's — and man's — glad eyes.

Viggo at the pre-Golden Globes Bafta Tea
By Cara Buckley
NY Times
8 January 2017




A few nights ago, the team behind the Argentine-Danish film 'Jauja' reached Copenhagen on their Danish tour visiting local cinemas. In Grand Theater in Copenhagen, the film's Danish actors Ghita Nørby and Viilbjørk Malling stood in front of the audience introducing the remarkable, poetic film that takes place in both Argentina and Denmark.

Quite deliberately, a man - around 180 centimeters tall, slightly gray-haired and angular, with a cleft chin and high cheekbones - stood unobtrusively at the side of the hall. It was Viggo Mortensen aka the team's driver during the whole tour through Denmark, which he later in an email interview called "The Jauja Magical Mystery Tour"…. Because his father is Danish, and because he has lived in Denmark as a young man and speaks fluent Danish, it is as if Viggo Mortensen is one of our own and is expected to give a little more of himself than other world stars do.

Mortensen – The Intellectual Hick
Polotiken - Translated by Our Danish Translator
5 June 2015




Trying to catch his breath in a luxury suite in a Century City hotel, Mortensen swivels slowly in his chair, stopping short when he is confronted by a large poster for his new movie. The poster, in which his face is prominent, was mounted on an easel by someone at the studio, and the actor is taken aback by the star treatment he is suddenly being accorded on movie posters.

Big fat-head poster notwithstanding, this is a pretty good movie,' he says with a sheepish grin of embarrassment, turning back around quickly so that he doesn't have to look at the poster for one more agonizing second.

Clearly, Mortensen is not your typical ego-driven Hollywood actor.

On promoting 'Hidalgo'
A Reluctant Star
By Barry Koltnow, Orange County Register
7 March 2004




Cronenberg on the airbrushing of Viggo's scar out of the posters:

"It became a classic Viggo issue. He was really upset,' Cronenberg recalls, remembering how the posters were promptly changed to reflect reality. "He's not afraid of what he is.'

Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish, by Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




'I don't care about being famous. I don't care about having my face on posters. It doesn't massage my ego. It's nice to have a poster, but in the end it's about the movie. Nobody walks around saying "The movie stunk, but the poster was awesome'.'

Viggo Mortensen while promoting Hidalgo
A Reluctant Star
By Barry Koltnow, Orange County Register
7 March 2004




Barefoot, carrying a coffee plunger of water and sporting a United Nations badge on his jacket, Hollywood star Viggo Mortensen wandered into his own press conference as though he were planning to sit on the back lawn.

A Barefoot Viggo Lords It Over The Fans
By James Gardiner
New Zealand Herald
29 November 2003




The first thing you need to know about Viggo Mortensen is that he doesn't like talking about himself. The second thing you need to know about Viggo Mortensen is that he hasn't stopped talking about himself for the past six months.

On promoting 'Hidalgo'and 'ROTK'
A Reluctant Star
By Barry Koltnow
Orange County Register
7 March 2004




Despite his exhaustion, Mortensen's tongue did not call a truce. The actor refused to stop talking about his movie. "It's unique. It brings together aspects of mythology, history, fairy tales...It's a very special combination of Scandinavian and South American storytelling. It's as Argentine as it is Danish," he concluded as he fought off the charms of Morpheus as well as he could.

During Viggo's marathon promotion of Jauja
Viggo Mortensen firma en valenciano
Translated by Ollie and Zoe
Levante
7 February 2015




You'll notice Mortensen has segued nicely back to the theme of the film he's promoting. He's clever like that. If you were a film director, he's exactly the kind of actor you'd want talking up your movie: on-message, but not in a bland, PR-trained sort of way. He's passionate, informed and willing to answer a question like 'Is it weird to know that so many people have seen you naked?' without the slightest murmur of complaint.

Viggo Mortensen: Straight Shooter
By Ellen E Jones
Little White Lies #22
April 2009




There´s very little that I don´t like about being an actor, an artist. I think I´m very lucky to be able to make a living from this profession, and it´s a privilege. I travel, I meet a great variety of people and landscapes, I continue learning from other points of view. Sometimes the amount of time it takes to promote the finished films, with a lot of interviews, photo sessions, can be a bit annoying, but I understand it and accept it as part of my job.'

Viggo Mortensen demonstrates to this newspaper that the great never lose their humility
By - translated by Ollie and Zoe
TiempoSur
9 June 2013




After the movie, Viggo came back up on the stage and answered a few questions. When put on the spot to add on a final word he thought for a second then dug into his bag and brought out his personal copy of THE ROAD. There were what looked like a hundred stick-it notes marking different pages and the spine was cracked and worn. It's obviously seen a lot of use.

To close the event he read a bit from McCarthy's description of the sea-area landscape. That was pretty cool…

Viggo promoting 'The Road'
Quint at the Telluride Viggo Mortensen tribute
Ain't it Cool News
8 September 2008




Viggo promoting A History of Violence

Viggo Mortensen has a trick. He performs it to amuse himself during back-to-back interviews, when he needs something, other than cigarettes, to keep himself alert.

The trick is this: He is wearing a Canadian Hockey League pendant - one of those pewter souvenirs you buy at any arena gift shop. He starts the interview with the pendant facing forward on his chest. Then, at some point, he flips the pendant over. On the other side is a Montreal Canadians sticker.

"First I try to guess if the interviewer is a hockey fan and secondly if they're a [Toronto Maple] Leafs fan. Then I wait to see how long it takes them to notice," he says. "This one guy stopped the interview and just starts going, 'No, no, no!' "

Profile: Viggo Mortensen
By Leah McLaren
Globe and Mail
23 September 2005




In February, a rare event happened: Disney Touchstone Picture's new film 'Hidalgo,' had a press stop in Rapid City, South Dakota.....
.....When we inquired how Touchstone Pictures ended up bringing Hidalgo to Rapid City, we were told by Disney publicist Chad Olson that it was 'Because Viggo Mortensen wanted to bring it here.'

An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004

Quotable Viggo: 9 July 2017

Well – it has to be Blouse Man Week doesn't it? How can we not focus on a film which has tie-and-dye, Moon Landings and a lesson in how to make removing a tag from a lady's blouse hotter than the Sahara. Oh, and add to that the fact that it's a beautifully acted and well written film which perfectly conjurers up the heady days of Woodstock. The film also generated some of my favourite quotes :D.



© Miramax Films / Village Roadshow.


The rest of the leads also seemed to just click into place during the auditions. Getting Viggo Mortensen was Goldwyn's only "moment of panic," the director says, because he wanted a free spirit type, but definitely not a hippie, and he had his heart set on the actor from "A Perfect Murder," Gus Van Sant's "Psycho." "When I saw some of Viggo's work, I thought, that's always who I've had in my head. I realized there is not one other actor anywhere who could play Viggo's part other than Viggo. He has this kind of complexity and mysteriousness to him. He doesn't have to say much and you get a lot."

Tony Goldwyn, Director
Actor Goldwyn side-stepped cliches for summer of '69 directorial debut
By Robin Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire, splicedonline.com
February 24, 1999




"I knew I wanted him for that role in such a way that I was saying, Please take some of my money and give it to him….Because he gives immeasurable depth to what he does, full commitment, full conviction."

Diane Lane
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Mortensen is also perfectly cast, skillfully side-stepping all stereotypes even though he plays a sensitive, seductive beatnik.

Rob Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire
Splicedonline.com




'I was 10 that summer, so I don't remember thinking that period in time seemed really weird,' Mortensen said. 'At that age, you're a kid on the periphery so you just accept what's in front of you. I ended up basing my character a lot on my stepbrother, Jeff, who passed away some years ago. I know that some people are describing Walker as a hippie, but he really wasn't. He was a little older than that generation and probably more influenced by jazz and the beat generation, so that made him maybe a little more open to things. It wasn't just about Woodstock for him.'

Viggo Mortensen on A Walk on the Moon
Viggo Artist & Actor
by Jae-Ha Kim
Cleveland Plain Dealer 1999




'Viggo's already cornered the market on animal magnetism.'

Liev Schreiber
The Knoxville News Sentinel
6 April 1999




'I had to have some definition in my body if I was going to take my shirt off in the same movie that Viggo runs around naked in. Trust me, that's mighty intimidating.'

Liev Schreiber
Calgary Sun
April 1999




As the guy Pearl falls for, Viggo Mortensen drips with sex appeal. He'd attract almost any woman.

Robin Dougherty
25 February 1999
Miami New Times




Watching the film, Mortensen roots for neither the husband nor the lover but for how Pearl deals with her dilemma. Neither does he believe audiences should belittle Pearl and Walker's relationship. "I think it was very important to him and it meant a lot that he couldn't be with her, but he was respectful of what she needed. I don't think it was just another [affair]. He's not selfish or stupid. There's a mutual respect on both ends."

Talking With.....Viggo Mortensen
By Pamela
Pamela's Film and Entertainment
1999




...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker 'Blouse Man' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015




The Blouse Man… played with silky eroticism by Viggo Mortensen…

Janet Maslin
New York Times
March 26, 1999




Walker is no mindless hippie going with the flow. He cares about Pearl. Certainly, he cares about pleasing her sexually. She gets her own flight to the moon at the same time as Neil Armstrong. And what Walker does to her under a waterfall should be bottled.

A Steamy 'Walk on The Moon'
Ruthe Stein
San Francisco Chronicle
2 April 1999




'If Viggo and I convince people we're enjoying every second of that encounter we've really done our job as actors. It was freezing in that river. The water was filled with debris and cigarette butts and the rocks were covered in little worms.'

Diane Lane on the Waterfall scene
Calgary Sun
10 April 1999




....Following its world premiere at the 1999 Sundance Film Festival, A Walk on the Moon received a standing ovation from the 1300 viewers in the Eccles Theater - an occurrence that's a testimony to the film's emotional strength and truth. It's easy to make a bad movie about a woman finding herself by cheating on her husband, but difficult to fashion one that hits most of the right notes.

A Walk on the Moon
Reelviews
James Berardinelli
1999

Quotable Viggo: 2 July 2017

So this week is Eastern Promises week… Russian mobsters, tattoos, bathhouses and square haircuts. Wow – Viggo rocked this film with some amazing preparation and a big dose of bravery. Thanks to his skills, Cronenberg's taut direction and Steven Knight's great screenplay, the critics went mad for his performance as Nikolai and it all ended with Viggo's first Oscar nomination (I like saying 'first'!). Can you believe it was 10 years ago? If only there had been an EP2. Love the first quote for all kinds of reasons…



© Focus Features.


… at the risk of sounding like the proprietor of one of his countless fan pages, Viggo Mortensen is just amazing as Nikolai. He's the ideal Cronenberg anti-hero: gentle and macho at the same time, as charismatic as Steve McQueen and as beautiful as a saint in a master painting.

Dana Stevens
Slate.com
13 Sept 2007




Nikolai is an unforgettable cinematic event…

Matthew de Abaitua
Channel 4 News
18 October 2007




Mortensen is a standout as Nikolai, doing a credible accent and stripping down to a body that looks like it was carved out of a Siberian glacier.

Stephen Whitty
The Birmingham News
21 Sept 2007




Mortensen's character does the skillful cinematic equivalent of an intellectual striptease during the course of this story. Slowly, ever so slowly, bits of my first impression are stripped away, destroyed. In the end, Nikolai is nothing at all like I first imagined, and yet he is all that I imagined.

'Eastern Promises' a gripping mob thriller
Bend Weekly
Robert Hawkins
21 December 2007




No, Mortensen is not Russian, but don't even think about the problem of an accent; he digs so deeply into the role you may not recognize him at first. At a time when movie fight scenes are as routine as the dances in musicals, Nikolai engages in a fight in this film that sets the same kind of standard that The French Connection set for chases. Years from now, it will be referred to as a benchmark.

Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun Times
14 Sept 2007




The fight scene kicks all sorts of ass, and mock me if you will, but I don't think I blinked once.

MiraJeff
Aint it Cool News
13 Sept 2007




Viggo Mortensen, whose tightly coiled star turn recalls the magnetic work of Hollywood's greats of yore.

Todd McCarthy
Variety
8 Sept 2007




Mortensen is a glowering marvel, locating a great range of expression in impassivity, his stone face prone to compelling split-second fissures.

Indelible Ink
By Adam Nayman
Eye Weekly
30 Aug 2007




Viggo Mortensen dares you to take your eyes off of him.

Jan Stuart
Newsday
14 Sept 2007




Mortensen plays the character so strongly the movie stops being about anything or anyone else. The more we get to know him, the denser his mystery gets. His experiences soon embody the harsh truths of being a part of this underworld. It culminates in what is sure to become the most talked about scene in the film -- a hand-to-knife-in-hand struggle in a Turkish bathhouse. Mortensen foregoes bodily modesty in a raw fight scene that literally lays bare this subculture's history of violence.

Mortensen is the reason to watch this movie...

Jeffrey Chen
Realmovienews.com
15 Sept 2007




Mortensen plays this role as if he had different blood chemistry than the rest of us. Nikolai remains eerily still until he's moved to act; then he glides forth with reptilian grace. Yet something still glows at the bottom of those half-lidded eyes - enough to suggest the cobra has a soul.

Ty Burr
Boston Globe
14 Sept 2007




From the way his shoulders are set to the way he lights and smokes his cigarette, everything about Mortensen's Nikolai is convincing. Any clip from the bath house scene would make the best darned Oscar clip ever.

Daniel Feinberg
zap2it.com
23 December 2007




The visceral and gritty performance of Viggo Mortensen is like a tornado. It knocks us off our feet, and swallows us whole.

Chad Webb
411mania.com
25 Sept 2007
His performance is flat-out brilliant
.



When you look into Mortensen's eyes, you're convinced that he's come to terms with the fact that he's condemned to eternal damnation and is living his life accordingly. His performance is chilling and mesmerizing, perhaps the greatest of his career.

Jake Hamilton
That movie guy Blog
10 Sept 2007




The film is easily this generations Godfather and begs for a sequel. Or at least, I will beg for a sequel. PLEASE.

Patrick Luce
Best DVDs of 2007
monstersandcritics.com
10 January 2008


Quotable Viggo: 25 June 2017

As Riv has named this Alatriste week there's no need to tell you what this week's Quotable is about! Remember those heady days of intrigue, battles, capes, swords and that amazing moustache? Of Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno's wonderful articles for Diario de León which he always took the trouble to share with us? And how we followed the Captain through the heat and dust and fell in love with Spain? Wasn't it all wonderful?



© 20th Century Fox/Estudios Picasso


The protagonist of this franchise is perhaps the least dashing, most enigmatic hero ever to rattle a rapier. Alatriste speaks little, drinks alone, dresses badly and blunders into traps set by more cunning adversaries. But he is fearless, deadly with a blade and, beneath his armored persona, stubbornly loyal.

The Pen and the Sword
By Donald Morrison
Time Europe
29 May 2006




"I liked the script a lot, and if you really want me to play this character, and it turns out that this can be done, it would be an honour for me, I'd like it." That was the simple and firm answer that the New York actor Viggo Mortensen gave the director Agustín Díaz Yanes when the latter offered him the part of Alatriste, the wicked soldier of the convulsed Spanish XVII century, created by Arturo Pérez-Reverte.

The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García - translated by Paddy
El País Semanal
6 August 2006




CK: What did Viggo Mortensen provide the film with?

ADY: Everything; absolutely everything. In Spain, because of the tradition of our cinema, we don't have action heroes, and Viggo combines an impressive physique (that "exact image of the weary hero" that Arturo wanted) with the fact of being a spectacular actor of action films. He's an extraordinary actor in dialogue, in everything...he has that combination that it's so difficult to find here. Viggo has been the vital centre of the film. The title of the movie is Alatriste! His experience, his help and his advice have also been very important.

Action, history...and skilled swordsmen
By Andrés Rubin de Celis - translated by Paddy
Citizen K Espana
July 2006




CC: Which part of the novel was the most difficult to turn into a film?

ADY: What I was most scared of, but then it wasn't difficult, were the swords and the action, but via Viggo we brought in Bob Anderson. He taught us how to do it and we weren't afraid anymore.

Capitán Alatriste - in conversation with Agustín Díaz Yanes
By Ignacio Saldaña - translated by Paddy
Comunicación Cultural
25 July 2006




I went to the Prado Museum, which I had visited many times, but now I saw the paintings in a different light, searching for the character, so I'd call Tano (the director) at 2 am and tell him, "listen, I found this painting by Góngora". Viggo makes a face and changes his voice to imitate Díaz Yanes: 'Okay, let me explain it to you. You're an idiot.' But nothing. I saw the characters in those paintings."

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




"I know that my character is bitter and upset. He has good things within him, but it is difficult to find them."

Viggo Mortensen
The Soul of Viggo (El Alama de Viggo)
By Miguel Juan Payan -translated by Chrissie
Accion magazine
April 2005



"Some supposedly great stars doubt you and call you and say. 'Man, what are you doing?!' But Viggo went for the kill. He was the first one to throw himself into the cold water, into a filthy mud puddle, and the rest followed him."

Agustín Díaz Yanes
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




'When you are used to filming in the U.S., the way things are done in Spain may feel like a great chaos, because there is a more relaxed atmosphere. But you soon realize that it is something that has to do with the culture, and I loved it!'

Viggo Mortensen
Top Men - Viggo Mortensen, Glamour Magazine,
August 2006
Translated for V-W by Graciela




Viggo Mortensen plays his character to perfection. He submerges himself in Alatriste and his terse, murmured and yet sonorous speech is that of one who knows words are extraneous when swords meet. His clear gaze, firm and serene, his calm, fluid gestures and that loyal spirit he has toward his comrades in arms, serve better than any narrative to tell the story of a man who knows irrevocably what his destiny will be, but still keeps hope alive for a future day when Spain will see better times and break free of the agonized struggles it is presently enmeshed in.

Diego Alatriste y Tenorio - Hero or villain?
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Margarita
Diario de León
29 August 2006




"He is Alatriste, the one I thought, the one I wrote! He's almost the one from the drawings!"

Pérez-Reverte
A Look of His Own
By Juan Cruz, El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




Among clouds of dust and in the middle of a group of officers I see the Captain's gallant figure, leant on the musket fork, without the hat on his head, while smoking with pleasure his umpteenth cigarette of the morning. He doesn't speak. He looks at the crowd with half-closed eyes, and stays imperturbable exhaling puffs of smoke. Heat is crushing.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




The final sequence of the film was being shot, because it is in Rocroi that the final square made up of veterans from the Old Cartagena regiment makes a stand and the story of Captain Alatriste ends. I was behind the cameras, a privileged spectator watching hundreds of riders charge again and again against the loyal Spanish infantry and Viggo in the front line, his head uncovered and sword in hand, defending his life and that of his comrades. "He truly believes he is Diego Alatriste," Agustín Díaz Yanes told me between takes. "Actors are all a strange breed," he added, "but this one is a special case."

Viggo, The Captain
By Arturo Pérez-Reverte - translated by Elessars Queen and Astarloa
El Semanal, Diario de León
20 July 2005




"We were enormously lucky with the appearance of Viggo Mortensen; it could be no one else! Even Arturo took things from Viggo for the next novel. That´s where we succeeded with the followers... Viggo was so extraordinary that he surpassed everything that Arturo, and obviously I, could have thought. His physical presence on screen is tremendous, " he says emphatically."

Diaz Yanes
The Biography of Captain Alatriste
By Jose Edurado Arenas - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
ABC.es
6 June 2010




That hero will have Viggo Mortensen's face forever. Challenging and tender. Big blue eyes and proud look.

The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García
El País Semanal - Translated for V-W by Paddy
6 August 2006

Quotable Viggo: 17 June 2017

In my last Quotable I looked at why Directors have picked Viggo for various parts. This week I'm turning it around the other way with insights as to why Viggo has chosen to take certain roles. And it's not always for the reasons you might expect…



© Gregory Widen.


Loin des Hommes

...the producer happened to have seen me on YouTube speaking French to introduce Guy Lafleur at the centennial for the Montreal Canadiens. And the producer said, "Look, I'm producing an adaptation of an Albert Camus story, could you do a whole movie in French?" And I said, "Well, I can try, but why don't you send me the story and see if I like it?" And I loved it. I wasn't looking to do something in French or Arabic.

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
By Eric Benson
Grantland.com
19 March 2015



Todos Tenemos Un Plan


"I gave her my address, she sent [the script to me, it surprised me. I liked the script very much. It was a strange story, but strange in a very positive way, because it's very original. It's a very original thriller. What I liked immediately and what I continue to like a lot are the contradictions, the dualities that it contains, not only between the two twin brothers that I play, but also the landscapes, the city and the river, and all the characters have certain contradictions."

Viggo Mortensen
Todos Tenemos Un Plan Press Conference
By - transcribed and translated by Rio, Zoe and Ollie
La Metro Television
9 August 2011



On The Road

"When I read the book, the last person I'd have seen myself playing would have been the Burroughs character. I was a little surprised. But it was just when I was finishing A Dangerous Method, and I thought, 'Don't forget, you were surprised at David's idea of you playing Freud too.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Mortensen slipped into Freud role
By Jim Slotek
Toronto Sun
6 January 2012



A Dangerous Method

'I accepted the challenge because I trusted David. The last thing he wants to do is miscast his movies, when it's someone like me who's his friend. He thought I could do it and didn't let go of the idea, so I thought there must be something to it.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Dangerous Method' Taught Me How to Talk in a Movie
By Michael Hogan
Moviefone
23 November 2011



"The scrip of A Dangerous Method written by Christopher Hampton ( from his play) enchanted me from the first reading. During the filming, like Michael (Fassbender) and Keira (Knightley, involved with Jung and studying with Freud), I was completely trapped by the emotional and complicated human relationships in the film. Bodies and thoughts, words and life choices are interwoven, although the latter are "contaminated" by the social conventions."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine – translated by Ollie
September 2011



The Road

Is it true that you almost turned down The Road?

Yes, I was very tired, and I did not want to accept the role unless I felt I was capable of giving it my best. But then I changed my mind because the story was really good and the topic is one everybody can relate to. Besides, my being exhausted fit the role perfectly. It is about a man who, in some sense, is dying of exhaustion, so the result was very interesting.

Viggo Mortensen Under The Spotlight
Selecciones Magazine
March 2009
Translated for V-W by Graciela



Good

"I was starting out in acting 25 years ago, and was in London on what was only my second audition," he recalls. "I didn't get the part, but while I was there I saw a play Good with Alan Howard, and it made a strong impression. When the opportunity to play the role on film came along, I thought it an interesting way to make a circle out of the experience some quarter century later."

Viggo Mortensen
Emmanuel Levy
Emmanuel Levy.com
24 November 2008



Alatriste

"I liked the plot as a tale, as a story. And it captivated me. So I decided to do it, against everyone and against everything."

Viggo Mortensen
The filming of Alatriste, by Jesús Martin
Acción Magazine July, 2006
Translated by Paddy for V-W



A History of Violence


"I thought it was interesting, but most directors would make an exploitation movie out of it and it might have been interesting to look at, but not very thought-provoking. Obviously, he makes thought-provoking movies, so I wondered why he wanted to do this one. I asked him immediately. He gave -- and continues to give -- interesting answers."

Viggo Mortensen
American brutality
Globe and Mail Cannes Review
by Liam Lacey
May 17 2005



The Lord of the Rings

"I guess in the end I did it because I would feel that I had been chicken shit really. I had to leave the next day, so I'm on the plane reading, looking at this gigantic book and thinking, 'What the hell have I done?"

Viggo Mortensen
The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent
Black & White magazine
2001



Psycho


"....when I met Gus [Van Sant] for the first time to discuss the part, my first question was:"why do you want to remake that movie; it was a perfectly good movie the first time round?" So I wasn't inclined to do it, but he simply said that it might be fun."

Viggo Mortensen
Uncut
November 2007



The Prophecy

His participation in this movie was agreed at a moment's notice. It went all so quickly that he read the script while flying out to Arizona, where the scenes in which Mortensen appears were shot. "I accepted, in part because I had always wanted to work with Christopher Walken," the actor says while sitting on the sofa's edge. His face lights up when saying Walken's name. It's evident that Christopher Walken is a cult actor for many young actors nowadays. "I would do any movie with him, no matter what [it was]."

On "The Prophecy'
Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995



American Yakuza

One of my favourite movies of yours is American Yakuza. What drew you to that part and can you share any stories on making it?

I was quite broke and needed a job.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012



The Indian Runner

[Penn] sent me the script and I was instantly hooked. At the start, I preferred the character which was finally played by David Morse. Mine was just described as "the baddy'. But I said to myself that, behind the slightly too obvious behaviour of Frank Roberts, there had to be a really complex reason. The filming was extremely interesting ... The more so because Sean was very involved.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002



Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3


'I was visiting a friend in Los Angeles and he had a part in the third. "We need a man. Wasn't that something for you?', he asked. Why not? I had seen the original 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre', and I thought there was something about it - in spite of everything. I hoped the third would contain the same. But the movie company got cold feet and cut away the most terrifying and gruesome scenes, and it ended up being a rather incoherent movie.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
2001

Quotable Viggo: 3 May 2017

With Viggo now in talks for two new films (I have all my fingers and toes crossed) I thought I'd take a look at Directors and casting. We all know the stories that have been told about how Viggo ended up cast as Aragorn in The Lord of the Rings. It was a mixture of an initial casting error, some insightful suggestions from the production team, luck, and a son who was a huge fan of the books. But I'm going to look at the films that came afterwards, what drew all the directors that followed to Viggo? Lucky David Cronenberg, who knows a 'full symphony orchestra' when he sees it, gets three goes at enlightening us.



© Focus Features.


Matt Ross – Captain Fantastic

Viggo was cast first. He was my first choice for the part and we sent him the script. He read it and we met.

Viggo is highly selective and his dedication to storytelling is unparalleled. He's a rare artist. He acts, writes, paints, he's an accomplished musician who makes CDs. The list goes one. So he looks at the big picture, in deep and profound ways. And when he commits, he really commits, not just to the doing, but also to the selling of the film. Which can go on for a long time and is exhausting.

Matt Ross may play a greedy tech titan in 'Silicon Valley,' but in Berkeley he's just a regular guy
Frances Dinkelspiel
15 April 2015



Director David Oelhoffen - Loin des Hommes

'I had dreamed of bringing Viggo Mortensen on board; his singularity made him the perfect fit for the role.'

Director David Oelhoffen - Loin des Hommes
labiennale.org
21 August 2014



Lisandro Alonso - Jauja

'I had seen him only once at the Toronto Festival many years ago. We exchanged two or three words and he gave me a San Lorenzo pin - he's always going around giving people those things. I liked him very much; right then I realized that we could treat one another as equals. He's an actor I love, among other things for the way in which he transmits emotions physically, gesturally. He's not an actor who's usually given great lines of dialogue, but you see him, for example, in the final scene of History of Violence, David Cronenberg's film, and you realize how incredible his work is, the things you can read in his face.'

"It´s a mixture of spaces, times and languages."
By Diego Brodersen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Pagina 12



Hossein Amini – Two Faces of January

'I just tried for so long and just couldn't get anyone to finance the movie or be interested in kind of, you know, exploring it, and the moment Viggo read the script and was interested in doing it; it's amazing how suddenly people start kind of saying, "Oh, well we're interested in doing it," because if it's a business decision then they can. Suddenly, there's foreign sales and they can sell the idea. It suddenly [went] from "this is too dark," "the characters are [too] unlikable and complicated,"- it was suddenly, "Well it's Viggo."'

Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014



Ana Piterbarg - Todos Tenemos Un Plan

What was it that drew you to Viggo. Why was he right for the role?

I think he one of the best actors in the world. In his body of work he plays such a range of different characters that I knew that he could play the two diverse roles in this movie. He is a well-travelled and cultured person as well as being sensitive he can be brutal at the same time.

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012



David Cronenberg – A Dangerous Method

'I wanted to show another Freud, not the strict looking grandfather we all know, but someone in his fifties who, it's said, was handsome, funny and charismatic. How was I not to think of Viggo?'

David Cronenberg: "Nunca he ido a terapia, pero me parece una situación fascinante"
Rafa Vidiella
20minutos.es
3 November 2011



John Hillcoat – The Road

"The interesting thing about picking an actor for a movie is, you want to try to surpass the audience's knowledge or expectations of what that actor's about. We took a shot with Viggo as opposed to bigger box-office stars. In large part, he's the right choice because, as good as he is, he's still untapped."

The Road Is the Most Important Movie of the Year
By Tom Chiarella
Esquire Magazine
12 May 2009



Ed Harris - Appaloosa

"I wanted the guy who I could ride next to on a horse for ten hours and never say a word and feel totally comfortable, and I figured he'd be the guy. He's the only man I wanted to play the role."

TIFF: Riding Into Appaloosa with Ed Harrs, Renee Zellweger, Viggo Mortensen, and Jeremy Irons
By Jordan Riefe
The Dead Bolt
13 September 2008



Vicente Amorim - Good

Viggo Mortensen is an extraordinary actor. I had seen him in A History Of Violence, directed by David Cronenberg, in which he plays a man haunted by ghosts from his past. In Good he is a mirror image of it, his character is becoming the ghost he will be. He has the perfect biotype to play a German. He has a sweet kind of masculinity, almost fragile and these characteristics are very important to convince the audience about his choices, even though these choices will take him to an abyss.

Rede CBN radio interview
Translated by Claudia
3 June 2006



David Cronenberg – Eastern Promises

'I admit I was looking for something I could do with Viggo. A director has a strange relationship with his actors, because after the actor has gone on to his next movie, you're in the editing room living with him every day, dreaming about him and hearing his voice. I had always thought he had a very Russian, Slavic look. And when I read the script I thought, "This is a role made in heaven for Viggo."'

Q+A : David Cronenberg, Film Festival Preview
nowtoronto.com
30 Aug 2007



Agustín Diaz-Yanes - Alatriste

"...he's got the age, professionalism, look, body and he's one of the few action heroes in modern cinema."

Viggo Mortensen Will Be A Splendid Captain
by Gontzal Díez
The Truth of Murcail
Feb 19 2004



David Cronenberg, - A History of Violence

"Viggo's my kind of actor," smiles Cronenberg, who likes to work with actors who are not just leading men, but also character actors. "First of all they tend not to be afraid because they're not trying to protect some image they see of themselves as traditional leading men, but also it gives them a much bigger palette to paint from because they have all kinds of edges. I need a kind of eccentricity that is more typical of a character actor than a leading man, and yet still has a leading man presence and charisma."

"Viggo was perfect. He is not only a charismatic leading man, but the combination of other qualities made me feel he had the depth to play a very complex role."

Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit


Joe Johnston - Hidalgo

"I saw this picture with Diane Lane called A Walk on the Moon. And there was something about his performance in that film that told me that this guy could be Frank Hopkins. I hadn't seen the first Lord of the Rings before we cast him, but I figured anybody that could sell blouses to Diane Lane out of a truck could do anything."

Joe Johnston - Hidalgo
Staci Layne Wilson
American Western Magazine
March 2004

Quotable Viggo: 28 May 2017

Seeing the lovely photo of Viggo as a boy posted by Chrissie last week, I really had to do a childhood quotable. Viggo had a more adventurous childhood than most and one that has deeply shaped his life giving him an enduring love of travel, Argentina, wild places and photography. Though hopefully not the ass end of dragons…



© Viggo Mortensen


The eldest of three brothers, Viggo was born in New York in 1958 and given his father's name. Viggo is, he says, considered in contemporary Denmark to be a slightly archaic, eccentric name for a young man. "It would be like being called Herbert…"

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




"…I was always running away. I did that a lot. [Another time] when I was a child, about two-and-a-half, I crawled out of bed and across the road and crawled into someone's house on a Sunday morning. I was in the kitchen playing with all the pots and pans, and they called my parents, who had been calling the police. I think they said: 'You are missing someone, and he is here playing with our kitchen knives.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




When Viggo was 7, his parents sent him to boarding school in Argentina. "It was a strict school, isolated in the foothills of the mountains," he said. "Other than holidays, I really didn't see my parents. The other kids were miserable, always crying or wetting their beds. But I was pretty self-sufficient. So I guess it must have suited me."

Back in the saddle 'Rings' hero Mortensen is riding high with 'Hidalgo'
By Nancy Mills
Daily News
25 February 2004




'According to my mother I never went anywhere as a child without a pencil, and I drew all the time. Recently she gave me a notebook with some of my old drawings. I especially noticed one I drew when I was 7 - it was rather wild. On the top it said: 'Little Red Riding Hood', and then there were a lot of oil colours mixed together, almost abstract. I really liked it. But across the drawing it said with a red pen - and underlined: VERY BAD! Some teachers still think that is motivating...'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001




"Every once in a while you do something really dumb when you're a kid and you realize when you're an adult that that's dangerous, but.. you know.. There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show, 2004



As an 8-year-old, Mortensen played "the ass end of a dragon" in a school play…

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"I remember trying out for a play once in junior high school, and as soon as the audition started, they said 'Speak up! Speak up!' And I just stopped and took off. I wasn't really cut out for it."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




I was 11 when we moved back to the States. I couldn't believe the swear words, the slang, the music - all the kids were into Blue Oyster Cult and Grand Funk Railroad. I was a closet Carpenters fan. I'd sing 'Top of the World' to myself on the way to school, but when I got close to campus I'd shut up.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




"Within a month or two, I knew all the swear words."

Viggo Mortensen on leaving South America
I've taken on too much...
By James Mottram, The Independent / UK.
23 October 2007




.... "my brothers and I spoke only Spanish. But you quickly adapt. I somewhat replaced it with French. We were not that far from Quebec, so I [replaced] my football team with the Montreal Canadians hockey team, which has the same colours".

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




…as an adolescent, he felt comfortable behind the lens of a camera. Mortensen says he started taking pictures as a teenager, although he wasn't "really serious about it." For him, the camera not only offered a sense of control over his surroundings but a kind of veil to help him feel invisible from a world he found both intimidating and inspiring.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"I didn't have friends when I was little that I know now - there wasn't any sense of continuity like that," Mortensen says. "But I got to see a lot of things and learn a lot of things. And I learned to rely on my imagination, and on myself."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'Now I see things in hindsight and what I learned in those years is what has made me who I am today. And, even though I recognize that I'm a rather strange guy, I don't think the end result has been so bad.'

Viggo Mortensen on growing up in Argentina
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
30 August 2006

Quotable Viggo: 21 May 2017

I've put together a light-hearted Quotable for you this week with a lot of old favourites, all of which are a little offbeat, quirky, amusing and very, very Viggo.



© Besiktas JK.


When asked why he always sports [San Lorenzo] gear during interviews (today it's a pullover with their logos) he jokes, "mind control."

Viggo does 'Good'
Mortensen shows us his softer side
by Tina Chadha
Metro New York
9 January 2009




'Ridley Scott's filming George Orwell's Animal Farm and I'm playing the goat...'

Viggo on being asked if he's grown his beard for a new role
BBC Breakfast Television
13 May 2014




'I'm not usually a suit person… You're lucky I'm wearing shoes!'

Viggo Q&A after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




PA: If you were a flower, viggo, what kind would you be?

VM: Today, I'd be one of those spiky little red bottlebrush trees.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




Me: We have to talk about women, because you are the sexiest man alive.

Him: So there are a lot of dead men who are sexier?

Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish
By Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




"I like to live dangerously. Last night I was quietly at home, cooking a meal of chicken, onions and garlic, Cuban style, and then here I am today facing a pack of journalists."

Viggo Mortensen Talks About "Jauja" and "Far from Men"
By Martin Dale
Variety
7 December 2014




"We can do some doll therapy if anyone's interested…"

Viggo talking about 'Sigi' the Freud doll in San Lorenzo colours
at the Venice Film Festival ADM Press Conference
2 September 2011




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?

My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...

If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005




"Thank God for special effects, makeup the voice dubbing and all that. They completely replaced Kodi, thank God! We had Andy Serkis do it."

Viggo Mortensen sets the record straight about his acting career, 'The Road' and 'The Hobbit'
By Carla Hay
Examiner.com
25November 2009




Corey, Triple M, Melbourne: Viggo you're now at the stage where you could get the majority of roles you wanted. You've had love scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow and now Liv Tyler. Is there anyone you aspire to have a love scene with, in the world?

Viggo: Gimli? That was cut from the movie - maybe it'll be in the extended version.

Return Of The King Press Junket: Viggo Mortensen
By Nazz
December 2003
Source: Nazz




When I ask him for his favourite joke he responds with a rare one-word answer: "Me".

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




Following the press Q&A, as he left the stage, he paused, looked at the huge 'Viggo Mortensen' image on the screen behind him, and said, 'You spelled my name wrong…' There was a horrified moment as the organisers checked in panic – then he smiled, 'No, just kidding….'

Viggo after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




Hi Viggo, aside from knowing your lines, what's the most important thing you do to prepare yourself before you go in front of camera?

Breathe.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




When you were a kid, what'd you want to be when you grew up?

A crow was probably what I wanted to be most of all.

Really? Why is that? What is it about crows?

They're survivors. They can live anywhere. They're very self-sufficient. They're very resourceful. They're adaptable.

That sounds like you.

Yeah!

Viggo Mortensen: Making peace with the camera
By Tracy Smith
CBS
11 December 2016

Quotable Viggo: 14 May 2017

With the Two Cuervos sharing poety together in Barcelona, I just had to do a Quotable on their other great passion - San Lorenzo de Almargro. We know Viggo 'wears a San Lorenzo shirt like it's tattooed on his skin' and I'm sure Fabian does too. Cuervos heart and soul, here's a tribute to El Ciclon and it's fans.



© Stella Pictures.


....the Cuervo ambassador to the world.

Jorge Barros
San Lorenzo Supporters Subcommittee interview
Transcribed/translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
SCH tv
20 May 2011




A global star since his turn in Lord of the Rings, he could easily lay claim to the title Lord of the Nuevo Gasometro, the stadium home of Argentinian side San Lorenzo de Almagro.

Fans in high places
FIFA
20 February 2009




'Although they fail again and again, and only end up champions occasionally, although we have a glorious but hard, and sometimes tragic, history, I like how the San Lorenzo supporter behaves; I like their traditions. They have the best songs and are the most witty, and the other supporters recognize that. And besides, they sing non-stop; it doesn't matter if we're losing 0 to 7. San Lorenzo supporters have a very rich history, of endurance above all, and a special dignity.'

The World of Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez Torres - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
March 2012




How would you define San Lorenzo fans?


Brothers, sisters - forever.

Viggo, A True Cuervo
La Revista de San Lorenzo
Translation by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
14 May 2010



Brother Cuervo. I'm going to call you repeatedly during the match. I asked to be free during these two historic hours for our club, the 90 minutes and what could come afterward. They've allowed me to escape from work to shut myself in with the laptop, the candles, t-shirts, flags, medals, little lucky stones and pieces of paper and the hopes of my whole life. I love you.


Viggo Mortensen
The Past Is In Everything
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 August 2014




…he went to the seats for the away team where he watched the match just like any other "cuervo", under the sun and with very high temperatures. Although he had been offered a much more comfortable seat in the local area, he chose to be with the San Lorenzo fans, even though that meant bearing the scorching December sun.

Viggo, a true cuervo
Translation by Graciela
Simplemente San Lorenzo
15 December 2008




He arrived in time for the 102nd birthday of the club, on Holy Thursday, fulfilling one of his dreams: to inaugurate a chapel a few meters from the field. It was his gift (one of many), out of his own pocket, one more irrefutable proof of his love/madness/fanaticism for the colors blue and red. For many, an exaggeration, a mystery, a disproportionate devotion. For others, a distinctive hallmark of his Argentinianism and a proof that genuine love, loyal and eternal, finds in soccer a beautiful excuse for expressing itself.

Viggo Mortensen - "Above all, I'm a Cuervo... And a greater pride does not exist"
By Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zooey
Gente
April 2010




What do you remember of the first time you saw San Lorenzo play live in a stadium?


That we lost... but that the passion, the unconditional support of the fans, the non-stop singing, were exactly what I had always imagined and felt. Every time I go to a match I get excited and enjoy myself just as much, no matter what happens soccerwise. As the song says "... it´s a feeling you carry deep inside.."

Viggo, A True Cuervo
La Revista de San Lorenzo
Translation by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
14 May 2010




'I ran from one side of my hotel room to the other, jumping and shouting like a man possessed. I opened the window and shouted the goal at the crescent moon.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers watching San Lorenzo
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




Go San Lorenzo! My membership card says "supporter from another country", but I am not a supporter from another country; that does not describe me properly… I am a "local" supporter, [a supporter] from the bottom of my heart, from a heart that is ours, that belongs to all the "cuervos", in the past, in the present and for ever.

Viggo's speech
100th year San Lorenzo celebration
Buenos Aires
Translated by Silver
2 April 2008




Excuse the daring but, sincerely, did you come to Argentina for the screening of Alatriste or to watch a San Lorenzo game?


To screen Alatriste...

You mean that wholeheartedly?

Well. El Ciclon (San Lorenzo de Almagro's nickname) and the heart are pretty close to each other…

"Now Even My Son Wants To Get To Know Argentina"
By - translated by Margarita
Gente
3 April 2007




CUERVO, WE ARE CHAMPIONS!!!
I woke up with my clothes on, my head wrapped in a flag with the image of Pope Francis, as if it was some sort of turban, and the TV full blast showing The Mummy with Boris Karloff, but we are still champions!

Viggo Mortensen
In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




....if he were called to face the end of the world as we know it, he would do it with a t-shirt from his team pressed to his heart.

In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010


Quotable Viggo: 6 May 2017

It's wonderful news that Viggo will be at the Barcelona Poetry Festival on the 12th of May, reciting poetry with his great friend Fabián Casas. Viggo has a long history of poetry readings with several recitals at Beyond Baroque and other venues. He's recorded his poetry on CDs, often to an improvised musical accompaniment, and has also read other poets' works including Eliot's masterpiece, The Waste Land, at the British Library (also recorded for Touch Press). I love the fact that he carries a notebook wherever he goes 'just in case a moment presents itself to be stolen.'



Poetry Reading and Book Signing - Odense, Denmark 2003
© Chrissie.



'It is important to protect living poetry, which is also why I participate as often as I can in public readings."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




"Exene... encouraged me to recite my poems in public. At the beginning the idea was totally worrying for me. But something happens when you are faced with an audience. No matter whether you present photographs, pictures, movies or poems to other people, it's worth it because you always learn something."

Viggo Mortensen
Two-Men Show
By Silvia Feist - translated by Always Smiling and Doreen
Vogue Deutsch
November 2005




"As an actor you're always reading someone else's words, and then what you do gets edited. So there's several screens through which you're speaking, if at all. As a poet, it's your words."

In The Navy
By Joy Ray
Detour
September 1997




….if you´ve written a poem and you read it, you don´t know what will happen. Something changes between my mouth and the eyes and ears of those who are there reading or listening to my words, my little story. Something changes between writing it and pronouncing the words. I don´t know what the reader receives. There´s no net. For that reason, I'm responsible for what I´ve written and for how I read it.

Viggo Mortensen - All of Us are Mestizos
by Carlos Shilling – translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Zoe
LaVoz
November 2010




On record, Mortensen's speaking voice--especially in Spanish--actually is more melodic and alluring than his singing. Confident and clear, he draws listeners in as he spins tales of deceit and humor.

Sensitive Side of Psycho
By Jae-Ha Kim
Chicago Sun Times
16 December 1998




Mortensen began the evening by lighting a candle and quoting a phrase by poet S.A. Griffin. 'We are here for the sweet stigmata of the poem. And here's the news.' The breathless, packed room received the news, and it was clear from the moment Viggo spoke that this was poetry's night.

Three Fools poetry reading
National Poetry Month Starts At Beyond Baroque With Three April Fools
By Philomene Long, Poet Laureate of Venice
Santa Monica Mirror
27 April 2006




"The success of the Lord of the Rings trilogy changed the deal a little. Before then, when I put on a poetry reading, there would just be a circle of my friends around me. Now there are hundreds of inquisitive strangers. If fame can make an under-appreciated art better known, it's perfect!

Viggo Mortensen
Grazia Magazine
Translated by Chrissiejane
December 2009




'It's great if someone who never would've gone to a poetry reading goes to one because they're thinking, "Oh, that actor guy's doing it – it'll probably be shit, but we should go and see it anyway!"'

Viggo Mortensen on 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




If they come and hear the poems and they have a reaction pro or con, and there's a connection made between me and them - then who cares?"

The Brain Dane
by Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
2003




...he begins reading. He's nervous. "I don't slur when I read other people's stuff," he jokes, and the crowd laughs indulgently. But he soldiers on, losing himself in the rhythm of his words.

They were always giving birth, always pregnant, always taking ****ing for granted. They were not being brave when they dug up the skulls of their past lovers in the middle of the night and painted them for use as Jack O'Lanterns. It was summer and they were crazy about each other.
("Hallowe'en" 1990)

Maybe it's the visceral attack of his writing, or the R-rated shock of hearing Aragorn cuss, but the audience's attention never wavers.

Midnight Special poetry reading
Viggo Trip
By Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
November 2002




'A lot of people that were here tonight said something about their writing, but were too embarrassed by it. And I'd ask them about what they write and encourage them to pursue it. People sometimes seem to feel that poetry is just this little thing you do privately, like your diary. But in reality it's something that you can work at in many ways, that you can share, that you can take as far as you like.'

Viggo Mortensen at the Midnight Special reading
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
by Scott Thill
Morphizm 2002


Quotable Viggo: 29 April 2017

Short, pithy and to the point, these one sentence comments say it all, although I've been very generous to Matt Ross at the end and allowed him two… :wink:.



© Madame Figaro.


They don't make them like Viggo Mortensen anymore.

A Reader interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Ben Olson
Sandpoint Reader
13 January 2017




Is Viggo Mortensen the most interesting man in the world?

Viggo Mortensen: Still here, still fantastic
The Film Experience
By Nathaniel Rogers
24 April 2016




He's constitutionally incapable of creative blockage.

True Colors
By Margot Dougherty
Los Angeles Magazine
1998




Viggo Mortensen is, besides a great actor, an inexhaustible conversationalist, so full of curiosity that he doesn't hesitate to occasionally take the role of the interviewer.

The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




Actor, poet, photographer, musician and always exquisitely provocative.

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008




Mortensen is a matinee idol with a philosopher's soul — Jean-Jacques Rousseau trapped in the body of Rudolph Valentino.

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




His work is a trace of his own adventure, lived openly and exploratively, with curiosity and a constant sense of surprise.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




'It's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




When the elements, the weather and the terrain get tough, Viggo gets going.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




Viggo Mortensen is a study in contradictions: rugged and undeniably virile, and yet thoroughly and irresistibly sensitive.

Interview: Viggo Mortensen
By Todd Gilchrist
Cinematical
26 November 2009




He has that incurable, unbearable, enigmatic eroticism of a three in the morning dream you've just awakened from.

Talking With Viggo
George Magazine
1999




He never had Champagne dreams and caviar wishes.

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say can do better.

The Man Who Would Be King
By Nick Dent
December 2001
Black & White magazine, #58




Viggo Mortensen is not about the words. He's about being... present. .......

Ray Pride
Movie City News
4 March 2004




Mortensen is not what Tolkien's Treebeard would call "hasty."

After Aragorn
By Jeffrey Overstreet
ChristianityToday
2004




Is there a language Viggo Mortensen doesn't speak?

Jill Lawless
Associated Press
2 September 2014




He's like a one-man United Nations.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




Trying to describe his movie career is like finding your way in a Middle-eastern medina.

Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
2001




"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient... and he's got a great chin."

David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




The man has never disappointed us.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




"Doesn't everybody want to be Viggo Mortensen? I do!"

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen & Family
by Christine Westwood
FilmInk
11 June 2016



Quotable Viggo: 22 April 2017

Hey, I like to be topical so while the focus is on the Argentinian Film Industry, let's revisit one of Viggo's Argentinian films, Todos Tenemos Un Plan which Viggo not only acted in but also produced. And not only produced, but starred in twice as brothers Augustin and Pedro, in which he was 'on top form - twice over' (Empire Magazine). What's not to love about seeing a double Viggo? Or even triple as we also had Viggo as Augustin pretending to be Pedro…



© 20th Century Fox/Haddock Films.


"I always dreamt of shooting in Argentina. Since I´ve began acting, long before returning to the country after living 25 years out of it, I wanted to return to make a film."

Viggo Mortensen
Soledad Villamil - Viggo Mortensen: Brothers In Arms
By Nazareno Brega - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012




What was it that drew you to Viggo. Why was he right for the role?

I think he one of the best actors in the world. In his body of work he plays such a range of different characters that I knew that he could play the two diverse roles in this movie. He is a well travelled and cultured person as well as being sensitive he can be brutal at the same time.

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012




'Like a lot of unique movies, it took years to get together. Two or three years, probably. I kept working on her and said, "I want to be a producer. I've never done it before, but I want to do it." I wanted to make sure that whatever happened, her vision got to the screen. As a producer, I had a little more say, and I could say, "Well, let me see the script with subtitles and let me correct them." '

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




"I like the movie because it's not a clean story. All the characters are frustrated and resentful people."

Viggo Mortensen's Plan
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais Semanal
16 September 2012




"With the entry of Viggo, what wasn't viable became possible,"

Vanessa Ragone, producer.
Local filmmakers use Hollywood stars as lure
By Charles Newbery
Variety
15 May 201
1



Because I was raised here, there are a lot of memories. I look around and the way people speak, talking to the crew each day, it's as if I were with my people, It was very special for me to be able to work in Argentina again and reconnect with the way of life here and with the people.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




"The first day, Viggo arrived and hung up a San Lorenzo pennant. That´s the way it started, little by little, and then he brought a pennant from Tigre and later the one from Boca. In the end, he filled the entire wall with jerseys from all the teams from Argentina, but also from Real Madrid, Barcelona and Uruguay. And this has been the only thing that succeeded in uniting everybody."

Javier Godino
Mortensen faces the "mental challenge" of playing both twin brothers in 'Todos tenemos un plan'
By - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zoe
Terra.es
9 August 2011




'It freed me to be able to act in Spanish, speaking more or less as I normally do. I'm not saying that I speak the same way for Pedro and Agustín. Neither of the two speaks exactly as I do, but I had the measure...I know the accents of Pedro and Agustín; I grew up with those accents. It was something immediate.'

Viggo Mortensen - Todos Tenemos Un Plan Production Notes
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Todos Tenemos Un Plan website (Spain)
July 2012




What's Viggo like to work with, honestly?

He's a little obsessed. He's a little bit of a perfectionist, but then so am I so that's ok!

Ana Piterbarg
Still Waters Run Deep
by Shelley Marsden
Film Juice
27 October 2012




One of the skills he had to learn for the film was beekeeping. 'We got to make honey,' he says, smiling. 'I have one jar left. It's pretty good. What was surprising – and what probably distracted me from the fear of being stung – was the noise. One bee buzzing close to your head is quite loud, but imagine thousands. Your world closes off and you become very focused on what you're doing, because you can't really hear what other people are saying.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




If you, for some reason, want to watch Viggo Mortensen watching Viggo Mortensen take a bath, then, my friend, your luck is in – as the renowned star of The Lord of the Rings franchise turns in one of the finest performances of his career…

Stefan Pape
Heyuguys.co.uk
28 May 2013




... how often do you get to kill yourself in a movie? I assume that's not very often.

Mortensen: (laughs) No, it was fun. What I like doing is to create that grey area of why do each of them do what they do? Why do they react in the way that they do? It's not all explained to you. I think it's a believable way to behave, but it leaves you with some questions

Interview: Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan
By Edward Douglas
Comingsoon.net
20 March 2013




'Agustín reaches the true essence of his brother (Pedro) much more now that he´s dead than before, when he was alive. Embodying him in front of everybody, he´s closer to his brother but also closer to himself. Finally he opens his eyes and accepts what he is and where he is and that river of his childhood. That river, that childhood he had left behind.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"I'd always thought I'd love to be able to say I'm part of its movie history,"

Viggo talking about filming in Argentina
'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013


Quotable Viggo: 8 April 2017

After this week's Exhibition themed 'Good Day Viggodom's' I'm still in exhibition mode with a quotable based around Viggo's photography. He has described his photography as 'part of my dream, of the way I exist and act in the world'. If so it is a magical dream full at wonder at life's idiosyncrasies and attention to its smallest details. Long may he keep sharing that dream with us.



Sådanset Exhibit Press Event - Roskilde, Denmark 2008
© Rex Features.



He has mounted a half-dozen solo exhibitions in Cuba, Denmark, New York, and Los Angeles. His New York dealer, Robert Mann, says he had no idea who Mortensen was when he first met him four years ago.

"The Lord of the Rings wasn't out, and I was clueless about that part of his life' Mann says. "I saw the work and responded to it on its own merit. There's a lot of volatility to it, a lot of emotion, a lot of subtext and sensitivity." Mann says that, typically, celebrity art implies an underlying dilettantism. But Mortensen "is not a dabbler. I consider him a very lucky and talented person. Most artists are lucky to express themselves in one avenue."

Robert Mann, New York Gallerist
Finding Viggo By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Mortensen's photography is decidedly low-tech, utterly spontaneous, and free of preconception, employing no staged lighting or posing. He literally takes pictures of what is right in front of him. But there is certainly saturation to his colors and a mystique to the content which captures the sometimes obscure significance in the ordinary moments pictured. Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19
1999




'Two years ago, I spent a few days in Montana with Viggo while he was shooting Hidalgo, and I swear he was never without a camera. One moment he was slamming on the brakes to photograph a horse on a hill, and the next, he was slowing down to take a picture of a cloud. Viggo's a passionate guy…'

Senior Premier Editor Tom Roston
Editorial
Premiere
November 2004




I must admit that I didn't recognise him. In the middle of a not yet finished exhibition a young blond man is standing who, after shaking my hand and mumbling something as a greeting, seems relieved to have a practical task: to get me a glass of water. He brings it to me with all the hidden greatness that makes him as perfect as he is in the role of Aragorn.

…Viggo Mortensen was bare-footed, with loose dark pants and a large shirt that makes him look both small and newly awakened. His left hand is decorated with stuff to remember and phone numbers all the way up his arm and a stubborn bit of tape has attached itself to his sleeve.

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




'I take pictures at the edges of the things happening. So many strange things happen. I know lots of artists change reality, change the motif, to make it stranger but I don't think that is needed at all. Reality is very strange in and of itself.'

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




…there is certainly saturation to his colors and a mystique to the content which captures the sometimes obscure significance in the ordinary moments pictured. Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19
1999




Not everything's a masterpiece, of course, not by a long shot. But when Mortensen's good, when he's firing on all cylinders, he has the ability to produce some truly breathtaking images. According to Dennis Hopper, it's because Mortensen's instincts "come from the right place, from the subconscious."

Whether he's shooting around the fringes of a set or among the people who populate his personal life, Mortensen's best photographs capture the partial, the fleeting and the unnoticed with surprising ease. One critic described them as "perfectly colloquial." In other words, he makes great snapshots.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
2003




'I decided to take photos of trees for this show because there are no trees in Iceland. I decided to bring trees to Iceland.'

Viggo Mortensen on the Skovbo Exhibition
Capable Of Many Things
By Hanna Björk Valsdóttir - translated by Ragga
30 May 2008
Source: Fréttablaðið




He got the idea for the [sadanset] exhibition while he was looking at pictures and discovered that two of them sort of continued in each other. He got interested and the next 14 days he worked his way through a pile of pictures to find photos that could continue the horizon-line and make the puzzle more complete. Also five pictures from one of Mortensen's earlier books raised his interest. The five photos are very similar, but originate from different continents. The pictures show, according to the artist, that people and landscapes are connected.

From movies to photos
Jyllandsposten
Jette Hansen
19 October 2008




"Some of the pictures are good, even if they stand alone. Others are not that interesting" he judges. He continues "But it is the Whole, that is important to me."

Viggo talking about sadanset
From movies to photos
Jyllandsposten
Jette Hansen
19 October 2008




Mortensen's photographs are humbling and a bar artists should hope to achieve themselves after thirty plus-years of photographing.

Jaxon House Rocks With Perceval Press Artists: Newsom, Milstein, Bryce, Mortensen
by Kriss Perras
PCH Press
18 June 2006




Viggo Mortensen's photographs can be explained as poetic; sometimes the focus is shallow, a lot of movement, light sometimes leaks into the pictures and makes weird influences.

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




So how good a photographer is he? I've looked at two of Mortensen's books and from that evidence I would hazard the opinion that he is very good indeed.

Mark Power
The Salt Mine
3 September 2008




'Some of the photos are bit blurry though, Viggo, so perhaps you should buy yourself a tripod...

Peter Jackson at the "For Wellington' opening, Massey University
Stars Come Out For Exhibition Launch
Massey University
1st Dec 2003


Quotable Viggo: 2 April 2017

The recent comments about Miyelo, Viggo's wonderful exhibition and book based on the Lakota Ghost Dance, got me reminiscing about the amazingly creative response Viggo had to his time playing Frank Hopkins in Hidalgo. I think that if I could go back in time and visit one of Viggo's past exhibitions, Miyelo would be have to be the one. I want to see those photos BIG!



© Viggo Mortensen


As Hopkins in Hidalgo, as part of the team that worked to portray the Ghost Dance and subsequent Wounded Knee massacre, and as someone taking the opportunity to be outspoken about the personal and cultural consequences of the troubled history, Mortensen is a rare bridge. Viggo Mortensen the ikce wicasa (common man) can be trusted not to give out under the weight of the responsibility.

Native Voice Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King,
Pine Ridge Reservation
South Dakota
December 2003




"…days after he was cast he called me and said, 'Who do you know on Pine Ridge reservation and can I go there?' Within a week he was out with these Lakota horsemen and riding with them, and on a long ride to Wounded Knee."

John Fusco
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




'All that time I was in Morocco it was neat. We'd be out there in the desert. Everyone else would drive the hour, hour and a half back to town where the hotel was, and I'd stay out in the trailer on the set, alone. The dust would settle and it was quiet. It would get dark and I would wash up, make myself some food or whatever and put on these tapes and a bunch CDs that I got from people and different places like Prairie Edge. I'd play these tapes and songs, ceremonial songs, and I'd have the door open in the trailer and I'd be out in the desert, in the middle of the Sahara. I'd be like singing Lakota songs out there - it was cool! I knew I had to come back here.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004




"The dance had been performed once before in South Dakota, and now we were in the middle of the California desert trying it again, as a sort of mirage, a distorted memory. Just as they had done for the Wounded Knee reenactment, the dancers took their responsibilities in the ritual very seriously; there was an atmosphere that was created through the sheer earnestness of their effort. It transcended anything else that was going on with regard to the filming of the scene. When the dancers had finished and it became my turn to be filmed observing the dance, a pair of dust devils and weird crosswinds suddenly blew in on what had been a completely still day. As soon as the last take of the scene had been shot, the winds instantly and completely ceased, leaving everyone and everything calm and silent for several moments."

Viggo Mortensen on the Ghost Dance
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




Viggo, a renowned still photographer, had forgotten his camera that day and asked our unit stills photographer, Richard Cartwright, if he might borrow a camera and some color neg film. The unit photographer gave Viggo his Hasselblad panoramic camera... the 15 perf 35mm version. Viggo snaked around the set with the shutter open and he was amazing to watch. His movements were very similar to that of the Native American Ghost Dancers and he captured these incredible handheld abstract time exposures. Absolutely amazing.

Shelly Johnson, Hidalgo cinematographer
Instagram
23 March 2017




'When you have these figures, these humans, moving,' says Mortensen of his surreal technique, 'you can see the echoes of their movements, their residue as they're moving through the frame ... It makes their presence sometimes so thin that they become one with the landscape, one with the air.'

Seeing Ghosts
By Lonny Pugh
Movieline Magazine
November 2003




"In taking the pictures, I wanted to join in rather than observe from a distance. Or at least to take pictures in the spirit of the event itself."

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




"It's rather unusual for a Hollywood movie to address the Indian question, and in particular the Sioux culture, with this much respect. That made me realise this would be a rather unique film. And I have tried to 'capture' this 'ghost dance' as a nebulous memory, an ephemeral dream."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




"I wondered how one would use a still camera to represent images of the ephemeral dancers in wide-open, empty landscape - how the ghosts of Ghost Dancers might look. So I really approached it as an exercise… I shot the one roll of film at different settings, with increasingly longer exposures. The sun was very bright, so I was hoping to get one interesting image from the roll. Luckily, this was one of those rare situations where intentionally doing "the wrong thing" with the camera worked in an interesting way. As conscious an exercise as making these particular pictures was, there are accidents in the images - weird spots, unexpected areas of saturation and contrast variations - strange things that I couldn't see when shooting and still cannot really explain."

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




'Digging up these people and these memories and sharing it, is a big deal. It's not just, 'Hey I got to be in a movie.' I didn't meet anyone that was an extra at The Wounded Knee set that seemed to be 'Hey, I'm just in a movie.''

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004




When I arrive at the gallery [for the Miyelo Exhibition], I see the show is entirely composed of marvelously printed images from the ghost dance... amazingly saturated and 8 feet wide. Stunning! At the show, I run into Richard, who loaned Viggo his camera to shoot these same stills. I ask him; "Did Viggo borrow only one roll of film?" Yes... only a single roll. Well, the show was comprised of 16 photographs that were double wide (15 perfs instead of 7) which meant that the collection represented nearly every photo that Viggo shot that day. 16 of the 18 total exposures from the single film roll. Mind blowing.

Shelly Johnson, Hidalgo cinematographer, on the Miyelo Exhibition
Instagram
23 March 2017




'It is perhaps our most successful marrying of text, imagery and design. It worked out really well, so it feels like it was supposed to turn out that way.'

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
"Life's Too Short to Do All This Work and Not Do It Right": An Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm.com
6 April 2004

Quotable Viggo: 25 March 2017

Well, here are the results of last week's mini-quiz. Hope you had fun guessing the answers. Anyone get all of the right? If so, you are definitely a Viggo Uber-Fan!



© Miramax Films / Village Roadshow.


Find the missing words and the film:

A Walk on the Moon:


...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker Blouse Man and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015

Jauja:

The film is also thrillingly beautiful, and graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing horse manure.

Farran Smith Nehme
New York Post
18 March 2015

Carlito's Way:

I don't have much screen time in the movie, but during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies. And I also learned to do everything from a wheelchair, including cooking and washing the dishes afterwards.

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008

Alatriste:

"From the first moment you start to see the film, you realize that Viggo is not playing a Spaniard, the thing is that he is a Spaniard."

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Mano a Mano
XL Semanal, 20 August 2006
Translation for V-W by Paddy

Eastern Promises:


"It was like some creeping disease, you wake up one morning and everyone is speaking Russian."

Festwatch
Globe and Mail
10 Sept 2007

Juaja:

Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015

The Prophecy:

Ah...that was fun, but difficult, because the truth is that I couldn't prepare the role the way that I usually do...going to Lucifer's house or meeting him or meeting his family. But I think that we all have a dark side and so I had to think a little bit about that.

"If they give me a Salvadorian script, I'm game."
By Isabela Vides - translated by Margarita
7 March 2007
Source: La Prensa Grafica

The Road:

"These characters, in spite of seeming to be very cold, in fact, beneath the rags they wear San Lorenzo t-shirts," says the actor, and laughs.

Viggo talking about The Road
In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010

Captain Fantastic:

"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016


What film is this and what is he talking about?

"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge. Then we made the decision that he should walk around with it everywhere." 8 Gauge Shotgun – Appaloosa

Viggo Mortensen on the eight-gauge shotgun
Mortensen delves into America's cowboy mentality
By Katherine Monk
Canwest News Service
7 September 2008


...It's deafening. It's kind of shocking at first, but then it's strangely soothing. It's so overwhelming that it puts you into this place where you're very focused, unless you freak out and run away. But I had a good teacher. Bees – Todos Tenemos un Plan

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Beekeeping, and The Hobbit
By Bilge Ebiri
Vulture.com
22 March 2013



"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk." Viggo's Action figure – The Lord of the Rings

Viggo Mortensen on his LOTR action figure
Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk, 2001



"He said 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' " Locust - Hidalgo

Joe Johnston on filming Hidalgo
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post, 2004



What is he not as good at?

'Let's just say I'm not as good as the hobbits.' Surfing

Chairman Of The Sword
By Liane Bonin
Entertainment Weekly
10 December 2003



And finally, which film it this?


…to my absolute amazement, it features Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave, though still giving the film's best performance by miles… Daylight

Shaun Munro
BluRay review
Obsessed with Film
Feb 2011

Quotable Viggo: 18 March 2017

OK – things are very quiet here at the moment so here are a few teasers to keep things ticking over. Some of the questions are easy and some might prove a little bit harder! This is just for fun so if you think you know the answers, keep it to yourself so others have a chance to guess too, and I'll post the correct answers next week. Of course, you will all do amazingly well because you are all experts :D.



© Focus Features

Find the missing words and the film:

...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker ****** *** and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).



The film is also thrillingly beautiful, and graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing ***** ******.



I don't have much screen time in the movie, but during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies. And I also learned to do everything from a **********, including cooking and washing the dishes afterwards.



"From the first moment you start to see the film, you realize that Viggo is not playing a ********, the thing is that he is a ********."



"It was like some creeping disease, you wake up one morning and everyone is speaking *******."



Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful ********.



Ah...that was fun, but difficult, because the truth is that I couldn't prepare the role the way that I usually do...going to *******'* house or meeting him or meeting his family. But I think that we all have a dark side and so I had to think a little bit about that.



"These characters, in spite of seeming to be very cold, in fact, beneath the rags they wear *** ******* *-******," says the actor, and laughs.



"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little ******," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."



What film is this and what is he talking about?



"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge. Then we made the decision that he should walk around with it everywhere."



...It's deafening. It's kind of shocking at first, but then it's strangely soothing. It's so overwhelming that it puts you into this place where you're very focused, unless you freak out and run away. But I had a good teacher.



"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."



"He said 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' "



What is he not as good at?


"Let's just say I'm not as good as the hobbits."



And finally, which film it this?

…to my absolute amazement, it features Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave, though still giving the film's best performance by miles…

Quotable Viggo: 11 March 2017

Despite us lighting a forest of karma candles, Viggo didn't walk away with the Oscar. But one day he will – how can he not? Because we are not alone in thinking he is one of the greatest actors working today. So here I'm presenting the evidence. All are familiar quotes (and many are old favourites of mine), but they cheer me up and I hope they'll cheer you up too. Power to Viggo, stick it to the Oscars!



© Bleecker Street.


Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of Captain Fantastic
Silverscreenriot.com
Matt Oakes
22 June 2016




Here is a handsome, photogenic, intelligent, multi-lingual actor who has simply refused to be typecast in specific kinds of genres and roles and/or to become a bankable Hollywood star, even though he had all the ingredients for that position two decades ago.

Cannes Film Fest 2016: Captain Fantastic–Viggo Mortensen Dominates Eccentric Tale of Nature Vs. Civilization
Emanuellevy.com
8 May 2016




Mortensen, perhaps the only actor alive who could play Sigmund Freud, William Burroughs and a Middle-earth king...

Uday Bhatia
Live Mint
11 September 2015




"There is a depth to his art that I greatly admire. Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




'Working with Viggo was really special, he's an amazing human being, and obviously a brilliant actor…'

Michael Fassbender
Sam Adams
AVClub.com
8 March 2011




...one of the great little pleasures of cinema in our day - seeing Mortensen tilt his head and sketch a knowing half smile with the corner of his mouth.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




I really can't say enough about the work Viggo Mortensen. He's able to give this character so much life that you're under his spell..

Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com




Philip Seymour Hoffman, certainly one of the great actors of our time, told us in a Venetian hallway of the Hotel Excelsior how he regarded Viggo Mortensen as one of the masters of the profession. A point of view that is totally shared.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




'…I saw "Eastern Promises," in which Viggo Mortensen is giving one of the great, great powerful screen performances. It's absolutely amazing.'

Geoffrey Rush at the Toronto Film Festival
Geoffrey Rush Revisits The Golden Age
By Edward Douglas, Coming soon.net
5 Oct 2007




'To me, there's a lack of self-consciousness to the great actors. I think the performance of Viggo Mortensen in Eastern Promises is brilliant: he's living the guy's life on screen and you can't take your eyes off him. It's the same with Marlon Brando. You might not know why you're drawn to him, but you are.'

Actor Richard Jenkins commenting on Viggo
Metrolife film
29 June 200
8



Viggo is one of the pillars supporting The Road. I´d say he is everything. I have seldom seen an actor so dedicated, so ambitious and so ready for his work. Mortensen immersed himself in the project to the extent of giving all. He placed inconceivable demands on himself. After every take he would look me in the eyes and say: Have we got it? He's been a lesson in professionalism and comradeship.

Javier Aguirresarobe (cinematographer)
On the Road with Javier Aguirresarobe
by Blanca J de la Hoz
Fotogramas
February 2010




In Viggo Mortensen, Hillcoat is working with one of the current cinema's great quiet everymen, and if anyone can make the novel's stolid, unnamed hero empathic and emotionally alive on screen whilst remaining loyal to the novel's aesthetic minimalism, it's this immensely physical, restrained performer.

Kris Tapley
InContention.com
August 2009




Mortensen is long overdue for an Oscar win and if this film doesn't earn him that honor, there really is little justice (or sense) in the Academy voting system. Hearing the cast and crew talk about the actor's strict dedication to the part is downright inspiring.

Kofi Outlaw, 'The Road'
Screenrant
24 November 2009




…the ever-flawless Viggo Mortensen.

Jesse Hawthorne Ficks
San Francisco Bay Guardian
26 September 2011




"Viggo's an artist," said a movie exec and Mortensen fan during the Toronto fest. The way he said it underlined "artist."

Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post Film Critic
September 2007




Mortensen is one of the most diverse, least mannered but most overlooked actors working in Hollywood...

Emanuel Levy
emanuellevy.com
1 Sept 2007




Fantastic performance from Viggo Mortensen... he is absolutely a brilliant actor, he is the Robert de Niro of his generation, the Marlon Brando of his generation, the man is a genius.

Mark Kermode, A History of Violence
BBC Radio Five Live
30 September 2005




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




'I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011




'There are actors whose performances come as light emanating from the screen. Then there's Mortensen. His effect is gravitational. It draws you closer, inward.'

Actor Geoffrey Rush after seeing the film at Tiff
Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post Film Critic




'When it comes to cutting an effortless master like Viggo Mortensen, what can I say besides you're just trying to pick the best of the best and make sure it all hangs together in the right way. He makes it look easy.'

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen, however, is that rare American actor who is both muscular and humane, tough and sensitive, fighter and lover. He seduces us with a threat of danger, his chiseled Nordic physique and stunning blue eyes. Never over the top, for Mortensen, less is more. His performances are slow reveals of hidden information and emotion.

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Road
By Anne Thompson
Indie Wire
13 September 2009




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




"Viggo is just... a great actor."

David Cronenberg interview, by Moriarty
Ain't it Cool News
November 6th, 2005


Quotable Viggo: 19 February 2017

A week from now Viggo will once again be walking down the Oscar red carpet. The last time we were here was for Eastern Promises at the 2008 Oscars (was it really nearly 10 years ago?) after his stunning performance as the complex and troubled Nikolai. His preparation for the film was extreme and detailed, as always, vanishing into Russia, introducing Cronenberg to the culture of Vory tattoos, fighting in the buff in a tiled bathhouse. Nobody does it like Viggo. As Zack Sharf of Indiwire said this week, 'Power to Viggo, stick it to the Oscars!'



© Focus Features.


In 2007 (when he was nearly 50), Viggo Mortensen showed not just one of the great bodies in modern film, but naked commitment to one of the screen's most uncompromising fight scenes. He was playing a Russian gangster living in London, speaking very good Russian, and acting as cool and sultry as Brando. There's a scene in that film, Eastern Promises, where his character, Nikolai, stubs a cigarette out on his own tongue. At that moment, all was made clear: Mortensen was an old-fashioned star, as confident and as taciturn as Gary Cooper.

Viggo Mortensen
By David Thomson
The Guardian,
10 April 2009




'I admit I was looking for something I could do with Viggo. A director has a strange relationship with his actors, because after the actor has gone on to his next movie, you're in the editing room living with him every day, dreaming about him and hearing his voice. I had always thought he had a very Russian, Slavic look. And when I read the script I thought, "This is a role made in heaven for Viggo."'

David Cronenberg
Q+A : David Cronenberg, Film Festival Preview
nowtoronto.com
30 Aug 2007




"You say, 'Well, where's Viggo today?' " says David Cronenberg, recalling the conversation that happened more than once on the London shoot, last year, of the exceptionally fine new thriller, Eastern Promises. "And they say, 'Oh, he's in St. Petersburg.'

"And you say, 'What!? I thought he was at the hotel.' "

Star's Eastern Immersion Impresses His Director
By Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
16 September 2007




"I know everyone was a little bit worried because I disappeared for two weeks. They said I should have someone go with me into the underworld, but the whole point of me of going was not to get a filtered version of what Russians do and what they're like. "I just wanted to draw my own conclusions."

Viggo on his trip to Russia
Contactmusic.com
13 Sept 2007




"It's a complete transformation from the inside out. He played two characters really in A History of Violence, and I saw traces of neither of them in his portrayal of Nikolai."

David Cronenberg
Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007




"You would think, 'Of course Cronenberg was drawn in by the tattooing,' but it was almost not there," says the director. "In the original script, tattooing was just alluded to. Viggo discovered a set of books called Russian Criminal Tattoo and a doc called Mark of Cain, which was about the tattooing subculture in Russian prisons, and when I saw them my mind was blown completely."

Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




When he appears, getting out of a black limo, in front of a Russian bath situated in a small London street, I can't recognise him. The actor is one those perfectionists who works on his roles to obsession… He is so scary that all the clients from a bar ran away in a panic the minute they noticed the tattoos on his hands.

Cronenberg and the Russian Godfather
By Serge Grunberg - translated by Celine
Studio, May 2007




"Some of the tattoos were humorous - and some were quite poetic. On the instep of my right foot, one said 'Where are you going?' On the instep of the other foot, another said 'What the hell do you care?"

Viggo Mortensen
Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007




"We were shooting in London and my hotel room had a 24 hour Russian channel, so I just left it on all the time. I watched movies, variety shows, very strange soap operas…."

Viggo Mortensen
By Natasha Stoynoff, People Magazine
1 October 2007




Any clip from the bath house scene would make the best darned Oscar clip ever.

Daniel Feinberg
zap2it.com
23 December 2007




"Viggo blew me away on a daily basis..…He spent time in Russia and every day he would come to the set with something interesting: a piece of writing or a Russian chocolate or a photo album. I think he stayed in character pretty much the whole time. And that's great. It really helped me… I saw Viggo yesterday for the first time since we finished the film and it was like a whole different person. I almost didn't recognise him."

Naomi Watts
Matt Mueller, Total Film
October 2007




Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The Soviet Bloc."

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




It's a watershed role for Mortensen and, such is the commitment he offers, it's not too rash to compare his performance to Robert De Niro's Oscar-winning turn as the young Don Corleone in The Godfather Part II.

I've taken on too much...
by James Mottram, The Independent / UK.
23 October 2007




"To me it's a movie about kindness and compassion and self-sacrifice," he said. "Nikolai is a man who holds hope and compassion next to his despair and fear. In this increasingly complicated and confusing world, there are people even in the darkest realms who will nonetheless do the right thing.

"Just because it is the right thing."

Viggo Mortensen
A Violent Tour De Force
By Robert W Butler
Kansas City Star
15 September 2007




"I wrote the lines but the heart and soul of Nikolai is really from Viggo."

Scriptwriter Steven Knight
Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007


Quotable Viggo: 14 January 2017

This week's Quotable is all about roads, real and metaphorical. There are real journeys on tarmac and along trails, and then there are those inner journeys that run parallel. The journeys within journeys. The ones that really count. As the recent 'Road Rules' article that Inlander published a couple of days ago points out, Viggo is an expert journeyer.



© Bleecker Street.


For the recent Esquire cover story on Mortensen, the actor/artist/poet picked up his interviewer at the airport and proceeded to take her on a road trip to his childhood home in upstate New York. This wasn't out of the ordinary for him. Not only has he taken many solo road trips throughout his 58 years, Mortensen also takes to the road in many of his films. Obviously, there's LOTR, but there's also the postapocalyptic The Road, as well as a film version of Jack Kerouac's On the Road, and then his most recent film Captain Fantastic, where he takes his brood of children raised in the wilderness of the Pacific Northwest on a cross-country road trip for their mother's funeral. Clearly, in both art and life Mortensen, isn't afraid of the journey ahead.

Road Rules
By Laura Johnson
Inlander
12 January 2017




"I never stopped traveling through countries and characters; this is my job."

Viggo Mortensen
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




In Mortensen's view, the journey is always more entertaining than the destination anyway.

The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




'I travel a lot because I'm interested in knowing how the rest of the world lives. I love to learn about other cultures, to submerge myself in them, to learn of points of view that are different from mine.'

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm a guy who sticks his nose in everything"
By Stuart Gollum, Gala Magazine
30 August 2006




"I was 20 years old, I was travelling in the north of Norway," he recalls, like an old war veteran. Trying to go "as far up as possible," young Mortensen got lost, survived by lighting a fire and being rescued by the inhabitants of the region, the Samis, a native people of Finno-Ougric descent. "They sheltered me in exchange for work. Afterwards they tried to convince me to spend the winter there. They offered me a big coat and kilos of meat. And when I said no, they offered me a small fat girl of about 16. Maybe I should have stayed. It would have been an interesting experience.

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France)
May 2013




'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




"Traveling is probably the number one most effective anti-war weapon there is. I've been to Tehran, for example. I happened to go to the city park there, and played a game of pick-up soccer with some Iranian men. I saw the sun come up and go down in Tehran, I saw the mountains, old people, dogs, pigeons, hospitals, things you can find anywhere in the world. It's much less likely that you're going to convince me that they are just this thing, that we must bomb Iran. I probably wouldn't agree that we should bomb anyplace, but those are people. Those are plants, those are animals. The weather changes there. People get up, they eat, they live, they die. It's much less likely when you know a place, you know?"

Viggo Mortensen on "Good"
By Aaron Hillis
IFC.com
31 December 2008




"You say, 'Well, where's Viggo today?' " says David Cronenberg, recalling the conversation that happened more than once on the London shoot, last year, of the exceptionally fine new thriller, Eastern Promises. "And they say, 'Oh, he's in St. Petersburg.'

"And you say, 'What!? I thought he was at the hotel.' "

Star's Eastern Immersion Impresses His Director
By Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
16 September 2007




On a coast-to-coast road trip when Henry was 11, Mortensen says, his son made a homemade map ahead of time to chart their itinerary, a map Mortensen has kept. "Instead of a little under 3,000 miles, it looked like it was going to be 16,000 or so, a kind of insane cardiogram, you know?" he laughs. "It took us the time it took us."

A History Of Defiance
By Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




The story of Hidalgo, as told in John Fusco's script, mixes historical details with a heavy dose of myth and speculation. Mortensen spells out the familiar pattern: A hero's character is determined not by whether or not he is triumphant, but by the choices he makes during a dangerous journey or a strenuous race. "To complete the cycle in the classic hero journey, there is one more step: What does that person (or group of persons) do with what they've learned from the experience?"

After Aragorn
By Jeffrey Overstreet
Seattle, WA 5 March 2004
Source: ChristianityToday.com




"You must make the difference between loneliness and isolation: between the two, I see a road that can take me farther than I would dare imagine. And wherever this leads me, I still want to take it!"

"You must read Camus if you're plugged in"
By Cécile Lecoultre - translated by Donna Marie
24 Heures
27 January 2015




Viggo, what do you love most about acting?

The ongoing journey of it, and its unexpected consequences. It is hard to know at any given time if you are making the right decisions as an artist, but the surest way to stay in the moment and make progress in this moveable feast of a profession is to say "yes" as often as you can. As Yogi Berra once said: "If you come to a fork in the road, take it."

One-on-one interview with 'On the Road's' Viggo Mortensen
By Steven Lebowitz
Examiner.com
6 April 2013




"I think it was Robert Louis Stevenson who said this," Mortensen says, "it was about meandering through a career, or the arts in general, without seeming to have a deliberate plan. He said, 'To travel hopefully is better than to arrive, and the true success is in the labor.' That's a great line, 'To travel hopefully.' That's what I'd like to do."

Viggo Mortensen
The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003


Quotable Viggo 8 January 2016

The Golden Globes are tonight and both Viggo and Denzel Washington are up for the Best Actor Award. Both appeared together in Tony Scott's Crimson Tide in 1995. They will, I expect, have some serious catching up to do when they meet as a lot has happened since they did both the ironing together on the USS Alabama. Crimson Tide is a great submarine movie rammed with terrific acting, and a look back at it is long overdue, although quotes are pretty thin on the ground! But diligent research has turned up a few new ones and even a couple of unexpected Aragorn connections. The quotable concludes with Viggo's beautiful tribute to the wonderful James Gandolfini.


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© Hollywood Pictures


'My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth.'

Viggo Mortensen on Crimson Tide
Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




'Watching Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington was pretty interesting; to be at several scenes when they're arguing in speeches and stuff. I'd say that's fun to watch those actors go at it like a sporting event and I had a front row seat. '

Viggo Mortensen on Crimson Tide
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
by Carnell, Carpe Noctem magazine #15
1999




PA: Now, convince me you love Tony Scott more than I do, because I don't believe it's possible.

VM: You said you loved him so I was favorably disposed toward him. It's not a coincidence that all the fellas look so nice in their snug khaki uniforms in Crimson Tide, because in the rehearsal period, he paid out of pocket for all of us to get liposuction.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 199
5



Despite an overload of technical terms, this film still managed to capture my attention and interest with a plausible situation, credible actors (Mortensen rocks!), an environment about which I knew very little and spitlets of comic relief.

Michael Schiffer
JoBlo.com Movie Reviews
October 12, 1999




BE: Are you familiar with the cast lists that have been circulating on the Internet for years, where fans submit their ideal casts for a movie version? I'll read you some of the ones they've thought about for Aragorn. David Hasselhoff.

VM: Umm, okay.

BE: Elvis, in the all-musical version.

VM: Oh, wow!

BE:
Keanu Reeves.

VM:
(Silence)

BE:
Denzel Washington.

VM:
I could see Denzel doing that, actually. I worked with him on Crimson Tide. I see him having those heroic qualities.

Veni, Vidi, Viggo
By Bilge Ebiri
Yahoo Internet Life magazine
23 November 2001




In the movie, he is caught between a rock and hard place in the deadly confrontation between Hackman and Washington. Mortensen offers a restrained, dignified and incredible solid performance: the voice of reason in the power play of the two main characters.

The Guy Can't Help It
By Manuela Cerri Goren
L'Uomo Vogue #270
April 1996




In Tony Scott's searing post-Cold War thriller Crimson Tide, Viggo Mortensen gives a superbly taut performance as a nuclear-submarine weapons lieutenant - the only officer who knows the missile code - caught in a power showdown between hawkish captain Gene Hackman and by-the-book commander Denzel Washington. It's a rare studio role for the Danish New Yorker, who selects his parts with no concern for celeb kudos and has consequently retained the saturnine edge he showed in films like The Reflecting Skin and The Indian Runner.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




The submarine drama, which opens today, has everything you could want from an action thriller and a few other things you usually can't hope to expect: an excellent script, first-rate performances and a story that has more to do with individuals than explosions.

Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle 1995




Although considerably more literate and intelligent than most of Jerry Bruckheimer's productions, Crimson Tide still shows off a few of the producers standard trademarks: the slick visual stylings of Tony Scott, the rousing musical score of Hans Zimmer, and a character actor ensemble that's just a joy to sift through. Sweating inside the Alabama's belly you'll find Viggo Mortensen, James Gandolfini, Rick Schroeder, George Dzundza, Matt Craven, Danny Nucci, Lillo Brancato, Steve Zahn, and Ryan Phillippe ... plus there's a great little cameo by Daniel von Bargen as a mad Russian and another one by Jason Robards as an ultra-high ranking Naval official. I've said it a thousand times, and I'll say it again: Bruckheimer knows good actors.

Scott Weinberg
DVD Talk
2006



For Mark Ordesky, there was only one contender for the role of Aragorn-Viggo Mortensen: "My wife had seen Viggo in Crimson Tide and pushed me and harangued me to track him down and meet with him. Viggo doesn't 'do lunch' with Hollywood 'suits,' but eventually I got to meet with him and afterward told Peter that I was passionate about finding an opportunity to work with Viggo."

The Making of the Movie Trilogy



Viggo's words to James Gandolfini

Thank you, friend. You were an ideal acting partner and a man of your word. You blew all of us away on your first day of work on "Crimson Tide" in that confrontation scene with Denzel Washington . You played your part to perfection, so intensely that Denzel, who'd by then more than proved himself to be a very fine actor, lost his bearings for a moment. Your performance seemed so real, your make-believe antagonism so true-to-life, that we all lost our bearings. The electric energy you brought to that scene revolutionised the set, and upped the stakes for Tony Scott and all of us involved in that production. You gave us a creative wake-up call, and inspired us all to do our very best. I have enjoyed watching your remarkable work all these years since that shoot, and am sorry, like everyone else in our profession, that I will not get to see any more characters constructed by you. We have your outstanding work to remember you by, and the good example you set as a person. Good luck. Travel well. Love, Viggo.

20 June 2013
Perceval Press
20 June 2013


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