Quotable Viggo

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Quotable Viggo 2016

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Quotable Viggo: 31 December 2016

Well, it's the last day of 2016 and it's time for my annual round-up of favourite quotes of the year. This has been a very much a 'Fantastic' year, despite its many ups and downs, with Viggo's work with Matt Ross and all those wonderful children very well-received by audiences and critics. And his performance as Uber-Dad, Ben Cash, has garnered some heavy awards attention. The start of 2017 could be very exciting. Here's wishing a Happy Viggo-filled New Year to us all!



Image Fabrizio Cestari. December 2016
© Rolling Stone, LLC.



Is Viggo Mortensen the most interesting man in the world?

Viggo Mortensen: Still here, still fantastic
The Film Experience
By Nathaniel Rogers
24 April 2016




In the flesh, his inscrutability gives off an electric hum.

Understated A-lister Viggo Mortensen tells our reporter about his new cult hit 'Captain Fantastic' - and why it's impossible to be the perfect parent
by Ed Power
Irish Independent
31 August 2016




Viggo Mortensen, who seems only loosely tied to modern life at the best of times...

Helen O'Hara
Empire Magazine
18 August 2016




Okay, let's just get into it: Viggo Mortensen is hot. He has impeccably chiseled features, and he has received just enough commercial success that we know who he is, but we don't know enough about him to ruin his artistic appeal. Oh, and he has a chin dimple that would make Tom Brady weep.

Mortensen Fan Fiction
By Gabriella Paiella
New York Magazine
25 May 2016




Viggo Mortensen, who has both the looks (the piercing blue eyes and jutting Kirk Douglas chin) and the buff physique of a Marvel type, but would probably prefer slow death to putting on a cape and tights.

Viggo Mortensen Goes Off the Grid With 'Captain Fantastic'
Charles McGrath
New York Times
28 June 2016




... Mortensen, who looks like he'd be perfectly at home playing Jesus Christ or Charles Manson...

Owen Gleiberman
Variety
13 July 2016




Making it endlessly watchable is Viggo Mortensen, here in his fully bearded, hippie-Viking mode.

Stephen Whitty
NJ.com
8 July 2016




"The camera's your friend," he said. "But it's like this person that's there that doesn't talk. But they have really good eyesight! So you should be on your toes. It's this mute, hawkeyed friend that doesn't know how to keep a secret," he laughed. "I'm not afraid of it," he added.

Viggo Mortensen: Making peace with the camera
By Tracy Smith
CBS
11 December 2016




"I was 12 or 13 when a friend of mine encouraged me to be an actor, something that had never crossed my mind. I was then living in New York and didn't know anybody. I went up on stage and read the first paragraph from David Copperfield. The only thing I heard before closing the book and fleeing from that inconceivable torture was 'Louder, louder.' And here I am!"

Viggo Mortensen: "The older I get, the more tired I get of Hollywood."
By Rocío Ayuso
El Pais
8 October 2016




Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of CAPTAIN FANTASTIC
Silverscreenriot.com
Matt Oakes
22 June 2016




...he did something truly bizarre by Hollywood standards. He had the world by the balls, with his pick of roles—big studio stuff, Clooney kind of stuff, paycheck stuff. He turned all of it down, choosing instead to do what he wanted to do, little of which was lucrative. "I mean, how much ****ing money do you need?" he asks.

Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016




'I trust her about as far as I could throw him.'

Viggo on the Clinton/Trump Presidential election circus.
Viggo Mortensen: 'Do something, or get out of the kitchen.'
By Ed Rampell
The Progressive
18 October 2016




His poetry and prose are taut and gripping - the outpourings of a genuine talent, not a bored dilettante.

Understated A-lister Viggo Mortensen tells our reporter about his new cult hit 'Captain Fantastic' - and why it's impossible to be the perfect parent
by Ed Power
Irish Independent
31 August 201
6



"When you were a kid, what'd you want to be when you grew up?"

"A crow was probably what I wanted to be most of all."

"Really? Why is that? What is it about crows?

"They're survivors. They can live anywhere. They're very self-sufficient. They're very resourceful. They're adaptable."

"That sounds like you."

"Yeah!" he laughed.

Viggo Mortensen: Making peace with the camera
By Tracy Smith
CBS
11 December 2016




Here's the thing about Viggo Mortensen: I could listen to this man speak on just about any topic for hours. His voice is both passionate and hypnotic. It's impossible not to be engaged when he's speaking because he presents himself with, somehow, both a welcome calmness and a focused intensity at the exact same time. It might be magic. I suspect it is magic.

Viggo Mortensen Will Hypnotize You With His Intensity As He Dissects What's Wrong With Our Polarized Country
By Mike Ryan
Uproxx
7 November 2016




The one and only Strider, also known as Aragorn, later called by the name King Elessar Telcontar of Gondor is coming to Dublin. He's also called Viggo Mortensen sometimes.

Viggo Mortensen is coming to Dublin!
Breaking News.ie
9 August 2016




Brainy and brawny—a rare combination of qualities among leading men in Hollywood that hasn't strongly applied since Roberts Ryan and Mitchum—personifies Viggo Mortensen and sets him apart from just about everybody else on the contemporary screen.

Super-Dad: 'Captain Fantastic' Enthralls the Senses and Engages the Mind
By Rex Reed
The Observer
5 July 2016




DS: You were rocking a much friendlier penis than in Eastern Promises. That was an angry penis.

VM: No, in Eastern Promises, it was a frightened penis.

Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross Interview
Jason Gorber
Dorkshelf.com
14 July 2016




Meeting the Madrid-based poet, actor, photographer, editor and publisher in this place and under these circumstances feels something akin to encountering an albino bison in a veal pen. He seems to be a soul meant to wander the earth in search of universal truth, not discuss Hobbit movies over canapés with journalists.

On interviewing Viggo in a posh hotel
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




Mortensen doesn't go in much for trappings. He has a flip phone!

Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016




"Doesn't everybody want to be Viggo Mortensen? I do!"

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen & Family
by Christine Westwood
FilmInk
11 June 2016



You will find all previous Quotables here.
[/CENTER]

Quotable Viggo: 18 December 2016

Thanks to recent Golden Globe and SAG awards nominations (yay) this Quotable can really only be about one thing - why Viggo is the fantastic captain of Captain Fantastic and why he deserves every plaudit coming his way.



© Bleecker Street


'He is an extraordinary man, an extraordinary mind. He had many thoughts and notes — great insights — before shooting. And once filming, Viggo contributed an effortless simplicity and deep humanity that, I believe, elevated the film.'

Matt Ross
Cannes Festival
Eugénie Malinjod
20 May 2016




"We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work."

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




'Viggo was there early enough that he planted the entire garden and that's a real garden.'

Matt Ross
'Captain Fantastic': Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen and the perils of off-the-grid fatherhood
by Michelle Lanz
The Frame
7 July 2016




Mortensen says he brought "sleeping bags, a canoe, bicycles, clothing, blankets, books, pots and pans — all things that I knew these people would have. It looked like 'The Beverly Hillbillies.' " Most of it made it into the film, including a loud patterned red shirt that the actor had squirrelled away from his 1987 wedding.

In 'Captain Fantstic,' Viggo Mortensen found more than a modern-day 'Mr. Mom'
By Michael O'Sullivan
Washington Post
15 July 2016




"...what was surprising to me about working with him is that I could never catch him acting. He doesn't have any false moments."

Matt Ross
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




All the 'family' members got along but I think the strongest bonds that were made were between the kids and Viggo. He would come on set every day with different books for all the kids to read. I ended up having about 10 books that I've never gotten around to reading. He really is a generous, amazingly kind man."

Nicholas Hamilton
Captain Fantastic and the Sundance Kid
By Matthew Lowe
Filmink.com
20 January 2015




...we had this two-day, one-night wilderness survival camp, with just the six of us kids and a guide," she said. "We each were given a knife and had to figure out how to survive. We had to track down our food, purify water, build a shelter. I love being outdoors, but this was pretty extreme."

"We were building fires because in the forest it was so incredibly dark," Isler said. "All of a sudden, we heard these sounds and saw this shape coming toward us through the forest. It was Viggo, who said he wanted to bring us beef jerky and dried cherries. And we were all like, 'How in the world did you find us?' "

Tulsa teen actress Samantha Isler talks about her role in 'Captain Fantastic'
By James D Watts Jnr
Tulsa World
29 July 2016




'When it comes to cutting an effortless master like Viggo Mortensen, what can I say besides you're just trying to pick the best of the best and make sure it all hangs together in the right way. He makes it look easy. He also comes to the role with such fierce dedication and so many ideas. We invited him into the editing room later in the process and he had a very complete memory of what he had done and what had been shot and asked us very challenging questions about why we had chosen one approach over the other. He was a very good extra eye in the editing room and I was glad we were able to spend some time with him there.'

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




When he appears, caked in mud, looking like a kind of eco-Rambo, splashing barefoot through a river and cutting the heart out of a deer, you'll be thinking: Well, that's just Viggo Mortensen's life, isn't it?

Wild man Viggo Mortensen lets it all hang out in Captain Fantastic
Neala Johnson
Herald Sun
8 September 2016




In "Captain Fantastic," he truly does seem like a hunter, in the Hemingway/James Fenimore Cooper sense. He looks like the kind of guy who, yes, would worship Noam Chomsky, but he also looks like the kind of guy who would eat him for breakfast.

The Secret Appeal of 'Captain Fantastic': It's Left-Wing… and Right-Wing
By Owen Gleiberman
Variety
14 July 2016




...The beauty of the film lies in its refusal to paint Ben as a deluded tyrant or principled pioneer. He doesn't have two faces — thanks to the script, as well as Mortensen's squirrely brilliance, he has hundreds.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
Evening Standard
9 September 2016




Mortensen sets about captaining this ship so well, with such fine shadings of distant grief, self-reproach, humility when it's necessary, defiance when it's not, that you can't imagine anyone else in the role, and wouldn't want anyone else near it.

Tim Robey
The Telegraph
8 September 2016




Brainy and brawny—a rare combination of qualities among leading men in Hollywood that hasn't strongly applied since Roberts Ryan and Mitchum—personifies Viggo Mortensen and sets him apart from just about everybody else on the contemporary screen. He displays plenty of both, not to mention a mesmerizing talent, in Captain Fantastic...

...Above all, Viggo Mortensen overcomes every intrusion of doubt with a performance that is informed, inspired, ideological and overwhelming. He's so sensational that he makes the film's title come true with no strings attached.

Super-Dad: 'Captain Fantastic' Enthralls the Senses and Engages the Mind
By Rex Reed
The Observer
5 July 2016




"I couldn't have done this without him, he's my collaborator."

Matt Ross accepting his best director award
Cannes
May 2016




'Viggo demonstrates the aspirations of the movie, what kind of movie are you hoping to make, and for me, I can have no better faith than in Viggo Mortensen.'

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross Interview
Jason Gorber
Dorkshelf.com
14 July 2016

Quotable Viggo: 4 December 2016

Well, it's that time of year again. More and more speculative lists of awards nominees are coming out by the day and Viggo's name is popping up everywhere on them for that Holy Grail of acting, the Best Actor Oscar. Yep we've been here before. In 2008 we even made the Red Carpet. Do we care? Well... um... we know it's a 'crapshoot' (Viggo's description) but, yes we do. As Viggo said to El Argentino in 2009 'if it happens, it happens. And if not, it doesn't... Win or lose with dignity. And that's it.'



Annual Oscar Nominees Luncheon
© Reuters.



...a career best turn by Viggo Mortensen... I really can't say enough about the work of Viggo Mortensen. He's able to give this character so much life that you're under his spell; whether you agree or disagree with Ben's view of the world and outlook on raising his children. We see the best and worst of him, with Mortensen showcasing that brilliantly. In a perfect world, he would be in the Best Actor conversation for the Oscars.

Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com
7 July 2016




'For me, awards are a lottery; if it's your turn, it's your turn. I don't remember who told me, but it's like Churchill's medals: "You shouldn't go in search of them, but must accept them and never wear them."'

Viggo Mortensen
Alatriste, The Modern Hero
By Robert Andres Gomez - translated by Margarita
El Universal
25 March 2007




" …..my goals aren't the same goals that other people have that are perfectly justifiable on their own terms: wanting to be famous, wanting to make lots of money, wanting to win Oscars or something. It's not my main reason for doing it. My main reason for doing it is because I am drawn to it."

Viggo Mortensen
Things are getting 'Good' for Mortensen
By John Clark
SF Gate-San Francisco Chronicle
23 January 2009




You watch [the Oscars] and you realize that good work is maybe rewarded half the time and the other half of the time it's sort of a crapshoot, a popularity contest, and it's become more so. It's not gonna change my opinion about it having been a job well done, a good effort, and that's gonna last.

Viggo Mortensen on the ROTK Oscars
'King' Star Returns To The Screen, Riding High
by Todd Camp
Star Telegram, 6 March 2004




''I'm not gonna be rude about it. I'll show up for the ceremony. But I didn't participate in the everyday ... I dunno what they do, cocktail parties, keeping in people's minds, trying to convince people to vote for them. It's like, 'ugh, I'd rather just let the work speak', you know.

Viggo on the Oscars
Viggo Mortensen on his new film Good
Neala Johnson
Herald Sun
8 April 2009




"…It was nice to see Tommy Lee Jones in there. He hadn't been in so much of the mix and when I saw his name come up and there was only one name left to go, I thought, `Naah, well, there's no way (I'll be nominated).' So to be honest, I was quite surprised."

Viggo on hearing his Oscar Nomination for Eastern Promises
Associated Press Release
Cleveland.com
22 January 2008




Viggo Mortensen scrubbed up for the big night. The best-actor nominee (Eastern Promises) prepped by taking "my annual bath. It was an arduous process of refilling the tub many times."

Viggo on Oscar night
Donna Freydkin and William Keck
USA Today
25 February 2008




Fresh from the set of the post-apocalyptic film "The Road," Viggo Mortensen sized up the path to the Kodak Theatre entrance and smiled a grim smile. "This road is more daunting than the road in the movie I'm making -- and that one has cannibals."

Viggo at the Oscars
The Envelope
By Geoff Boucher and Chris Lee
February 24, 2008




"It's always a bit bewildering when people are taking pictures and asking questions before the ceremony. I'm not very good at giving quick answers, and that's what they want. So I end up saying half a sentence, and then they go, 'OK, thank you!' and I'm thinking, 'WHAT did I just say?'"

Viggo on awards ceremonies
'My mother is very happy about it'
By Harriet Lane
The Guardian
February 22, 2008




"I feel probably like Eli Manning felt at the Super Bowl. Glad to be in the show, ready for anything."

Viggo at the Oscars
Newsweek.com
Associated Press
24 February 2008




"I'm realistic," Mortensen says. "I know I'm the odds-on favourite to remain seated throughout the ceremony."

Viggo on the 2008 Oscars
'My mother is very happy about it'
By Harriet Lane
The Guardian
February 22, 2008




"Most People don't win, you know? So on the way out of the big auditorium, the Kodak, I went over to these people and said, 'Hey, let's do a loser's dance.' I started jumping, and they were just horrified at this loss they just suffered, you know? There were these filmmakers from Canada who lost and actually agreed. And I think Michael Moore did the losers dance. But I would say 99% of the losers didn't want to do the losers dance. They all just sort of ran from me like I was shitfaced drunk or something."

Viggo celebrating losing his Oscar
A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




"I would rather see San Lorenzo win the tournament than get an Oscar, definitely."

Viggo Mortensen
By Juan Cruz Sanchez Marino - translated by Graciela
GENTE
26 December 2008




Have you ever thought what you would say if you won an Oscar?


Thank you.

El Mundo Webchat With Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
21 November 2011

Quotable Viggo: 26 November 2016

It's clear from all I've read over the years that a lot of critics, directors and actors think Viggo is a pretty fearless actor, but Viggo has often commented (as he has just done in recent The Wrap interview) that fear is good and he often goes out of the way to choose things that scare him a little. He likes to push himself and meet interesting challenges head on so that fear never becomes a 'prison'. What others see as a kind of fearlessness is, I think, really a readiness to embrace fear and use it creatively.



© Haddock Films.


'...this tender and complex man is not afraid of anything.'

The Desired One
By Ester Aguado, Women Magazine, August 2006
Translated for V-W by Graciela




"I am an optimistic dreamer who has never been imprisoned by fear."

Viggo Mortensen, Beautiful Savage
Richard Gianorio
Le Figaro
26 September 2008




"I believe you should pick things you want to see," he added, "and things that scare you a little bit."

Oscar Dark Horse Viggo Mortensen on Why He Embraces Fringe Characters
By Steve Pond
The Wrap
22 November 2016




"Sometimes it's interesting but I'm not sure about it, and then you ask yourself why am I not sure about this? Is it because I'm afraid, because it's different, it's unknown? And then in which case maybe you should do it just for that reason."

Viggo Mortensen
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today
2001




What brought you to theatre?

Fear. I've done theatre because it frightens me. I'm attracted to everything that frightens me. It's not like in film, where you do a take and then you can do another and another. Theatre is just one live take that lasts an hour and 40 minutes, depending on the performance. It's a new adventure every night. If you get off track, you have to see how to get back.

Viggo Mortensen: "I'm attracted to what scares me"
By Roció García - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
24 November 2011




"I´m getting to know myself bit by bit (laughs) and one thing that always happens is that when I´m on the right path I get a little scared. Rather quickly. Always, after saying "yes", hanging up the phone or coming out of the office... they´ve said to you "OK! We choose you." or "Your test was the best." Or they call you sometimes, and if you are lucky, they say "We thought you´d do this role very well." You read it, you think about the script and make the leap. And everything is fine but at the moment you do it, myself at least, then I get scared and think "Well, they think I can do it, but I don´t know." The truth is that I say it half-jokingly, but a lot of times I say "I don´t know how to act. Don´t know how to act!" Because you look at each character..."How do you do this?""

Viggo Mortensen
Lleida Festival Press Conference
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
April 2011




"If there's something in a story that might be good for me to explore and learn about, that pricks my conscience or even scares me on some level, then that's where I try to go."

Viggo Mortensen
"Life's Too Short to Do All This Work and Not Do It Right": An Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm.com
6 April 2004




"Viggo's my kind of actor," smiles Cronenberg, who likes to work with actors who are not just leading men, but also character actors. "First of all they tend not to be afraid because they're not trying to protect some image they see of themselves as traditional leading men, but also it gives them a much bigger palette to paint from because they have all kinds of edges. I need a kind of eccentricity that is more typical of a character actor than a leading man, and yet still has a leading man presence and charisma."

David Cronenberg, Director
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




'I think it is necessary to be afraid, because when you think that you know everything and you feel confident, you can contribute or learn very little. Yet, it is very important to visualize yourself doing everything, and to believe that you can do it; that will guarantee your success.'

Viggo Mortensen
Top Men - Viggo Mortensen, Glamour Magazine
August 2006
Translated for V-W by Graciela




Is success an antidote to fear or, on the contrary, does it feed it?

I'm always afraid, and I always will be. Every time I finish a shoot I think about taking some time to prepare for the next. But sometimes projects come quicker than you think, as happened with Appaloosa. Right after that we started The Road, based on Cormac McCarthy's novel, directed by Australian director John Hillcoat. That means added fears. If I weren't afraid at the start of a movie, I would feel strange.

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair
November 2008




'... the weeks before the filming [Alatriste] I was really frightened. I was afraid of not doing it well and that all Spain would kill me."

"I'm an actor so I'm not completely adult"
By Amalia Sanz
La Voz
1 April 2007




'Artists need to come to terms with their personal fear of death and the other mysteries that we all eventually face. That doesn't mean that Dennis [Hopper] or any of us have to go around brooding and cursing our fate. On the contrary: the absurd side of being alive, for however long and for whatever reason we are, can be the source of playfulness, if we allow it to be.'

Viggo's Acceptance Speech on receiving the Dennis Lee Hopper Award at the inaugural AMFM Fest
20 June 2013




"I guess in some sense I tend to agree with Freud's idea that everyone is flawed and it's better to - rather than bury our insecurities and our fears and our desires - it's better to acknowledge them.

Not because you're going to eradicate your imperfections but you're going to accept them and find a way to be able to live with them, y'know?"

On the couch with the former King Of Gondor
By Matt Maytum
Total Film
9 February 2012




What is your biggest fear?

Not being honest with myself and not getting the most out of life. This is one of the reasons I stay very active, always doing things that interest me in the field of art, by editing books, writing, drawing, painting, photography…

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Interview: "This film has made me feel closer to my father"
By Laura Sacksville - translated by Ollie, Rio and Sage
Cuore
13 February 2010

Quotable Viggo: 19 November 2016

[B]Is Viggo really some kind of magic weaving Zen Master masquerading as an actor/photographer/poet/painter? Mike Ryan's recent comments for Uproxx has made me wonder. Deeply. So pull up your meditation cushions, light your karma candles and just for the fun of it, let's suppose he is.../B]



© Unknown


Here's the thing about Viggo Mortensen: I could listen to this man speak on just about any topic for hours. His voice is both passionate and hypnotic. It's impossible not to be engaged when he's speaking because he presents himself with, somehow, both a welcome calmness and a focused intensity at the exact same time. It might be magic. I suspect it is magic.

Viggo Mortensen Will Hypnotize You With His Intensity As He Dissects What's Wrong With Our Polarized Country
By Mike Ryan
Uproxx
7 November 2016




Supping a herbal remedy from a mysterious brass pot that looks like it was stolen from Middle-earth, while sporting a bushy moustache liable to make Bill the Butcher green with envy (for his next role as a Spanish soldier in Alatriste), Mortensen exudes a Zen-like calm.

"We're Animals Too, Y'Know?"
By James Mottram
Hotdog #67
September 2005




Viggo Mortensen is no flake. He's a pretty intense guy — with a mellow sort of presence.

After "The Road" Viggo Mortensen Looks on the Bright Side: "You Could Always Be Dead"

By Jeffrey Podolsky
Wall Street Journal
17 November 2009




His voice is calm, a Zen whisper from the depths.

Understated A-lister Viggo Mortensen tells our reporter about his new cult hit 'Captain Fantastic' - and why it's impossible to be the perfect parent
by Ed Power
Irish Independent
31 August 2016




My first impressions of Viggo are a little hard to explain. He has an elusive reputation but I found him very down to earth. At the same time, however, he came off as quite mysterious. He spoke in a hushed, thoughtful tone and sounded very poetic in his speech patterns. Even when he wasn't saying much of anything I felt compelled to listen.

John Makarewicz
CHUD magazine
2004




He speaks with a gentle yet engaging passion and carries himself with a sense of calm that seems to radiate outwards to anyone in proximity - whether it be the ardent fans he enjoys speaking to while walking up red carpets or the hotel waiter who brings him boiling water so he can brew his cherished maté, a syrupy tea first tasted as a young boy growing up in Argentina.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




Mortensen is a matinee idol with a philosopher's soul — Jean-Jacques Rousseau trapped in the body of Rudolph Valentino.

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




Most actors will agree on the value of appearing enigmatic. But there is enigmatic and then there is Viggo Mortensen…

On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007




He doesn't need to wield a sword to be recognized. For those who can see beyond that, his personality stands out from the rest with no need of spotlights. He has his own light.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




"We function very differently, especially in the way we channel our energy. He is always calm, and speaks softly. I have a more brutal side. I learned a lot from knowing him."

Vincent Cassel
Viggo Mortensen the Insatiable
Studio Magazine
By Sophie Benamon
November 2007




"Viggo has the perfect qualities as a man and as an actor to do this part. He's got incredible depth of soul."

Nick Wechsler – 'The Road'
Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




"When we needed more wind, and after a long dead calm, Viggo sniffed and said: "This afternoon it's going to rain.' And so it was.'

Agustín Díaz Yanes
Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




"I think he has a quality of self-knowing that challenges everyone that he meets - perhaps unwittingly. But the electrical charge of that challenge of 'How well do you know yourself? Cause I know myself real well.' You know, that's kind of the unspoken Viggo experience. He's also fascinated by other people. And when you combine those elements, it's very charismatic. It can definitely be interpreted as sexy."

Diane Lane
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




'Viggo is just the coolest guy. It's hard to say too much about how cool he is. If you spend enough time with people they will do something to piss you off, or that shows them to be just a normal human being, but I think Viggo does like to push himself to be just the best person he can, and that comes across. If you believe in reincarnation, he does seem to be quite far along his line. He does seem to have learned a lot of lessons, and seems quite old and wise. But he's not a serious fuddy-duddy. He'll go surfing with us, and he likes to go out at night and have some drinks.'

Billy Boyd
Lone Star
By Peter Ross
Sunday Herald, 2004

Quotable Viggo: 6 November 2016

After Viggo's 10 Lessons in Filmmaking from Filmmaker's Magazine and his recent account in El Pais of the horrors of reading from David Copperfield on stage as a 12 or 13 year old ("inconceivable torture"), I've been thinking what a very long way he's come since he played "the ass end of a dragon" in a school play. Though I would have given a lot to see that dragon :lol:.



© Light House Cinema


"I was 12 or 13 when a friend of mine encouraged me to be an actor, something that had never crossed my mind. I was then living in New York and didn't know anybody. I went up on stage and read the first paragraph from David Copperfield. The only thing I heard before closing the book and fleeing from that inconceivable torture was 'Louder, louder.' And here I am!"

Viggo Mortensen: "The older I get, the more tired I get of Hollywood."
By Rocío Ayuso
El Pais
8 October 2016




Viggo Mortensen is one of the most fascinating stars in contemporary cinema. The image of his penetrating gaze and wide jaw seems to have traversed all the corners of the globe and of Planet Cinema.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




...one of the great little pleasures of cinema in our day - seeing Mortensen tilt his head and sketch a knowing half smile with the corner of his mouth.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




Here is a handsome, photogenic, intelligent, multi-lingual actor who has simply refused to be typecast in specific kinds of genres and roles and/or to become a bankable Hollywood star, even though he had all the ingredients for that position two decades ago.

Cannes Film Fest 2016: Captain Fantastic–Viggo Mortensen Dominates Eccentric Tale of Nature Vs. Civilization
Emanuellevy.com
8 May 2016




Viggo Mortensen holds the unusual distinction of having two TIFF movies in which he speaks four different languages … none of which are English, the language that moviegoers are accustomed to hearing Mortensen speak.

Steve Pond
The Wrap
11 November 2014




"...what was surprising to me about working with him is that I could never catch him acting. He doesn't have any false moments."

Matt Ross
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




When it comes to cutting an effortless master like Viggo Mortensen, what can I say besides you're just trying to pick the best of the best and make sure it all hangs together in the right way. He makes it look easy.

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




Philip Seymour Hoffman, certainly one of the great actors of our time, told us in a Venetian hallway of the Hotel Excelsior how he regarded Viggo Mortensen as one of the masters of the profession. A point of view that is totally shared.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of CAPTAIN FANTASTIC
Silverscreenriot.com
Matt Oakes
22 June 2016




There are actors whose performances come as light emanating from the screen. Then there's Mortensen. His effect is gravitational. It draws you closer, inward.

Actor Geoffrey Rush after seeing the film at Tiff
Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post Film Critic




Few actors can do stillness on screen with as much conviction as Viggo Mortensen. That chiselled face, turned towards a landscape or held in concentration as someone else speaks, can stand in for any amount of narrative exposition: look at any of Mortensen's characters and you know, without having to be told about it, that man's had a hell of a past. When he does speak, of course – in whichever language, given he speaks four and has learned new ones on the hop for several of his films – you're the one paying attention. Quiet as he is, he commands the screen.

Far From Men: Viggo Mortensen saddles up in Albert Camus' short story
by Stephanie Bunbury
Sydney Morning Herald
23 July 2015




"He is methodical, exacting in his work, he carries out meticulous labors to do something that looks true, and projects it. He is like Robert Mitchum or William Holden, the class of actors whose work seems effortless."

Ray Loriga
Chiaroscuro: Viggo, Light And Dark
By Rocio Garcia - translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
El Pais
26 June 2009




Part of what makes Mortensen such a fascinating character is that his constant analysis of his own work means that he sees a value and a weakness in everything he does. Nothing, it seems, can be good enough for him to rest on his laurels, but even an unsuccessful project is a worthwhile learning process.

An Unconventional Method: Viggo Mortensen
Clash
8 March 2015




In a world of paste reproductions Viggo Mortensen is a rare gem of creative energy. His work as an actor goes far beyond the normal level of effort exerted by a conventional leading man which results in his performances being elevated into works of art as unique as his poems and pictures.

Viggo Mortensen: An Artist For All Seasons
By Richard Marcus
BNN Blogger News Network
6 May 2005




Mortensen, who radically rejects any clichés and stereotypes, has become one of the most interesting and idiosyncratic actors of his generation. And incidentally, so to speak, a world star of cinema.

Venniale Tribute publicity
August 2014




"Oh wow. It's Viggo," says the "Dorian Gray" star. The observation was understated -- no hoots, hollers or autograph mania here. But the surprise was unmistakable as a publicist escorted the handsome British star down a corridor at Toronto's Intercontinental Hotel.

"You sound impressed," the woman comments, hurrying the 28-year-old actor off to another interview.

"Sure I'm impressed," Barnes smiles broadly. "That's Viggo Mortensen!"

Ben Barnes spots Viggo at Toronto
Constance Droganes
CTV.ca
12 September 2009

Quotable Viggo: 29 October 2016

Well... this will come as a shock and I will say this very quietly... I have almost finished my Christmas gift shopping. Which brings me in a round-about-way to gift giving and Viggo, for whom gift giving seems to be almost part of his daily routine. No matter what it is – a few special chocolates, an ice-cream, a CD – it's a gesture of thanks, an ice-breaker, a way of introducing others to the things he loves. And it's kinda beautiful.



© New Line Productions Inc


Viggo Mortensen has come bearing pancake mix. We are curbside at the tiny airport in Syracuse, New York, on a truly dreary day (even by Syracuse standards), and within seconds of hopping into his rented Ford Fusion, I learn two things about him: He's the kind of guy who picks you up at the airport, and he's the kind of guy who brings presents. Pancake mix is a delicacy in upstate New York. "Do you like maple syrup?" Because he brought me some of that, too. He's prepared a gift bag.

Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016




Throughout the shoot, each time Mortensen went to visit his mother, he'd purchase T shirts sporting various types of fish logos, swimming in turbulent streams. On each visit, he purchased more until soon, nearly the entire crew was garbed in fish T shirts...

A History of Violence
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




"There's rarely a day he doesn't show up bearing gifts of some sort from his different weekend jaunts," says his Appaloosa costar Renée Zellweger, "where he'll go find some really obscure village behind Taos somewhere and visit an artists' colony and bring back some wares to share."

Renée Zellweger
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




He… presents me with two large chocolate squares, one wrapped in pink paper that has a handwritten "Venezuela" on it, and another in orange paper that has a handwritten "Indonesia".

I am not sure whether he handwrapped them himself or whether they came from a hand-wrapped chocolate shop. I imagine him travelling the world with a suitcase of wrapped chocolates.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009





"Viggo is such an amazing guy. He's the gentlest, kindest person you'll ever meet. All the 'family' members got along but I think the strongest bonds that were made were between the kids and Viggo. He would come on set every day with different books for all the kids to read. I ended up having about 10 books that I've never gotten around to reading. He really is a generous, amazingly kind man."

Nicholas Hamilton
Captain Fantastic and the Sundance Kid
By Matthew Lowe
Filmink.com
20 January 2015




"He's an unbelievable man. He brings chocolates to the set, expensive haute cuisine chocolates, and he hands it out in plastic bags."

Jason Isaacs
Jason Isaacs Loved Working With Chocolate Man Mortensen
ContactMusic.com
1 March 2012




"He's definitely a caretaker, which is a really beautiful quality, and a man of many passions – poetry, photography, books.... I arrived on set and there was a library in my trailer."

Charlize Theron – The Road
Beautiful Dreamer
By Holly Millea
Elle (U.S.)
October 2009




A really nice box-office clerk (I'm not naming names) at a downtown Madrid theater discovers that Viggo Mortensen, whose girlfriend, a famous Spanish film star, was acting in a version (very poor, to be sure) of a famous play which was playing right there, has come to buy a ticket.

Quite possibly, Mortensen could have asked his partner for an invitation and that would have been that. Instead, he insisted on paying like any regular guy. The box-office clerk recognised him, and smiling, gave him a guest ticket. "How much do I owe you?" said Mortensen in his cheerful Argentinian accent. "No, no, nothing, you are invited," answered the box-office clerk. The Hollywood star thanks her cordially, goes, and ten minutes later returns with an ice cream for the box-office clerk! He insisted that she should take it, although she said she was on a diet, so he sweetened her afternoon. Anyway, when I grow up, I want to be Viggo Mortensen.

Where I said Viggo (Mortensen), I say Diego (Alatriste)
By Juan Luis Sánchez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Decine21.com
25 November 2011




"When he knew about my big childhood fondness for Sugus sweets, one day I found on the floor of my dressing room the shape of my name all made out with sugus."

Unax Ugalde
The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García, El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




'I met Maradona once on Susana Giménez' program.... The idea was that his arrival would be a surprise at the end of the broadcast, but someone got excited and told me a few hours before going to the station. I took with me in my pocket a CASLA t-shirt with "10" and gave it to him during the program. I told him that there was a gap in our lineup because of injuries (maybe it was Walter Montillo that was hurt, I don't remember now) and that the following day, since we were playing against River, maybe he would like to join us. The idol took it very well and Susana, who's a Cuervo, laughed too.

In the last minutes of the program, I took off my boots to give him the San Lorenzo socks I was wearing and I think I told him that he'd have to look for the shorts himself. He also accepted that gift with a lot of dignity and in an extremely generous spirit. If he thought that I was an idiotic Cuervo, he didn't say so.'

Viggo Mortensen
In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




A few days later, as evening fell, he returned to Valdeteja bringing with him an enormous bag of goodies for the town's kids who by now know that Viggo never arrives empty-handed. There, in Anabel's bar, he resembled Jesus among the children. Scores of kids cavorted around him, watching eagerly as Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like Santa Claus to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
20 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita

Quotable Viggo: 23 October 2016

Talking about the wonders of suits last week let me to watching Two Faces of January again and to this week's Quotable. As in many of his projects, Viggo's interest in the movie and the quality of the script helped kick-start the film for Director Hossein Amini. Along the way Viggo peeled back the layers of conman, Chester McFarland, rocked his white suit and nearly set fire to Kirsten Dunst.



© StudioCanal.


"He was incredibly gracious and generous — I hadn't directed anything," Amini says. "He said as long as it's done properly, as long as we shot in Greece, as long as there was a sufficient budget. He became almost like a partner, sort of a patron saint to the whole movie. That allowed me to go and get the financing."

New director turns to an old favorite, '2 Faces of January'
By Pam Grady
San Francisco Chronicle
1 October 2014




'I just tried for so long and just couldn't get anyone to finance the movie or be interested in kind of, you know, exploring it, and the moment Viggo read the script and was interested in doing it; it's amazing how suddenly people start kind of saying, "Oh, well we're interested in doing it," because if it's a business decision then they can. Suddenly, there's foreign sales and they can sell the idea. It suddenly [went] from "this is too dark," "the characters are [too] unlikable and complicated,"- it was suddenly, "Well it's Viggo."'

Hossein Amini
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




"For me it was the story first," she said. "I loved the script and Viggo [Mortensen, her co-star] was attached already, and I've always wanted to work with him, so that's what drew me to be part of the film. Sometimes it's about the role for me, but most often it's about the actors I want to work with, the director and the story."

Kirsten Dunst
Dunst's Guide To Dressing
By Lauren Milligan
Vogue
15 May 2014




Who's been your favourite actor to work with?


Viggo Mortensen was a delight to work with on The Two Faces Of January. There was one occasion where I had a fitting with him in Barcelona but Viggo had just come down with a fever and was completely delirious. He was sweating buckets and he confessed to his girlfriend afterwards that he hadn't a clue what he was trying on, but he remained professional to the core. I wasn't aware how bad he was until he confessed to me later that he could have been trying on bin bags for all he'd known.

Steven Noble
ESQ&A: The Hollywood Costume Designer
By Tom Ward
Esquire Magazine
6 December 2014




"Chester is kind of a slob, all sweaty and paranoid; he's crazy from the start, really."

Viggo Mortensen
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




'...it's part of his con, the look, he wants to look like he came from money and all that. I don't think his origins are those clothes that you see.'

Viggo Mortensen on "Lord of the Rings" — and playing an American at last
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon
24 September 2014




Soaking up the highlights of Ancient Greece, Chester MacFarland resembles a spick-and-span palace. In fact, as becomes apparent, he's a ruin. Every time he gets drunk another partition collapses; when he sobers up, the grand edifice dazzles again.

It's the best thing Mortensen has done in years.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
London Evening Standard
16 May 2014




"He's got a lot of hidden fears. It's a real banquet for an actor."

Viggo Mortensen explains rooting for the bad guy in 'The Two Faces of January'
By Chris Lee
Entertainment Weekly
26 September 2014




"[As an actor], you lie as well as you can, that's what you're paid to do. And in this case I'm lying about a guy who's lying about being this person who's lying about being another person. It's kind of like a hall of mirrors. Instead of looking in one mirror and trying to be that person as an actor, it's a whole series of mirrors. It's fun."

Viggo Mortensen
The many faces of Viggo Mortensen
By Karl Quinn
Sydney Morning Herald
5 June 1014




"One of the first things we did, where it still had to be kind of neat and tidy, we were filming in a bus that travels around Crete," he said. "It was a vintage bus, a 1959 Mercedes bus, and the seats were red leather, beautiful seats. But it was so hot, and we were sweating so much that when I stood up, all the dye from the seats got on it, so I had this big red ass."

Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst Experienced the Downside of Wearing Vintage Costumes in The Two Faces of January
By Bennett Marcus
Vanity Fair
17 September 2014




...they start out as this glamorous couple that you could almost be envious of. This golden couple, and life is good, life is beautiful, "if only we could be them" is how you feel. And then you start to find out who they really are, and they disappoint you, they shock you, they embarrass you.

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Two Faces Of January
Adam Miller
Entertainmentwise
15 September 2014




But as an audience member you find yourself cheering them on. You want them to get away with everything. You want them to get away from the cops, you want them to get away with the girl, with the money. It's a contradictory thing, it's a strange thing, but it's a dynamic that happens a lot, at least to me as an audience member. When a movie, a film noir thriller, works I want the bad guy to get away with it.

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Two Faces Of January
Adam Miller
Entertainmentwise
15 September 2014




If it's almost impossible to feel sympathy or compassion for Chester, who does unforgivable things, Mortensen accomplishes the difficult task of compelling you to respect him, even in failure and defeat.

Viggo Mortensen on "Lord of the Rings" — and playing an American at last
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon
24 September 2014




Can you talk about that very fateful moment in the cave, or would you prefer not to spoil it.

KD: Well, Viggo had to illuminate that scene with a lighter, and he was holding it and he burnt me and he was wailing and being emotional, and I couldn't say anything. The light was out was out but it was still so hot. I think I still have a scar. I didn't want to mess with Viggo.

VM:
Scarred her for life.

Kirsten Dunst & Viggo Mortensen Talk Bonding On Set, Paparazzi, & 'The Two Faces of January'
by Hillary Weston
Black Book
1 October 2014




"Everybody's got their secrets; even the nicest, calmest nun has got the possibility to think strange things or have resentments. All these characters have their secret desires and resentments, and their own sense of morality. Chester's just an opportunist. No one's purely good or purely bad in this story."

Viggo Mortensen
"The Two Faces of January" - Production Notes
StudioCanal
February 2014

Quotable Viggo: 15 October 2016

We love him in his worn Aragorn leathers, or scruffed up in a well-loved shirt and jeans. But Viggo really does scrub up rather well, and, with his latest blue suit, found himself unexpectedly at the forefront of a new fashion trend. Over the years we've seen white suits, red suits, blue suits and green suits and even a splendid Spanish inspired suit. And they all suit him.



© Getty. Images: Aurelien Meunier


As Viggo Mortensen approaches from the wings of a London cinema lobby, we're agog to see he's wearing a suit. Onscreen, Mortensen often sports long mud-matted hair, casual duds (at best) and can often be found atop a horse. When we meet him, his haircut is tight, he's in a handsome grey check suit, and there's nary a nag to be seen.

Viggo Mortensen Talks Jauja
By Philip Bagnell
Scannian
10 March 2015




'I'm not usually a suit person… You're lucky I'm wearing shoes!'

Viggo Q&A after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




In the flesh, his inscrutability gives off an electric hum. He is soberly dressed - grey suit, sensible shirt - and speaks in hushed, gravelly tones. If you didn't know, and of course you do, you might mistake Mortensen for a visiting academic or a writer.

Understated A-lister Viggo Mortensen tells our reporter about his new cult hit 'Captain Fantastic' - and why it's impossible to be the perfect parent
by Ed Power
Irish Independent
31 August 2016




'I particularly liked the white linen suit that you see in the poster that Chester wears, and in a way that's another character in the movie because the journey of that beautiful cream-coloured linen suit, on the Acropolis in the sunshine in the beginning, this immaculate, perfect, fits perfectly, looks great. You see that suit at the very end of the story, and that suit's been through it, it's a bit torn, it's frayed, it's not as clean as it was, it's suffered almost as much as the man wearing the suit, and it's an interesting journey for that suit. It's interesting to see that sometimes there's an object or set of clothes that has a life of its own, and that's the case with that suit.'

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Two Faces Of January
Adam Miller
Entertainmentwise
15 September 2014




Viggo Mortensen surely wasn't just cast because he's a great actor; it's because no one can rock a 1960s cream linen suit quite like him.

Leigh Singer
IGN.com
19 May 2014




"It comes from a very good tailor in Boedo, in Buenos Aires. San Lorenzo de Almagro".

Viggo on being asked who tailored his Golden Globes suit
Mortensen highlights his Argentinian team at the Golden Globes
By E J Tamara - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Publimetro
16 January 2012




...his sharp, shiny suit and coiffed hairdo should win an award all of their own.

Eastern Promises
From Russia With Loot
By Helen Barlow
Sydney Morning Herald
26 October 2007




...Mortensen's performance here is a restrained, shadowed work of art. Perfecting a Russian accent and shaping himself into an impeccably suited vision of doom...

Eastern Promises review
Brian Orndorf
Filmjerk.com
14 Sept 2007




"In the movie," said Cronenberg, "Viggo was wearing Armani. We don't allow him on the street like that, because he can't carry off the class when he's being himself."

Mortensen, director discuss their noirish
Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 September 2007




Viggo Mortensen asked to have 6 extra copies of the Monday issue of Ekstra Bladet so that he could send them to his relatives in Denmark and they would be able to see him in his nice red suit at the Gala Premiere for Eastern Promises at the Imperial Cinema

My Heart Beats For Denmark
By Kim Kastrup - translated by Rosen
Ekstra Bladet
25 September 2007




Why, it's Aragorn Powers: International Middle-Earth Man of Mystery!

Comment on the Armani Red Suit worn at the Copenhagen
Eastern Promises Premier
Life&style Magazine
October 2007




Viggo Mortensen stacks his case and suit protector neatly in the corner of the room. The precision of the movement is entirely in keeping with an angular formation of razor cheekbones and sharp suit. We probably shouldn't be surprised the Danish-American-Argentine has this travelling thing down.

The Mad Men
Tara Brady
The Irish Times
10 February 2012




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?

My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...

If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005

Quotable Viggo: 1 October 2016

The last review round-up I did for Captain Fantastic was the beginning of July. A lot has happened since then! Time for another look at more recent reviews of Viggo's performance in a film which is still taking theatres by storm. Given the quality of all Viggo's previous characterisations, the repeated comments that this is a career best shows how deeply Viggo embodies Ben Cash, possible the best and worst father in the world.



© Bleecker Street.


This is the only film this year that I have willingly watched twice.

Captain Fantastic is a tale of parenthood, childhood, loss, morals, right and wrong, good and bad. This mix of road trip, dark comedy and uplifting drama sees Viggo Mortensen in his best role for years.

Janie East
The Sun
9 September 2016




In what must rank as one his best-ever performances, Viggo Mortensen is superhero, Ben Cross, a former academic raising six kids in the woods of north-western America

John McDonald
Australian Financial Review
9 September 2016




The writing is wonderful, with a family you grow extremely close to in a matter of minutes. At the heart of it all is the ever-brilliant Viggo Mortensen. Ben is a complex character that has every fragment of thought etched into Mortensen's expression. He's taken a hold of this character unlike any since Aragon. He embodies Ben perfectly, and the film can't be imagined without him.

By Amie Cranswick
Flickeringmyth.com
9 September 2016




Ruggedly handsome, flamboyant and self-assured, Mortensen is like a poster boy for 'off-grid' living, bringing humour and charm to a role that could easily have come across as gratingly sanctimonious.

Henry Williams
Culture Whisper
18 September 2016




Mortensen gives a hugely charismatic performance, making it hard not to get drawn into the tractor beam of his free-spirited father character and wish he could raise you in the woods as well.... Viggo Mortensen gives one of the best turns of his career here, and the young actors on show alongside him are strong too.

Rob Leane
Den Of Geek
6 September 2016




Ben isn't the quixotic nutjob Harrison Ford played in The Mosquito Coast – this film's hidden soulmate, in a way – because Ross believes in him too much. And Mortensen sets about captaining this ship so well, with such fine shadings of distant grief, self-reproach, humility when it's necessary, defiance when it's not, that you can't imagine anyone else in the role, and wouldn't want anyone else near it.

Tim Robey
The Telegraph
8 September 2016




...a magnificent, nuanced performance from Viggo Mortensen.

Leigh Paatsch
Herald Sun
7 September 2016




As for the man wanting a life apart for his family, who comes to realise his idealism may actually be harming them, Mortensen is, yes, fantastic in what is a career-best performance.

Ben Cash might be a deeply flawed character. But he remains fascinating throughout and Mortensen's portrayal of him is perfect.

Russell Baillie
New Zealand Herald
22 September 2016




Oregon, says that his film asks whether Ben is "the best father in the world or the worst" and Mortensen does a terrific job of keeping both possibilities alive. A pointed discussion of Nabokov with Ben's super-smart kids flags up the question of how loving or abusive his parenting may be, leaving our own sympathies divided.

Mark Kermode
The Observer
11 September 2016




...this is a thoughtful examination of the fragility of any idyll under pressure from the imperfect world outside. But all of it is anchored and, like the family itself, dominated by Mortensen's Ben, who's both the hero and the villain. Caring but dictatorial, idealistic but often blind, he's a fascinating figure and, in bringing him to life, Mortensen gives his best performance yet.

Helen O'Hara
Empire Magazine
18 August 2016




Every now and then, a movie comes along that plays out almost entirely on a gifted actor's face; you feel as if you could watch the whole thing in quiet close-up, and catch every nuance of the story. I think of Cate Blanchett in "Blue Jasmine," Brie Larson in "Room," Denzel Washington in "Flight," to name just a few — and now, Viggo Mortensen in "Captain Fantastic.".... Early on, watch that handsomely etched face; on it, flickering, is Ben's fierce love for his children, his stubbornness, his patience, his self-righteousness that's tempered — just a bit — by affection. And, later, see how it falls, like a seemingly immovable rock suddenly tumbling down a mountainside, when he realizes something rare for him: He has, perhaps, been wrong.

Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
14 July 2016




Captain Fantastic hangs on its central character – tough, wise, charismatic, arrogant, possibly deluded – and Viggo Mortensen, usually a very contained performer, is magically effervescent in his chieftain-patriarch role....I will watch absolutely anything Ross chooses to make next: a fine director is born.

John Patterson
The Guardian
5 September 2016




Rather like The Royal Tenenbaums and Little Miss Sunshine, it's a vibrantly mordant yarn that involves endlessly changing vistas and precocious kids. All that, and Viggo Mortensen's penis. What's not to love?...

...The beauty of the film lies in its refusal to paint Ben as a deluded tyrant or principled pioneer. He doesn't have two faces — thanks to the script, as well as Mortensen's squirrely brilliance, he has hundreds.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
Evening Standard
9 September 2016

Quotable Viggo: 24 September 2016

After last week I thought 'Let's have another Aragorn Quotable'. Why not? Of course, we really liked Viggo as Aragorn because he threw himself into Tolkien's world wholeheartedly, carried The Lord of the Rings with him everywhere, uncovered undiscovered depths to Aragorn's character and lived and breathed Ranger even when fishing. Of course we did. No other possible reason.



© New Line Productions Inc


This is Return of the King though, and Viggo is that king. Throughout all three films, this has been a journey of responsibility for Aragorn as he grows to accept the destiny for which he was born. Viggo is noble, Viggo is powerful, Viggo is resplendent. He's a young Sean Connery but with a grittier style. More than anyone else, this is Aragorn's film.

ROTK
Film Hobbit
Cinemablend.com
16 December 3003




You can have your wee hobbits and wizened wizards. Give me the man who would be king. Rough-hewn Aragorn is as manly as they come as he slays loathsome orcs and woos elf princess Arwen, whispering sweet nothings into her pointy ears.

It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
16 December 2003




"From the moment that I saw him onscreen," says Otto, "I thought, 'Shit, he looks incredible. Here's a character I don't have to pretend to be in love with.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




Viggo Mortensen stuns as the tormented, destiny-shucking warrior Aragorn, exuding a bravery that will make men admire him and an intensity that will make women want to hop into his leather jerkin.

FOTR
Tor Thorsen
Reel.com 2001




In the dictionary under the term "Star making performance" there should be a photo of Viggo as Aragorn. The only thing keeping him from becoming the next HUGE leading man is if he decides he doesn't want to be. Women will love him and men will too. To top it off, he has a terrific (but brief) scene of incredible romance.

FOTR
Nick Nunziata
CHUD
December 2001




Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn easily dons the mantle of epic hero that used to be worn by Charlton Heston, and he's a lot sexier.

The Two Towers
Christopher Tookey
The Daily Mail
December 20, 2002




Aragorn has the slinky swagger and dreamy stubble that make him look like a legend created by Tolkien, Sam Shepard and Ralph Lauren. Fortunately Mr. Mortensen also has a touch of modesty as an actor, which allows him to take up space as if he belongs in the center of the frame rather than battling the other performers for it.

ROTK
The New York Times
Triumph Tinged With Regret in Middle Earth
Elvis Mitchell
December 16, 2003




I am being seduced by royalty. And not your garden variety Windsor, either. Admittedly, he looks more like a gypsy in his earthy tunic repaired to within an inch of its life, his hands and nails bearing the ingrained grit of a farmer. But he's a king all right: the King, the Lord of Men. He is Aragorn, son of Arathorn, and any minute now he's going to reach out one of those taut brown arms, lift me up on his trusty steed and whisk me away from all this...

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph
23 November 2003




The fiery passion that blazes in his eyes can do what no extra-large popcorn can: sustain a grown woman through six-plus hours of viewing pleasure for the past two years. It has been a torrid, if one-sided, affair, though I suspect many others have fallen for his unwashed charms.

On Viggo as Aragorn
It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




....even sitting in a plastic chair under the unflattering glare of fluorescent, in a drab office at Miramar Productions' headquarters in New Zealand, Viggo Mortensen is by far the dishiest bloke ever to have donned a crown.

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph, 2003




Casually dropping his name into conversations with the girls over the past 48 hours has produced more gasps, heaving bosoms and sighs of jealousy than a Lotto win.

"I'm a poet" - Rings star Mortensen
By Josie McNaught
Sunday Star-Times 2003




Viggo wears his beauty so carelessly and deflects flattery with a wry head-on-the-side smile of modesty.

Ian McKellen
"The White book", Mckellen.com
July 15, 2003




It's crucial that the film, like the journeys it narrates, is straggly. I spent the duller sections thinking about how flaxen-haired Legolas looks like a Milky Bar hippy as he pings his egg-slicer-strong arrows at the barbarous monsters. I also drifted off looking at Viggo Mortensen: has a more virile, dynamic actor ever appeared on the silver screen?

TTT
Sukhdev Sandhu
The Daily Telegraph
December 18, 2002




Q: What do you think makes you sexy?

VM: I don't really know how to deal with that question. I'm sure that there's just as many people who think I'm a grizzled hack.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003

Quotable Viggo: 18 September 2016

I was having an Arwen moment last night, togged up in elven garb and singing in a magical open-air fairy themed concert next to someone dressed vaguely like Elrond. And I thought – if only Aragorn were here! The closest I can get is an Aragorn quotable. Of course, Viggo had his own unique take on Tolkien's Elessar, bringing a deep inner questioning and psychological depth that had us hooked from the moment he lowered his hood in the Prancing Pony.



© New Line Productions Inc


We knew we were blessed in having Viggo - who is part-Danish descent - step into the role of Aragorn when he arrived carrying a copy of the Volsunga Saga that he had taken from his bookshelf! Viggo not only has an actor's sense of bringing his character to life, but also an innate understanding of 'the warrior code' and Tolkien's philosophy of heroism.

Philippa Boyens
The Making of the Movie Trilogy




The filming was going on at the far end of the [Prancing Pony] set when I noticed this figure in a dark hood, smoking a pipe, sitting in another corner of the set altogether. Then I realized: it was Viggo. He wasn't required in the scene, he was just sitting there, observing the vibe, he was actually being Strider, being the outsider, the lonely man in the corner that no one spoke to.

Costa Botes, Video Documentarian
Official Movie Guide




"I hope you feel to some degree Aragorn's sense of hesitation. On a practical level as an actor, that was already with me when I arrived in New Zealand... it's one thing for someone to tell you that you're capable but it's quite another for you to know it yourself. I felt that in Aragorn, and I felt it too as an actor: 'You've hired me 'cos you think I can do it but privately I'm not sure'."

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
By Ryan Gilbey
The Independent
14 December 2001




The first thing I had to do was a swordfight [the confrontation with the Ringwraiths on Weathertop]. Even before I spoke a single word of dialogue, I was forced to confront the physicality of my character. It was probably helpful to do something physical before speaking. More than for any other character, Aragorn's actions speak for him. His choices, the decisions he makes, his physicality, his body, tell you a lot about him. He's a man who throws himself into situations.

Viggo Mortensen
Official Movie Guide




'An orphan raised by elves. A little like Moses. He knows the best and bravest of his forefathers screwed up. They were not immune to the corrupting temptations of the ring. So why should he, a distant and diluted descendant of a noble line, fare any better? He becomes a master of disguise and assumes different names, living a nomadic, hit-and-run existence.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Washington Times
15 December 2001




"Except as a child, he's never really ever been truly able to be himself publicly, or even privately - how would he even get used to that? When you get into that or any other habit, there's a resistance to or fear of changing; it's not a comfortable notion. To suddenly come out of the closet and say, "This is who I am" - to no longer operate in hiding and keep leaving the scene like the Lone Ranger, to stand in one place undisguised and let others have access to you - is in some ways more frightening than fighting any army. That inner conflict is an interesting thing to portray. It's not always something that's written, or can be fully written."

Viggo Mortensen
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com
2003




He's under pressure to be a public leader and not the lone ranger type. You see when he makes strategy decisions, and asks others to follow him, it is on his head. It's not just him and his horse going to the Black Gates, basically to commit suicide in order to buy Frodo more time. He's convinced armies and friends to fight together. He doesn't order anyone to do anything.

Viggo Mortensen
The One King
By Bryan Cairns
Film Review Yearbook
2004




"He was the greatest traveller and huntsman of his age," Mortensen says about his quiet, stoic role. "There is no character in this story, in these books, that has travelled more extensively and had more contact with other cultures, races, languages, and an appreciation and understanding of the differences of all the free peoples of Middle-earth. . . . He has an understanding that the most precious thing that any intelligent being possesses is free choice."

Viggo Mortensen
Playing the Hero Suits Mortensen Fine
Philadelphia Enquirer
2002




'He's always looking for what he has in common with other people. He is inclined to be compassionate, show mercy; that's the way he was raised, what he's been taught. And he's conscious of these having been the most positive qualities of the greatest of his ancestors.'

Viggo Mortensen The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com
2003



"Despite his vast knowledge of the world, Aragorn always considers himself fallible. It is his internal conflicts that make him evolve."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
By Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine
December 2003




On one level, Aragorn is the heroic, archetype that you find in the [Nordic] sagas, but with the striking difference that he is a man who seems almost to have lost his tongue! In the sagas, the hero will brag about what he's going to do, do it and then brag about what he's done. Aragorn, in contrast, is a modern character with qualities more like those of the Samurai hero who must often learn difficult lessons and endure much hardship on his journey, and whose eventual triumph is usually as much in the service of society as it is for himself.

Viggo Mortensen
"Aspects of Aragorn"
The Making of the Movie Trilogy




"I don't think Aragorn is naturally prone to fighting in the same sense that maybe Boromir was in the first story or Eomer is in this. He isn't, by nature, warlike.

The Elvish name his mother gives him at birth is Estel, which means hope. I think he basically has a sunny disposition, but it has been dampened over the years by what he has seen in the world. He is a skilled fighter who has taken on the fighting styles of the different places he has lived and fought in, but it's by virtue of necessity that he does it."

Viggo Mortensen
Aragorn Explains the Whole Good-Evil Thing
By A. J.
E! Features
15 December 2002




You sense that what Mortensen prizes in Aragorn, he prizes in himself. When he tells me that Aragorn understands the value of "stretching yourself, being passionate about other cultures and languages", I discern only the thinnest of veils separating observation from autobiography.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
By Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk
2001




'Ultimately, you create your own luck. Fate does step in. When we ended up with Viggo, fate was dealing us a very kind hand. Viggo, in hindsight, was the one person who was perfect for this film. He came out of nowhere, and suddenly there was Aragorn.'

Peter Jackson
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004


Quotable Viggo: 9 September 2016

The last couple of months have brought us a barrel load of new interviews as Viggo has promoted Captain Fantastic here, there and everywhere. As always, some of the reporter's comments on meeting him and their take on his career have been priceless: insightful, funny, pithy and – often - rather awed. In cast you missed them in the melee, here are some of the best.



© Mark Klein.


In the flesh, his inscrutability gives off an electric hum. He is soberly dressed - grey suit, sensible shirt - and speaks in hushed, gravelly tones. If you didn't know, and of course you do, you might mistake Mortensen for a visiting academic or a writer.

Understated A-lister Viggo Mortensen tells our reporter about his new cult hit 'Captain Fantastic' - and why it's impossible to be the perfect parent
by Ed Power
Irish Independent
31 August 2016




"I've always been comfortable in the wilderness," coos Viggo Mortensen. We are, as it were, quite far from the bucolic, huddled together in a booth at a chic restaurant in downtown Manhattan, a maddening mélange of unimpeded socialites, regrettable facial hair, and Viggo who, at 57, does not look as though he's aged a single day since carving up Orcs in Middle Earth. Spending most of the year in Madrid, Spain, sipping on Argentinean malbecs will do that to you.

Viggo Mortensen Goes Green: 'I Trust Hillary About as Much as I Trust Donald Trump'
By Marlo Stern
Daily Beast
16 July 2016




Brainy and brawny—a rare combination of qualities among leading men in Hollywood that hasn't strongly applied since Roberts Ryan and Mitchum—personifies Viggo Mortensen and sets him apart from just about everybody else on the contemporary screen.

Super-Dad: 'Captain Fantastic' Enthralls the Senses and Engages the Mind
By Rex Reed
The Observer
5 July 2016




He writes poetry—good poetry, not just a few free-associated thoughts slapped together. He is a photographer—not just a shutterbug whose work hangs in galleries because he's famous, but a photographer you can actually see thinking through the aperture of his instrument. He publishes books—not just one or two every now and again, but consistently, through an actual publishing house he founded 15 years ago and continues to run. He's a musician, but not in the way many actors dabble in music—he's released 17 albums, including some collaborations with some outstanding musicians.

And, of course, that same deliberateness and commitment has led to a truly extraordinary film career.

Viggo Mortensen and the Art of Deliberate Living
By Michael Dunaway
Paste Magazine
3 August 2016




Meeting the Madrid-based poet, actor, photographer, editor and publisher in this place and under these circumstances feels something akin to encountering an albino bison in a veal pen. He seems to be a soul meant to wander the earth in search of universal truth, not discuss Hobbit movies over canapés with journalists.

On interviewing Viggo in a posh hotel
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen is pressing me to eat a croissant from a large basket sitting on a table in front of him. It is certainly the right hour for them – most actors would draw the line at 8.30am interviews – but whoever imagined that arthouse cinema's most visibly rugged outdoors man would start his day with effete French pastries? This is the man whose chosen set souvenir from Lord of the Rings was his horse! He looks relieved when I take one; nobody need now be embarrassed.

Viggo Mortensen gets dirty to play a 'wolf dad' in Captain Fantastic
By Stephanie Bunbury
Sydney Morning Herald
2 September 2016




Mortensen doesn't go in much for trappings. He has a flip phone!

Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016




The one and only Strider, also known as Aragorn, later called by the name King Elessar Telcontar of Gondor is coming to Dublin. He's also called Viggo Mortensen sometimes.

Viggo Mortensen is coming to Dublin!
Breaking News.ie
9 August 2016




...while he's clearly driven by a need to express himself via many outlets, he still exudes a sense of some private, fundamentally unknowable core self. It permeates his screen presence, too, and is part of what makes him so intriguing as an actor.

Viggo Mortensen: Still here, still fantastic
The Film Experience
By Nathaniel Rogers
24 April 2016




When he appears, caked in mud, looking like a kind of eco-Rambo, splashing barefoot through a river and cutting the heart out of a deer, you'll be thinking: Well, that's just Viggo Mortensen's life, isn't it?

Wild man Viggo Mortensen lets it all hang out in Captain Fantastic
Neala Johnson
Herald Sun
8 September 2016




In "Captain Fantastic," he truly does seem like a hunter, in the Hemingway/James Fenimore Cooper sense. He looks like the kind of guy who, yes, would worship Noam Chomsky, but he also looks like the kind of guy who would eat him for breakfast.

The Secret Appeal of 'Captain Fantastic': It's Left-Wing… and Right-Wing
By Owen Gleiberman
Variety
14 July 201
6



Is Viggo Mortensen the most interesting man in the world?

Viggo Mortensen: Still here, still fantastic
The Film Experience
By Nathaniel Rogers
24 April 201
6



Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of CAPTAIN FANTASTIC
Silver Screen Riot
22 June 2016




With all this prep, it's clear why Mortensen doesn't make more than one movie a year. He has other interests to pursue – painting, poetry and running his boutique publishing firm Perceval Press. But it's more than that. "When you first start out as an actor, you just want to do any kind of work – to try and make a living," he says, recalling those early days when he pitched up in Peter Weir's 1985 Amish thriller Witness. "But for many years now, I've been able to wait to find the right thing. I'm not looking for what could pay me the most or what could win me an award." If only all actors had this much integrity.

Viggo Mortensen's woodland nights set him up for parenting-in-the-wild role
by James Mottram
The Herald
1 September 2016

Quotable Viggo: 27 August 2016

Viggo wasn't too keen on the rock climbing in Captain Fantastic because of occasional vertigo. Good to know there is something risky which gives him pause for thought because he has a long history of breaking and bashing bits of himself in films. Just as well they had him hooked up to ropes really...



© New Line Productions Inc.


The Indian Runner

Facially, Mortensen looks like a cross between Sam Shepard and echt movie villain Lance Henriksen, a suggestion enhanced by his character's myriad jailhouse tattoos (applied in hours-long makeup sessions) and the unperiodlike leather brace on his right hand and wrist, which he wears constantly and removes only immediately before shooting. Word on the set is that Mortensen busted a knuckle and sprained his wrist during rehearsals for a fight scene, but when asked about the injury, his eyes take on a demonic glint.

'Sean Penn,' he says, 'bit me.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premiere
October 1991



Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3: Leatherface


...the production [TCM 3: Leatherface] of itself had a few hiccups; the originally cast actor for the role of Tex didn't work out, and had to be replaced (however he was replaced with Viggo Mortensen, so it's not exactly the worst thing that could happen)...

The screening [at the New Beverly Cinema, LA] was boosted by a fun Q&A with Foree, who revealed that he accidentally broke Viggo's ribs during their fight scene - the shot is seemingly in the movie (watch Viggo suddenly clutch his side after being thrown to the ground)...

Collins' Crypt: The Sad Saga Of LEATHERFACE
by Brian Collins
baddassdigest.com
8 April 2014



The Lord of the Rings


In one take, Mortensen was battling an Uruk-Hai, a powerful and ferocious strain of orc, when a blade that was jutting from an extra's armour slashed into his face. "I thought, Oh my God, he's lost his face," recalls Perez, who then saw that the blade had somehow missed Mortensen's flesh but split his tooth - literally in half. "I said, 'You lost half a tooth.' And he looked at me and said, 'Look for it. You can stick it on with superglue.' And I said, 'No, come on, don't be silly, you can't.'" Mortensen finally relented and went to a dentist's office, still in full battle armour.

Filming the Battle of Helms Deep
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere
January 2003




"He had no knuckles," laughs make-up man Perez. "He'd been virtually slaughtered by everyone because he would not let anyone do his rehearsals. All his knuckles were completely bruised and cut and God knows what else. Every time that he had a scene, I said, 'Okay, now where did they hit you?'"

Jose Perez
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"On the fifth take, Viggo kicked the helmet, screamed, clenched his fists and dropped to his knees. I thought he was just doing some powerful acting. But then I noticed after I said 'cut' that he wasn't saying anything. Finally, he did the next scene limping."

Once they had finished filming, Jackson made the actor take off his boot.

"His toes were broken. Normally, an actor would yell 'ow!' if they hurt themselves, and stop the scene. Viggo turned a broken toe into a performance that's a great moment in the film."

Two Towers 'bloodier, more compelling'
New Zealand Herald
7 December 2002




"Most people that were in fights at all for an extended period, including all the stunt people, got hurt one way or another, some certainly worse than I did. The fact that a stuntman broke his leg really badly or cut his head open is not mentioned, but if I break my toe or I cut my hand open or break a tooth off, then there's where you hear something."

Viggo Mortensen
King Of The Ring
By Melissa J Perenson
Sci Fi magazine
February 2004




"We were on the Greenstone, the river that flows into Lake Wakatipu, and I was being filmed floating down the river. I went off course. I got caught in a current, and I got stuck at the bottom. I had the sword and the cloak and all the wool and the boots. That was one time I was really scared. I was just about on the verge of passing out. I guess I must've kicked against a rock because I kicked out of the current and popped up."

Viggo Mortensen Interview
Tim Wilson
Metro
December 2003




Did you get the shot?


I wasn't sure. I asked and said, "Be honest." I said I would be willing to do it again. But they didn't want to.

Viggo Mortensen Interview
By Tim Wilson
Metro
December 2003




"The shoot took several months and the more tired we got, the more risks we took. You slip, you fall, you get cuts and bruises. That's the price you pay when you want it to look real."

Don't Look For Analogies In 'Rings', Says Mortensen
By Chris Betros
Japan Today
10 February 2003



A History of Violence and Eastern Promises


Noah Cowan:
Did you get hit, Viggo?

Viggo Mortensen:
Repeatedly.

David Cronenberg:
I would do that even when we weren't shooting.

Viggo Mortensen: It happens in all the movies we do, he hits me with the camera. Even when I'm having a cup of coffee…

Viggo and Cronenberg talking about the dangers of filming the fight scenes
Listening in: David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortenson introduce AHOV at Tiff
Next Projection.com
14 January 2014




Viggo Mortensen: We went through a lot of actors.

David Cronenberg:
This is not the original Viggo.

Listening in: David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortenson introduce AHOV at Tiff
Next Projection.com
14 January 2014



"I knew it would be relatively painful, and it was.

There's no pads. But the two guys playing my attackers were good - one guy was a Georgian who had been in the Russian military, and the other guy was a Turkish professional boxer. They were perfect, and perfectly painful."

Viggo Mortensen on the Eastern Promises Bathhouse scene
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




"Viggo is so dedicated ... he would never admit it to me then, but the makeup guy later told me he was spending more time covering up Viggo's bruises than putting on his tattoos."

David Cronenberg
A Violent Tour De Force
By Robert W Butler
Kansas City Star
15 September 2007



Two Faces of January

You chipped your tooth filming Lord Of The Rings and superglued it back on. What's the most serious injury you've ever sustained on a film set?


I broke my foot on that movie too. I broke a finger on this one though. You know the free-for-all in the square in the little town? It happened then. That was annoying for the rest of the shoot because it happened to be my ring finger and as my character happens to be married they had to cut the ring and just hold it in place. I broke the knuckle and they couldn't get the ring past it otherwise, unfortunately.

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014



And finally


....he has broken both legs twice; playing soccer, skiing and in an accident at a Danish smelting plant where he once worked.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




…I would say probably 95% of the work that you see as Viggo onscreen is completely computer generated, because he has a wooden leg and he can't run.

IGN Interviews Dominic Monaghan
December 2003


Quotable Viggo: 20 August 2016

So, is Viggo 'only loosely tied to modern life at the best of times...' as suggested by Empire Magazine? He started shooting photographs digitally about 8 years ago, but has also been mending his old film cameras and falling in love with them again. He edits publications on his laptop but still sends postcards and letters. He reads books by the dozen but sees the value of the internet and uses it to keep up-to-date with international current affairs. It enables him to watch his beloved San Lorenzo on his laptop while globetrotting (much to the consternation of airport staff) but he likes the silence of being away from it all, beyond the reach of the internet and mobile signals. Maybe he has found the perfect balance of engaging deeply with real life while keeping technology in its place as a useful servant?



Skype interview with Viggo at the Stockholm International Festival in 2011
© Carla Orrego Veliz.



Viggo Mortensen, who seems only loosely tied to modern life at the best of times...

Helen O'Hara
Empire Magazine




The film's director, Matt Ross, dissuaded everyone from using their mobiles. Did you appreciate that?


Very much. It's such a given in society now. It used to be that [on set] people would read a book or talk to each other. There's less talking now. People are in their own bubble. I was joking the other day, but I said they should have a lane for people [texting] on the sidewalk. Let them bump into each other!

The Interview: Viggo Mortensen plays Ben in Captain Fantastic
James Mottram
Herald Sun
13 August 2017




I doubt that I will ever watch a movie on a mobile phone.

A Minute with Viggo
Viggo-Works
7 October 2015




In our relentlessly tech-driven age, the actor, now 57, feels strongly about the importance of the written word.

"Oh yeah,'' he says. "The written word and even the handwritten word. I still send postcards. I hope that it never becomes entirely impossible to put a letter in a mailbox and have it arrive magically on the other side of the world.'' And for all its benefits, he says technology — the harmful effects of which are alluded to in the film — may be shrinking our attention spans: "Sometimes, yeah. I think people are less patient and their attention span [is shorter]. It also goes with movie going culture. It's less frequent that people will sit for two hours or three hours and watch a movie that unfolds slowly and in a complex way. Same with novels and poems. People are maybe less patient.''

Viggo Mortensen goes off the grid for film Captain Fantastic
Rosemary Neill
The Austrailian
19 August 2016




Viggo Mortensen, Oscar-nominated star of the new film "Captain Fantastic," said he hasn't played [Pokemon Go] but his son has explained it to him and he doesn't judge it.

"When I do have a little bit of free time, there are other things that I personally would like to do (rather) than that. But I can understand it's a fad," he said. "It probably won't last forever but people are running around like chickens with their heads cut off, chasing these illusions.

"But they're also having fun. There's no point in being judgmental about it. I don't have a criticism, I just think it's amusing."

News1130
25 July 2016




He collects cameras, and still uses his two 1903 Kodaks, but says he has gradually started shooting most of his photography digitally. He has been a late convert to the wired world, only relatively recently starting to carry a mobile phone. 'It's antiquated, just a flip phone. I don't have a BlackBerry or whatever you call it. And there is something to be said for being isolated and out of phone range, because you can fall into a habit to such a degree that you don't even realise that you've lost something: silence.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




"I've repaired a couple of my analog cameras, my film cameras . . . I have been shooting digital, which is great, this past decade. But there's something about loading film, and shooting it, your exposure and your framing and then that surprise when you go to develop it. Oh, I didn't expect that!"

Viggo Mortensen, 'Captain Fantastic's' radical dad
Steven Rea
Philly.com
27 July 2016




"It was a crew of about ten people walking over the rocks. We were all tired but we had a lot of fun. By nightfall, since we were 150 km from the internet and telephones, we made a little fire, an asado [grilled meat], we talked... It was a family experience."

Viggo Mortensen talking about filming Jauja
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN
August 2014




How are you at finding your way around the internet?

I do understand why there are people who sit in front of a computer and stay there eight hours non-stop (chuckles). It´s dangerous. I think you also have to do some physical exercise. I get into what interests me culturally: history, politics, things. To compare, to have a better idea of what has happened in some country or in some artistic area. You can spend hours. It´s wonderful the things you can find.

1 Minuto.com with Viggo Mortensen
By - transcribed/translated by Ollie
RTVE
24 September 2012




Because of all his travels, a laptop has become essential for Mortensen, who says he didn't know how to use one until he founded Perceval. Now he has one to edit books and work with images and text. "It's an incredible tool, because of what I can do. But like all of these things — like social media — if you don't control it, it will control you."

Viggo Mortensen shows off his wild side as an off-the-grid family man
By Rob Lowman
Los Angeles Daily News
7 July 2016



"These days with the technology we've got, you know, on the laptop. I don't miss a single game and I try to follow everything that's happening closely."

Viggo Mortensen
'Return to Boedo' Chat on Radio Splendid
transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Radio Splendid
8 March 2012




I´m neither in Buenos Aires nor in a place where I could see the match well. I put up with seeing blurred and constantly interrupted images on my laptop, with an infernal audio of generally dull comments, in the middle of a forest where it never stopped raining. The goal by Boca filled me with anguish. But, little by little, I calmed down. I believe in our team. We are doing fine. Hold on Ciclón!

The Cuervo Personality of Horacio Quiroga
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
CASLA
29 August 2011




'A warm hello to everybody who is reading and writing. This is a different world from ten years ago because of technology, but it's necessary to be careful because any communication can be used in a negative form. There are people who use the technological advances in communication to promote negative ideas, harmful efforts towards people, to sow doubt, separation among nations, racism, intolerance. So just because of the new technology and this communication we have to be careful, work honestly. Even if someone is in a good relationship with some people, family, society, we shouldn't lose our guard too much. You have to be honest with yourself, and communicate honestly. I don't want to be a drag. Thank you very much for the conversations tonight and have a good day.'

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Margarita
Reforma
18 November 2005


Quotable Viggo: 14 August 2016

I liked Viggo's recent comment to the Seattle Times that he still loved watching movies in a movie theater. Over the years he's spoken of movie making as a kind of ritual and compared cinemas to a temple where there is mystery, magic and a sense of communion. That while this can be profound, there is also something of the child's 'let's play pretend' in this. He recognises that we want to leave a movie theater with a sense of wonder, of having been taken out of our lives and ourselves by great storytelling, and that there is something special about sharing this with others in the darkened space of a cinema.



The Two Faces of January screening and Q&A © Paul Heyes.


...he's still in love with old-school cinema.

"I'm sort of old-fashioned in that I don't think a movie is fully realized until people have paid a few bucks to go into a room and sit down together, with strangers," he said. "I think there's something about that that's different. You can sort of simulate that in your house, but there's something about the movie house, the movie theater, that I think is valuable. I hope it never completely goes away."

How Viggo Mortensen learned to be captain of 6 kids onscreen
Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
8 July 2016




"….I went to see films with my mother when I was a child. Towards twenty, I lived for a year close to London, and I went to a cinema which only showed classics. I discovered Bergman, Ozu, Pasolini, Dreyer ... It was a revelation. It wasn't just that I liked going to the movies, it was that on leaving the theater I wanted to enter this world…"

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
December 2002
Source: Studio Magazine




"I started thinking about acting about a year before I actually tried it," he says. "I just started watching movies in a different way, not just as entertainment. I started to really think about the ones that got to me, the ones that transported me so that, when I walked out of the theater, I'd be surprised. I'm really not in the desert? Or the 18th century? And I started to wonder what's the trick, how does a movie do that to you, technically? I wanted to try and figure that out."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




"That's the magical thing about telling stories in movies, and even going to movies – there's something else that happens. You hope. Because you want to be transported. You want to come out feeling different."

Viggo Mortensen
On the Road, signs of the apocalypse hit home
Johanna Schneller
Globe and Mail
27 November 2009




"A movie set is like a ritual, with all the trappings and preparation. I feel like when we go to a set and we rehearse - or not - and we're wearing these costumes and saying these words, it's like an invocation, an invitation to magic, to the unexplained, to let the unexpected to enter into our lives."

Viggo Mortensen
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today
2001




"I can go into a Mosque, or into the San Isidoro of León Collegiate Church, and sit there until things happen. I love visiting temples, churches, places that are supposed to be sacred, and that includes a cinema or a theatre. Where there's acting, there's communion."

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008




'Working with fantasy is, in a certain way, a childish activity. However, 'it's childish behavior' is often said in a pejorative way. How many times have we heard that phrase? I think that it's something that doesn't have to be negative. Childish behavior? Yes, thanks! Me, I'm really interested in going to that extreme. Perhaps other actors aren't.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




'My goal is just to make movies, whether they're big or small, that I'd like to see 10 years from now. That's sort of the way I gauge it.'

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




'I take a seat among my compatriots Ghita and Viilbjørk. People laugh several times, the Danes the most. It's because the film, besides being beautiful and profound, has very Danish humor, dry and ironic. Dinesen is a kind of Scandinavian Quixote. At the end, there's a prolonged silence in the theatre and then loud applause begins. To see the movie finished with image and sound for the first time has been moving. I feel very proud of what we just finished presenting.'

Viggo talking about the Jauja Cannes Premier
Something Material
By Viggo Mortensen, Fabián Casas and Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
31 May 2014




'Dreams about becoming famous wasn't what got me into acting to begin with, but the dream about telling stories.'

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008



'There are many talented individuals in this art form, but if there is one thing I have learned during the thirty years that I have been working as an actor in the movies it is that there is always a surprise around the corner. Stories and performances you would not expect to work, full of moments of rare beauty, humor, and inspiration. As an audience member, every time the lights go down and the images begin to dance in front of me, I am hoping for that kind of story, those sorts of moments.'

Viggo Mortensen
One-on-one interview with 'On the Road's' Viggo Mortensen
By Steven Lebowitz
Examiner.com
6 April 2013




MP: So why, with so many outlets to your passion and so many of them making up the components of film -

MORTENSEN: That's a perfect universe, movies. It has everything.

Viggo Mortensen - For The Good Of The People
By Elliot V Kotek
Moving Pictures
Winter 2008-2009




It's customary to finish with an epilogue that recaps everything. Considering this, I have no choice but to ask Viggo to describe himself as an actor. Just one sentence, at the most, that encompasses his personality and his attitude. He reflects for a few minutes. "One sentence?" he says, scratching his chin. "I'm a guy who makes a fool of himself."

Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995


Quotable Viggo: 30 July 2016

If you haven't had enough yet of Captain Fantastic, here is some more for you – a round-up of quotes sifted out of all the endless interviews and press junkets. A little taster of what an amazing ride the film has been for all involved. Everything is vintage Viggo, from bringing the cast presents to arriving with everything including (possibly) the kitchen sink.



© Karen McDonald.


"Viggo was an easy first choice, casting him was intuitive."

Matt Ross
Film takes audience on 'Fantastic' journey
Jay Meehan,
The Park Record
21 January 2016




'[Viggo] demonstrates the aspirations of the movie, what kind of movie are you hoping to make, and for me, I can have no better faith than in Viggo Mortensen.'

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross Interview
Jason Gorber
Dorkshelf.com
14 July 2016




"...we had this two-day, one-night wilderness survival camp, with just the six of us kids and a guide"...

..."We were building fires because in the forest it was so incredibly dark," Isler said. "All of a sudden, we heard these sounds and saw this shape coming toward us through the forest. It was Viggo, who said he wanted to bring us beef jerky and dried cherries. And we were all like, 'How in the world did you find us?' "

Tulsa teen actress Samantha Isler talks about her role in 'Captain Fantastic'
By James D Watts Jnr
Tulsa World
29 July 2016




"We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work."

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




"I looked like the Beverly Hillbillies arriving in my pickup truck," he remembered, "with bicycles and fishing poles and tools and pots and pans and clothes and sleeping bags, and I don't know what else." At least one of the items made it to the screen: a red-print Western shirt that Mortensen said he bought sometime in the 1980s, worn by Ben in a funeral scene.

"Even if [the filmmakers] had said no to everything I brought, it just helps me to get ready," Mortensen said, of his habit of bringing personal items to a shoot. "That was an extreme case of it — literally I brought a truckload. Sometimes it's just an object."

How Viggo Mortensen learned to be captain of 6 kids onscreen
Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
8 July 2016




'Viggo was there early enough that he planted the entire garden and that's a real garden.'

Matt Ross
'Captain Fantastic': Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen and the perils of off-the-grid fatherhood
by Michelle Lanz
The Frame
7 July 2016




"W.C. Fields said don't work with kids or animals, I guess because they'll upstage you or drive you crazy," said Viggo Mortensen, with a soft chuckle. "But I've always enjoyed it."

Viggo Mortensen
How Viggo Mortensen learned to be captain of 6 kids onscreen
Moira Macdonald
Seattle Times
8 July 2016




"He's really quiet out in public, but he loved all [us] little ones to pieces. He was hanging around with us all day and telling jokes. He acted like a father figure. He's a great guy."

Nicholas Hamilton
Young Aussie actor Nicholas Hamilton stars with Viggo Mortensen at Sundance
Harry Winsor
If.com.au
15 January 2016




'...music is when we all would get together. That was at least once a day we'd get together, all of us. We really were jamming and laughing and talking. We'd have something to eat. Okay, let's go! And then we'd start playing. The feeling there was, There's no such thing as making a mistake. We're just playing together. We got better and better and more comfortable with each other...I thought the music was important as an initial bonding thing.'

Viggo Mortensen
'Captain Fantastic': Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen and the perils of off-the-grid fatherhood
by Michelle Lanz
The Frame
7 July 2016




"He would come on set every day with different books for all the kids to read. I ended up having about 10 books that I've never gotten around to reading. He really is a generous, amazingly kind man."

Nicholas Hamilton
Captain Fantastic and the Sundance Kid
By Matthew Lowe
Filmink.com
20 January 2016




"...what was surprising to me about working with him is that I could never catch him acting. He doesn't have any false moments."

Matt Ross
Dr. No: Viggo Mortensen Has Made Turning Down Roles Into an Art Form
By Oliver Jones
The Observer
6 July 2016




"When it comes to cutting an effortless master like Viggo Mortensen, what can I say besides you're just trying to pick the best of the best and make sure it all hangs together in the right way. He makes it look easy."

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016




"When everyone climbed down for lunch, I was still standing up there," he said, laughing. "The kids were like 'Viggo come down to lunch!' and I said 'No, just send a sandwich up!' I was absolutely terrified. I couldn't look down."

Viggo Mortensen on His Idealistic New Film "Captain Fantastic"
by Gillian Sagansky
W Magazine
8 July 2016




'For Ben, you can alternate between what a great father and this guy's a maniac.'

Viggo Mortensen Goes Green: 'I Trust Hillary About as Much as I Trust Donald Trump'
Marlo Stern
The Daily Beast
16 July 2016


Quotable Viggo: 24 July 2016

Viggo's recent annecdotes on Jimmy Kimmel Live about his time filming with Woody Allen got me thinking. It's been an age since I compiled a Quotable covering Viggo's early film career. There were a lot that got away and slipped into the 'inpenetrable darkness' Barry Norman mentions below. We missed him as the world's stupdiest actor in The Purple Rose of Cairo, we missed him in Chanel in To Fong Woo, Thanks For Everything... above all we missed him swinging through the trees shirtless in Greystoke. The film may not have been the height of cinematic sophistication, but hey.... I would have worn out the DVD.





His first decade in movies proved difficult and often financially unrewarding so Mortensen worked as a waiter, bartender and truck driver to support himself

Versatile Viggo
By Louis B Hobson
Calgary Sun
5 June 1998




"In the beginning everyone was very obsessed with getting my name changed. 'Viggo Mortensen - that's too long and too strange', they said. I suggested as a joke to change it to "Vic Morton'. That sounds like one of those movie private investigators in the 40's... "Vic Morton, private eye'. No, my name is Viggo Mortensen, I am Viggo Mortensen, and Hollywood will have to live with that'.

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001




"It's a little embarrassing when you drag your friends of family along to the cinema and tell them that 'just watch now' - and then you've landed on the editing floor. Therefore I've stopped telling them in advance to pay attention to this or that scene. Because you never know if it's in."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001



Sixteen Candles 1884

[Molly Ringwald] drew gasps when she revealed she wanted future Lord of the Rings hunk Viggo Mortensen to play her love interest, Jake Ryan, in Sixteen Candles, after kissing him during auditions.

She said, "It was between two men... It was Michael Shoeffling, who ended up being cast, and Viggo Mortensen, who had just moved from Denmark... Michael Shoeffling did not kiss me during the audition - Viggo Mortensen did.

"He made me weak in the knees. Absolutely."

Ringwald teamed up with Mortensen years later in Fresh Horses and the actor revealed he thought the kiss cost him the role.

She explained, "He said, 'I've always been curious, do you know anything about what happened?' And I said, 'Hey man, I was rooting for you. I really wanted you for that part.'

"I brought up the thing about how he kissed me and the other guy didn't. He said, 'I always thought that's why I blew the audition! I go over it again and again. Why did I do that?'"

Ringwald pays a visit to John Hughes film class to talk kissing Viggo
Hollywood.com
10 September 2013



Swing Shift 1984


For a Hollywood actor, the night in "overnight stardom" can be very long indeed. For Viggo Mortensen it lasted about 17 years, starting in inpenetrable darkness when his entire performance in his first film, Swing Shift, in 1984 was left on the cutting room floor.

Barry Norman
Radio Times
November - December 2004




He was cast... playing a brash young sailor trying to pick up an emotionally fragile Goldie Hawn in a movie theatre. He felt it went well, but when he saw the movie he discovered that they had reshot the scene with Goldie Hawn in the movie theatre alone.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004



Greystoke 1984


"Right out of the gate, I was auditioning for leads in studio movies. It would get down to the last two people," says Mortensen, who recalls the whirlwind of being flown first class to England for the lead in 1984's Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes. "The next thing I know, I'm training with monkeys."

Viggo Mortensen
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"I was sent plane tickets to London, I did a load of tests, and when I thought the part was mine, they gave it to Christopher Lambert.

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




"Although if I'd gotten Greystoke I probably would've been frustrated," he adds, tacitly acknowledging that it's a bit of a stinker.

Viggo Mortensen: first Good - and then goodbye?
By Kevin Maher
The Times
2 April 2009



The Purple Rose of Cairo 1985


After what he thought was a disappointing audition with Allen, Mortensen said he learned that he won a part.

"Next day my agent calls me and said, 'He loves you. You got a part.' 'Oh really? What's the part?' He goes, 'I don't know exactly, but it's a part. You're in the movie,'" Mortensen said.

Viggo Mortensen Once Didn't Know He Was Cut From a Woody Allen Film Until Its Release
By Alexa Valiente
ABC News
20 July 2016




"They have this big huge party. It looks fantastic, lights, all this stuff. And Woody Allen is whispering into this actor's ear, this other actor who's been called. And the actor smiles and nods," Mortensen said. "He goes, 'Okay, let's shoot.' And I go, 'Mr. Allen? Sir? What am I supposed to do?' 'You just follow his lead. You'll be alright.' And I'm freaking out. I have no idea what the story's about."

Viggo Mortensen Once Didn't Know He Was Cut From a Woody Allen Film Until Its Release
By Alexa Valiente
ABC News
20 July 2016




Woody Allen... cut all the scenes I was in. That was frustrating! I looked a real fool, ashamed, especially with my family and friends as I had announced my participation in the films to them. My parents thought I was lying and would say: "Son, tell us the truth! What do you do in New York?" [Great laughter]"

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre




"It is like I never was in that film. I think it's common in Woody Allen's way of making movies. He throws out lots of material. He almost shoots the same film twice."

Viggo Mortensen
Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008



Platoon 1986


Oliver Stone cast Viggo as a sergeant in a war movie that he was making. Platoon. Then the financing fell through but Viggo knew that Oliver Stone would get the movie made in the end, and he would be ready as an actor had ever been. For the next year, Viggo read every book on Vietnam he could lay his hands on. "I researched that part as thoroughly as I f******* could," he remembers. "Mentally and in every way. Physically."

One day he heard that the film was going into production and that Oliver Stone had recast his role, giving it to Willem Dafoe. About ten years later Viggo met with Stone again, when the director was looking to make a movie about Manuel Noriega.

"Oh, it's great to meet you," the director told him. Viggo pointed out that they had met several times before (Viggo had also auditioned for a part in Salvador, in Spanish, for Stone).

"He didn't seem to remember much of any of it at all," Viggo reflects. "Pretty shocking because I took it pretty seriously."

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004



Reservoir Dogs 1992

I think [Tarantino's] really smart and funny. I'd never sat down and talked to him that much, although I did audition for Reservoir Dogs, which he remembered.

Which part did you audition for?
Mister … I don't know which one it was. It was one of them. I might have auditioned for two. I had fun. I did one take where I made the character Hispanic. I remember it was in this tiny office on the Fox lot, I think, and I read with Harvey Keitel.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
By Eric Benson
Grantland.com
19 March 2015



To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar 1995

Q: Any tapes you wouldn't mind seeing?

A:
One. The test for the part Patrick Swayze got in To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar.

Q: What was your drag queen outfit like?

A: I think it was Chanel, like a Jackie O. thing with Ann-Margaret hair. Before the audition, I wanted to practice a little so I called up a friend of mine, [actress] Valeria Golino, and she helped me to get all dressed up. Then I walked on Broadway in New York in the middle of the day. Nobody even blinked an eye, and some guys whistled.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
August 1998




'But I like to think that had I gotten the lead in some of those early movies that I auditioned for, I wouldn't be the same person I am today. I would have been so busy being a star that I wouldn't have learned about anything else in life. I probably wouldn't have devoted so much time to writing, painting or music.

'Without the spotlight on me, I was able to live a life and learn a lot.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Reluctant Star
By Barry Koltnow
Orange County Register
7 March 2004




"The attention is troubling enough now; 20 years ago, it would have been too much. I would have become tired of the whole circus. I think I would have got disenchanted and probably quit."

Interview - Viggo Mortensen, Actor
By Siobhan Synnot
The Scotsman
28 December 2009

Quotable Viggo: 17 July 2016

A couple of the latest Captain Fantastic reviews call Ben Cash a career best performance. Such is the high standard of his acting, most of his performances since he hit the critics radar in LOTR get that kind of praise. 'Best' is a relative term, dependent on the critic's own likes and dislikes, but one thing we can be sure about is that Viggo always delivers a quality performance that will astonish. He is always at his best – and it gives me a great excuse to dig out some wonderful reviews.



©New Line/Warner Brothers/Hanway/2929/Dimension Films/Good Films/Focus Features/Estudios Picasso/OrigenProducciones


Captain Fantastic


...a career best turn by Viggo Mortensen... I really can't say enough about the work Viggo Mortensen. He's able to give this character so much life that you're under his spell; whether you agree or disagree with Ben's view of the world and outlook on raising his children. We see the best and worst of him, with Mortensen showcasing that brilliantly. In a perfect world, he would be in the Best Actor conversation for the Oscars.

Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com
7 July 2016




...Mortensen is just magnificent: His performance standing with his career-best work in The Lord of the Rings, A History of Violence and Eastern Promises. He gets under the skin of this loving father who is unafraid to face the world naked and yet touchingly ready to grapple by the possibility that his arrogant, free spirit might actually do harm to his children.

Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
6 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of CAPTAIN FANTASTIC
Silverscreenriot.com
Matt Oakes
22 June 2016



Loin des Hommes


...filmmaker David Oelhoffen's more significant achievement is in the casting of a never-better Mortensen, who possesses the sort of face that conveys volumes in virtual silence and the similarly expressive French Algerian actor Kateb.

Michael Rechtshaffen
LA Times
1 May 2015




With such recent films as Jauja, Viggo Mortensen has proven himself to be one of the world's finest and most versatile actors. Far From Men brilliantly continues this trend.

Christopher Bourne
Twitch Film
17 April 2015



Jauja

A wonderful reflection on the evocative power of cinema. And, incidentally, the umpteenth confirmation of Viggo Mortensen´s great talent. Mustachioed , astride his horse in a cavalry uniform, sword in sheath and a splendid hat on his head, he is reminiscent of John Wayne in the early John Ford films.

Franck Nouchi - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Le Monde
19 May 2014



Two Faces of January

Soaking up the highlights of Ancient Greece, Chester MacFarland resembles a spick-and-span palace. In fact, as becomes apparent, he's a ruin. Every time he gets drunk another partition collapses; when he sobers up, the grand edifice dazzles again.

It's the best thing Mortensen has done in years.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
London Evening Standard
16 May 2014




Yet this is Viggo Mortensen's movie, his best work since A History of Violence (2005), another film about an apparently decent fellow with a dark past. Mortensen, playing a handsome, impassive mystery of a man, gives one of the year's best and subtlest performances.

David Gritten
Saga
17 May 2014



A Dangerous Method


It's possible that in lusting after Mortensen all these years, we've taken his talent for granted. Of course, we really didn't know how talented he was until he started working with Cronenberg. This is the best thing Mortensen's ever done. His slow, paunchy, hairy Freud has a cavalier authority and a capacity for drollery. He's also seductively wise in a way that makes both Fassbender and Knightley, as very good as they are, also seem uncharacteristically callow. I don't know where Mortensen found this physical and psychological heaviness, this expressive inexpressiveness, but now isn't the time to start a diet.

Wesley Morris
Boston Globe
23 December 2011




This is a Viggo you don't think of when you think of Viggo. I will be very surprised if I don't see his name among the Best Supporting Actor nominatees next year (unless the studio decides to bump him to Best Actor and kinda f**k Fassbender). There should also be an honorary Oscar involved for Best Cigar Smoking, for his ever-present stogies.

Joshua Miller
Chud.com
21 October 2011



The Road

It's hard not to be drawn in by the sunken, haunted weariness of Mortensen's face, especially when he's doing some of the best quiet, understated work of a long career built on quiet, understated work. Mortensen's laconic strength has always well served the hero who knows how unlikely a happy ending is, and yet keeps pushing ahead.

Locke Peterseim
Redblog
Redbox.com
26 May 2010




No performance in "The Road" is poor. Mortensen does easily his best work since "The Lord of the Rings" films, and can shift his emotional dynamic from cunning protector to gentle mentor effortlessly. His long, overgrown hair and beard mask his true compassion for his son, but his resourcefulness and street smarts take them far. I felt his on-screen presence defined the film.

David Van Der Haeghen
DVDTown.com
22 May 2010




Luckily for Smit-McPhee, one of our greatest actors shares every scene with him. Viggo Mortensen is perfectly cast. Was anyone even surprised when he was announced as The Man? It's a challenging role for any actor, but one can't help but see it as something as a culmination of the excellent work he's been doing since appearing in that little fantasy film a few years ago.

Brian Kinsley
Incontention.com
September 2nd, 2008




When the world goes boom, I want Viggo Mortensen to be my dad. Who's better to keep your spirits up in the hideous post-apocalyptic afterlife, as pictured in John Hillcoat's The Road, the adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy epic-length tome? Mortensen, as always, brings grave dimension and inner grace to an Everyman part he's mastered. This is perhaps the greatest of those roles.

Marshall Fine
Huffington Post
24 November 2009



Appaloosa


While many might not appreciate this slow and slightly revisionist western, I'm going to put it up there with "Open Range" and "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" as one of best. Go to see Ed Harris kick tail, but stay for one of Viggo Mortensen's best performances.

Coop Cooper
The Small Town Critic
1 October 2008



Good


An extremely powerful World War II drama about a man at a crossroads, forced to make almost impossible choices between friendship and survival. It's the best work Viggo Mortensen has done.

Jeffrey Lyons
NBC/Lyons and Bailes Reek Talk
October 2008



Eastern Promises

If I could readjust my ratings on some of last year's reviews, I'd start with David Cronenberg's "Eastern Promises." I gave it only three stars though I would have gladly stayed in my seat for another showing. The best actor nomination for its star Viggo Mortensen made me happier than any other on Tuesday's ballots.

Jack Matthews
New York Daily News
23 January 2003




As Nikolai, Mortensen is nothing short of remarkable, completely disappearing into his heavily-tattooed character and speaking in both Russian and flawlessly accented English. Hardly a cardboard villain, Nikolai is easily the most compelling character in the movie. In spite of earlier scenes of furious — and chillingly callous — violence, he nevertheless gains some of the audience's sympathies as he compelling presents his internal conflict with subtlety and nuance, often using only his eyes. It may very well be the best performance of his career thus far, topping even his recent work in another Cronenberg thriller, A History of Violence. Someone, nominate this man for an Oscar already!

Jason Turer
Cornell Daily Sun
14 Sept 2007




Most noticeably, Viggo Mortensen as the quietly timid yet dangerously terrifying mob driver Nikolai, gives an Oscar caliber performance of both restrained humility and fear. When you look into Mortensen's eyes, you're convinced that he's come to terms with the fact that he's condemned to eternal damnation and is living his life accordingly. His performance is chilling and mesmerizing, perhaps the greatest of his career.

Jake Hamilton
That movie guy Blog
10 Sept 2007




Even with his clothes on, this is Mortensen's best and richest performance, worthy of serious awards consideration. He lends a moral complexity to "Eastern Promises" that makes it much more than just a very accomplished action thriller.

Lou Lumenick
New York Post
14 Sept 2007



A History Of Violence

'Viggo Mortensen probably gave the best performance I have seen in a motion picture in as long as I can remember in A History of Violence .... Bill Hurt got a nomination for a rather bizarre, overly done performance in that film, but Viggo Mortensen is probably the premier actor in the business.'

Dale Olson, publicist
Oscar, You Insensitive Lout
by Sara Vilkomerson, New York Observer,
February 2006



Hands down, this is the best performance that Viggo Mortensen has given in a film yet. He is just breath-taking in the film......Viggo's acting here reminds me of vintage Harrison Ford, before... whatever happened to him. Think WITNESS or maybe even THE FUGITIVE. He's just very very good. He's not an actor counting the motions for a scene, but his eyes are alive, you can see fear and desperation in his face as he acts, you also see a resoluteness to do what has to be done. It's kinda perfect.

Harry
Ain't it Cool News
28 September 2005




...As for Mr. Mortensen, his whole career seems to have been a set-up for this moment where he finally comes into his own and claims his own place among the best actors of his generation.

Sasha Stone
Santa Monica Mirror
28 September 2005




Viggo Mortensen stars in one of the best performances of his career.

Roger Ebert
Cannes Festival Review
Chicago Sun-Times
May 17, 2005



Quotable Viggo: 10 July 2016

All of us here at V-W are thrilled at the reviews Captain Fantastic has been receiving this week, the vast majority of which have been outstandingly good. They've been arriving thick and fast, but fear not, here is my Review Round-up concentrating, of course, on Captain Fantastic himself.



© Bleecker Street


Brainy and brawny - a rare combination of qualities among leading men in Hollywood that hasn't strongly applied since Roberts Ryan and Mitchum - personifies Viggo Mortensen and sets him apart from just about everybody else on the contemporary screen. He displays plenty of both, not to mention a mesmerizing talent, in Captain Fantastic...
...Above all, Viggo Mortensen overcomes every intrusion of doubt with a performance that is informed, inspired, ideological and overwhelming. He's so sensational that he makes the film's title come true with no strings attached.

Super-Dad: 'Captain Fantastic' Enthralls the Senses and Engages the Mind
By Rex Reed
The Observer
5 July 2016




The clan's father isn't a superhero, but because he's played by Viggo Mortensen he's the next best thing. Mr. Mortensen, whose intensity has the sting of possession, has a way of making you believe his characters can do whatever they set their minds to: fly, leap over buildings, save the world.

Mostly, though, Ben Cash takes care of his children.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
7 July 2016




It's left to Mr. Mortensen, who can make menace feel like vulnerability — and turn vulnerability into a confession — to keep the movie from slipping into sentimentality. He's the most obvious reason to see it, although Mr. Ross's insistence on taking your intelligence for granted is itself a great turn on. His characters don't need smartphones to do their thinking for them; he assumes the same holds true of his audience.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
7 July 2016




...a career best turn by Viggo Mortensen... I really can't say enough about the work of Viggo Mortensen. He's able to give this character so much life that you're under his spell; whether you agree or disagree with Ben's view of the world and outlook on raising his children. We see the best and worst of him, with Mortensen showcasing that brilliantly. In a perfect world, he would be in the Best Actor conversation for the Oscars.

Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com
7 July 2016




Making it endlessly watchable is Viggo Mortensen, here in his fully bearded, hippie-Viking mode.

Stephen Whitty
NJ.com
8 July 2016




Played by a bearded Viggo Mortensen in the performance of his career...
...Stunningly photographed by Stéphane Fontaine, "Captain Fantastic'' belongs to the fully committed Mortensen and the wonderful, pitch-perfect young actors who play his offspring confronted by a new world.

By Lou Lumenick
New York Post
7 July 2016




Ben is the family's rock, and Mr. Mortensen gives the story unshakable grounding. He's a star who doesn't act like a star, yet everyone in his orbit feels his power. He and this strong, adventurous film deserve each other.

Joe Morgenstern
Wallstreet Journal
7 July 2016




Mortensen is able to convey all Ben's pros and cons (and more besides — we didn't mention he swapped out Christmas for "Noam Chomsky Day") without breaking a bead of sweat. He's of a constitution that can be gentle and admirable then slip into sinister and hissable then back again, just by being there in front of a camera.

By Matt Prigg
Metro.us
7 July 2016




...having Mortensen rocking it here like he is really makes it all succeed. This is his career best performance in my book, worthy of awards consideration, at least to me. He's just absolutely captivating. Ross knew what he was doing when he opted to cast Mortensen in the lead here. It's a huge win for him, and the film itself.

Joey Magidson
Hollywoodnews.com
7 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen is at the top of his game in this family dramedy, shot through with humor and heart...
...Mortensen is just magnificent: His performance standing with his career-best work in The Lord of the Rings, A History of Violence and Eastern Promises. He gets under the skin of this loving father who is unafraid to face the world naked and yet touchingly ready to grapple by the possibility that his arrogant, free spirit might actually do harm to his children.

Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
6 July 2016




Writer-director Matt Ross (perhaps better known for his work as an actor; he currently appears as megalomaniac billionaire Gavin Belson on HBO's Silicon Valley) has to pull off his own high-wire stunt. Ben's tactics are brutal. But his kids are superheroes, and casting fit and handsome 57-year-old Viggo makes a compelling case for having whatever he's having. Could Ben be right?

Amy Nicholson
MTV.com
7 July 2016




But the movie truly belongs to Mortensen; fierce and tender and tremendously flawed, he's fantastic.

Leah Greenblatt
Entertainment Weekly
7 July 2016




The way Ben is written, and Mortensen's portrayal of him, are impressive things. In the hands of a less capable actor, or with a less well-written character, Ben would be irredeemable.

Josh Lasser
IGN.com
7 July 2016




Above all else, however, Mortensen gives "Captain Fantastic" its underlying credibility. Spending most of the movie buried beneath an unkempt beard and peering out at his relatives with tired eyes, he exudes the convictions of a man eager to reject the standards surrounding him.

Eric Kohn
IndieWire.com
5 July 2016




This dramedy marking the sophomore feature of longtime actor Matt Ross (who plays Gavin Belson on Silicon Valley) has the breezy Americana momentum of a hobo riding the rails and the dramatic chops of none other than Viggo Mortensen.

April Wolfe
LA Weekly
6 July 2016




Mortensen is such a delicately sentient actor that nothing he does reads as pure caricature. When Ben realizes that in trying to prepare his children for everything he may have prepared them for nothing, it's as if we can see right into his crushed soul. It's also the moment he becomes most human: at some point, all kids have to learn that parents are people too.

Stephanie Zacharek
Time
4 July 2016

Quotable Viggo: 2 July 2016

Long-time followers of Viggo will have realised by now the endless wishful thinking that casts Viggo in a part in practically every comic book film adaption, EVER. Sometimes as a Super Hero, sometimes - much more interesting - as a Super Villain. Remember General Zod? The fact that Captain Fantastic doesn't involve tights must be a huge disappointment for some. Aragorn is the closest he's come to an actual action hero and despite always managing to avoid all things 'Super', he has ended up with the ultimate Superhero accolade, being made into a moveable plastic action figure.

And just for a bit of fun:


Lotr Rohan outtake



© Unknown


Viggo Mortensen, who has both the looks (the piercing blue eyes and jutting Kirk Douglas chin) and the buff physique of a Marvel type, but would probably prefer slow death to putting on a cape and tights.

Viggo Mortensen Goes Off the Grid With 'Captain Fantastic'
Charles McGrath
New York Times
28 June 2016




...there is reason to suspect Viggo Mortensen was born on a dying planet light years away...

Philip Martin at TIFF
Arkansas Democratic Gazette
September 16, 2008




I liked Batman and Superman, but the comics that interested me the most were the ones about "Korak, son of Tarzan," "Green Lantern," any issue of the "Treasury of Classic Tales" series... or "Patoruzu."

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




'I remember being shocked when I moved to the US and saw that all the TV shows that I used to watch in Argentina in Spanish were the same, but they were in English! I thought that Batman and all the cartoons were in Spanish...'

Viggo Mortensen Under The Spotlight
By Gabriel de Lerma - translated by Graciela
Selecciones
March 2009




Some of the comic book characters I find interesting, in no particular order of preference, are 'Asterix', 'Felix the Cat', 'Vladek' (from "Maus"), 'Ogami Itto' (from the "Lone Wolf and Cub" series), 'Patoruzu', 'Condorito', 'Aquaman', 'Korak, Son of Tarzan', 'Dr. Manhattan' (from "The Watchmen" series), 'The Green Lantern' (first comic book i ever read from cover to cover, as a little boy in Argentina), 'Ren' (from "Ren and Stimpy"), 'Maggie Chascarrillo' (from "Love and Rockets"), 'Lucifer' (from "The Sandman" series), 'Corto Maltese', 'Morpheus' (from "The Sandman"), 'Enid Coleslaw' (from "Ghost World"), 'The Pink Panther', and... I can't think of any others at the moment.

A Minute with Viggo
By Viggo-Works and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo-Works
30 December 2015




Speculating on Viggo Mortensen as Batman: As I said before, this really isn't the Batman that we know, love, and secretly wish we were. He is not the Bruce Wayne figure with flaunted wealth. He's a beleaguered soul ruined by the loss of his parents, a figure of revolution and destruction, a terrorist. I'd like to throw out the name Viggo Mortensen for no other reason than it's Viggo. I don't see a need to justify it beyond that. The guy is a genius.

By Cole Abaius
FilmSchoolRejects.com
6 February 2010




Films like Todos tenemos un plan or Cronenberg's don't stand much of a chance against superhero movies at the box office.

Those films bore me. Cronenberg, in fact, recently got into a controversy about that. They took him out of context, but I understand what he meant. And I agree. Totally. He didn't say that a film based on a comic bores him, but that the infantilization of cinema bores him. And I must say that as fun, creative and artistic as Christopher Nolan's Batman series can be, it reaches a point - even in the second one, The Joker one, I like how that one is acted and filmed - where the explosions, the car accidents bore me. Like a casino, it's boring. Nolan has been and continues to be a great director, but as an adult, I'm bored.

"They brand me as a traitor, a communist"
By Juan Manuel Dominguez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Perfil
26 August 2012




[Viggo] is an accomplished artist, photographer and poet - in short, not at all the sort of person that you would expect to find represented as a 3-inch high action figure in a Burger King children's meal.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk
2001




Two days later I'm in a toy shop looking at the small Aragorn figurine that my son has thrust into my hands bleating "I want, I want", and I'm wondering if this is as close as I'll get to Viggo.

Josie McNaught attempts to interview Viggo
"I'm a poet" - Rings star Mortensen
By Josie McNaught
Sunday Star-Times
16 November 2003




"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."

Viggo Mortensen on his LOTR action figure
Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk
2001




"Henry... was pretty well pleased and as I found out later, very happy for me to play a character who, as he put it, "finally has an action figure."

The One King
By Bryan Cairns
Film Review Yearbook (Special #49)
2004




Right now there is a resurgence of the hero but invested with those qualities we are most devoid of. Quite often, most of the time, they are fictional characters that have been wrongly embellished with those things we wanted to see. But at other times, occasionally, the flesh-and-blood hero emerges, stationed on a corner, wandering the streets or simply sharing fragments of his existence. Viggo Mortensen occupies that place of the ultimate present hero.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005

Quotable Viggo: 19 June 2016

Ben Cash is off grid and lovin' it. Something Viggo would be mighty comfortable with, as inside the movie actor is an inner woodsman constantly trying to get out. No wonder he has made so many films that involve tramping through woods and vast open spaces. Ben Cash isn't even his first off-grid character, Clay and Aragorn got there first, along with Agustín who returned to the woods to escape his complicated life. As he says one of the quotes below, the forest and wilderness is like 'food to him'.



Image Eric Simkins.
© Bleecker Street.



Like the philosopher Thoreau, Viggo likes to lose himself in the woods, into the wild, in a trip into nature to find beauty and freedom, and to find the essence of life, as he explains with a deep, quiet voice, between long pauses and a cigarette rolled by himself.

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




"I like places where there are very few human traces, places where I never feel time is wasted. If I'm stuck in a traffic jam in Los Angeles or waiting in a queue for the bank it's hard not to feel I'm wasting my life in that moment."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




In this new collection of images and poems are trees and the memory of trees, ghosts, words, nights, days, lives, deaths, and safe haven for them all in the place where "... the twigs become branches, / And the mist becomes make-believe.. ." (Osip Emilyevich Mandelstam). If you daren't enter the forest, or cannot find it, then perhaps you might find one tree, or a place where a tree could be, and just stop for a quiet moment to see what happens.

Viggo's presentation of th Skovbo Exhibition
The Reykjavik Museum of Photography.
24 June 2008




"We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work."

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Captain Fantastic Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




"The forest, the rivers, being alone in those places, it´s like food to me."

The Past Is In Everything
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 August 2014




"Every tree is something special, just like people are. All different, but... I look at them as I look at people. I get along well with most trees. I don't get into arguments with them, and if I do it's probably my own fault. If I don't watch where I'm going when I'm in the forest, it comes back and smacks me in the nose, and I only have myself to blame."

RUV Interview
Skovbo Exhibition, Iceland
Translated by Mums
30 May 2008




"The Danish woods look like Tolkien's, they are the kind that doesn't look dangerous, but if you walk alone by night in the forests of Denmark, you can feel the energies of the past."

Viggo Mortensen
The American Dane
By Susanne Johansson - Translation by Majken Steen Thomassen
BT (Berlingske Tidende)
28 November 2001




He smells of woodsmoke, as though he's just returned from some manly pursuit like chopping logs in a forest. Again, highly possible. He does have a home in the remote mountains of Idaho, surrounded by woods. In fact the scent is wafting from his cup of tea.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




I really don't know what happened myself, but I lost myself completely in [Aragorn]. I am a man who likes to withdraw into solitude and take long hikes in the woods and mountains. So was Aragorn. We fitted perfectly together.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan, Empire, December 2004




"I thought of the New Zealand landscape as one of my acting partners," he says. "Those forests and mountains - Aragorn knows them. He understands the language of the birds and beasts." He takes a long drag on his cigarette. "He has a special reverence for trees."

You sense that what Mortensen prizes in Aragorn, he prizes in himself.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
By Ryan Gilbey
The Independent
14 December 2001




...I would go crazy if I couldn't get out of the city and go out into the forest for a little while.

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014




'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




'I believe that I'm a man of the hills, the woods, the angry sea, a somewhat solitary guy but sometimes I miss what it's like to soak up metropolitan poisons. I love and am terrified by the great cities of the world, sometimes simultaneously.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




When I ask him where he'd like to be if the end was near, Mortensen briefly waxes poetic.

"My first impulse is to say I want to be in nature," Mortensen says. "By the sea, on a mountain, in the woods. But on second thought, it doesn't really matter where you are — it's how you are. We forget what's important, because we're in this drive to keep our jobs, or be good parents, or acquire certain possessions.

"But all it takes is an illness or a terrorist attack or a hurricane to bring you back down to earth. And you realize: It's good to be alive, it's worthwhile being kind.

"It's a special thing when art allows you to come to that conclusion."

Viggo Mortensen travels the 'Road' not taken
By Joe Williams
STL Today
22 November 2009


Quotable Viggo: 28 May 2016

Between football, bags of yerba mate, confusing passports and turning up with an assortment of gifts, Airport Security must go into overdrive every time Viggo turns up to catch a flight. Imagine my quotable delight when this week's Esquire interview turned up two new airport anecdotes. Any excuse to turn out all my travel favourites with no apologies for length...



ROTK: Wellington, NZ World Premiere
© unknown



Viggo Mortensen has come bearing pancake mix. We are curbside at the tiny airport in Syracuse, New York, on a truly dreary day (even by Syracuse standards), and within seconds of hopping into his rented Ford Fusion, I learn two things about him: He's the kind of guy who picks you up at the airport, and he's the kind of guy who brings presents. Pancake mix is a delicacy in upstate New York. "Do you like maple syrup?" Because he brought me some of that, too. He's prepared a gift bag.

Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016



Half an hour from our departure from the Dulles Airport in Washington, D.C., I'm watching the game against Newell's on my laptop close to the departure gate for our plane. And suddenly Romagnoli makes magic, running down the left wing and gives one last opportunity to Gigliotti, who had failed at two clear opportunities to win this incredible game. I shout:

GOOOOOOOOOOOLAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAZOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!
[trans.note:Spanish for "Great Goal!"]

with my whole soul, and I start jumping everywhere like a panicked deer among the passengers and their luggage.

!!!!!!PIPI!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!PIPI!!!! ¡¡¡¡PIPIIII!!!!

People don't understand what's happening. They don't understand why I'm shouting and jumping. They don't know if yelling "Pipi!" over and over means that I've pissed myself or if I've hurt myself somehow. A gentleman with a U.S. Army military uniform, probably recently returned from Iraq or Afghanistan, gets up and approaches me quickly, saying, "Cool it, man! Easy now...what's wrong, what happened???..." "Never mind" - I say shouting the goal. "CALM DOWN SIR!"

Viggo Mortensen
They Want To Throw Me Out Of The Airport
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
28 May 2012




"Sir, what is WRONG with you???"

Airport security get a taste of Viggo the football fan
They Want To Throw Me Out Of The Airport
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
28 May 2012




"He is so kind and playful and funny off set. He's almost like a hippie. We picked him up at the airport one time, and he wasn't wearing shoes. I still have no idea how he got through the airport barefoot."

Fran Walsh
On 'The Road' And Off, Viggo Mortensen Walks The Walk
By Scott Bowles
USA Today
3 December 2009




"It's true that they've checked my luggage more than once because of the yerba maté; they don't know what it is, it looks like a pipe. I once carried a kilo of yerba in a bag, and that was the problem... It looked like a kilo of something else!," commented this maté fan about the unpleasant moments he has had to go through when he has been held back at several airports.

A Hollywood Star in RSM
Translation by Graciela
Infobae.com
10 October 2008




The press conference before the [Good] premiere turned out to be a bit chaotic, a two act play...

A few minutes before the announced starting time we were told that Viggo Mortensen and the producer had missed their plane, they would land in Vienna an hour late, and would drive from there to the hotel in Budapest. By this time Jason Isaacs (Lucius Malfoy in the Harry Potter movies) was already giving enthusiastic interviews in the room next door and it looked like we would have to make do with him. Mr. Mortensen was to join us upon arrival.

Our disappointment only lasted until the conversation started because it soon turned out that Mr. Isaacs isn't considered by many to be the most lovable British actor by accident.... Referring to Viggo Mortensen's tardiness in his first sentences, he asked those present to please make Mr. Mortensen uncomfortable, and to stop him no matter what he said, telling him that they'd already heard that today. He also asked us to ask Mr. Mortensen what his breakfast was like at the airport, because the long breakfast was one of the reasons why he missed his plane. He also spoke with him on the phone twice, and conveyed to us that Viggo was so upset over being late that he could only growl, and he said that he would be happy to have even a hundredth of the talent that Jason Isaacs has. At the end Mr. Isaacs reassured Viggo that he didn't have to hurry because he (Mr. Isaacs) could do this press conference for another three or four hours with no problem.

Santa Brought Us Viggo Mortensen
By Lavicska Zsuzsanna - translated by Zee
Film Klub
7 December 2008




I have to tell you...what an awful combination it is to have a US passport and a Buenos Aires accent when you arrive at the Chile airport. A pretty long delay… my friends that had Spanish passports had already gone through (customs), and they were waiting… and the guy kept checking, very kindly, but he wasn't letting me go anywhere, and he talks to me in a pretty tortured English, and so I tell him: "I speak Spanish, you can talk to me in Spanish". And so he gave me a long look, and then I realized I had f***** up, really, because the combination of the accent and the passport… I was going straight to jail, or so it looked. And so another customs officer comes and says, "No, no, he is the Lord of the Rings", and so..."Welcome to Chile" and (pam, pam – sound of passport getting stamped) "Here you go…go ahead".

Viggo on Radio Cooperativa, Chile
By - transcribed/translated by Graciela
Radio Cooperativa
27 March 2007




Since I grew up travelling a lot, flying is almost like being at home for me, and a plane is like my second mother. I always liked airports and everything that goes along with getting ready for a trip - even now, when everything has changed so much because of the new security that we have after the terrorist attack in Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2001. I continue to enjoy watching people from everywhere walking through the terminals, waiting, looking for their gates - each person with their own destination, their dreams, their belongings, their preoccupations. And being in the sky during those hours when you feel as though you've escaped from linear time always seemed like an opportunity for reflection to me.

Viggo Mortensen
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




The following morning he flew towards Buenos Aires. At night, he left for the USA; he had to start working on the character of his next movie. "I'll come back," he said before taking the airport escalator. I began to lose sight of him. He had a bombilla in his back pocket, a white plastic bag, and a San Lorenzo flag wrapped around his shoulders.

A Trip With Viggo Mortensen Through The Heart Of The Province
By Robustiano Pinedo - translated by Graciela
Source: El Tribuno Salta
El Tribuno Salta
14 May 2007




Ninety minutes later, we pull up to the departure gates at the airport. I begin to say goodbye. But no, Mortensen is coming in with me. Way earlier in the day, in our first ten minutes together, I mentioned that I forgot my driver's license and that some drama ensued at LaGuardia Airport. He's coming in with me to make sure I get on my flight. He thinks maybe he'll know one of the TSA agents, but when we get to security, he knows no one. Nor do they know him.

The TSA cop wants to know what I was doing in Syracuse for just eight hours. She thinks I'm a drug dealer. At this, Viggo starts to laugh. I tell her I'm a writer and had to interview someone. "Huh." She looks Mortensen up and down. "Are you famous or something?"

On the other side of the security rope, Mortensen couldn't be happier.

On the other side of the security rope, Mortensen couldn't be happier
Why Viggo Mortensen Is Off the Grid
By Lisa DePaulo
Esquire
25 May 2016


Quotable Viggo: 22 May 2016

Captain Fantastic has taken the Cannes Film Festival by storm with a 10 minute standing ovation and the award of Best Director in Un Certain Regard for Matt Ross. What a tribute to the hard work and dedication of Matt and Viggo, and all those wonderful kids. Time to round up some of the very best comments coming out of Cannes this week.



© Bleecker Street[


It was the fifth, count 'em fifth , movie of the day for me here on this Tuesday in Cannes. I saw everything in languages ranging from Spanish (Almodovar's Julieta) to the Filipino's Tagalog (Mama Rosa) to Portugese (a delicious Sonia Braga in Aquarius) and Pete Hammond badge English channeled thru French director Olivier Assayas (Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper – and there were NO boos at my screening). All of these are official contenders in the main Cannes Competition. But it was in the lesser, but often more intriguing , Un Certain Regard sidebar that the best film of the day, maybe the festival, and maybe so far this year (at least for me) was unveiled to a packed crowd of adoring french – and other – moviegoers: Captain Fantastic.

Pete Hammond
Deadline.com
17 May 2016




'Captain Fantastic' is weird, warm, hilarious and moving, with the entire cast working together in harmony to form a cosy and engaging film. Matt Ross proves himself a director worthy of commendation with this film about love, loss and trying to do what's right for your family, even if it is not necessarily what is right for you.

Brogen Hayes
Movies.ie
17 May 2016




'[Viggo] is an extraordinary man, an extraordinary mind. He had many thoughts and notes — great insights — before shooting. And once filming, Viggo contributed an effortless simplicity and deep humanity that, I believe, elevated the film.'

Matt Ross
Cannes Festival
Eugénie Malinjod
20 May 2016




"We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work."

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




"When I was preparing for this role, I went back to where I used to live [in northern Idaho] and spent some time there. I ended up driving to Washington from Idaho in a pickup truck filled with all kinds of things I thought might be useful. It looked like something out of The Beverly Hillbillies when I arrived.

Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




The Lord of the Rings star shows a full complement of skills including driving family's bus, lighting a fire, playing guitar and rock-climbing.

"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016




As you might've guessed, he shines in Captain Fantastic. As is often the case with Mortensen, every beat of his character is fine-tuned so effortlessly. He's genuinely sincere and lovable, even if for much of the film you might find that his character's approach to parenting is absolutely clinically insane.

A Conversation with Matt Ross and Viggo Mortensen
Kee Chang
Anthem
20 May 2016




Magnetic, charming and funny, as well as tenacious and kind, Mortensen easily leads this cast to greatness.

Brogen Hayes
Movies.ie
17 May 2016




The actor delivers a rugged, raw, unguarded performance as the devoted father – his best turn for many years, and worthy of all of the praise that he's already receiving following the film's two festival bows.

Paul Heath
The Hollywood News
17 May 2016




As Ben, Mortensen... exudes warmth and intelligence from every pore.

Jo-Ann Titmarsh
HeyUGuys
17 May 2016




Captain Fantastic criticises both the flower child dream and the capitalist consumer society, using extreme examples of both to make its point very clear: a no-hunting-no-food way of life on one side, and multi-millionaire mansions on the other. The hippie dream comes to terms with American contemporary reality, but there is enough depth in the film to find fault with both lifestyles and recognise the problems inherent to both.

Jasmin Valjas
The Upcoming
17 May 2016




For audiences at the Cannes Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival (where it first premiered before landing in France), "Captain Fantastic" has resonated as a movie for its time: a heartfelt and comic exploration about whether our hyper-digital, cacophonous lives have strayed from important things.

Jake Coyle
Associated Press
18 May 2016




"It's one of those movies that has its finger on the pulse of what's happening, like American movies in the early seventies."

Viggo Mortensen Doesn't Need to Make Big Movies Anymore
Viggo Mortensen
Eric Kohn
Indiewire
17 May 2016




'....ultimately, it's not about these liberal, off-the-grid people you're going to follow through thick and thin. On many levels, the film is about communication. It's about being open to changing your mind about things and balancing things out as individuals. What does "Captain Fantastic" even mean? You might as well call it "The Perfect Dad." It's an ideal that you're never going to achieve because it's not possible. And yet, it doesn't mean you don't try.'

A Conversation with Matt Ross and Viggo Mortensen
Kee Chang
Anthem
20 May 2016




Some Golden Globe voters were at the premiere and it was thumbs up from at least one I spoke to. Although it is early, and the film needs to catch fire, there is indeed award potential here in some key categories including screenplay, and most definitely for Mortensen who has never been better.

Pete Hammond
Deadline.com
17 May 2016




"I couldn't have done this without [Viggo], he's my collaborator."

Matt Ross accepting his best director award
Cannes
21 May 2016

Quotable Viggo: 15 May 2016

This week's Variety article included a sad comment from Viggo that David Cronenberg may 'hang up his movie camera' to concentrate on writing novels, partly prompted by recent news that he now finds it almost impossible to find backing for his films. Over the years we've avidly followed Cronenberg's wonderful partnership with Viggo. We've watched his films in awe of the complex stories he's unfolded and the incredible performances he's drawn out of all his actors. Can this really be the end? I'm pretty sure all of us here at V-W fervently hope not. Here is a little tribute to Cronenberg drawn from the comments of his 'brother under the skin', Viggo.



© Focus Features.


"I think he's probably by far the most talented invisible man in directing history."

Viggo on Cronenberg's lack of awards
Viggo Mortensen and 'Dangerous Method's' Fate
by Melena Ryzik
The Carpetbagger / New York Times
15 December 2011




'With David's movies, sometimes people don't see it until it's on DVD, and then they say, "Wow, that had to have been one of the best movies of last year." No matter how well-received critically they are at the time of release, they tend to become sort of invisible, I think. It's astounding, after making three movies with him - not to mention all the other great movies he did before those three - that David's never been nominated for an Oscar for directing. It's incredible.'

Viggo Mortensen Wants The Oscars To Start Noticing David Cronenberg
By Kyle Buchanan
New York Magazine
22 November 2011




"… David is just starting to hit his stride. Usually someone who's been making movies for 30 years starts to tire, but his curve keeps going up and up. It's almost like he's getting younger and more adventurous with every movie."

Viggo Mortensen
By Robert W. Butler, The Kansas City Star
16 Sept 2007




"A lot of the information you get about the way a character is thinking and feeling is very subtle," Mr. Mortensen says. "It's a look or a hesitation before saying something or a blink or not looking at someone. You need a director who loves those details and pays attention to them as he's shooting and during editing. Otherwise characters played that way seem very flat and one-dimensional. With David, you know you're in good hands so you feel safe to play big or small."

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




"What I love most about David…..more so than any other director alive, is that he asks many, many questions, and with each subsequent viewing you find that there are more and more questions, but he doesn't give you any answers. He respects you enough to let you think for yourself and form your own opinions."

Viggo Mortensen
Crimes and Misdemeanours
By Phillip Berk, Filmink
October 2007




"In studying Freud I found many parallels with Cronenberg. I don't know how David sees it, but I found myself using him as a model to create my Freud. Freud was constantly reinventing himself, his theories were scandalous, revolutionary and dangerous. But in everyday life he was an irreprehensible family man, a typical member of the middle class. The same applies to Cronenberg, who makes a lot of disturbing films, constantly studies impulses, desires, repressed aggression and sexuality, always obsessed with physicality. Yet if you talk to him he's calm as can be, innocent, with a great sense of humour."

Viggo Mortensen
A Most Beautiful Mind
L'Uomo Vogue
September 2011




"When you work with him the excitement is contagious. You feel like you're with a recently graduated film student who is absolutely brilliant. He acts like a kid about shooting every day. It helps you feel excited about it too."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Reveals How He Became Freud in 'A Dangerous Method'
by Thelma Adams
Yahoo Movies
16 December 2011




"They're [the films] uncomfortable to watch because people in reality are not neat and tidy and orderly and always predictable and always the same. He's a great observer of human nature and on that level, you know, I do feel like we're kindred spirits."

Viggo Mortensen on Cronenberg
Rebecca Murray
About.com
26 September 2005




"There is an ease and a relaxed atmosphere on the set with David. He knows that that is a good atmosphere to have. It's good to have someone who is an ally. If a director shows that he too is puzzling his way through it, that helps you feel like a collaborator, like an ally."

Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




"I know that the three movies I've done with him are probably my best work or close to it, and I think there's a reason for that. He understands and likes actors."

On the couch with the former King Of Gondor
By Matt Maytum
Total Film
9 February 2012




'He continues what he's always done, which is taking people apart, almost like they were a machine or an engine, but now more taking their brains apart than their bodies, I suppose. It's more a psychological autopsy and the results are always a little disturbing. Not because he's disturbing, but because we are. As an audience and as a subject.'

Viggo on Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen, Actor, poet, photographer
Philip Matthews
New Zealand Listener
March 18-24 2006




'It took him four years after Eastern Promises to put another movie out, which is sad. It's a loss to filmgoers that he doesn't have a movie out every year.'

Viggo Mortensen Wants The Oscars To Start Noticing David Cronenberg
By Kyle Buchanan
New York Magazine
22 November 2011




'I would've nominated him for all three movies I've done with him. No question.'

Viggo Mortensen on Cronenberg and the Oscars
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Dangerous Method' Taught Me How to Talk in a Movie
By Michael Hogan
Moviefone
23 November 2011



Quotable Viggo: 8 May 2016

Now we finally have a trailer (hooray!!!) and some lovely new stills to play with, it's time to take another look at fantastic Captain Fantastic, a 'natural Papa Bear' role that fits Viggo like a glove.



Image Eric Simkins.
© Bleecker Street



"Viggo was an easy first choice, casting him was intuitive."

Matt Ross
Film takes audience on 'Fantastic' journey
Jay Meehan,
The Park Record
21 January 2016




"Viggo Mortensen's dedication to his craft and to the world of the story he's telling have been an inspiration to me for years," said Ross. "There is a depth to his art that I greatly admire. Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




Director Matt Ross found his leading man was very well-prepared in his research for the film, having sent him a stack of books by award-winning scientists and philosophers, only to find he didn't need to have done so.

He told Total Film magazine: ''I thought that was a great way to [give him] some of the knowledge that this family would have.

''It turns out Viggo had read all the books already.''

Viggo Mortensen brought his canoe to Captain Fantastic set
Xposé
18 March 2016




"It was one of the best scripts I've ever read. I think it is one of those stories that makes you question everything... ideologically, spiritually. I love stories like that."

How a Silicon Valley Tech Mogul Created Sundance's Most Bohemian Movie, Captain Fantastic
by Julie Miller
Vanity Fair
24 January 2016




...the cast spent time before filming getting to know each other and learning the skills needed to be authentic on screen. They camped and learned how to grow food and skin a deer and learned to play music together, all of which were important to the film.

Viggo Mortensen returns to his ranging ways in 'Captain Fantastic'
TheOneRing,net
16 February 2016




"He's the gentlest man you'll meet, especially with the kids. He's really quiet out in public, but he loved all [us] little ones to pieces. He was hanging around with us all day and telling jokes. He acted like a father figure. He's a great guy."

Nicholas Hamilton
Young Aussie actor Nicholas Hamilton stars with Viggo Mortensen at Sundance
Harry Winsor
If.com.au
15 January 2015




"All the 'family' members got along but I think the strongest bonds that were made were between the kids and Viggo. He would come on set every day with different books for all the kids to read. I ended up having about 10 books that I've never gotten around to reading."

Nicholas Hamilton
Captain Fantastic and the Sundance Kid
By Matthew Lowe
Filmink.com
20 January 2015




'I am a dad and there is no such thing as a perfect father and mother and this character is doing the best he can.'

'Captain Fantastic' explores fatherhood, family and man vs. society
Larry D Curtis
KUTV
25 January 2016




Mortensen, looking his most mountain-man handsome...

Brian Moylan
The Guardian
31 January 2016




...with his beard looking like a coloring experiment at a barber college.

Marshall Fine
Huffington Post
27 January 2016




''I didn't have to do a ton of research about living in the forest and being comfortable in nature.''

Viggo Mortensen brought his canoe to Captain Fantastic set
Xposé
18 March 2016




This is the role of Mortensen's career, capitalizing on his unique blend of rustic sexiness, gentle artsiness, and searing intellect in the service of one of cinema's greatest dads. Oh, and you'll get to sit back and take in the full Viggo in decidedly cozier confines than a bathhouse knife fight.

Marlow Stern
The Daily Beast
30 January 2016




Mortensen's own renaissance man characteristics segue seamlessly into Ben's intellectual idealism. He crafts every beat of this character seemingly without even trying; his may be the most seemingly-effortless performance at Sundance this year.

Russ Fischer
The Playlist
25 January 2016




Mortensen — a natural Papa Bear, who taps into both his physical strength and spiritual gentleness.

Peter Debruge
Variety
23 January 2016




By the time I took my seat for Sundance's Saturday evening premiere of "Captain Fantastic" -- my seventh screening in three days -- I was glassy-eyed and ready for a nap. Two hours later, I was on my feet, joining the entirety of the large Eccles Theater in a standing ovation. Suddenly, my Sundance spunk was renewed.

Viggo Mortensen Raises A Family Off The Grid In Sundance's Triumphant 'Captain Fantastic
Matthew Jacobs
Huffington Post
25 January 2016

Quotable Viggo: 25 June 2016

Amongst all the Captain Fantastic treats over the last few weeks, another treat was the news that we have a lovely new musical offering from Viggo, although this one's on vinyl (if you have an old record player, dig it out from the attic now). SEVENTEENODDSONGS is his latest recording produced with Travis Dickerson, in which 'an idea forms on the piano wire, and a tentative opening phrase reaches out from the corner of the studio'. Time to take another look at Viggo as a 'sound modulator', his own description of his long journey messing about with music just to see what happens.



© Viggo Mortensen/Lightening Creek Inc., out of print
Photo: © Pieter Lessing


...his almost ludicrous list of talents includes poetry, painting and a prolific discography which boasts more album releases than your average full-time musician.

An Unconventional Method: Viggo Mortensen
Clash
8 March 2015




'I like to play with music. But I would not define myself as a musician, but as a sound modulator. I love to be with musicians and play, to see what comes out from the mess that we do together.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Painter Hero
By Giulia D'Agnolo Vallan
CIAK
March 2002




'Writing or acting or playing music, I need to feel like I'm connecting with something. And although acting brings me many moments like that I'm probably most relaxed sitting down at a piano. I don't read music and I've never had lessons but it's fun and I find it very relaxing. I'm okay with mistakes and people not liking what I play. I just do it.'

Viggo Mortensen on Good
By Angus Fontaine
Time Out, Sydney
9 April 2009




"....for Good.....I play a professor who has music as his refuge. I also placed myself in the situation of having Mahler's music in my head. I felt the need to play the piano. Each night after filming, I played a bit, a way of leaving myself inspired for the scene the next day. Each time, something different came from my imagination. When I returned home I recorded what I had composed to save a trace, and it became an album!"

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen the Insatiable
by Sophie Benamon, Studio Magazine
November 2007




His response to the question, "I didn't know you played:"

"I didn't either," followed by a loud, horsy laugh.

Viggo Mortensen plays piano at Sutton Place
Bruce Demara
TheStar.com
8 September 2008




.....from his various books to his spoken word recordings to his exhibitions, one can't fault Mortensen for a lack of creative ambition. One listen to The Other Parade, his rereleased 1998 album with Buckethead, ex-wife Exene Cervenka, and a host of others, reveals total artistic fearlessness (Mortensen plays a motorcycle muffler on every track). Its haunting, post-industrial abstractions make Einstürzende Neubauten sound like 'NSync -- and, if taken in the wrong mood, they may encourage a listener to beat on the disc itself. But there's absolutely no lack of energy and presence.

Holding Court with the King: Viggo Mortensen heralds the return of the renaissance man
by Gregory Weinkauf
East Bay Express, 2003




"Being in the studio with [Buckethead] and just spending a day at work, I walk out of there always feeling a little lighter, all my problems and responsibilities just feel a little less daunting somehow. It's like going for a nice walk in the woods. You just feel a little more able to deal with thing 'cause you know that you've used your time well and gotten something special out of the day. I feel that working in the studio and in particular working with him."

Viggo Mortensen & Buckethead: The man who portrayed Aragorn talks about recording with the king of horror guitar.
By Spence D.
FilmForceIGN.com
3 March 2004




'...[Lisandro] said that we didn't have any budget at all to go find what he was thinking about, so he needed somebody to propose something. And I said there is a guitar player named Buckethead whom I've known for years, I've done lots of records with him. A lot of the music is kinda strange, but some of it is pretty lyrical. It has a sort of circular quality that would suit the story. I sent Lisandro ten songs, and he picked the one you hear and I thought "great choice." I wouldn't have thought of it, but he could see that. It was one of those things that happen.'

Viggo discussing the music in Jauja
Viggo Mortensen on 'Jauja,' Producing, Protecting Directors' Visions
John Hopewell
Variety
25 November 2014




...we're sitting in front of the pounding ocean in my rented LeSabre listening to Mortensen's new CD, an activity that serves two purposes: I get to hear his latest songs (his car doesn't have a CD player), and we both get to sober up before the drive home.

The music is dark, spooky stuff. Most of it comes from a jam session with Buckethead. We smoke American Spirit cigarettes as Mortensen, on the CD, recites over ominous guitar tracks a poem in Danish about a warrior who must leave home to avenge his country. We get into a long, boozy discussion about why he does so much stuff, why he is so bursting with creative energy that he can't just be an actor.

"People who are creators create," he says. "People say to me all the time, 'Why don't you just focus on one thing?' And I say, 'Why? Why just one thing? Why can't I do more? Who makes up these rules?"

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




A number of years ago I reviewed a collection of Mortensen's photographs and poems and commented on how with either media he seemed to have the innate ability to capture specific moments in time with both his words and his camera.

Maybe it's through his work as an actor, where you have to be in the moment at all times when you're portraying a character in order for it to be believable to your audience, that he has gained this ability.

However he does it, this recording shows he's equally capable of bringing an audience into a specific moment in time with his music. Acà is a beautiful and evocative collection of music which will allow you to travel into your own memories of time and place like few others I've heard.

DanVTMuzrzr reviewing Acà
Music Blogs
22 February 2014




Listening to Viggo Mortensen and Buckethead's renditions of Viggo's works on This That And The Other is to be brought back to the direct immediacy of art and to be given the opportunity to experience a creation firsthand from its creator.

Review: This That And The Other
By Richard Marcus
blogcritics.org
March 20, 2007




Now if he just changes his handle to something catchy like "V-Go," the fellow might prove quite the pop star.

On Pandemoniumfromamerica
Holding Court with the King: Viggo Mortensen heralds the return of the renaissance man
by Gregory Weinkauf
East Bay Express, 2003

Quotable Viggo: 23 April 2016

Following the El Punt Avui interview I've decided that it must be time for another poetry Quotable. Although it's not long since the last one, there is always more to say and more quotes to tease out of the archive. A poet long before he was an actor, Viggo takes the 'little things of life' and magically weaves the words that fall 'now and then from clouds, from my eyes to the table, onto my lap or became tangled in horses' manes'.



Solos at Teatre Romea, Barcelona 2015
© CoCo.



What inspires you at the moment you write your poems?

The things that most interest me are the everyday things. The normal incidents, the day to day...Everything lies beneath those thoughts. For me, the little things of life are very interesting.

"Poetry is an art that will never disappear."
By Lluis Arcalis and Teresa Marquez translated by Ollie and Zoe
El Punt Avui
1 March 2016




One day, in Tehran, I see a tourist bus parked in front of my hotel. The name written on the side of the bus, I forget you forever, intrigues me. Isn't that a strange name for a transport company? It became the title of one of my books of poems and travel photos...'

Viggo Mortensen: "You must live your contradictions"
by Olivier Cariguel
Le Magazine Litteraire
March 2015




'A teacher gave me the taste for poetry. I like the discipline it imposes, I like the reign of precision and the perfect word.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)
2 February 2015




'Words were everywhere I looked, filling dreams, giving me names for everything. It was all I could do to keep up with them, catch a few as they drifted through me, fell now and then from clouds, from my eyes to the table, onto my lap or became tangled in horses' manes. Most of the words got away, as they usually will, but at night I regularly managed to gather them in bunches.'

Viggo Mortensen
Introduction to Best American Non-Required Reading
Houghton Mifflin
2004




"Poetry is a way to look at life from multiple points of view, a feeling of duplication which even gets more intense if you do it in two languages, like I do."

About Them... "I like a brave woman"
By Salvador Llopart - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zooey
La Vanguardia
14 March 2010




In September I'm going to read T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land" at the British Library in London to help celebrate the centennial of this poem... On reading the poem again this morning, I was especially impressed by the way of enduring and containing pain that Eliot's writing has. The pain affects me more, touches me more, by being contained. The poem also has many absurd and somehow funny moments. Like Joyce's novel Ulysses, "The Waste Land" is a puzzle with a thousand mythological and literary references. In no way do I understand it all, but I like how Eliot's poem sounds, the rhythm it has when it's read aloud. Lovely mystery.

The Structure of Fiction
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
26 July 2015




'It is important to protect living poetry, which is also why I participate as often as I can in public readings."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




….if you´ve written a poem and you read it, you don´t know what will happen. Something changes between my mouth and the eyes and ears of those who are there reading or listening to my words, my little story. Something changes between writing it and pronouncing the words. I don´t know what the reader receives. There´s no net. For that reason, I'm responsible for what I´ve written and for how I read it.

Viggo Mortensen - All of Us are Mestizos
by Carlos Shilling – translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Zoe
LaVoz
November 2010




Viggo Mortensen bares himself in front of the audience. "For me, music and poetry together mean something. When I feel something, I write. When I write, I think of a melody," he confesses at one point during the show. This is the essence of this Solos cycle programmed by the Romea Theatre, getting the protagonist of the event to face the audience. Viggo Mortensen, accompanied by pianist Rafel Plana, had to seduce a packed room that was impatiently waiting for him.

Viggo Mortensen Seduces at the Romea
By Griselda Oliver - translated by Ollie
Núvol
26 February 2015




Approximately halfway through the performance, silence reigned for a moment and the Master of Ceremonies blurted out "Descanso" [Rest]; the audience broke out in applause and Viggo hurried to make it clear that this wasn't actually a break in the program but that the poem was titled that way.

Viggo Mortensen - Teatre Romea
By Marc - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Another Time, Another Place
23 February 2015




When it's pointed out that people might come to his poetry readings or buy his books because he's a movie star, he nods, accepting this. "Sure, sure - I'm not unaware of that. I know if I announced that I'm going to do a book signing tonight with no advance warning, there will probably be a bunch of people there because of the movie. But some people will come to hear the reading and some people will come because of The Lord of the Rings. I don't care. If they come and hear the poems and they have a reaction pro or con, and there's a connection made between me and them - then who cares?"

The Brain Dane
by Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
2003




These [Mortensen's] poems seem close to the way his mind works: things tend to be collaged in where they almost fit, or, more precisely, they fit in the only way they can: almost.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguag
2002




'A lot of people that were here tonight said something about their writing, but were too embarrassed by it. And I'd ask them about what they write and encourage them to pursue it. People sometimes seem to feel that poetry is just this little thing you do privately, like your diary. But in reality it's something that you can work at in many ways, that you can share, that you can take as far as you like.'

Viggo Mortensen at the Midnight Special reading
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
By Scott Thill,
Morphizm
2002

Quotable Viggo: 4th June 2016

This week I thought I'd take us out West to a film that never got the audience attention it deserved when it came out – Appaloosa. I really love this film. We not only get Viggo sporting the best goatee ever but also another of my favourite actors, Ed Harris. As critic Richard Crouse said 'Are there two more stronger, silenter types in modern movies?'. Nope. All that and horses too...



© New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.


Are there two more stronger, silenter types in modern movies than Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen? Each of these actors are a throw back to the days when cowboy stars were manly men who mean what they say and only say what they mean and nothing else.

Richard Crouse
CTV.ca
6 September 2008




"Not only do I have a great respect for [Viggo] as an actor but as a human being. He's a really decent guy. He's great on the set, treats everybody really respectfully. I just thought he'd be perfect. These were two guys who had to communicate a lot about being who they were and the knowledge of each other without really talking about it ... If Viggo couldn't have done it, I don't know if I would've made the movie"

Ed Harris
Viggo is one straight shooter
By Kevin Williamson
Toronto Sun
6th September 2008




"One of the many things I love about Viggo is that he's a man of his word. Even though he was busy up until two days before we started filming, he came prepared, ready to work. He really knew what he wanted to do and who this guy was that he wanted to play. And he did it. I'm really proud of him."

Ed Harris
Appaloosa
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys and Indians magazine
October 2008




"I like characters who find themselves at the brink of change. Everett is in the centre of the transition from anarchy to civil law in America. My characters always stand for crossing a ford. Years ago, Everett studied at West Point but I love imagining him as the black sheep of the family because he has gone West, looking for adventure and he has found it. In the book he says: I'd been in West Point, like my father, but I found it boring. While the hairstyle, gun, saddlebag, riding positions are based on the photos of that period; it was me who added the dandy touches to him; the gilet, the Victorian manners, formalistic as well as brutal, he can't erase them."

Viggo Mortensen
Appaloosa - 5 Questions For Viggo Mortensen
By Antonella Catena - translated by Ewa
Max
16 January 2009




"I think Cole trusts Hitch more than anyone else in the world, specifically because Hitch is very honest with him, even when it's difficult to bring certain things to Cole's attention," says the actor. "That is my definition of a good friend: somebody who is brave enough to tell you the truth even when it's not what you want to hear."

Viggo Mortensen
Emmanuel Levy
Emmanuellevy.com
August 2008




"I can't lie to you, I had a lot of fun riding around on horseback…"

Viggo Mortensen
CBS News Interview
8 September 2008




"Wow, that was nice," said Renée Zellweger, who plays Cole's love interest, Allison French. "Look at that man ride!"

Watching Viggo ride off at the end of the film.
Ed Harris ramrods unconventional western 'Appaloosa'
By John Horn
Los Angeles Times
7 September 2008




Viggo Mortensen follows a classic cowboy code in the Western "Appaloosa": Speak softly and carry a big honkin' gun.

Mortensen Packs a Big Gun
By David Germain
Associated Press
17 September 2008




"When I first had it, I said, `Do you really need it to be an eight-gauge, Ed? It's not that manageable, it's not going to be accurate at much distance. I said, `I'm not going to shoot that thing off a horse, because I'd get blown off the horse, realistically.'"

Mortensen Packs a Big Gun
By David Germain
Associated Press
17 September 2008




Each time the tracks in the street were swept away rapidly by the crew including Dennis 'the horseman'. All of a sudden Viggo Mortensen apppeared, grabbed a big broom and started sweeping vigorously alongside the crew Now that was different. Viggo Mortensen is definitely not afraid of hard work and dirt.........

Blogengeezer
daflikkers.blogspot.com
24 October 2007




"There's rarely a day he doesn't show up bearing gifts of some sort from his different weekend jaunts," says his Appaloosa costar Renée Zellweger, "where he'll go find some really obscure village behind Taos somewhere and visit an artists' colony and bring back some wares to share. And there was never a day that he wasn't plying us with dark chocolate. It was ridiculous. Bags full. Bags full! Bacon–covered truffles. Where was he getting it? He was the chocolate crack dealer."

Renée Zellweger
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




" ….I like [Appaloosa] because it's told in a leisurely pace. I enjoyed being in it because Ed didn't try to reinvent the genre or appeal to younger audiences. He said, 'This is how these stories are told, and I'm going to respect the genre.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Play It As It Lays
By Philip Berk
Filmink
April 2009




"There are film buffs and story buffs who like the apparent simplicity [of a Western]. Although in a movie like this you can see that, yes, there is silence and there's an easy pace at times punctuated by dramatic tension, but in that silence, if it is well acted, and it is a good Western, which I think this is, then that silence is full of complicated things and a lot of subtext."

Viggo Mortensen Talks 'Appaloosa'
Premier Magazine
By Karl Rozemeyer
19 September 2008




...Holding one's body still in front of a movie camera while also giving the sense of a mind in motion is a specialized art, one with few masters. Paul Newman comes to mind, notably in his later career, as does Robert Duvall, a perennial movie cowboy who will surely wish that Appaloosa had come his way. And now, it would seem, there is Mortensen, who steals this film by doing nothing much more than lean against doorways and bar counters.

Chuck Wilson
Village Voice
17 September 2008




Mortensen said he was hooked by the dynamics between the two men. They love each other, said Harris, even if they might never say those exact words. It's a deep, complex friendship, though don't expect it to unravel like the one between the cowboys in Brokeback Mountain.

Said Mortensen: "They cut those scenes."

Appaloosa: TIFF press conference diaries
by Mark Medley
National Post
September 05, 2008




'This may surprise you but the film I had most pleasure shooting remains Appaloos'.

Viggo Mortensen: "I love the darkness and immorality of The Two Faces of January"
By Thomas Agnelli – translated by Celine
Premiere (France
June 2014

Quotable Viggo: 16 April 2016

Having spent the best part of last week in a theatre dressing room I was thinking how much that space becomes a home from home, even if it's only for a short time. Everything has its place, good luck cards go up on the wall, it becomes a social space as well as a work space and it's where you start putting on your makeup and costume and transforming yourself into somebody entirely different. In film, the dressing room is also your temporary mobile home on set, often for long periods of time. As you would expect with Viggo, his trailer is never just an ordinary trailer... and the Lotr bus even became a legend in its own right.



© Unknown


Instead of the standard luxury lodging demanded by most stars on set, Viggo and co-star Orlando Bloom shared a converted bus while filming Rings. Viggo stocked the bus with a wine cellar and wallpapered the inside with candid behind-the-scenes photos. A source on the set said the bus was the site of frequent cast parties, with the motto, "Everyone is welcome, but when it's time to go, get out!"

Could Viggo Mortensen Be The Perfect Man?
By Nathan Cooper & Mike Glynn
Star
23 December 2003




According to Mortensen, "It was a crazy small bus"... The C-bago became a frat house, where much drinking and partying ensued...."It was a very free-spirited bus," Bloom reflects. "It came about because me and Viggo kept being moved around, and we ended up on this bus one day. And the actors were fed up and we said, "This is it. This is our home and we are not moving. If they come, tell them to go away."

The Fellowship Lives On with The Return of the Kings
By Josh Herman
Campus Circle




"We actually drove it out onto the streets for Viggo's farewell. Viggo didn't know we were going to do it, and when it started moving, you should have seen his face."

Bernard Hill
The Fellowship Lives On with The Return of the Kings
By Josh Herman
Campus Circle




'All that time I was in Morocco it was neat. We'd be out there in the desert. Everyone else would drive the hour, hour and a half back to town where the hotel was, and I'd stay out in the trailer on the set, alone. The dust would settle and it was quiet. It would get dark and I would wash up, make myself some food or whatever and put on these tapes and a bunch CDs that I got from people and different places like Prairie Edge. I'd play these tapes and songs, ceremonial songs, and I'd have the door open in the trailer and I'd be out in the desert, in the middle of the Sahara. I'd be like singing Lakota songs out there - it was cool! I knew I had to come back here.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo,
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004




'Viggo Mortensen was an absolute joy to work with. He slept on the roof of his trailer with his saddle and bedroll. We had to constantly keep him late and call for him early and he never complained.'

Joe Johnston
Joe Johnston Sketchbook
Oct 2014




Nobody knows when Viggo is going to arrive, that's the thing [laughs]. It was like, "Viggo will be here one of these days." They started filming with Keira and I first. He arrives, there's nobody at the airport to meet him because nobody knows when he's going to be there [laughs]. He gets a rental car and turns up on the set. And slowly his trailer starts to get all this character. It was the World Cup at the time, so he's a massive football fan, so all these flags started going in his trailer. He had a picture of the Queen of Denmark up. I was watching him from my trailer, "What's he doing today?" [Laughs] He's a very interesting guy.

Michael Fassbender on meeting Viggo
Michael Fassbender Explores A Dangerous Method with Movie Fanatic
by Joel D Amos
Moviefanatic.com
25 November 2011




...Yanes talks about how Viggo is always looking forward to receiving news and things from León and being told anecdotes from there, and he points out that from the moment they started the shooting in Cádiz, Viggo has had the flag of León next to the San Lorenzo one, both hanging from the trailer window, and the music of that land sounds for many hours from Alatriste's caravan.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León, by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




...a thunderous music could be heard from the inside: pure flamenco.

Alatriste
By María Casanova - translated by Paddy
July 2005
Cinemanía




'You just have to see his caravan, where he has an enormous collage of photos of Leon... of mastiffs, customs, processions, festivities and other things related to that region.'

Diario de Leon
29 June 2005
Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno




During the film shoot, Mortensen had with him artefacts that he had brought back from Russia - including worry beads made in prison from melted-down plastic cigarette lighters. He decorated his trailer with copies of Russian icons and created an atmosphere that was conducive to maintaining his character.

Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007




I put the script here, although I already know the text. I always have the script backstage. I have this owl with the bracelet in San Lorenzo colors; I touch the two eyes of the owl every night before I go on. I have a photo of San Lorenzo's first championship team in 1923, Father Lorenzo Massa, the Silesian who founded San Lorenzo, I have chocolate. I'm always eating...

Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room - Purgatorio
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




"And when we were shooting in Hungary, he said, 'I don't want my trailer to be bigger than the other actors'. He's a very special guy and that shows in the work. When you're on set, you feel like you're equals collaborating. That's often not the case with big stars."

Jason Issacs
Good premier, Toronto
7 September 2008




One day, after wrap, he invited me to have a glass of wine in the makeup trailer. I was surprised to find in the space of a wide trailer hundreds of photographs stuck next to the mirrors. They were funny images of Kodi, of him, and many people. The entire film crew, practically. Some were cut up to compose amusing puzzles. I also appeared there as one of them. In one of the closets, there were bottles of wine from different places. And packets of chocolate, their brands completely unknown to me. There were also pennants and emblems from San Lorenzo de Almagro, the soccer team for which Viggo is a fanatic supporter. That room breathed the taste of your own home. The home we always long for.

Diary of The Road's Shooting
By Javier Aguirresarobe - translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio, Sage and Zooey Esquire (Spain)
January 2010

Quotable Viggo: 2 April 2016

It's a bit of a bumper collection this week! When I did the recent Quotable of my favourite pithy reviews, I also started pulling out a bunch of quotes centred around the physicality of Viggo's performances. He clearly has most critics mesmerised and his charismatic physical presence makes some reviewers wax almost poetic. It's a combination of beauty, flexibility, ambiguity and the ability to balance the two forces of vulnerability and power that gives him enough onscreen magnetism to destroy all those credit cards.



© Focus Features.


Viggo Mortensen has one of the most incredible faces in the world, striking and amazingly versatile. His rough-hewn, chiseled visage allows him to inhabit any character he wants to, regardless of background or ethnicity, and we buy into it unconditionally.

Through physical appearance alone, Mortensen can be both "Lord of the Rings'" rugged warrior and noble king and "Hidalgo's" half-Lakota cowboy. He was even entirely convincing as an everyman with a shady past in "A History of Violence".

Andrew Smith
Charleston Gazette
29 Sept 2007




Viggo Mortensen, however, is that rare American actor who is both muscular and humane, tough and sensitive, fighter and lover. He seduces us with a threat of danger, his chiseled Nordic physique and stunning blue eyes.

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Road
By Anne Thompson
Indie Wire
13 September 2009




As he progresses through this limbo-like landscape we watch him gradually transforming, Mortenson's weathered features becoming akin to the rocks surrounding him.

Jauja
David James
wegotthiscovered.com
6 April 2015




The warm candle light extending rapid strokes of red and orange in the dark, as in a painting by Georges de La Tour, outlining Daru´s (Viggo Mortensen) chiselled and beautiful profile...

Loin des Hommes
Alessia Pelonzi
Bad Taste – translated by Ollie
30 August 2014




Watching Viggo Mortensen positioning himself in grand style in the preparation for the climactic shootout offers visual pleasure as well as reaffirmation of a code of honor that may be too mythical but helps maintain the tradition of the Westerner as a gentleman guided by strong inner conscience and sense of self.

Appaloosa
Emmanuel Levy
Emmanuellevy.com
7 September 2008




Mr. Mortensen gives [The Man] a gaunt grandeur—it doesn't hurt that the actor's face can evoke paintings of Christ without a muscle being moved—and an emotional spectrum that is muted but remarkably wide, considering the character's plight and the author's spare style.

The Road
Joe Morgenstern
Wall Street Journal
26 November 2009




Mortensen, bearded, smudged, greasy-haired, has a primal, haggard beauty.

The Road
David Edelstein
New York Magazine
15 November 2009




His still eyes and body language is so captivating that his performances look as beautiful as the landscapes.

Loin des Hommes
Nafees Ahmed
High on Films
17 September 2015




Viggo Mortensen is just amazing as Nikolai. He's the ideal Cronenberg anti-hero: gentle and macho at the same time, as charismatic as Steve McQueen and as beautiful as a saint in a master painting. When Nikolai gets his star tattoos—the Russian equivalent of being "made"—Mortensen sprawls nude on a red banquette, lit from above like a Caravaggio martyr.

Eastern Promises
Dana Stevens
Slate.com
13 Sept 2007




... with his extraordinary looks (those cheekbones could have been cut by a jeweler) and athlete's physique, he all but demands the camera's attention.

Eastern Promises
Christopher Orr
TNR Online
15 Sept 2007




Mr. Mortensen's physical presence dominates any frame in which he appears by virtue of his mesomorph solidity. His Nikolai represents the sort of idealized Russian alpha male who might have just stepped from the stone perch of a patriotic sculpture; indeed, by all appearances a punch to Nikolai's stony jaw would result in naught but broken knuckles. As icing on the beefcake, Viggo can act…

Eastern Promises
John P, Meyer
Pegasus News
15 Sept 2007




There are some actors who work with the gesture: the fold of Robert Mitchum's eyes while he takes the last drag off a cigarette; Bogart's voice and the tic of his hand lightly touching his ear lobe to accompany a thought... Viggo Mortensen, on the other hand, can be completely expressive just by walking.

Alatriste
By Susana Fortes - translated by Xabo
El País
21 September 2006




The sharpest scenes are those where Mortensen turns into a stranger in front of his wife, Edie (Maria Bello), a sexy lawyer whose loyalty gradually crumbles into hysteria as her husband hardens like cement before her eyes. Even his vocabulary and accent change.

A History of Violence
James Christopher
The Times (UK)
29 September 2005




Appearances are deceptive, indeed. What's more, Mortensen skillfully injects that deception into his chameleon performance. His features themselves seem to evolve, soft at first and then growing hard, progressing (regressing) from cherubic choirboy to flinty-eyed thug and back again.

A History of Violence
Rick Groen
The Globe and Mail
23 September 2005




...Mortensen's the kind of actor-turned-star who allows himself to be shot in shadow and mottle and shade, a palette of light that often obscures his features as much as illuminates them.... Mortensen's an actor I'm content just to watch: Those riven cheeks, taut against blade-sharp cheekbones, features that gift golden hour. He quietly inhabits the role of Frank Hopkins....

Hidalgo
Ray Pride
Movie City News
4 March 2004




Perched on a post like a big, black-plumaged bird of prey, beautiful Viggo Mortensen is a long-haired, soft-voiced, doe-eyed seducer.

Sympathy for the Devil
Kathleen Murphy
MSN Movies
MSN.com 18 April 2005




Deploying that unsettling stare and those bacon-slicer cheekbones for the first time, he creates a memorably feral, seductive and unpredictable lost soul with a capacity to switch from charm to menace in an instant that brings to mind a young Kirk Douglas.

The Indian Runner (1991) Film Review
By Jeff Robson
Eye for Film
14 September 2011




His features were as clean and untrammelled as a new field of wheat and his eyes were so wide apart you could have driven an Amish buggy between them.

Witness
Man Power
By Katherine Mitchell
Movieline
September 2002




I spent the duller sections thinking about how flaxen-haired Legolas looks like a Milky Bar hippy as he pings his egg-slicer-strong arrows at the barbarous monsters. I also drifted off looking at Viggo Mortensen: has a more virile, dynamic actor ever appeared on the silver screen?

The Two Towers
Sukhdev Sandhu
The Daily Telegraph
December 18, 2002

Quotable Viggo: 19 March 2016

The latest snippet from Total Film revealing that Viggo brought his own canoe along for Captain Fantastic brings a whole new meaning to the phrase 'paddling your own canoe'. Not only do we get Viggo in each movie, we also get a substantial part of the contents of his house as well, along with collected bits and pieces from his preparation period. Who needs a props department when Viggo can bring 'the kitchen sink'?



Image Larry Horricks.
© Good Films.



''I like to offer up things of my own that might be appropriate.

''Many of the books you see on the bus and in our home are books I brought.

''There's also my canoe, things from the kitchen, knives, and clothes. I brought a lot of plants from the garden.''

Viggo Mortensen
Family Values
Total Film
May 2016




'I tend to bring things to films. I find things that are useful for a movie and I usually end up getting along well with the prop man, or the designer. In this film, for example, there are the books that Chester finds in the market... I brought those books.'

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014




"The Danes were involved in two wars in the 1800s: in 1848 and 1864. For my role, I found a uniform from this 1848 war, as well as a sabre from this war, and a double-medal for a man who served in both wars. This medal was very important. Most of the people back then were farmers, but they would be out with the pigs, with their medals, that is how important these medals were."

Viggo Mortensen - Jauja
A Conversation with Viggo Mortensen at Cannes
Karin Luisa
Huffington Post
21 May 2014




He gets off the plane, rents a car, turns up and starts to decorate his trailer. This time he brought some of the things from that Viennese world that Freud inhabited. And he wrote those letters you see in the film, painstakingly, like Freud did.

"That's his process. These things add texture to his characters.

Michael Fassbender – A Dangerous Method
Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




"He's a very cerebral man. He turned up with these beautiful old antique books from the time, like Baudelaire, and things that his character would have had. He had a bag of goodies that he brought with him and a hat, a tie and a shoulder holster. I thought, 'this guy is f**king cool.' I was quite intimidated."

Sam Riley – On The Road
Sullivan on Cinema: Sam Riley
By Chris Sullivan
Redbull.com
9 June 2011




I brought [from Germany and Poland] a lot of books, editions that would have been from that time. Poets from the 18th and 19th centuries, and Scandinavian writers. And my glasses; I found some frames that were made back then. My pocket watch. Little things. I like collaborating with the props and set designers, to feel like I'm involved in the character's life.

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen - Good
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008




During the film shoot, Mortensen had with him artefacts that he had brought back from Russia - including worry beads made in prison from melted-down plastic cigarette lighters. He decorated his trailer with copies of Russian icons and created an atmosphere that was conducive to maintaining his character.

Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007



Mortensen's commitment translated to a collection of artifacts he purchased in the Midwest on his travels, which included ducks and a bank in the shape of a fish head that says 'fishin' money' on it and is set on the diner's cash register, posters of Birds of North America, some landscapes, a small ceramic eagle and other animal sculptures for his daughter's room which he thought Tom's character would have in his home."

"Viggo has been very active in helping to create the surroundings that his character will emerge from. That is unique," says Cronenberg.

A History of Violence
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




"It's amazing what he brought to that role," Fusco says. "I remember I was in my hotel room in Santa Fe, and there's this knock on the door pretty late at night. I open it, and there was Viggo holding a rifle. He said, 'I got some ideas about the scope my character would have on his rifle. Do you have a minute?' He came in, and he sat down dead serious and showed me this conversion he'd done to an historically accurate scope. He said, 'With all the copper mining in these parts, I think it would be copper.' I remember thinking, 'Wow, this guy is serious. He's really got it.'"

John Fusco – Young Guns 11
Mandi Bierly
Entertainment Weekly
6 August 2010




"He was dazzlingly committed all the time. He literally brings the kitchen sink for a character," says Penn, who delighted in seeing Mortensen arrive on set each day with a "Santa Claus sack" full of various props he'd chosen. "He's an often solitary, very poetic creature, Viggo, and all of that worked [for the movie]."

The Indian Runner
History Teacher by Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
August 19, 2005




'...was I who suggested to Ridley Scott the use of a poem by D.H. Lawrence for the introduction scene in "GI Jane'. This reference gave my military character another dimension. It made him a lot more original, it was also my way of making him less misogynist! And the book which I give to Demi Moore, in which there is that poem, it was mine, all battered, really old ...'

Viggo Mortensen – GI Jane
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




'I played a painter and I needed to have all of this artwork around me, so I asked if I could do some paintings myself. I just went crazy. I couldn't sleep. I did about 45 paintings in two weeks.'

Viggo Mortensen - A Perfect Murder
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
by Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
1998




"...there's also some other personal belongings in [A Perfect Murder] because my movies are a kind of photo album for me. When I look at them some years from now, they'll reflect my feelings and where I was at that time. The pants I wear are some I found in Denmark. Other belongings are some things I got from my aunt in Jystrup. They're just some small things which make me feel at home and more relaxed."

Viggo Mortensen – A Perfect Murder
Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998

Quotable Viggo: 13 March 2016

Whenever I go through all the film reviews I've collected there are always some I just have to stop and read again because I enjoy them so much. Pithy, witty or just spot on, they are all favourites. Some make regular appearances in Quotables because I just can't resist them, and some are a bit less familiar but no less fun.



© Haddock Films.


If you, for some reason, want to watch Viggo Mortensen watching Viggo Mortensen take a bath, then, my friend, your luck is in...

Everybody has a Plan
Stefan Pape
Heyuguys.co.uk
28 May 2013




When the world goes boom, I want Viggo Mortensen to be my dad.

The Road
Marshall Fine
Huffington Post
24 November 2009




Viggo Mortensen surely wasn't just cast because he's a great actor; it's because no one can rock a 1960s cream linen suit quite like him.

Two Faces of January
Leigh Singer
IGN.com
19 May 2014




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

A Dangerous Method
Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




He's a master of minimalism – what most actors need a monologue to express, Mortensen can convey in one wordless close-up, from behind sunglasses. But a long, naked fight sequence? You've got to admire his balls. And now you can.

Eastern Promises
Ryan Gilbey
New Statesman
18 October 2007




...what Walker does to her under a waterfall should be bottled.

A Walk on The Moon
Ruthe Stein
San Francisco Chronicle
Friday, April 2, 1999




Viggo Mortensen, priceless in Old Bull Lee / William Burroughs, highly intelligent and completely smoky.

On the Road
Norbert Creutz
Le Temps
26 May 2012




Just seeing him stand there, his face half-obscured by a tattered black hat, his sculpted frame offset by a long cloak worn over the shoulders — it's no wonder Maria looks as though she's ready for cardiac arrest every time he appears.

Alatriste
Kaori Shoji
Japan Times
11 December 2008




...Viggo Mortensen plays a small-town American paterfamilias, equal parts Marlboro Man and Terminator...

A History of Violence
Manohla Dargis
New York Times
11 Sept 2005




...if there is in recent cinema a more convincing scene of psychological torture than the moment when Mortensen rages against a teeny-weeny Patricia Arquette, spattering her with mouthfuls of food, I'd really rather not see it, thank you.

The Indian Runner
On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007




…as weathered and craggily handsome as any butte in Monument Valley.

Appaloosa
Richard Corliss on Mortensen, Harris and
Time
19 September 2008




Mortensen plays the devil with a malicious glee that can only be seen in psych wards.

The Prophecy
Colin Briggs
Gotcha Movies
4 July 2013




When it comes to playing disillusioned veterans of anti-Indian atrocities, it's Viggo Mortensen over Tom Cruise by a nose.

Hidalgo
Steve Schneider
Orlando Weekly




"Jauja" is also thrillingly beautiful, and graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing horse manure.

Jauja
Farran Smith Nehme
New York Post
18 March 2015




Viggo Mortensen, in a small role, manages to steal a scene from Pacino without ever getting out of his chair.

Carlito's Way
Ken Dubois Ultimate Edition DVD Review
Reel.com
October 2005




Brooding, intense, and handy with a blade, Mortensen is the film's greatest strength - Han Solo to Wood's Luke Skywalker.

The Fellowship of the Ring
Nev Pierce
11 December 2001
BBC.co.uk




Viggo is noble, Viggo is powerful, Viggo is resplendent.

Return of the King
Film Hobbit
Cinemablend.com
16 December 3003

Quotable Viggo: 27 February 2016

You may find it hard to believe, but it's been just over four years since Viggo braved the stage at El Matadero in Madrid for Dorfman's Purgatorio. In theatre there is nowhere to hide. There is no second take, the audience is just a few feet away eyeballing you and if you forget your words you just have to keep going until you pick them up again. It's an challenging experience Viggo that enjoyed very much and one I hope he'll return to one day.



Rehearsals - October 2011
Image Andrés de Gabriel.
© Teatro Español.



What brought you to theatre? "Fear. I've done theatre because it frightens me. I'm attracted to everything that frightens me. It's not like in film, where you do a take and then you can do another and another. Theatre is just one live take that lasts an hour and 40 minutes, depending on the performance. It's a new adventure every night. If you get off track, you have to see how to get back."

Viggo Mortensen: "I'm attracted to what scares me"
By Roció García - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
24 November 2011




"Any mistake you make is live, and it can go off the rails," he said. "Also, in the script, there's a lot of repetition and a lot of strange things about time."

Viggo Mortensen interview
By Chris Brock
Watertown Daily Times
20 November 2011




"I learned more about acting and thinking on your feet in that play than in my last ten or fifteen years in filming," he says, seriously... I really loved it, loved the connection with the audience."

Viggo's round-table at the Freud Museum
by Lucy Wiles
Felix Films
10 February 2012




"[Dorfman] sent me a version of the play. It's a play that has been evolving. It was performed in a theater workshop, I think in Seattle, in the northwestern United States, for the first time and it's been attempted several times. Ariel says, more or less in jest, that it's a cursed play, that every time he tries to put it on in a, shall we say, legitimate theater, it doesn't work. Someone gets sick, something happens, somebody leaves, and there's been a long journey for us, too, before arriving here."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




Do you approach a character for the theatre in the same way you would if you were acting in a film?

Yes, always with a certain fear and preparing myself the best I can, paying a lot of attention. I don't think there's so much difference between good acting in film and good acting in theatre. In general, depending on the size of the hall, it's true that in theatre you have to take into account adequate voice projection, but, ultimately, what matters is whether the spectator believes what the actor is doing or not.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




Sometimes, during rehearsals, I have thought that I've been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge, but then the doubt, the insecurity go away and I keep enjoying what I´m learning from my colleague Carme Elías, and from our director, Josep María Mestres. Ariel Dorfman´s script is demanding, but it´s full of little gifts that keep coming to you to the extent that you are deciphering the text and physically absorbing it.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




"…this script is complicated because it's not how people speak. I think that it's just as complicated to seem natural, conversational in a script by Lope de Vega, by Shakespeare. It's complicated! And when you find it, you find the humour in a phrase or in the circumstances, in the moment...Then, yes. Then it begins to be more fun and you begin to understand. During rehearsals, even in some performances, there are moments in which we say, "Ah, that phrase also means this or it could..." Or, last night, we had quite a laugh there. Also, it's also possible...Or, at times, you cry at one point and during another performance, you don't. I don't know, because the thing is alive."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




"I find peace in Viggo´s eyes. Confronted with the giddiness of the text, you can take risks with him, walk the tightrope."

Carme Elías
Viggo Mortensen And Forgiveness
By Ulises Fuente - translated by Ollie and Rio
La Razón
1 November 2011




I put the script here, although I already know the text. I always have the script backstage. I have this owl with the bracelet in San Lorenzo colors; I touch the two eyes of the owl every night before I go on. I have a photo of San Lorenzo's first championship team in 1923, Father Lorenzo Massa, the Silesian who founded San Lorenzo, I have chocolate. I'm always eating...

Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




Yesterday we were at the Matadero watching Purgatorio, Ariel Dorfman's play starring Viggo Mortensen and Carme Elías. We enjoyed it very much. The two actors, towering, in my opinion, remained onstage, alone, without intermissions and with no company or props but a bed, a table and two chairs, for an hour and three quarters. It seems a luxury to me to be able to see a star like Mortensen onstage in Madrid, speaking Spanish (with an Argentinian accent; something that surprised some people, but not me, having already listened to many of his interviews in Spain)....

It seems incredible to me that the guy I had seen the day before in Freud´s skin in Cronenberg´s flick was the same actor we had less than a metre away (we were in the first row, facing the stage). He looked like another, completely different person. With another voice, other features, other movements...If this is not a huge actor, I don´t know who could be.

Purgatorio Review
By José Angel Barrueco - translated by Ollie and Rio
Globedia
28 November 2011




Viggo Mortensen is a better stage than film actor. And not because that medium is bad, but because the nearness of the spectator and the live performance allow one to appreciate more intensely the entire panoply of gestures and intonations that accompany his acting. From the sober, tough, unpleasant, and relentless interrogator of the first act, he transforms himself into the frightened, eager to please, somewhat conceited and competitive man he is in the second, when the roles change and he turns into the victim of a tyrant, also played to perfection by Carme Elías, who is at times playful and affectionate, other times inflexible and insensitive.

An Interpretive Reading
By María Martín - translated by Ollie and Rio
Diario Abierto
14 November 2011




...Viggo Mortensen is unsurpassable in humanity, contained pain and buried passion.

You and I make four
By Marcos Ordóñez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
7 November 2011




'[It's] been a tough but rewarding challenge after more than 20 years not doing a play. Tough subject, difficult script to memorize and present.'

Viggo Mortensen on Purgatorio
Viggo Mortensen Talks Working With Kristen Stewart in On the Road
by Allie Merriam
Buzz Sugar
29 November 2011


Quotable Viggo: 21 February 2016

One of Viggo's favourite films, and one which had a huge influence on him as a young man, is Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc. It is, of course, a silent film and it is carried on the shoulders of the great Maria Falconetti who could speak volumes with the smallest gesture or change of expression. Sound familiar? Viggo has always been lauded by critics for the same ability to speak without speaking. of course his films contain dialogue, but often his characters don't say that much. His ability to rivet critics attention while saying very little started early, famously even playing a mute role in The Passion of Darkly Noon where he didn't even speak on set. I'm always amused by the contrast between the strong, silent roles he often takes and the fact that in interviews it's pretty hard to get him to stop talking.



© New Line Productions Inc.


Mortensen is a voluble man, off-screen — he frequently responds to questions with dense, uninterruptible monologues — but as an actor, he is usually allotted taciturn, still-rivers-run-deep roles.

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




Although he has no dialogue throughout as Clay is a mute, his silent actions are evidence that this actor is not one who doesn't need lines to act the role of his career. To a lesser-talented actor, this restriction might have resulted in a poor performance but does not.

"The Passion of Darkly Noon" Review
By Russell Hill
WILDsound




Even though Mortensen is the lead he really doesn't say too much but his character just has this strong silent presence and he takes care of business.

Prison
Alienbee.net Blu-ray review
13 February 2013




"When I saw some of Viggo's work, I thought, that's always who I've had in my head. I realized there is not one other actor anywhere who could play Viggo's part other than Viggo. He has this kind of complexity and mysteriousness to him. He doesn't have to say much and you get a lot."

Tony Goldwyn, Director of A Walk on the Moon
Actor Goldwyn side-stepped cliches for summer of '69 directorial debut
By Robin Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire, splicedonline.com
February 24, 1999




…..keep your eyes on Mortensen. You could make an entire movie about the way that guy just stands in a room and quietly scans the atmosphere for even the slightest molecular disturbance.

Come to think of it, Eastern Promises may be that movie.

By Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
6 Sept 2007




Mortensen is a glowering marvel, locating a great range of expression in impassivity, his stone face prone to compelling split-second fissures.

Indelible Ink
By Adam Nayman
Eye Weekly
30 Aug 2007




He's not an actor who's usually given great lines of dialogue, but you see him, for example, in the final scene of History of Violence, David Cronenberg's film, and you realize how incredible his work is, the things you can read in his face.'

Lisandro Alonso
"It´s a mixture of spaces, times and languages."
By Diego Brodersen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Pagina 12




The scene which confirms the truth is a masterclass in understatement - it's a shot rather than a scene, the merest flicker on Mortensen's face, but you couldn't say it wasn't dynamite. The actor nailed it on his first stab; Cronenberg knew instantly that there was no need for take two.

A History of Violence
On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007




A single close-up upon realization of his daughter's disappearance and the quest it will entail becomes a tender conduit, a portraiture of a historical human that is unspeakably, indefinably beautiful. And from there he plunges away from his tent-and-soldier edge of civilization into a beyond that is only the older world.

Daniel Kasman – Jauja review
Mubi.com
21 May 2014



Mortensen's power comes directly from his eyes. They speak much more than any line he delivers in the film and offer an astounding glimpse into the psyche of his character.

Christopher Childs - A History of Violence
Twitchfilm.net
May 31, 2005




In Viggo Mortensen, Hillcoat is working with one of the current cinema's great quiet everymen, and if anyone can make the novel's stolid, unnamed hero empathic and emotionally alive on screen whilst remaining loyal to the novel's aesthetic minimalism, it's this immensely physical, restrained performer
Kris Tapley – The Road
InContention.com
August 2009



Mortensen's performance is a thing of wonder; he is an actor whose instrument is more finely tuned with each new venture. Using his entire body to signal pain, but particularly wielding his glassy eyes like sharp little weapons, the actor captures a cagey, yet hopeful spirit, a good man in a worst case scenario trying to do what he can to get by. Not unlike the greatest leading men in classic Hollywood westerns, Mortensen is stoic, brimming with quiet fury.

Hitting 'The Road' with Director John Hillcoat
Matt Mazur
Popmatters
22 November 2009





Anyone familiar with Mortensen's career will know that he tends not to be a big talker. Instead, he makes his presence felt on screen by way of a steely, periodically murderous intensity. In the flesh, he's not short of intensity either. His pale blue eyes stare at you unblinking, while at the same time a deep vertical groove runs down his forehead.

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




Few actors can do stillness on screen with as much conviction as Viggo Mortensen. That chiselled face, turned towards a landscape or held in concentration as someone else speaks, can stand in for any amount of narrative exposition: look at any of Mortensen's characters and you know, without having to be told about it, that man's had a hell of a past... Quiet as he is, he commands the screen.

Far From Men: Viggo Mortensen saddles up in Albert Camus' short story
by Stephanie Bunbury
Sydney Morning Herald
23 July 2015




...from the first scenes of Viggo Mortensen, playing a teacher running a school and teaching local kids to read and write in 1954, you realize that he packs all the qualities of the archetypal strong and silent man as he has been constructed in the mythology of classic American westerns.

Flix
2 September 2014




Everett says very little and spends a lot of time just watching the other characters, so Mortensen's performance resides almost entirely in his eyes, which register tiny, unmistakable nuances of surprise, suspicion and amusement.

These are what make the movie worth watching

A O Scott - Appaloosa
International Herald Tribune
18 September 2008




"I can talk on film," he quipped on the red carpet, poking fun at the many roles in which he is a man of few words.

Viggo accepting his Genie Award
Viggo Mortensen wins
CBC.ca
8 March 2012

Quotable Viggo: 6 February 2016

We've been hearing a lot about fatherhood lately. As well as being the father to a large family in Captain Fantastic, Viggo has been in several films with a strong theme of fathers trying to do right by their children: Dinesen looking for his daughter, Tom Stall and his two children, the Man and his son in The Road. Fatherhood is also a strong theme in Alatriste, where the Captain is trying to do his best for his ward, Inigo. Even Freud in A Dangerous Method has a paternal relationship with Jung. But – of course – Viggo is a real dad with a real son...



© New Line Productions Inc.


Does your son think you're cool?


I wouldn't say so. I think, being a teenager, he has a healthy amount of -- I don't know if disrespect is the word. But he thinks I'm kind of a goofball a lot of the time. He doesn't buy the Aragorn or Frank Hopkins image. He knows I'm his dad.

Viggo on locusts, life and kissing Liv Tyler
By Molly Woulfe
Northwest Indiana Times thetimesonline.com
3 August 2004



'I am a dad and there is no such thing as a perfect father and mother and this character is doing the best he can.'

'Captain Fantastic' explores fatherhood, family and man vs. society
Larry D Curtis
KUTV
25 January 2016




The real pull [of The Road], however, was the theme of fatherhood. Mortensen cracks with pride if you ask about Henry, his 21-year-old son by Exene Cervenka, singer with the influential punk band X. Their marriage ended after 11 years but the couple remain on amicable terms, and Henry is the apple of his eye. They share a "pals" relationship, writing poetry, jamming together, and taking cross-country drives
across America.

The Road
Interview - Viggo Mortensen, Actor
By Siobhan Synnot
The Scotsman
28 December 2009




'The H [tattoo] stands for Henry - my son. I got it tattooed to feel his presence when we are separated. It's more practical than constantly holding a photo in your hand.'

The Outsider
By Roland Huschke - translated by Sally
Neon
January 2008




SKIP: You are a profound connoisseur of the writings of both Freud and Jung and occupied yourself in depth with their theories. Both worked on the psychology of children - did they form any influence on the way you brought up your son (Henry Blake, born 1988?

Viggo Mortensen:
If ever I learned something from Freud and Jung, it's the fact that you cannot form a human being, but only guide him. You can aid him in being aware of himself, but never change him basically. With Henry, it was important for me from the beginning to show him asmuch of the world as possible and let him take his own decisions. He always was a very bright boy, he reads a lot and watchesall kinds of films.

Couch Hero
By Kurt Zechner - translated by Athelin
SKIP
September 2011




"I have never met a child so well adapted as he is. He is taller and physically stronger than me, and he is a very calm and rational person. I often wonder how he can be so calm. He is very social and he has much more self-confidence than I had at his age. He is pretty remarkable."

Sophisticated and Talented Hollywood Eccentric
By Tina Joehnk Christensen - translated by Rosen and Estel
SKØN
January 2007




Are you a hands-on dad?

I've always been a hands-on dad. I thought about my son quite a bit while making the [The Road] and the transition that he made into pre-adolescence. My son reminds me of Kodi a lot. He's also wise beyond his years. In this movie, you see the kid calling on his dad for strength, but the dad can't always be strong and have all the answers. I guess that's universal. Any parent that has a relatively consistent relationship with their kids, no matter how good it is, reaches a point in pre-adolescence where they suddenly look at their dad or their mom and realize they're not everything.

Mortensen Ponders Fatherhood And The End Of The World
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun-Times
22 November 2009




A poet and musician himself who attends school in New York City, Henry has traveled extensively with his dad, joined him for live readings, and played with him on his albums. On a coast-to-coast road trip when Henry was 11, Mortensen says, his son made a homemade map ahead of time to chart their itinerary, a map Mortensen has kept. "Instead of a little under 3,000 miles, it looked like it was going to be 16,000 or so, a kind of insane cardiogram, you know?" he laughs. "It took us the time it took us."

A History Of Defiance
By Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




'We know very well that the experience of fatherhood is always unique, bringing up a son is a real adventure. What really counts is the example we give to our children, our behaviour, especially when we are tired or stressed.'

Captain Alatriste: betrayed by life, by his woman and his king
By Chiara Ugolini - translated by Cindalea
TrovaCinema
16 October 2006




David Cronenberg: As far as I know your son advised you to take this role [Aragorn] because he knows the books by Tolkien, and he was present during the shooting. And I still haven't met him. Or do you fear I could have a bad influence on him?

Viggo Mortensen: That's it. When I think about it then it's really the first movie where Henry didn't visit me on set, not even for a short time. In some of my other movies Henry appears somewhere in the background.

Two-Men Show
By Silvia Feist - translated by Always Smiling and Doreen
Vogue Deutsch
November 2005




Part of Henry's reward was joining the cast. He has played a villainous orc, a heroic Gondorian and a young soldier of Rohan in some of the battle sequences.

Asked if his teenage son is impressed to have Aragorn for a dad, the actor wrinkles his face.

"Ehhh ... he has a healthy amount of disrespect for me and every other adult," he said. "That comes with being that age. If it was otherwise I would think there is something wrong with him."

Mellow Warrior
By Anthony Breznican
South Coast Today
15 December 2003




You've played many different, complicated roles, but how do you see yourself in that of being a father? What does fatherhood mean to you?

A more important role than all of those I've done in films.

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
20 Minutos
6 September 2012




How long would he like to live?


"Forever." Without hesitation.

Really? Wouldn't you get bored?

"There's no excuse to be bored," Mortensen says. "Sad, yes. Angry, yes. Depressed, yes. Crazy, yes. But there is no excuse for boredom, ever."

A pause. "Of course. Henry says, 'Yeah, well, Dad, if you were in my science class you'd know what it is to be bored.' I guess that's something a little different."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




What's the most special thing about being a father?


Viggo: Everything.

Henry:
What's special about my dad is...everything.

Pop Stars
InStyle
June 2001

Quotable Viggo: 30 January 2016

After what seems – for us - to have been an almost endless wait, Captain Fantastic has premiered at the Sundance Film Festival to mainly positive and, in some cases, extremely enthusiastic reviews. Viggo's performance has been highly praised. Indeed, he seems to have been perfectly cast as the dad who goes that one step further in extreme off-the-grid parenting. Here is a round-up of the best of them for those of you who might have missed things in all the flurry of excitement.



© Bleecker Street.


Viggo Mortensen gets the role he may well have been born to play, not as a superhero, but as a super-dad determined to raise his kids on his own terms.... The inspired choice of casting Mortensen — a natural Papa Bear, who taps into both his physical strength and spiritual gentleness — shows through best when interacting with the kids, though the actor also shines when forced to defend his choices to others.

Peter Debruge
Variety
23 January 2016




This is the film I've been waiting for. And I don't just mean it's the film I was waiting for at Sundance, but perhaps this is the film I was waiting to come across in my life. Matt Ross' Captain Fantastic is one of the most inspiring, invigorating, and intelligent films I've ever seen at Sundance.... Every last scene and every moment is handled with care. It's often overtly hilarious because Mortensen speaks so honestly, he always tells his kids the real answers to their questions, never filtering anything. It made me smile more and more every time it happened.

Alex Billington
Firstshowing.net
23 January 2016




From the first frame Mortensen completely owns the role of poet meets MacGyver, his movie star face a bit softer and grizzlier.

Matt Donnelly
The Wrap
23 January 2016




The movie really belongs to Mortensen, who allows Ben to be exasperating, arrogant and impatient but also warm, loving and caring. He's a tough but adoring father, a grieving widower and an angry defender of his wife's final wishes, and Mortensen plays all these notes and more with subtlety and grace.

Alonso Duralde
The Wrap
24 January 2016




Captain Fantastic is charmingly eccentric and sweet and funny — and Mortensen is terrific (no huge surprise there).

Chris Nashawaty
Entertainment Weekly
24 January 2016




A common trope at Sundance is the star-led indie, painted top-to-toe with eccentricities that are meant to represent/replace both story and character development. Relatively straightforward narratives that stand out thanks to shock-and-awe details that usually fade not too long after the well-regarded premiere.

Captain Fantastic, written and directed by Matt Ross (28 Hotel Rooms), threatens to reinforce the expectation, before rising above and standing on its own. Much of the credit goes to Viggo Mortensen, who remains a singularly dominant on-screen presence, in a role here that feels deigned by the movie gods.

Dan Mecca
The Film Stage
24 January 2016




And then there's Mortensen whose warmth makes Ben one of the most admirable movie dads, a strong leader with a loving and playful heart. Just as Ben provides the foundation for his kids to thrive on, Mortensen brings the film from good to excellent. Captain Fantastic should be remembered as one of the best films to come out of Sundance, and, if it has a life beyond the festival, maybe one of the best of the year.

Erin Whitney
Screen Crush
25 January 2016




The lead role fits Mortensen like a glove, and he's surrounded by a very capable supporting cast... Mortensen's own renaissance man characteristics segue seamlessly into Ben's intellectual idealism. He crafts every beat of this character seemingly without even trying; his may be the most seemingly-effortless performance at Sundance this year.

Russ Fischer
The Playlist
25 January 2016




Viggo is ideally cast. He's always seemed like a man from another time, and it feels like a role only he could have played. Probably the reason for this is that he's just so sincere. Mortensen always seems like a man with good intentions, and his love for his children is never anything less than convincing. He also shows a bit of levity here for the first time in a while, with amusing scenes where he tries to give his eight-year-old the "birds and the bees" talk or fakes being a Christian home-schooler to avoid the cops. He's absolutely likable, even if for much of the film I thought the character was insane.

Chris Bumbray
Jo Blo
26 January 2016




Ben, initially viewed as wise and calm, eventually shows another side that, from the right angle, looks selfish and self-serving. He's not perfect - but he is fascinatingly real. Mortensen, with his beard looking like a coloring experiment at a barber college, gives a wonderfully controlled and witty performance, supported by George MacKay (who will be seen in "11.22.63") and the ever-reliable Hahn and Zahn. It's a funny film with heart that will have you in tears and leave you thinking.

Marshall Fine
Huffington Post
26 January 2016




As the only guiding force in these kids' lives, Mortensen's role is the most important in the film. He's totally believable as a man who's set his own moral code and lived by it for years. As he realises that he stands to lose his children to the outside world, Mortensen's performance shifts up a gear, becoming more sensitive and moving.

Ed Frankl
Little White Lies
28 January 2016




Viggo Mortensen is perfectly cast as Ben, a man who truly believes he's giving his children a better life by abstaining from the disease of society, but who still loves his children very dearly..."Captain Fantastic" is all heart and is strengthened by Mortensen's performance. It's a new take on the idea of family, but one that is a fresh look on a different version of it.

Mae Abdulbaki
movieswithmae.com
28 January 2016




Funny and vivacious, the movie is an ode to triumphing over the weight of the world, whether that means evading it or embracing it. Ross' biggest accomplishment is crafting a script that doesn't feel like a hodgepodge of tree-hugging tropes -- in fact, by the end, it's the opposite. There's wisdom to glean in Ben's philosophizing, which can be purposefully grating at times, and there's wisdom to glean in everything he gets wrong about the ills of a systemized society, even if it means "the powerful control the lives of the powerless." "Captain Fantastic" is about a guy figuring out how to care for his children, and how to course-correct when he realizes he hasn't gotten everything right.

Matthew Jacobs
Huffington Post
25 January 2016




Ross has given Captain Fantastic a really gorgeous look, with terrific location photography and a real ethereal vibe at times that makes this feel reminiscent of Into the Wild, where it closer to a family film. It's certainly a big-hearted, often beautiful family film that really belongs on the big screen and will hopefully pick up the kind of distributor that can make that happen.

Chris Bumbray
Jo Blo
26 January 2016




Mortensen is likely to attract the most attention for his performance, some are already calling for an Oscar nomination, but the film only works because the ensemble is fantastic. Not an easy task considering that the cast is dominated by young actors. Casting directors don't get their due, but clearly Ross had extraordinary help in finding the perfect mix of actors.

"Captain Fantastic" a special film, the kind I look forward to seeing again and again.

Ryan Painter
News3LV.com
27 January 2016

Quotable Viggo: 24 January 2016

A recent comment by Ignatiy Vishnevetsky in A.V Club described Viggo as 'incapable of coming across as vain' (first quote below). I immediately stored it away to create a Quotable around it as it's a recurring theme for those who have worked with Viggo over the years. He's one of the team, never demanding special treatment, never taking all the praise, never surrounded by a personal entourage. Never, never the Movie Star. That's our Viggo.



© Rafi Castillo.


...despite his behind-the-scenes involvement with Jauja (as producer, composer, and even subtitle proofreader), the movie doesn't come across as a Mortensen vanity project. Maybe that's because Mortensen, an actor with an amazing instinct for subtlety and believability, is incapable of coming across as vain.

In praise of Viggo Mortensen and the interdependent actor
A.V.Club
Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
13 January 2015




He never had Champagne dreams and caviar wishes…

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




...despite his movie-star reputation and looks, Mortensen remains a remarkably humble screen presence.

Far From Men review
Peter Debruge
Variety
30 August 2014




I'm sorry to have to break this to you, but Viggo Mortensen is not a movie star. A poet? Yes. Photographer? Yep. Guitarist? Sure. Author? Uh-huh. Painter? Yessir. Actor? Most definitely. But celebrity? No way.

Viggo Mortensen on 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




In contrast to the prancing egos on display at the TIFF, the undisputed hero this year has been charismatic, versatile and totally charming Viggo

What Has Happened to the Toronto Film Festival?
Rex Reed
The New York Observer
9 September 2008




The typical Hollywood leading man travels with an entourage between his palatial homes, five-star hotel suites and luxury trailers. He does not disappear alone for two weeks to meet the Russian mafia in the name of research.

Actor joins the underworld's shadowy cast
Ben Hoyle
The Times
October 17, 2007




'Viggo Mortensen was an absolute joy to work with. He slept on the roof of his trailer with his saddle and bedroll. We had to constantly keep him late and call for him early and he never complained. He came with no entourage and drove himself to location. When his stunt man fell off the horse and jammed his elbow, Viggo did the stunt himself, riding bareback at full speed.'

Joe Johnston
Joe Johnston Sketchbook
Oct 2014




What's it like working with Viggo Mortensen? Is there any competition about how far you can push each other?

Let me tell you something: it's impossible to have a competition with Viggo Mortensen because he's not on that vibe, you know? And neither am I. No, no, when you work with Viggo it's very warm. You get presents all the time and there is no competition on the set.

Vincent Cassel
By Robert Beames
Obsessed with Film
19 January 2011




"I've always sensed that I'd be insulting him a little bit if I called him a movie star," Johnston says. "If he chose to be a movie star, he could've done it a long time ago. . . . He's in control."

Joe Johnston
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post, 2004




Lord Of The Rings director Peter Jackson calls him 'no ego Viggo', and everyone who knows him says that a key part of his character is a complete absence of vanity. He certainly seems modest in person. Weirdly, for an actor, he mumbles and slurs his words, giving the impression of being very shy, very inarticulate or very stoned. Yet when I listen back to my tape, I'm amazed to notice that he almost always speaks in complete sentences, which places him in a very small minority of interviewees.

Lone Star
By Peter Ross
Sunday Herald, 2004




If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say can do better.

The Man Who Would Be King
By Nick Dent
December 2001
Black & White magazine, #58




"Viggo's … a real artist. He cares about what speaks to him. He doesn't care about how much he's paid, doesn't care where he lives, doesn't care how nice the hotel is. He's a horse."

Garret Dillahunt
Fred Topel
CraveOnline
20 March 2009




"...when we were shooting in Hungary, he said, 'I don't want my trailer to be bigger than the other actors'. He's a very special guy and that shows in the work. When you're on set, you feel like you're equals collaborating. That's often not the case with big stars."

Jason Issacs
Good premier, Toronto
7 September 2008




"I've always felt dependent on others, which I think is a good thing; I don't think it's a weakness, I think, really, my performance depends on other people all of the time. Not just the actors, well, mainly the actors but the crew [as well]"

Interview: Viggo Mortensen
By Todd Gilchrist
Cinematical
26 November 2009




'I don't care about being famous. I don't care about having my face on posters. It doesn't massage my ego. It's nice to have a poster, but in the end it's about the movie. Nobody walks around saying "The movie stunk, but the poster was awesome'.'

Viggo Mortensen while promoting Hidalgo
A Reluctant Star
By Barry Koltnow, Orange County Register
7 March 2004




"It's interesting, because Viggo is such a humble individual...We sort of viewed him as our king and as an inspiration, and I think that he certainly wouldn't see himself as that. There is quiet leadership to him, and it's not intentional, and I think it's simply because he takes care of the people around him."

Elijah Wood
The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




No matter how outstanding his work, or how successful his films, it's impossible to imagine Mortensen without that customary reticence that makes him such a fine actor and such a reluctant star. Long may he stay off the radar.

On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007

Quotable Viggo: 17 January 2016

This week's Quotable is about all creatures great and small, from bees to horses, from locusts to crows and even the odd giant rat. At least Viggo restricted himself to only keeping the horses...



© Touchstone / Buena Vista Pictures.


'Everything is connected. We are related to the animals and we are also in a way animals ourselves.'

Viggo on the sadanset exhibition
Kim Kastrup
Ekstra Bladet
16 October 2008




Mortensen's passion for horses is simple. "I just feel calm when I'm around them, just interacting with them. I think people have that relationship with dogs and cats and whatever. People can be afraid of horses and rightly so. They're big and can be dangerous. You have to be careful."

That serenity was a source of relief for Mortensen during the trilogy's epic 16 month shoot. Visiting the horses at the stable during his off days kept him invigorated. "When I would go out there, I'd be really tired. I'd be driving, it'd be an hour or something to the stables, and I would think 'I'd really like to stay in bed.' But by the time I got together with the horses and got the horse ready, got on the horse and went out riding, all the stress and the tiredness would just go away. By the time I was done riding and washing the horse and on my way back to town, it was almost like I'd taken some very pleasant drug. [I felt] just very calm and glad to be alive and noticing the trees and what not. And ready for the week."

Horses Bring Serenity To Viggo Mortensen
By Fred Topel
Horsecity
9 December 2003




'One bee buzzing close to your head is quite loud, but imagine thousands. Your world closes off and you become very focused on what you're doing, because you can't really hear what other people are saying.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




Viggo Mortensen didn't want to miss out on Election Day while filming his latest flick, "The History of Violence,'' in Canada so he staged a polling station on the set. People Maggie reports that the "Lord of the Rings" hottie rigged up a mock voting booth and producer Chris Burns used his dog, Rosie, to monitor the voters. Not surprisingly, cast and crew voted for John Kerry though the write-in candidate, Rosie the canine, made a strong showing in second place. Have these people never heard of absentee ballots?

Own Private Idaho
Boston Herald
5 November 2004



"I'm hoping to shoot a movie with an elephant soon, and I've no idea where I'm going to put him."

Viggo asked about buying horses from his films
Long Live the King
By Paul Byrne
Wow.ie
April 2004




'Did you see the crow I had tattooed?'" Viggo shows the little smile of someone who has an ace up his sleeve. "There is a Russian myth about the crow and it was good for the film if I had it tattooed. There is an old Russian poem, which is like a song, that says: 'I'm not ready, let the raven wait.' Or, 'I am not ready to die,'" clarified the actor, renamed "Guido Mortensen" by Bambino Veira.

Viggo talking about Eastern Promises
"I feel honored to be able to give a hand to poets"
By - translated by Zooey and Sage
Pagina 12
14 August 2009




Mortensen arrives at the Stephen Cohen Gallery caked in mud, having just been riding T.J., who plays the title role in Hidalgo ….and then washing him and giving him a conditioning treatment. "We don't do that all the time," Mortensen says. "He's not a pretty-boy horse."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Source: Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"He wanted to eat a real locust," Johnston says. "The locust he eats is made out of sugar. He said, 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' "

Joe Johnston on filming Hidalgo
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post
2004




Sitting casually, hanging out on the bench, seems ideal. But there is a problem. There are rats. Many of them. They are running back and forth between the bushes, over the footpath, and it is impossible to ignore them.

"Wow. They're bold," he says, incredulously. A couple of Brazilians pass by. "Hey - I could ask them who they played in the World Cup final."...

...Minutes later, he returns. "Yeah, in the final it was Brazil against Holland. I didn't really give a sh** but I was rooting against Brazil - I grew up in Argentina." But Brazil has never met Holland in a World Cup final: it was the semifinal in 1994. No matter, he's still impressed by the rats.

"Whoa! Did you see that one? That was a rat-a-roo. Is it a herd of rats, a flock of rats? Maybe it's a swarm."

Another one tumbles past. "That one has a bad back. He's old - that's sad." Having a conversation about anything else proves impossible. "I don't remember seeing that many rats here," he says. "They're twice as big as the rats in Los Angeles. That one was like a possum'.

The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
30 November 2003




"In the 60's, when I was between 7 and 9 years old, my father brought my brothers and I and our mother to that part of the country several times. Camping trips. At that time the roads were not as good as they are now... Our car had a serious breakdown and we waited several days in Puerto Madryn until our car could be fixed. The peninsula and its animal life were not yet protected. We swam very near seals, elephant seals. At that time, there were people who killed many of those magnificent creatures with rifles and shotguns. My father loved those animals and that place - so much that I remember he wrote several times, as others did, to people in the federal government to ask that the peninsula be designated a National Park. I don´t know whether his letters helped, but finally it was decided to suitably protect that special place.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's a shame that the government has cleared the way for open-pit mining."
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Noticias Net-Rio Negro
21 April 2013




VM: Rabbits sometimes run out in front of your car, right? Well, I hit this rabbit on this lonely road in the South Island and I wanted to make sure it was dead. If it wasn't, I'd put it out of its misery. And it was quite dead, so I thought, 'Well, why waste it?' And so I made a little fire and ate it.

Q: Is this something that you thought Aragorn would have done?

VM: As he was driving down the road and if he hit a rabbit? Yeah, he might. If he was hungry, I guess.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"Last week we were filming Hidalgo in High Plains, Montana, where there was no fence for miles; you could just imagine that it was 1890 or 1790," he says. "I was in the middle of a herd of six or seven hundred horses. I was really aware of the fact that very few people would ever get to be in such a place. Nobody in the world gets to be in the middle of that many horses, running as fast as you can." And where does that thought lead you to, I ask. He pauses. "Just, 'Don't forget this'."

The New Hollywood Male
by Charles Gant
Arena Hommes Plus #18
2001




"It's like working with any creature – horse, dog or bee. If you're calm you won't get kicked, bitten, or stung." Did he get stung? "No," he says with a small smile. "I was lucky. And I made my own honey. I've still got a couple of jars."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013

Quotable Viggo: 10 January 2016

Slightly overdue, but here is my annual round-up of my favourite quotes of 2015, a year which saw the slow roll-out of Jauja and Far from Men at Festivals and arthouses across the globe, the Magical Mystery Tour through Denmark and Viggo increasingly involved in promotion and production through Perceval Pictures. A busy year which had its ups and downs, but one which earned huge plaudits from critics.



[SIZE=1]© Bornholms Tidende/Go TV2.dk/Cinemateket/El Punt Avui/uniFrance.[/SIZE]


Cerebral, spiritual, sex symbol in spite of himself.

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)
2 February 2015




'It's the endlessly entertaining, often ridiculous, sometimes admirable, sometimes embarrassing attempts that some people make to find some meaning in their lives that make life worth living.'

What I've learned – Viggo Mortensen
By Kal Fussman
Esquire
22 April 2015




'When I'm awake, I dream of perfection. It's not about reaching it, I'm aware that it is not possible. My concern is to seek it, to try very hard to shoot the perfect movie, to have the perfect marriage, to paint the perfect painting – above all to know that it will never work out. What counts is the will, not the achievement of the goal.'

Viggo Mortensen
I Have A Dream
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by CoCo and Techadmin
Zeit magazine
23 July 2015



'In Denmark, I dine at 6 pm and I'm Danish. In Spain, where I live now, I dine at 10 pm and I'm Latin.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)
2 February 2015




Mortensen, perhaps the only actor alive who could play Sigmund Freud, William Burroughs and a Middle-earth king...

Uday Bhatia
Live Mint
11 September 2015




Viggo is highly selective and his dedication to storytelling is unparalleled. He's a rare artist. He acts, writes, paints, he's an accomplished musician who makes CDs. The list goes one. So he looks at the big picture, in deep and profound ways.

Matt Ross
Matt Ross may play a greedy tech titan in 'Silicon Valley,' but in Berkeley he's just a regular guy
Frances Dinkelspiel
15 April 2015




Despite his exhaustion, Mortensen's tongue did not call a truce. The actor refused to stop talking about his movie.

During Viggo's marathon promotion of Jauja
Viggo Mortensen firma en valenciano
Translated by Ollie and Zoe
Levante
7 February 2015




Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




As he progresses through this limbo-like landscape we watch him gradually transforming, Mortenson's weathered features becoming akin to the rocks surrounding him. As he emerges from within dark cracks, kneels to sip dripping streams or dozes underneath the stars, he melts into the environment, the boundaries of Dineson's self slowly eroding into the Patagonian dirt.

David James
wegotthiscovered.com
6 April 2015




His still eyes and body language is so captivating that his performances look as beautiful as the landscapes.

Nafees Ahmed
High on Films
17 September 2015




In "Far From Men," Viggo Mortensen, his sharply planed face weathered and solemn, plays a man who looks as if he were quarried right out of the hard red-rock earth.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
30 April 2015




Nobody moseys like Viggo Mortensen.

Adam Nayman
AV Club
30 April 2015




Mortensen acts in French, Arabic and a bit of Spanish as well. Is there nothing he cannot do?

Paul Byrnes
Sydney Morning Herald
31 July 2015




...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker 'Blouse Man' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film.

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015




...he has a defiantly-handsome face, with a jaw so well-defined you could carve a roast with it.

Viggo Mortensen talks Jauja
By Philip Bagnal
Scannia
11 March 2015




...his almost ludicrous list of talents includes poetry, painting and a prolific discography which boasts more album releases than your average full-time musician.

An Unconventional Method: Viggo Mortensen
Clash
8 March 2015




'There are people who go to museums who look at paintings and think: Shit, I could've done that. But you didn't.'

What I've learned – Viggo Mortensen
By Kal Fussman
Esquire
22 April 2015




People today are much less present in spite of being hyper-connected. You see people in the street absorbed in their cell-phone; there's plenty of time for that message. What's more important than now?

Viggo Mortensen: "The feeling of the absurd is something that's constant with me"
By Ima Sanchis - translated by Ollie and Zoe
La Vanguardia
8 October 2015




'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




"My house is the Atlas mountains or the Iceland ice, the forest, the rivers or the sea, the stars, the setting sun. If I stop one day, I die. You must make the difference between loneliness and isolation: between the two, I see a road that can take me farther than I would dare imagine. And wherever this leads me, I still want to take it!"

"You must read Camus if you're plugged in"
By Cécile Lecoultre - translated by Donna Marie
24 Heures
27 January 2015
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Last edited: 31 December 2016 08:55:46

Source: https://www.viggo-works.com/?page=3333