Quotable Viggo

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Quotable Viggo 2015

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Quotable Viggo: 24 December 2015

'Tis the season to be Jolly, so here is a little Christmas Quiz for you. I've put together a selection of some of the reviews Viggo has received over the years but I've left out the date and the film so you can try and guess them. No prize, just a bit of fun. And it's pretty tricksy! I'll post the answers for you next week. Hope you all have a very Merry Quotable Christmas!



Image Guadalupe Gaona.
© 4L Productions



Viggo is noble, Viggo is powerful, Viggo is resplendent. He's a young Sean Connery but with a grittier style.

Film H....
Cinemablend.com




...the perpetual shape-shifter Viggo Mortensen, slinks around like a silent old Zen master.

Matthew D'Abate
Your Beautiful New York




Mortensen's performance is flawless – so real that the film seems more like a look into the past, rather than a fictional slice of entertainment. You can see his power, his strength, and his intelligence as easy as you can see the all-prevalent dusty wind.

Monika Bartyzel
collider.com
Early Films




...graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing horse manure.

Farran Smith Nehme
New York Post




Mortensen effortlessly mixes glamour with masculinity and swiftness, and excels in several performances of secret or open insecurity and jealousy - it is almost impossible for the audience to empathize with him.

Liao Fangzhou
Global Times




The visceral and gritty performance of Viggo Mortensen is like a tornado. It knocks us off our feet, and swallows us whole. His accent is pitch perfect and absolutely never falters. This was not just a role he could sink his teeth into. Mortensen clamps down and never lets go...

Chad Webb
411mania.com




Viggo Mortensen... highly intelligent and completely smoky.

Norbert Creutz
Le Temps




The gradual moral corruption is wonderfully and convincingly portrayed and the entire film would fail in the hands of a less capable thespian. Mortensen is truly a master of his art.

Sebastian Cordoba
TheVine




He's not an actor counting the motions for a scene, but his eyes are alive, you can see fear and desperation in his face as he acts, you also see a resoluteness to do what has to be done. It's kinda perfect.

Harry
Ain't it Cool News




Mortensen oscillates between drowsy menace and raucous mania, making you unsure of the scene's intended tone, and of him; it recalls Jack Nicholson's infamous diner scene in Five Easy Pieces, only without the comforting hint of showmanship.

Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com




Mortensen is predictably fantastic. That dude can say 5 different things with his face in one ten second take. He's raw, nervous, slightly crazed, but still has a working moral compass.

Quint
Ain't it Cool News




It's interesting to watch him here as he channels a James Dean vibe, with his wedge-cut hair and sulky, almost shy delivery.

David Maine
Popmatters.com




The character is a quiet, introspective man who has spent his life suppressing his emotions. And they are painful emotions, indeed. Mortensen does an exquisite job of revealing just enough of the bottled-up angst to make us aware of the internal turmoil his character battles.

Jeff Strickler
Star Tribune




Viggo Mortensen... sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave, though still giving the film's best performance by miles...

Shaun Munro
BluRay review
Obsessed with Film




Viggo shows up well into the film, and we see an early example of his willingness to be both vulnerable and venomous.

Jason Gorber
Twitchfilm




In the end, the actor who makes the biggest impression is Viggo Mortensen, whose gentle presence seems to be masking some diabolical undercurrents. He's the only character who keeps us guessing throughout, and he manages to steal every scene he appears in by slyly underplaying the role.

Judge Clark Douglas
DVD Verdict




...the erstwhile Aragorn masters the tricky art of being a figure in the landscape. When it comes to traipsing either purposefully or desperately across the widescreen frame, he's several lengths ahead of the competition...

Adam Nayman
AV Club




The film sheds the romanticism of costume dramas. Battle scenes are brutal and bloody. Regular life is dirty and desperate. Heroism is found in intimate human gestures — and in Mortensen's soulful eyes.

Bruce Kirkland DVD review
Toronto Sun




...you really do feel like Mortensen was doing his level best to channel evil in a way we haven't seen for quite some time.

Box Office Prophets
Scott Lumley

Quotable Viggo: 13 December 2015

Having done a recent Quotable about Perceval Press, the time now seems ripe to complement it with one on Perceval Pictures which now has its own webpage. As Producer, Viggo brings the same commitment to the director's vision that he has always brought to the authors, poets and artists he's worked with. With Viggo interested in every aspect of the film making process, and his dedication to publicising and promoting films he believes in, it makes sense to be in a position where he can officially 'butt in'.



Image Guadalupe Gaona.
© 4L Productions.



'The three movies I've produced were just projects where I wanted to be able to in every way help protect the vision of the director. From the way it's allowed to be shot or cast, where it's shot, what the schedule is, how it's presented, who it's sold too, what the poster looks like... all those decisions are what an actor doesn't necessarily have any say about but a producer does. And in that way I can be helpful in protecting the director—having their vision be respected right 'til the end. So that's the main reason to do that.'

Viggo Mortensen Tells Us Why He Hasn't Done Blockbusters Since 'Lord Of The Rings'
LAist.com
By Carman Tse
19 March 2015




'As an actor I can give my opinion, but the producer might say: "O.K., but don't butt in."'

Viggo Mortensen on 'Jauja,' Producing, Protecting Directors' Visions
Variety.
25 November 2014




'Like a lot of unique movies, [Todos Tenemos Un Plan] took years to get together. Two or three years, probably. I kept working on her and said, "I want to be a producer. I've never done it before, but I want to do it."

Viggo talking about Todos Tenemos Un Plan
Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




'If you are professionally responsible, then you work very hard preparing the movie because you're only going to get one chance to shoot it. You just turn over every stone, even if there are things you don't end up using. Just burn as much as you can, work as hard as you can during the shoot, then you go out and promote the movie.'

Viggo Mortensen on 'Jauja,' Producing, Protecting Directors' Visions
Variety.
25 November 2014




What's Viggo like to work with, honestly?

He's a little obsessed. He's a little bit of a perfectionist, but then so am I so that's ok!

Ana Piterbarg
Still Waters Run Deep
by Shelley Marsden
Film Juice
27 October 2012



The preparation for films like Far From Men and Jauja can take up to two or three years, and during this time I received proposals for big films that I preferred to decline. Because I have the habit of staying until the end of a project even if it causes me to miss opportunities. I understand very well that there are consequences and viewers may forget me if I don't make a blockbuster movie after four or five years. But I gain many more things than I lose in the end. For example, I know that I will be able to watch Far From Men in twenty years, knowing that it's a good movie that deserved to be made, and of which I can be proud.

Viggo Mortensen: "I know that I will be able to watch Far From Men again in 20 years and still be proud of it."
By Daniel Leblanc - translated by Donna Marie
Premiere (France
13 January 2015




"Viggo is incredible. He has the triple role of actor, producer and musician and along with that, he was thinking about how to improve the film 24 hours a day. In addition he rigorously corrected every French, English and Danish subtitle."

Lisandro Alonso
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN




JB: [Jauja] isn't the first film you've produced. What draws you to the producer's role?

VM: The reason is always the same: to do what I do anyway but with a little more legal authority, rather than just being a meddling actor.

Jauja: An Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Jo Blair
ICA
26 April 2015




I went with Lisandro to the private event for the possible purchasers of our film, there in the huge cinematic bazaar of the festival. It's the fourth time that I've come to Cannes... but I've never seen the insanity of the great market for all kinds of cinema at such close range. Since I am the producer responsible for the North American rights for Jauja, I wanted to see which of the potential gringo distributors had come to see the movie.

Something Material
By Viggo Mortensen, Fabián Casas and Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
31 May 2014




"When we went up on the stage for the presentation, for a moment I thought like a producer and told myself, "I'm going to try to explain, to orient [the audience]. But then, I reconsidered - no, we're going to continue doing silly stuff and have fun. If you have to explain it, it's not worth it. It has to reach you or it doesn't."

Viggo Mortensen on receiving the International Critics prize for Jauja
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN
August 2014




Despite his exhaustion, Mortensen's tongue did not call a truce. The actor refused to stop talking about his movie. "It's unique. It brings together aspects of mythology, history, fairy tales...It's a very special combination of Scandinavian and South American storytelling. It's as Argentine as it is Danish," he concluded as he fought off the charms of Morpheus as well as he could.

During Viggo's marathon promotion of Jauja
Viggo Mortensen firma en valenciano
Translated by Ollie and Zoe
Levante
7 February 2015




'I think he is one of the best producers I've ever had in my entire film history. Hopefully there will be more actors who want to produce, because we need them.'

Lisandro Alonso, a well-known face at Cannes
by Pablo O. Scholz
Clarin
17 April 2014




'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014

Quotable Viggo: 6 December 2015

This week we have a rather random Quotable ramble. I've picked out quotes that just popped out at me while wandering through the Quotable Archive (located in a secret underground bunker somewhere in Middle England). Enjoy!



© Film4


In "Far From Men," Viggo Mortensen, his sharply planed face weathered and solemn, plays a man who looks as if he were quarried right out of the hard red-rock earth.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
30 April 2015




Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




Mortensen has the kind of face — both chiseled and mobile, with eyes that hold as many secrets as they spill — that's made for close-ups

Stephanie Zacharek
Village Voice
17 March 2015




...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker 'Blouse Man' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015




His features were as clean and untrammelled as a new field of wheat and his eyes were so wide apart you could have driven an Amish buggy between them.

'Witness'
Man Power
By Katherine Mitchell
Movieline
September 2002




...one of the great little pleasures of cinema in our day - seeing Mortensen tilt his head and sketch a knowing half smile with the corner of his mouth.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




'I believe that I'm a man of the hills, the woods, the angry sea, a somewhat solitary guy but sometimes I miss what it's like to soak up metropolitan poisons. I love and am terrified by the great cities of the world, sometimes simultaneously.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




He smells of woodsmoke, as though he's just returned from some manly pursuit like chopping logs in a forest. Again, highly possible. He does have a home in the remote mountains of Idaho, surrounded by woods. In fact the scent is wafting from his cup of tea.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




You have been described as the Robert De Niro of your generation, what are your views on that? And how much are you looking forward to becoming a Lego figure?

I already am a Lego figure! Very proud to be a part of Danish industry in that way. I'm not sure that Robert De Niro is a Lego figure yet, so he's got some catching up to do.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012



...his almost ludicrous list of talents includes poetry, painting and a prolific discography which boasts more album releases than your average full-time musician.

An Unconventional Method: Viggo Mortensen
Clash
8 March 2015




...he's a disconcerting interviewee. The conversation goes like this. I ask question A, expecting answer B. He listens carefully, considers, and gives me answer E, and then we find ourselves on point K, V, or Z.

'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




'It's the endlessly entertaining, often ridiculous, sometimes admirable, sometimes embarrassing attempts that some people make to find some meaning in their lives that make life worth living.'

What I've learned – Viggo Mortensen
By Kal Fussman
Esquire
22 April 2015




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?

My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...

If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005




What would you like as your epitaph?

"He was curious," which you can take more than one way.

Viggo Mortensen Interview
By Tim Wilson
Metro
December 2003


Quotable Viggo: 29 November 2015

We all like to sit and watch Viggo's films, but which films does Viggo like to watch? We know how great an admirer he is of Maria Falconetti's amazing performance as Joan of Arc. We know that going to the cinema as a young man nudged him towards acting because he wanted to discover just how cinema magic was woven. But it's not all Dreyer, Bergman and Pasolini...



Image Macall Polay.
© 2929/Dimension Films.



'….I went to see films with my mother when I was a child. Towards twenty, I lived for a year close to London, and I went to a cinema which only showed classics. I discovered Bergman, Ozu, Pasolini, Dreyer ... It was a revelation.'

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"I started thinking about acting about a year before I actually tried it," he says. "I just started watching movies in a different way, not just as entertainment. I started to really think about the ones that got to me, the ones that transported me so that, when I walked out of the theater, I'd be surprised. I'm really not in the desert? Or the 18th century? And I started to wonder what's the trick, how does a movie do that to you, technically? I wanted to try and figure that out."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




'I discovered [The Passion of Joan of Arc] when I was 20. I didn't know very much about movies, I wasn't even an actor: I wasn't yet measuring all of Dreyer's esthetic innovation and radicalism, but it still had a crazy effect on me. The story, the way it's told, but especially her, Falconetti: her modern way of acting, her immediacy. Whatever moment you're watching the film, she's there.'

Viggo talking about Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc
"It's women who made me want to be an actor."
By Clélia Cohen - translated by Donna Marie
Vanity Fair (France)
June 2014




He opens a large cardboard box at his feet. There are about a dozen books... all are published by Perceval, a small press he runs with a partner. Then he pulls out a DVD of The Passion of Joan of Arc, a 1928 silent movie. He informs me that the original negative was destroyed in a fire, and that the filmmaker died believing his masterwork had been obliterated. But a complete version was found in a closet in a Norwegian mental institution in the early 1980s and was restored.

"You published this too?" I ask.

"Nah," he says. "You should just see it."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"The real trigger for me was the film that everyone was talking about when I was twenty: The Deer Hunter, particularly Meryl Streep. What an inspiration! All the actors in that movie are amazing, no doubt; but there's something about Meryl Streep in that movie that makes me identify with her. I don't know why, something mysterious that you can't put your finger on, but which haunts you deeply, and for a long time..."

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




'Meryl Streep in Sophie's Choice, Jessica Lange in Frances, Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Bergman in Autumn Sonata, Anna Magnani... All of these roles have something indiscreet, indecent. You don't necessarily need to go through a series of tearful or hysterical scenes, it can be very sober and minimal, but this impression of seeing "inside" the person remains. This exposing of emotions touched me and inspired me very much.'

"It's women who made me want to be an actor."
By Clélia Cohen - translated by Donna Marie
Vanity Fair (France)
June 2014




"When I saw Death in Venice, by Visconti, I had a big shock. It is one of the movies that has really inspired me. I saw it again recently, it's a little dated, especially the flashbacks, but still ... That mixture of beauty and sadness ... And also the performance of Dirk Bogarde is so extraordinary! Its impact on me has been enormous."

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




It should come as no surprise to learn that Mortensen is an admirer of Greta Garbo, the "I vant to be alone" diva, and also John "The Duke" Wayne, star of Howard Hawks' Red River, a classic western and one of Mortensen's favourites.

"I just think John Wayne was wonderful, and I'm not looking at him as just this icon," said the chisel-jawed actor, a study in seriousness behind innocent blue eyes.

A New John Wayne: Viggo Mortensen Saddles Up for Hidalgo
By Peter Howell
Toronto Star
5 March 2004




"I like Missouri Breaks. And Red River, a case, as in this movie, where most of the main actors are not known as "western" actors. Montgomery Clift had basically never done a movie, much less a western, and he's an urban easterner. He comes out stepping smack in the middle of John Wayne's turf, and working for Howard Hawks, he must have been a little nervous, I'm sure. But he did a great job. I think he pushed Wayne into giving my favorite Wayne performance."

An Actor Lured By Western Promise
By Ty Burr
Boston Globe
28 September 2008




'I think I insulted [Warren Robertson] one time, unintentionally, but he knew what I meant. The teacher had talked about a certain movie, I think it was a movie with Montgomery Clift... I can't remember. But anyway, I went to see it, and I remember saying, you know, "I learned as much from that movie as probably a month of going to class..."'

Viggo talking about his time at the Warren Robertson Theatre Workshop
Viggo's Box
By Craig Clevenger
Fond Affexxions #5
Winter Thaw 1995




'I'd call my mom, and she'd say, "How are you doing?" "Oh, fine." "What have you guys been doing?" "Well, Henry and I watched all three Godfather films. He didn't care for the third one, but he liked the first two." And she'd say, "Isn't he a little young for that?" "No, he can handle it.'

Viggo Mortensen: Grilled
By Steve Pond
The Wrap
25 November 2009




"I am an old romantic, and I love costume movies. Elizabeth is my favourite."

A Latin Man Comes From The North
By Riccardo Romani - translated by Cindalea
GQ (Italy)
May 2007




Are there special actors or movies that influenced you as a lad/young man?


(to do interview via email is a classic horror scenario because of the often very short answers, for example to a question like this. But Viggo Mortensen begins his answer with "Among others" and then mentions 88 movies and 63 actors. Very kindly he points out that nothing must be edited away. All mentioned, nobody forgot. )

Euroman Interview
11 August 2015




He tries... never to watch the same film twice. "You can spend your whole life looking at movies made outside the United States [alone] and never see them all," he marvels. There is at least one exception to this rule, however: Adam Sandler's 1996 comedy Happy Gilmore, which he will watch any day, any time. The very mention of it makes him launch into his own Sandler imitation, which isn't half bad. "It's just one of those charmed movies," he says.

History Teacher
By Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
19 August 2005

Quotable Viggo: 14 November 2015

With the recent blu-ray release of a restored The Reflecting Skin gaining the film new fans and sparking a new interest in Philip Ridley's work, time to look at Viggo's collaboration with this visionary director. Working together on both Reflecting Skin and The Passion of Darkly Noon, both Viggo and Ridley have spoken of their mutual respect and trust in bringing Ridley's 'unique vision' to the screen.



© Miramax / Zenith.


'Viggo is one of the few people I've worked with who, I feel, is a true kindred spirit. From the moment we first met - when I was casting The Reflecting Skin in Los Angeles - it was as if we'd known each other all our lives. He understands my work totally. By the time we were doing Darkly Noon I hardly had to give him a word of direction. He knew instinctively what I wanted.

Philip Ridley at the Tokyo International Film Festival
From "The American Dreams: Two Screenplays by Philip Ridley'
Methuen 1997




All great artists reveal themselves more in their work than in interviews. Every time Viggo's in front of the camera or picks up a pen or a canvas or a camera, he's opening the door to his heart. This is where he's telling you the secrets of his life . . . Viggo cannot strike a fake note. I say with absolute experience that if he doesn't believe it, he won't do it.

Philip Ridley, Director
The Reflecting Skin and The Passion of Darkly Noon
The Telegraph




What has caused him to race down from his suite, probably giving several PR assistants heart attacks in the process, is the urge to impress upon me that one director has inspired him more than any other he has worked with - Philip Ridley, the British film-maker who cast Mortensen in his Lynchian adult fairy-tales, The Reflecting Skin (1990) and The Passion of Darkly Noon (1995).

"That man will never sell out," he enthuses, "because his vision is unique."

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent
2001




'Many actors tend to think of their work in terms of career - this strange sort of concept that acting is like climbing up a mountain, that they get bigger with each job - and art doesn't move like that. Viggo knows that instinctively.'

Philip Ridley
Super Natural
by Anna David
Daily Telegraph 2002



The Reflecting Skin


This independent feature was the directorial debut of Philip Ridley, a British painter-illustrator-novelist who had supplied the script to Peter Medek's mesmerizing 1990 gangster film The Krays. The Reflecting Skin was celebrated as one of the unique films of its year and received a good deal of favorable reviews.

Fantasia 2015: 'The Reflecting Skin' a gothic masterpiece that is criminally overlooked
Sound on Sight
25 July 2015



His voice is such a growl that you find yourself leaning toward the screen to catch the words. His features are well defined but suggest a curious amalgam of Kirk Douglas' and Burt Lancaster's. His credits include Swing Shift, The Purple Rose of Cairo and Young Guns II, but his onscreen time is so limited that you still may not know who Viggo Mortensen is. In his latest film, The Reflecting Skin, British writer-director Philip Ridley's disturbing tale of repression and decay in the American heartland, Mortensen doesn't appear until an hour has passed - but when he does he immediately marks himself as one of those actors who doesn't need fancy lighting to be incandescent. Cast as a young man returning from the Pacific (where he dropped bombs on sleepy atolls), he displays surly, distant passion that's at odds, yet perfectly in step, with a small town that is seething beneath its bucolic veneer. Word is that he fires up the screen in Sean Penn's directorial debut, The Indian Runner, a film about a good brother and a bad brother that is due for release in September. It's not hard to figure out which brother Mortensen plays.

Viggo Mortensen Interview
by Martha Frankel
June 1991




Mortensen also gets to shine in a smaller than expected role but one which is typically interesting of the actor. This is an early role for the actor but one which really begins to show the brilliant talent that would emerge post Lord of the Rings.

David Bishop
Suite 101
16 June 2010




Viggo shows up well into the film, and we see an early example of his willingness to be both vulnerable and venomous. Naturally, too, we see his buttocks, surely at least part of the appeal for some audience members. It's a beautifully realized scene of vulnerability (echoing perhaps the famous photo of Lennon/Ono by Leibovitz) and it's one of the film's most striking moments.

Jason Gorber
Twitchfilm
23 July 2015




The Reflecting Skin is a strange, at times wonderful film, one that leaves more questions open than answers. Its palate and performances collide in ways that seem unique decades on.

REFLECTING SKIN Remains A Wonder
Jason Gorber
twitchfilm.com
23 July 2015



The Passion of Darkly Noon



The Passion of Darkly Noon is cinema as opera - huge, iconic, occasionally ridiculous, sometimes moving, undisputedly spectacular. Understatement is not Ridley's middle name: "Either people are going to get it big, or they're not going to get it". It will baffle and astound audiences in (unequal) measure, but the sheer drive and ambition he displays are undeniable.

"The Passion of Darkly Noon"
By Gerald Houghton
The Edge
1996




By the time you get to the giant glittering silver shoe floating in the river, you'll know whether The Passion of Darkly Noon is your kind of insanity.

The Passion of Darkly Noon Review
By Rob Gonsalves
eFilm Critic
30 April 2009




"We were on location in what used to be East Germany, on the Czech border. I was there on my own, I didn't have anybody that I needed to talk to on the phone, so I thought I'd try to warm up because I didn't have a rehearsal period. I literally worked the day after I got there. When I stepped off the plane I decided not to say anything. I thought 'I'll just do this today' and then I just kept doing it. I did it the whole month I was there, which was really interesting because I did hear more what was being said, and I did watch people's reactions more closely."

Viggo's Box
By Craig Clevenger
Fond Affexxions #5
Winter Thaw 1995




"I only heard him speak after the shoot was over, and then only to say, 'Thanks everybody, so long.' He'd make clicking noises in the back of his throat to communicate," recalls costar Brendan Fraser. Mortensen refused to break character even to settle his hotel bill. "The concierge probably didn't speak English, and here's Viggo gesturing with his hands and pointing, scribbling on a pad. And I think Viggo eventually got 50% off the bill. If you know Viggo, it makes perfect sense. In a way, he transcends the acting."

Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




The strength of Ridley's debut helped him attract a top-tier cast, and they all perform to the level and tone of the script. David Lynch regular Grace Zabriskie gives good crazy as an old woman who uses Lee as part of her own vengeance against Callie, while Mortensen does his usual fine work here, getting across the depth and intensity of his feelings without the use of speech.

Fangoria
Issue 295
September 2010




Fraser isn't the only person who shines here. Mortensen is quite the revelation as well. Although he has no dialogue throughout as Clay is a mute, his silent actions are evidence that this actor is not one who doesn't need lines to act the role of his career. To a lesser-talented actor, this restriction might have resulted in a poor performance but does not.

"The Passion of Darkly Noon" Review
By Russell Hill
WILDsound




The forest itself is almost an extra character, paralleling the tone of events with a transformation from sun-dappled boughs to shadow-casting skeletal fingers. In many ways Callie is the Beauty, fair of heart and body, Darkly the beast of the woods and Clay the valiant but dumb (literally) knight.

Review: The Passion of Darkly Noon
By Damian Cannon
Movie Reviews UK
1997


Quotable Viggo: 8 November 2015

With Viggo's recent and hard hitting interview with Democracy Now, his defence of free speech, and the Twilight of Empire event at McNally Jackson Books, what better time to take a look at Viggo's publishing house, Perceval Press, and its dedication to presenting the work of little known authors, artists and poets in 'the way that they wanted to be published, without compromising'.



Promotion and reading of The Anthology of New Argentine Poetry
Image Javier Gomez.
© La Vanguardia.



I told myself that one day, if I could, I would be a publisher to publish the books and authors that I like. The Lord of the Rings was my chance. The success of the trilogy has allowed me to work with other directors and to make some money, which I've invested in Perceval Press. In the beginning, about five or six books appeared each year, now on an average three, plus reprints. Since the beginning of this adventure, I've been living in Madrid. Surrounded by a graphic designer and a person in charge of sales, I supervise every stage of the editing process.

Viggo Mortensen: "You must live your contradictions"
By Olivier Cariguel - translated by Donna Marie
Le Magazine Littéraire
February 2015




How do you select what to publish?


We publish books that I too am interested in. When you follow your curiosity there is a chance to meet a photographer, a poet, a historical time that interests you and you hope that this might interest other people too. I decide basically on personal criteria.

Inside Viggo Mortensen's Mind
By V Vergou - translated by Iraeth
Athinorama
5 April 2007




"...I don't see us being crusaders, other than in the role of defending the right of people to express themselves."

Viggo Mortensen on Perceval Press
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




"Perceval Press makes an enormous commitment to its books," said curator Kevin Power - who collaborated in the selection of poems [for the Anthology of New Argentine Poetry], "when the United States did not want to publish anything from that country" - and added that this book "has an impact because it brings together the most radical changes in Argentine poetry."

Kevin Power
The Generation of the 90's in an Anthology Published by Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Remolina and Sage
Diario Uno
12 August 2009




Everything began when Kevin Power, the art critic, found the recipe Gustavo López needed: "I've got someone who can value that poetry and the Argentinian character," he commented to him. "He phoned me, Viggo," explains López "and we talked about poetry for a while, about Williams Carlos Williams, about T.S. Eliot... about the anthology I was proposing... He was a guy with a background. But it didn´t come to me who he was till later on."

Everything He Touches Is Poetry
By Maricel Chavarria - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Vanguardia
28 October 2010




"I just wanted to have a company that would publish writers and artists and poets," he says, "people I wouldn't have heard of - the way that they wanted to be published, without compromising."

Viggo Mortensen on Perceval Press
Little Press Shines With Star Power
Susan Salter Reynolds
Los Angeles Times, 2004




'Viggo himself is a man possessed of both great creative integrity and strong, lucid political conviction. That he has used the fruits of his success as an actor to found Perceval is an extremely rare sort of endeavor but absolutely true to the man himself. There's a paradoxical quality to Viggo - he's a fiercely individual entity with an enviable creative output, but he simultaneously possesses a strong sense of community responsibility. I think Perceval is just one manifestation of that drive to illuminate work by others that might go unnoticed. It's a very, very positive quality, in my opinion.'

David Newsom, Author of "Skip'
ReadySteadyBook.com
Mark Thwaite, March 10 2006




One can see that you have a very deep friendship with Talo Kejner. How did you meet this solitary poet?

"Camilo Kejner, Talo's son, worked in the public relations team of the production company for The Lord of the Rings. When they found out that we both spoke Spanish, they sent us on a tour through South America.

During the trip, we became very good friends and, knowing about my interest in poetry, he timidly showed me some of his father's poems. They were very good! I asked if he had more. (He bursts out laughing). Eventually, when I got in touch with Talo by mail, he sent me more than a thousand poems - it was insane! He asked me, as the editor, to choose the poems, because he couldn't. It was very difficult, and at the same time, an honor. I truly devoted a lot of time to these books."

Viggo Mortensen, The Poet
Translation by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zoe
La Nacion.
23 December 2010




'With each of our books, we've taken care to satisfy the author first and foremost, while marrying that with our own design aesthetics as unobtrusively as possible.'

Viggo Mortensen on Perceval Press
"Life's Too Short to Do All This Work and Not Do It Right": An Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm.com
6 April 2004




I tell them, "You're not likely to get rich -- to be honest, your book may not make a profit for quite a while. But I can promise it'll be a book made as close to the way you have envisioned it as possible, well designed and produced." It's satisfying to be able to provide that service to artists whose efforts might not otherwise be presented in quite the manner they would like, if at all.

Books That Made A Difference
By Viggo Mortensen
O Magazine
September 2007




ST: Where did you come up with the name?

VM: Well, the legend of Perceval involves, in part - I'm sure you know about this - the notion of choosing and making your own way. A group of knights comes to the edge of a forest and each one makes his individual path. They consciously choose not to take a path that's already there, but instead create their own. Symbolically, that was the idea behind the press, and that is what we have tried to do with each book.

Viggo Mortensen on Perceval Press
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




"We take care with each book," he says, slouched against a doorway and looking down. "We try to keep the prices low. We're not operating with a goal in mind. We're not beholden to other people or to large companies. We don't have a plan. We just put out the books we want to. It's a kind of," he pauses searching for the word, "thoughtful anarchy."

Viggo Mortensen on Perceval Press
Little Press Shines With Star Power
Susan Salter Reynolds
Los Angeles Times, 2004




The [original photographs] on glass plates on which Schmidt "meticulously captured the soul, the culture" of these peoples, were taken to the United States by Mortensen himself to submit them to a restoration process before returning them to the museum, which, by the way, has the poorest of budgets, he explained.

Mortensen himself related a pretty hilarious anecdote about the move to California: "I was very nervous," he said while dragging his "r's" in a perfect Porteño accent. "I took the hand luggage packed with these glass plates. I wrapped them in San Lorenzo t-shirts, partly from superstition and also for protection. I was afraid something would happen to them. I felt like [I did] the first time I put my son on a plane."

Viggo talking about Hijos de la selva [Sons of the Forest]
Rescued at the hands of Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Zoe
Terra.com.ar
17 September 2013




... the artist who can tame a stallion and then adopt him, an outspoken political liberal who can cook from scratch and sword fight with a vengeance. A movie star who backpacks in remote, unlovely places. A beautiful man who will sleep in the dirt on a mountain in New Zealand. A rich guy who uses his money to publish books that will never sell because they are lovely.

If you could design the perfect man, Mortensen might just be close to it.

Viggo at the Rome Film Festival
Mr Good Bard
Sydney Morning Herald
28 February 2009


Quotable Viggo: 31 October 2015

It's 31st October! Time to have a look at one of Viggo's early horror films, Prison, which is full of ghosts, gore, spooky electrical goings on and... well... Viggo. Lots of Viggo. Happy Halloween!



© Empire Pictures.


Before Viggo Mortensen became Aragorn and before Renny Harlin became known for helming such flashily forgettable action fare as The Long Kiss Goodnight and Driven, the two made sweet incarcerated horror music together with the aptly named Prison (1988). Well, not that sweet, but Prison does have the dubious distinction of being one of Harlin's best as well as the finest film to come out of the late '80s trend of the return of the vengeful executed (remember Wes Craven's Shocker?).

Haunted Prison
Independent Film Channel
30 October 2007




'I met with about 80 young Hollywood actors for Viggo's part. I couldn't find the one. I was looking for a young James Dean. Then, Viggo Mortensen walked into the room. I knew almost instantly that he was the one. There was such a charisma about him. I really thought that this film would make him a household name.'

Renny Harlin
Review Fix Exclusive: Q & A With "Prison" Director Renny Harlin
Patrick Hickey Jr.
Review Fix
14 February 2013




'I just looked at him and thought please let him know how to act.'

Director Renny Harlin
Daily Grindhouse
19 December 2011




'He was this striking looking guy and he really was a good guy and still is. He's just a very nice person. But boy he really brought up the smoldering intensity right away. That was terrific.'

Screenwriter Courtney Joyner
Late night classics – Prison
Jason Bene
Killerfilm.com
2 June 2010




Prison is pretty remarkable on a lot of levels; it also features Viggo Mortensen in one of his first feature film roles. I know it's cliché to say an actor has intensity but I think Prison is one of his more intense roles. There is a scene in the prison yard when he's going toe-to-toe with a prisoner who's trying to run the yard that is just cool as hell.

Daily Grindhouse
19 December 2011




'It was a real low budget horror exploitation thing. The cast was a bunch of people [who were] New York stage actors. For that kind of movie, it was a pretty experienced group of actors; good actors got those parts. So, I was surrounded by people who really knew what they were doing, which was nice. It was fun to work with them. I mean, the story was what it was. It was a horror movie and it was on the cheap side and all that, but Renny Hahn had a certain amount of visual flair. Other that,I don't know if it stands out any more than the other movies at this time. I liked the location, I liked Wyoming.'

Viggo talking about Prison
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
By Carnell
March 1999




Mortensen, who can count PRISON as his first starring role, is equally great as the "strong silent" con who has no problem threatening to tear the dick off of his ward's biggest, baddest rapist in the middle of the yard. It's not a showy perfomance (particularly when you put it into context with the rest of Viggo's career, TEXAS CHAINSAW III included), but it's enough to keep the film anchored and give the audience a formidable anti-hero to root for once Forsythe's ghost begins wreaking havoc.

Jacob Knight
Veryaware.com
22 February 2013




This was an early role for Mortensen, who would go on to fame in The Lord of the Rings, Eastern Promises and The Road, among other films. It's interesting to watch him here as he channels a James Dean vibe, with his wedge-cut hair and sulky, almost shy delivery. He rises to the occasion when the dramatic scenes demand it, but for much of the movie his presence borders on the self-effacing, in contrast to his later work.

David Maine
Popmatters.com
20 February 2013




Viggo Mortensen is something of a find as Burke, an inmate apparently bred on James Dean and Montgomery Clift films. All the supporting roles are solid as well. As for the Spirit of Forsythe, he's not just another masked menace or a flesh-rotted presence, but more of a malevolent specter à la The Keep. When his hell breaks loose, it's quite chilling.

Source: Hollibonitos
Starblog.com




Mortensen shows good leading man chops well before Hollywood took notice of him...

Shlockmania Blu-ray review
18 February 2013



Viggo Mortensen, in an early role before stardom, offers a strong-willed, no-frills performance that suits the character wonderfully.

Martin Liebman
Blu-ray.com
2 February 2013




This was Mortensen's first lead role, too, but he delivers with a calm and extremely cool persona who holds his own against the more traditional thugs.

By Rob Hunter
filmschoolrejects Blu-ray review
16 February 2013




"After this movie wraps, I'm thinking of going into goatherding, like my mother and her mother before her."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Prison'
Prison Press Kit Biography
1988

Quotable Viggo: 25 October 2015

Waking up from a particularly vivid dream last night, I wondered if it was possible to do a 'dream' quotable – not just about the dreams we have when we are asleep, but those dreams we have when we are awake. After all, Jauja blurs dreams and reality, Viggo has often referred to how dreams and myths shape our world and how we see it, and he has played Freud at a time in his career when he and Jung spent hours analysing each other's dreams. It seems Viggo's own dreams includes the classic 'unable to see' nightmare (I bet there are quite a few of us who have had those!)...



© New Line Productions Inc.


'Dreams about becoming famous wasn't what got me into acting to begin with, but the dream about telling stories.'

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
29 May 2008
Source: Morgunblaðið




"…..you know, no one looks at the world like it really is. Everyone looks at the world like they want it to be. When it comes down to it, everyone is in their own 'dream world', we could become crazy if we thought of the world like it really is."

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




Viggo explains that the promise of Jauja was used as propaganda by the Spaniards who conquered South America in the 16th century.

"It was hard to convince people to go there. You'd either die on the way or die when you got there. You never got to go home. So they tried to make it sound like the ideal place. Something you'd dream about seeing or achieving. But you never really get what you're looking for, do you?"

Viggo Mortensen: 'Often people are desperate, so I do what needs to be done'
By Alice Fisher
Observer Magazine
5 April 2015




"There's a lot of entering and coming out of dreams, a lot of transitions in the movie. It takes seeing it two or three times before you see all of these moments, from the first scene where the daughter grabs my arm once I give her the answer she wants about getting a dog, and she closes her eyes and never opens them again for the rest of the scene. I think that's the first dream. By the end of the story, you don't know if we're being dreamed, or if the characters are all dreamed, or if it's a dog's dream or the girl's dream. In a way, it doesn't matter. It's what it stimulates."

Interview with Actor Viggo Mortensen
Nick Chen
London Calling
7 April 2015




"I think that plans are not that different from dreams; they are like dreams with another [kind of] will, conscious dreams. People think that a plan fails or works, or comes to nothing, but it's not like that; plans change because we change, circumstances change."

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




'When I'm awake, I dream of perfection. It's not about reaching it, I'm aware that it is not possible. My concern is to seek it, to try very hard to shoot the perfect movie, to have the perfect marriage, to paint the perfect painting – above all to know that it will never work out. What counts is the will, not the achievement of the goal.'

Viggo Mortensen
I Have A Dream
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by CoCo and Techadmin
Zeit magazine
23 July 2015




10 o'clock, Thursday morning. Fifth day of shooting. Only a few hours after Lisandro Alonso has swallowed the last of a long series of Fernets with Coke, Viggo Mortensen, along with Fabián Casas, knocks at the director´s door. When the water for the maté is boiling in the kettle, the actor starts the conversation. Tonight Viggo has dreamt. "When the day is over, we talk about the film, then I think about it and I go to bed," he explains, dressed in a threadbare sweater with the colours of the national Danish team. "I dream a lot. Tonight for example, I dreamt about something that could later be useful for our story." Lisandro corroborates it: "He comes every morning before shooting and he tells me `Che, I thought of this for the film.´

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France)
May 2013




It was a stroke of inspiration to cast the virile, hyper-secure Mortensen as the godfather of neurosis. Puffing on a cigar, he makes Freud a charismatic control freak, a man all too eager to engage in dream analysis yet too much of a self-designed authority figure to put his own dreams up for dissection.

Enertainment Weekly
Owen Gleiberman
10 September 2011




"It's based on a real person and a real horse," Mortensen says. "But we take some liberties, for a good reason. Myth-making is a way of dreaming out loud or dreaming in public. . . "

Viggo Mortensen
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post, 2004




WH: Many accomplished artists tell their students to always follow their dreams

VM: Well how can I tell someone to follow their dreams when I can't even come up with a good one for you. [both laugh]

WH: Which is true, so I ask also sometimes that sounds like such a hollow phrase because especially as a young person how do I even know what my dream is?

VM: I think an easier thing, because that's like sort of a concept, don't forget your dreams, follow your dreams and the kid's thinking, yeah yeah and then they're what is that? I guess what is that, is the thing you need to do. A better piece of advice would be listen to yourself, because that's where the dream is eventually.

The German Dream Interview
By Wolfgang Harrer - transcription by Aflon1
ZDF
19 October 2005




'It's imposing your dream on others that does damage.'

Viggo Mortensen
What I've Learned
By Cal Fussman
Esquire.
23 April 2015




You act, write poetry and paint. Do you still struggle to achieve everything you want to do?

Yeah, I wish life was longer. I wish that I didn't have to sleep. I like sleeping, and dreaming especially. But I wish sleep was a luxury, that I could just lie under the covers, listen to the rain but that I didn't have to if I didn't want to.

The Inner Viggo
By Jenny Ewart
New Zealand's Woman's Weekly
2003




I am standing in a big garden, looking into the sky and watching the birds in the tree tops. Behind me there is a house. Everything is very calm and quiet. One bird flies towards me, it is colorful like a parrot, but reminds me more of a crow. The bird attacks me, tries to pick one of my eyes. I try to fend him off to protect my eyes. Finally I flee into the house. As I get in there, I see a lot of people. All of them are reading – books, newspapers or comics. They are reading while moving or standing. No one is sitting. I go from one to the other, asking them to look after my eye and asking if everything is ok with it. But the more people I ask, the worse my eyesight gets. Before I become completely blind, I wake up.

I have had this dream many times, the first time as a child, then as a teenager and also in my 20s and 30s – interestingly very often in phases of my life in which I really had problems with my eyes and had poor eyesight for some days. Maybe the dream was a first hint, or maybe it even symbolizes my fear of going blind. During the last years I haven't dreamed this anymore.

Viggo Mortensen
I Have A Dream
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by CoCo and Techadmin
Zeit magazine
23 July 2015




"This world is a dream we all contribute to, in one way or another. We are part of the dream, if we are aware or not, if we like it or not. These pictures are a part of my dream, of the way I exist and act in the world."

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008


Quotable Viggo: 17 October 2015

This week's quotable could be labelled 'food, glorious food'. But not just your everyday food, oh no. We have everything from crickets to French fries, pickled herrings to frangipane, dandelions to ducks. For our health we have a little bit of salad. And for the sake of completeness, we also have the washing up...



Image Larry Horricks.
© Good Films.



Just for fun … what is your favorite comfort food?

Hard to choose one, but I can give you four off the top of my head: pickled herring, strong cheddar cheese, dark chocolate, and salted almonds.

Viggo-Works 10th Anniversary Interview With Viggo
By Viggo-Works and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo-Works
30 May 2014




Could this guy be sweeter? Um, no. He's like a heaping serving of a triple blueberry hazelnut frangipane smørrebrød sweet!

Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, Mar 2004




VM: Rabbits sometimes run out in front of your car, right? Well, I hit this rabbit on this lonely road in the South Island and I wanted to make sure it was dead. If it wasn't, I'd put it out of its misery. And it was quite dead, so I thought, 'Well, why waste it?' And so I made a little fire and ate it.

Q: Is this something that you thought Aragorn would have done?

VM: As he was driving down the road and if he hit a rabbit? Yeah, he might. If he was hungry, I guess.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"He's just a very simple guy with simple tastes; he doesn't like any luxurious things. I would try to get Viggo to have a decent meal and he would just sit there nibbling on a piece of lettuce, which upset me no end."

Omar Sharif
contactmusic.com
5 May 2004



Here were all the toy soldiers, ineffective windshield wipers, first tastes of chocolate, wine, asparagus, venison, trout, chalk, ants, a Big Mac, dirt, dandelion stem, unsweetened yerba maté, duck, beer, snow, blood...

Viggo Mortensen on his lost notebooks
Introduction to Best American Non-Required Reading
Houghton Mifflin, 2004




He gave presents every day.....An example of what Viggo Mortensen's participation in this Spanish project has been like is explained by Unax Ugalde: "When he knew about my big childhood fondness for Sugus sweets, one day I found on the floor of my dressing room the shape of my name all made out with sugus."

Unax Ugalde
The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García, [I]Translated for V-W by Paddy
El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
[/I]


The comfortable rapport between the young Australian and the seasoned Mortensen was on display as the duo described pre-production bonding activities, including a visit to an anatomy exhibit that featured real human bodies and a trip to a Mexican restaurant in Pittsburgh to sample edible crickets and worms.

Viggo Mortensen and young co-star trade barbs, discuss bleak film The Road
By Cassandra Szlarski
The Canadian Press
13 September 2009




They later found packages of edible dried insects in a local shop - crickets and maggots in either chilli or salt and vinegar flavours. We decide to use the chilli crickets for the movie.

The Road - John Hillcoat's Diary
By John Hillcoat
Sunday Telegraph
3 January 2010




'The McDonald's french fry is unbelievable. When you bite into it, you think: It's so tasty, it can't be real. As soon as it gets cold, it turns to lard and flubble. I mean, have you ever tried to eat a McDonald's french fry that's gone cold? That's one of the circles of hell. The gulf between the warm, fresh, lightly salted McDonald's french fry and the cold McDonald's french fry is as great a gulf as any I know.'

What I've Learned
By Cal Fussman
Esquire.
23 April 2015




"He wanted to eat a real locust," Johnston says. "The locust he eats is made out of sugar. He said, 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' "

Joe Johnston on filming Hidalgo
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post, 2004




"I like to live dangerously. Last night I was quietly at home, cooking a meal of chicken, onions and garlic, Cuban style, and then here I am today facing a pack of journalists."

Viggo Mortensen Talks About "Jauja" and "Far from Men"
By Martin Dale
Variety
7 December 2014




"After the first day of shooting on the set of Jauja, the whole team had dinner together. Viggo was enjoying himself, we talked about this and that, but when we had finished eating and the dishes had been removed, he disappeared. After a while we started speculating where he was. Had any of us said something inappropriate? We found him in the kitchen doing the dishes."

Lisandro Alonso
Euroman
11 August 2015




This myth of the poor lonesome cowboy, the guy who has no need of others to be happy, is it really a trick to attract women?


On the contrary! Each time I have tried to charm them with my poetic cowboy side, it's ended in total failure. To seduce a woman, food is more effective than poetry. I love to make complex dishes. That always works!

Viggo Mortensen
Grazia Magazine
Translated by Chrissiejane
December 2009




I would make a giant salad from my own garden, provide good home-baked bread, and, to be safe and not offend anyone, a big rice dish with options of meat and vegetarian, with lots of hand-picked forest mushrooms in both. Also oven-baked potatoes, carrots, garlic, turnips, onions. For those interested, I'd provide fresh-caught wild rainbow trout and salmon, grilled with a bit of lemon, olive oil, salt and pepper. Blackberries, raspberries, thimbleberries, blueberries, huckleberries, apples, plums, wild grapes, and whatever else I could find in my ideal orchards and surrounding forest. Lots of good water from a spring, and plenty of red and white wine from Spain, Argentina, Italy, France, and New Zealand.

Viggo saying what he would cook for historical figures invited to a dinner party
Viggo-Works 10th Anniversary Interview With Viggo
By Viggo-Works and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo-Works
30 May 2014




"I have nothing against being seen as the greatest invention since sliced bread,"

Viggo Mortensen
Fyens Stiftstidende
23 October 2005


Quotable Viggo: 3 October 2015

Only a few quotes this week, but I won't leave you short changed because they are not really quotes at all but wonderful stories that have to be read complete to be fully appreciated. Because of their length they hardly ever make it into a Quotable, but all of them are favourites of mine and deserved to be enjoyed again.



© CBS.


"Every once in a while you do something really dumb when you're a kid and you realize when you're an adult that that's dangerous, but.. you know.. There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show, 2004




One last thing that I wish to report is a small anecdote concerning someone. One of my charming girlfriends, attached to the press core assisting all of the DVDrama personel, yesterday was herself helped by a hero and not the least of which since it was Mr. Viggo Mortensen, alias the sensual Aragorn of the Lord of the Rings, about whom we are still having numerous fantasies since the first showing of Peter Jackson's trilogy. Present in Cannes to support David Cronenberg's film, A History of Violence, in which he proves once again his immensity talent, he went to the private evening gathering that followed the premiere screening, which was exactly where my girlfriend was, whose dress suddenly caught fire as she walked down the centre of an avenue edged with small candles. An accident which could have transformed itself very quickly into a catastrophe if the courageous Viggo hadn't intervened immediately, gently throwing himself on her to help extinguish the first flames that could have become a conflagration. Reassuring and concerned he next took lengthy care of her. After this summer the King of Tolkien, Viggo, is today the King of Cannes...

Viggo the Hero
DVDrama, Cannes Film Festival Report
17 May 2005




"I was 20 years old, I was travelling in the north of Norway," he recalls, like an old war veteran. Trying to go "as far up as possible," young Mortensen got lost, survived by lighting a fire and being rescued by the inhabitants of the region, the Samis, a native people of Finno-Ougric descent. "They sheltered me in exchange for work. Afterwards they tried to convince me to spend the winter there. They offered me a big coat and kilos of meat. And when I said no, they offered me a small fat girl of about 16. Maybe I should have stayed. It would have been an interesting experience.

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France)
May 2013




I order a margarita. He orders a whiskey and a beer. The waiter sees a notepad on the table and his celebrity antennae pop up like Ray Walston's extraterrestrial ones in My Favorite Martian.

"So just who is interviewing who?" the waiter asks us. This is a formality. He's pretty sure that this is the guy from The Lord of the Rings. I start to reply, but Mortensen holds up his hand. "She has just set the world record for the longest distance windsurfed by a human being," he says, tilting his head in my direction.

"No!" the waiter gasps.

"She windsurfed from Hawaii to the mainland," he continues. "Sure, there was a boat that followed her, and she slept at night, but still. That's what, how many miles?" He looks at me.

"Um, thirty-seven hundred?" I say. I have no idea.

"And not even a man has done that yet," Mortensen tells the waiter. "Isn't that cool?"

The waiter asks me to sign a menu.

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Mortensen….never had any overwhelming desire to jump into anyone else's skin. Instead, he drifted into it – prompted, in part, by an experience he had in Denmark when he was 21.

"When I was a volunteer at the Winter Olympics, I met this woman who asked me if I would go and look after her elderly parents in Sweden for three weeks. They were in their nineties, and they lived miles from anywhere. It was one of the strangest experiences of my life. Every morning, the old man would write a letter to the king explaining why he couldn't pay his taxes. The wife was obsessed with Björn Borg and with playing bridge. She would insist that I play with her, even though I had no idea of the rules. Also, you need four people to play bridge, of course.

"Every night we would sit down and pretend to play. We had imaginary partners and she would deal out the hands. I never had any idea of what I was meant to do, none at all. It was totally crazy, but it was one of the first times I had to try to pretend to be someone else and in an odd sort of way I found it fulfilling."

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




Even Mortensen's memories of early childhood are deeply spiritual. He tells me about the time he crawled into the woods and fell asleep. "I was sleeping under a tree, and it was very peaceful," he says. "And then a dog started barking, and that's how my parents found me."

You are always escaping, I say.

Yeah, he says. He calls his mother - on my cell phone, because he doesn't have one - to double-check his recollection. "Hi, it's Viggo. Sorry to be calling so late," he says. "Oh shit. You're in the middle of it? That's funny. Is it the tape? [She was watching a tape of The Two Towers.] O.K., sorry, it's just a quick question and then I'll let you get back to what you're doing. Remember there were a couple of times I ran away? And the time the dog came and found me in the woods? How old was I then? About one and a half. O.K. But, anyway, the dog came and found me and I was sitting under a tree? Happy? Sleeping, right?"

Big look of consternation.

"I was sitting in the middle of the woods crying? I thought I was sleeping. Are you sure?"

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Mortensen also fell head-over-reel in love with New Zealand because he's a keen angler. He particularly enjoyed wandering off into the wilds, looking for remote rivers to do a spot of fly-fishing. "There are some streams where the fishing's so good, I wouldn't tell you about them," he grins. However, on one of these safaris in the South Island, disaster struck and Mortensen nearly perished.

"It was one of those rare times when I actually had the weekend off, so I headed off to the West Coast, into the rainforest, to a place I'd been to before," he recalls. "I was trying to get to the coast via the woods but it was a bit of a hike and it started to get dark. Stupidly, I hadn't brought a flashlight with me because I thought I knew the trail. But I soon got lost because there was no moon and I was in dense bush. It was pitch black but luckily I had a camera with me that had a flash, so I used the flash to try and find my way out.

"I was taking pictures, using the flash to try and find the trail, because it let me see everything around me for a second. But I never did find it and then I ran out of film! At some point, I ended up in a marshy area and I kept falling down and getting cut by thorns. I just thought, 'This is stupid,' so I found a piece of relatively high ground and lay down for a while until the moon came up.

"Fortunately, when the moon did finally come up, I managed to get my bearings and figured how to get back to where I started from," he recalls. "When I showed up, I really alarmed the makeup people because it looked like I'd been through a grinder!"

Viggo Mortensen
By Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62,
Summer 2003-2004




A really nice box-office clerk (I'm not naming names) at a downtown Madrid theater discovers that Viggo Mortensen, whose girlfriend, a famous Spanish film star, was acting in a version (very poor, to be sure) of a famous play which was playing right there, has come to buy a ticket.

Quite possibly, Mortensen could have asked his partner for an invitation and that would have been that. Instead, he insisted on paying like any regular guy. The box-office clerk recognised him, and smiling, gave him a guest ticket. "How much do I owe you?" said Mortensen in his cheerful Argentinian accent. "No, no, nothing, you are invited," answered the box-office clerk. The Hollywood star thanks her cordially, goes, and ten minutes later returns with an ice cream for the box-office clerk! He insisted that she should take it, although she said she was on a diet, so he sweetened her afternoon. Anyway, when I grow up, I want to be Viggo Mortensen.

Where I said Viggo (Mortensen), I say Diego (Alatriste)
By Juan Luis Sánchez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Decine21.com
25 November 2011

Quotable Viggo: 27 September 2015

After all our comments last week about Viggo's walk ('nobody moseys like Viggo Mortensen...'), I was musing over the fact that walking is probably one of Viggo's favourite pastimes – not just in Nature, but also through towns and cities. Not just to discover the essence of places, but also as a way of winding down and re-focussing. Appropriate for a man who's had two 'roads' and one 'walk' enshrined in his film titles, who has been both 'Walker' and 'Strider', and who's two latest films involve long walks through stunning remote landscapes.



© 4L Productions.


When I'm out in nature it can be an inspiration. If I am going through a rough period, if I just go out for a walk, on some level everything is all right because I'm here, do you know what I mean? That's my way of dealing with stress.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




"I am a happy man when I am not tied down," he says, taking a sip of maté. "I don't have a hidden self, I am not prone to depression. If I feel unwell, it is enough to walk in the forest to immediately feel better. I am an optimistic dreamer who has never been imprisoned by fear."

Viggo Mortensen, Beautiful Savage
Richard Gianorio
Le Figaro
26 September 2008




"I have never been in a natural place and felt that that was a waste of time. I never have. And it's a relief. If I'm walking around a desert or whatever, every second is worthwhile."

Viggo Mortensen
The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times, 2003




'I've walked I don´t know how many kilometers, from alley to alley, going up and coming down thousands of steps around the Casbah and the old European neighborhoods, letting myself be drawn towards a nameless destination, going forward or retracing my steps according to noises and colors, mental associations, memories, questions I was asking myself. Everything perfect, everything inconclusive, everything valuable, the city came into me, and I into it.'

Viggo on preparing to film in Morocco
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




"I listened to music, looked at paintings, trying to find my face in those pictures. Walking down streets that you wouldn't have walked down. And you never know where that's going to take you. You're lost. I didn't have people with me smoothing the way, because then I wouldn't have learned anything."

Viggo doing research for Good in Germany
The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




He also went for a walkabout in the Urals. "We kind of worried he'd never come back and we'd never find out what happened to him, until we'd probably find him running the country eventually," says Cronenberg...

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




Do you have to have the last word in an argument?

Only if I get really incensed. It usually has to do with fairness, or if I feel I've been cornered or misrepresented, then I will lash out. It's good to have the presence of mind to say: 'Can I call you back? Let me take a break and go for a walk.' Always better.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




And last weekend, on the eve of the summer solstice, like King Elessar, Captain Alatriste went back to León to walk round its streets, taverns, bookstores and even to keep some promise, in solitude.

Returning to Leon after filming
Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León, by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




SC: I read somewhere that you had the best walk. What's that about?

VM: Really? (Laughs) I don't know. How do you they know? I guess people are standing behind you. Yeah ... watching me walk. What's a good walk? I stay in a straight line, I think. That's a good thing to aim for.

Leggo My Viggo
By Suzan Colon
Jane magazine 1999



Quotable Viggo: 19 September 2015

I have a miscellanea of quotes for you this week, loosely based around Viggo's eclectic and always fascinating acting career, but mainly here just because I really like all of them.



Image Gregory Smith.
© MK2 Productions.



Mortensen, perhaps the only actor alive who could play Sigmund Freud, William Burroughs and a Middle-earth king...

Uday Bhatia
Live Mint
11 September 2015




Nobody moseys like Viggo Mortensen...

Adam Nayman
AV Club
30 April 2015




There are some actors who work with the gesture: the fold of Robert Mitchum's eyes while he takes the last drag off a cigarette; Bogart's voice and the tic of his hand lightly touching his ear lobe to accompany a thought... Viggo Mortensen, on the other hand, can be completely expressive just by walking.

Alatriste - Opinion
By Susana Fortes - translated by Xabo
El País
21 September 2006




In "Far From Men," Viggo Mortensen, his sharply planed face weathered and solemn, plays a man who looks as if he were quarried right out of the hard red-rock earth.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
30 April 2015




He will always be Aragorn to us, but the 'Lord of the Rings' actor has been in over 30 films spanning three decades and seems to get more handsome with every rugged wrinkle.

Celebuzz
June 2012




Viggo Mortensen, priceless as Old Bull Lee / William Burroughs, highly intelligent and completely smoky.

Norbert Creutz
Le Temps
26 May 2012




"He is methodical, exacting in his work, he carries out meticulous labors to do something that looks true, and projects it. He is like Robert Mitchum or William Holden, the class of actors whose work seems effortless."

Ray Loriga
Chiaroscuro: Viggo, Light And Dark
By Rocio Garcia - translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
El Pais
26 June 2009




Viggo Mortensen -- who is pickier than a five year-old at a salad bar…

The Playlist commenting on how selective Viggo is choosing films.
Kevin Jagernauth
The Playlist
29 June 2012




I'm sorry to have to break this to you, but Viggo Mortensen is not a movie star. A poet? Yes. Photographer? Yep. Guitarist? Sure. Author? Uh-huh. Painter? Yessir. Actor? Most definitely. But celebrity? No way.

Viggo Mortensen on 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




Trying to describe his movie career is like finding your way in a Middle-eastern medina.

Soon you think you're on the right way - only to end up in a dead end of spices and camel-mongers. The Danish-American has had his breakthrough in a - for an actor - mature age. As Los Angeles Times found out with a shake on the head: 'He was not less than 40 years old, before he got his own website'.

Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




For Hollywood, Viggo Mortensen is the same character as the Aragorn of Lord of the Rings: a king who refuses his throne and who would rather go around the world in tatters.

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France)
May 2013




....warmest regards to Viggo Mortensen for attending the awards. His star power actually helped keep the electricity in the building running.

Nick Flanagan
Live-ish from the Genie Awards
9 March 2012


Quotable Viggo: 12 September 2015

With Viggo given the signal honour of reading T.S. Eliot's masterwork,The Waste Land at the British Library yesterday, it seems only fitting to focus on poetry this week. I wonder whether Eliot ever kept his poetry in the fridge...



Reading from The Anthology of New Argentinian Poetry
© Splash



Before becoming an actor, he was a published poet, and he still carries a notebook wherever he goes 'just in case a moment presents itself to be stolen.'

The Appealingly Weird World of Viggo Mortensen
By Amy Wallace
Esquire
March 2006




Mr. Mortensen's poetry is not your typical verse and rhyming couplet-type thing, or even the more acceptable modern version of free verse. He creates something more along the lines of prose pictures, imagery forged in words that seek to define, in the words of Joyce that he quotes so appropriately in one of his books, the conciseness of his race.

Review: This That And The Other
By Richard Marcus
blogcritics.org
March 20, 2007




The author of two published books of poetry, Mortensen crafts spare, fine-tuned verses that end with the sharp report of a metaphor hitting its target. Most paint a languid picture of West Coast suburban life a milieu of cars, swimming pools and lovers' conversations; some ruminate on the life of the movie actor with surprising acuity.

The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent
Black & White magazine 2001




'To write a good poem requires discipline, discretion and precision. I often start with situations of everyday life. One day, in Tehran, I see a tourist bus parked in front of my hotel. The name written on the side of the bus, I forget you forever, intrigues me. Isn't that a strange name for a transport company? It became the title of one of my books of poems and travel photos...'

Viggo Mortensen: "You must live your contradictions"
by Olivier Cariguel
Le Magazine Litteraire
March 2015




'I don't have to wait on other people as to whether I'm allowed to work, and it's up to me if I want to ruin it in the editing.'

Viggo Mortensen on writing poetry
Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond
US Magazine #236, 1997




"For me, it's like taking apart an engine. You take all the pieces, you put them on a table and when you finish putting it together, you leave some of them aside."

Viggo on writing poetry
"Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
By Eduardo Bejuk
Gente Magazine – translated by Zooey
September 2009




"I sometimes gravitate toward one language or another or a certain structure for a poem or short story. In the past year or so, I've been writing mostly in Spanish for some reason. Whatever I was feeling, I felt like I've got to express it in Spanish. I'm not sure why that is. Maybe it's because I've been hanging around Spanish-speaking people or Spanish-speaking countries a lot recently."

Viggo Mortensen - For The Good Of The People
By Elliot V Kotek
Moving Pictures
Winter 2008-2009




….if you´ve written a poem and you read it, you don´t know what will happen. Something changes between my mouth and the eyes and ears of those who are there reading or listening to my words, my little story. Something changes between writing it and pronouncing the words. I don´t know what the reader receives. There´s no net. For that reason, I'm responsible for what I´ve written and for how I read it.

Viggo Mortensen - All of Us are Mestizos
by Carlos Shilling – translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Zoe
LaVoz
November 2010




Are your poems born from happiness or from pain?

I've probably written more poems about moments that have some kind of complication. But I think there are elements of both.

The Inner Viggo
By Jenny Ewart
New Zealand's Woman's Weekly
2003




'It is important to protect living poetry, which is also why I participate as often as I can in public readings."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




'It's great if someone who never would've gone to a poetry reading goes to one because they're thinking, "Oh, that actor guy's doing it – it'll probably be shit, but we should go and see it anyway!"'

Viggo Mortensen on 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




Mortensen began the evening by lighting a candle and quoting a phrase by poet S.A. Griffin. 'We are here for the sweet stigmata of the poem. And here's the news.' The breathless, packed room received the news, and it was clear from the moment Viggo spoke that this was poetry's night.

Three Fools poetry reading
National Poetry Month Starts At Beyond Baroque With Three April Fools
By Philomene Long, Poet Laureate of Venice
Santa Monica Mirror
27 April 2006




"Exene... encouraged me to recite my poems in public. At the beginning the idea was totally worrying for me. But something happens when you are faced with an audience. No matter whether you present photographs, pictures, movies or poems to other people, it's worth it because you always learn something."

Viggo Mortensen
Two-Men Show
By Silvia Feist - translated by Always Smiling and Doreen
Vogue Deutsch
November 2005




'He kept a lot of his poetry inside his refrigerator,' says Cervenkova, 'which endeared him to me forever.'

Exene Cervenkova
Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond
US Magazine #236, 1997

Quotable Viggo: 5 September 2015

This week's Quotable really is a mixed bag – the result of me roaming the dusty corridors of my vast Quotable Library and just randomly plucking a bunch of stuff from the shelves that I enjoyed reading again!



© Bleecker Street.


Cerebral, spiritual, sex symbol in spite of himself.

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)
2 February 2015




That chiselled face, turned towards a landscape or held in concentration as someone else speaks, can stand in for any amount of narrative exposition: look at any of Mortensen's characters and you know, without having to be told about it, that man's had a hell of a past.

Far From Men: Viggo Mortensen saddles up in Albert Camus' short story
by Stephanie Bunbury
Sydney Morning Herald
23 July 2015




'It's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"Viggo really embraces the ugly side of characters… not a lot of stars do."

Dave McNary
Variety
22 June 2014




Viggo Mortensen surely wasn't just cast because he's a great actor; it's because no one can rock a 1960s cream linen suit quite like him.

Leigh Singer
IGN.com
19 May 2014




He's like a Stateside version of Alec Guinness – a chameleon who never plays the same role twice.

There's a special pleasure in giving in to being a fan
by Tony Earnshaw
The Yorkshire Post
16 May 2014




Is there a language Viggo Mortensen doesn't speak?

Jill Lawless
Associated Press
2 September 2014




I've had four or five conversations with Mortensen over the years, and they've all followed the same pattern: He takes your measure for a minute or two, just to establish some basic comfort level and make sure he's not talking to a total idiot, and then it's hard to get the guy to shut up.

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




...he's a disconcerting interviewee. The conversation goes like this. I ask question A, expecting answer B. He listens carefully, considers, and gives me answer E, and then we find ourselves on point K, V, or Z.

'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'

Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




...his almost ludicrous list of talents includes poetry, painting and a prolific discography which boasts more album releases than your average full-time musician.

An Unconventional Method: Viggo Mortensen
Clash
8 March 2015




Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Jauja: Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




...one of the great little pleasures of cinema in our day - seeing Mortensen tilt his head and sketch a knowing half smile with the corner of his mouth.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




There's been a lot of good-looking men at this year's 2014 Toronto International Film Festival, but none of them can compare to the sexy beast that is Viggo Mortensen.

The Huffington Post
9 September 2014




....warmest regards to Viggo Mortensen for attending the awards. His star power actually helped keep the electricity in the building running.

Nick Flanagan
Live-ish from the Genie Awards
9 March 2012




The man has never disappointed us.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011

Quotable Viggo: 30 August 2015


With San Lorenzo doing so well we had the rather surprising and bizarre rumour circulating this week that Donald Trump wanted to buy the team. Luckily for the Team, Viggo and the Pope (not to mention our Sobrevuelos translation team) it seems to be untrue. Phew. But it got me thinking it was time for another football quotable...



[SIZE=1]© Agustin Alberio. [/SIZE]



[He]….wears a San Lorenzo shirt like it's tattooed on his skin.

"I feel honored to be able to give a hand to poets"
By - translated by Zooey and Sage
Pagina 12
14 August 2009




Oh God,no! Viggo Mortensen is wearing the sweatshirt of San Lorenzo, the Argentine soccer team of which he is a big supporter. The effect is what I feared: all male journalists present at the meeting with the actor unleash questions about who will win this game, this season, the derby ... with the result that the first 20 minutes with one of the most fascinating men in the world are wasted with talk about sports!

Viggo Mortensen: "Do I look sexy?"
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




CUERVO, WE ARE CHAMPIONS!!!

I woke up with my clothes on, my head wrapped in a flag with the image of Pope Francis, as if it was some sort of turban, and the TV full blast showing The Mummy with Boris Karloff, but we are still champions!

In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




'I ran from one side of my hotel room to the other, jumping and shouting like a man possessed. I opened the window and shouted the goal at the crescent moon.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers watching San Lorenzo
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




'I'm not very fond of passports, borders or flags, but for San Lorenzo de Almagro, I do have unconditional love! They can almost do no wrong!'


Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




I don't need cards or bits of paper to know I'm a Cuervo and I'm still alive. It's true that San Lorenzo is a beacon for me, as I believe it is for you, brother. An inextinguishable light that helps to illuminate the journey through the f****** night we carry inside ourselves. It has to do with our colours, our loves and tribal disappointments that we've inherited and made our own. We share a way of celebrating certain beauties and certain sufferings, a complex and mostly intangible aesthetic that gives us the necessary tools to cope with the series of big and small defeats that our bodies and our way of thinking suffer throughout this life. We share an endurance that has a voice and a name, a most stubborn feeling. I could never say that CASLA doesn't matter to me.

There's No Tomorrow
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
13 July 2015




What do you remember of the first time you saw San Lorenzo play live in a stadium?


That we lost… but that the passion, the unconditional support of the fans, the non-stop singing, were exactly what I had always imagined and felt. Every time I go to a match I get excited and enjoy myself just as much, no matter what happens soccerwise. As the song says "… it´s a feeling you carry deep inside.."

Viggo, A True Cuervo
La Revista de San Lorenzo
Translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
18 April 2010




It's almost three o' clock in the morning. He is sitting next to the fire on a wood and leather chair. The "asado" (barbecue) is over. The people he was preparing mate for, two at the same time, have said goodbye. He is wearing a gray San Lorenzo goalkeeper's soccer shirt, and he throws a cigarette butt into the embers. Viggo Mortensen, 49, now has a needle in his hand and he starts sewing his red and blue flag, which suffered a passionate tear in the victory against Lanus: "I like to sew it myself."

A Trip With Viggo Mortensen Through The Heart Of The Province
By Robustiano Pinedo - translated by Graciela
El Tribuno Salta
14 May 2007




Wearing all manner of Buenos Aires and soccer trappings (socks, bracelet, and a San Lorenzo pin, plus a complete mate set and the sports section of The Nation on hand), Viggo Mortensen greeted the Argentinean press on his recent visit to Buenos Aires….. He takes off his black boots and allows us to see the wide stripes on his socks in the colours of the team he loves.

Viggo Mortensen: The Biggest Soccer Fan In Hollywood
By Lorena García - translated by Margarita
La Nacion
16 November 2005




"Every time I go to Argentina, I go to the San Lorenzo store and I buy all the decals they have because I have the habit of sticking them up in cities, airports, in the stadiums of other teams, " he recounts and ends with a sly smile, "to mark territory."

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




'I could care less about the Vatican but if you got to be pope, you might as well be a fan of San Lorenzo.'

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




"I'm spreading "the cuervo gospel" all over the world. That's not only my mission, but my career, that's my job. Cinema, poetry and all the rest are hobbies. Spreading the cuervo gospel, that's what I'm dedicated to..."

Viggo Mortensen
In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010




…C.A.S.L.A. CHAMPION!!

absolute happiness
absolute happiness absolute happiness
absolute happiness absolute happiness

absolute happiness absolute happiness!!!!!!!!!!


The Past Is In Everything
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 August 2014




"Have I behaved? I haven't talked about San Lorenzo too much, right?"

Viggo Mortensen in a Todos tenemos un plan interview
Soledad Villamil - Viggo Mortensen: Brothers In Arms
By Nazareno Brega - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012


Quotable Viggo: 16 August 2015

In a recent video about Viggo's many acting skills, the commentator clearly hadn't had the huge pleasure of seeing Viggo in the heart-stopping swashbuckling role of Alatriste, mistakenly calling the film 'Alteriste'. We all know what she's missing! So how did a Danish American (by way of Argentina) end up playing a much loved Spanish literary hero? And how did he create a Captain Alatriste so convincing that Arturo Pérez-Reverte said 'He is Alatriste, the one I thought, the one I wrote!'?



© TFI/Estudios Picasso/Origen Producciones.


"I wanted to be Alatriste at any cost."

Viggo Mortensen
A Latin Man Comes From The North
By Riccardo Romani - translated by Cindalea
GQ (Italy)
May 2007




"...he's got the age, professionalism, look, body and he's one of the few action heroes in modern cinema."

Agustín Diaz-Yanes
Viggo Mortensen Will Be A Splendid Captain
by Gontzal Díez
The Truth of Murcail
Feb 19 2004




How did you manage to convince such an international star like VM, who had just worked in the succesful LOTR, to play the lead in the film?

Díaz Yanes: It was very easy. I didn't know Viggo, but Ray Loriga is a good friend of him, and he [Loriga] is a close friend of mine. I thought in Viggo because this is a very high-budget film and he fulfilled two basic things: he looked like Alatriste and he was a Spanish speaking star, for something was clear to me: I'd had never made this film in English. So Viggo fulfilled all requirements. Ray Loriga passed him the script and it happened that Viggo had watched my two films and we went to Berlin and met him. He liked the script a lot and said yes at once.

By Rocío García
El País - translated by Queneplace
21 February 2005




"Alatriste is a fellow that looks in a way...his look is a look that frightens, is a look cold and hard, and the look of Viggo is impressive, he has a look that captives the camera. That look of Alatriste... the audience is going to forget anything else about Alatriste and remind the eyes of Viggo, that are the eyes of Alatriste"

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Diario de Cadiz, October 2004
translated by Vicky




It is the return to the big screen of the king of swords in modern cinema

The Soul of Viggo (El Alama de Viggo)
By Miguel Juan Payan
Accion magazine - translated by Chrissie
April 2005




"I liked the plot as a tale, as a story. And it captivated me. So I decided to do it, against everyone and against everything."

Viggo Mortensen
The filming of Alatriste,
By Jesús Martin - Translated by Paddy for V-W
Acción Magazin
July, 2006




"What Viggo has done when playing Alatriste is to adapt himself as far as possible; so at first they wanted him to have a beard, and I said, "no, Alatriste has a moustache; I couldn't care less, he's a Spanish soldier of the Tercios and he has a moustache". And we had to adjust Viggo's look to the Alatriste look; and there's truly a fusion, because in the movie Viggo, being Viggo all the time, is fairer than the dark-haired Alatriste in the books; so there's a superimposition of both images and Joan Mundet himself is influenced by that. In the course of time there will be an approach of both images, Viggo-cinema and Alatriste-illustration, there will be a perfectly compatible fusion."

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Talk About Alatriste
By Luthien 66 (transcription) - translation for V-W by Paddy
4 April 2006




I went to the Prado Museum, which I had visited many times, but now I saw the paintings in a different light, searching for the character, so I'd call Tano (the director) at 2 am and tell him, "listen, I found this painting by Góngora". Viggo makes a face and changes his voice to imitate Díaz Yanes: 'Okay, let me explain it to you. You're an idiot.' But nothing. I saw the characters in those painting."

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




"And there's something very interesting; Agustín Diaz Yanes is the son of a bullfighter, and he told Viggo that the attitude of the bullfighter is the attitude Alatriste has, in the contact with death, the steel as a companion, and he was with bullfighters. And there are scenes in the film in which Viggo is composing his gestures, his attitudes before the enemy like a bullfighter..."

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Talk About Alatriste
By Luthien 66 (transcription) - translation for V-W by Paddy
4 April 2006




"I have always thought that the character of Alatriste, though a fictional one, needed to have a place of origin where to link his personality, so I decided that that place could be the highlands of El Curueño, those lands where the cold hardens one's character and people are succinct in manner, like Alatriste, but they are noble and natural when you can get to know them slowly. Pérez-Reverte told me that the Captain of Los Tercios de Flandes, as he had conceived him, was similar in character to the Northern people, and after studying the character carefully, I firmly believe I could place him in any of the Curueño lands.'

Viggo Mortensen finds Alatriste in Curueño
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León - translated by Paddy
20 March 2005
translated by Paddy




"I also tried to discover the Captain's soul; that's why I went to León..."

The Desired One
By Ester Aguado, Women Magazine - Translated for V-W by Graciela
August 2006




"But of course he's Leonese!, Viggo wanted it that way and I haven't doubted it."

Pérez-Reverte: "I have no doubt about Alatriste being from León"
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de Leon




'Many people have said that I wasn't able to master the rhythm of Spanish speech but what I was looking for was a specific manner of speaking: the pace and the rhythm, as they would have been spoken by a terse Northern Spaniard. I found that way of speaking, a little slow, very cautious, without revealing too much, because that's how they speak in the mountains of Leon in the north of Spain, near Asturias.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Old-Fashioned Hero
Cinemania (Mexico)
By Daniel Ritz - translated by Margarita
April 2007




'I'll never be able to see Alatriste with another face than that of Mortensen.'

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Diario de Cadiz
translated by Vicky
October 2004




'Without Viggo this wouldn't have been built up ever. Viggo could have done any film, especially after The Lord of the Rings. He fell in love with the project. He insisted on it and this could be done thanks to him.'

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Mano a Mano - Translation for V-W by Paddy
XL Semanal
20 August 2006

Quotable Viggo: 8 August 2015

This week I've brought together a bunch of quotes that express what it means to Viggo to be an artist – something that informs everything he does, regardless of medium. And for Viggo it's clearly more about a state of mind and the process than just the results.



©CoCo/Viggo Mortensen/Warner Brothers/unknown


'I'm an observer. An artist. But I think that all people are artists. You go walking down the street and hear something that a person says and already you're imagining something about the life of that person.'

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




'...if one can decide to become an actor, it's not the same for art - there is no starting point, it's there, in you, that's all."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




'There are people who go to museums who look at paintings and think: Shit, I could've done that. But you didn't.'

What I've learned – Viggo Mortensen
By Kal Fussman
Esquire
22 April 2015




"I usually use the excuse that everything is abstract. That way, I can do whatever I want. And if you don't like it, it's because you don't get it," he joked.

Viggo joking about his art
Viggo Mortensen Brings The Law Of Appaloosa To Madrid
By Jose Arce - translated by Graciela
[I]La Butaca

20 November 2008 [/I]



'Make it [art] purely to please yourself and then there's a chance to please someone else -- that's what it means to me. Everyone has a few friends that they can listen to. You don't have to agree with them, but their opinion is worthwhile. If you're trying to please everyone, then you're not going to make anything that is honestly yours, I don't think, in the long run.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
by Scott Thill
Morphizm 2002




"...he has no great ego as an artist. He allows the art to move through him like a vessel."

Find 4 Change and AMFM Fest co-director Robert Galarza talking about Viggo being awarded the 4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award
The Wrap
23 May 2013




'So much has already been done and there's not much that's new,' he concludes. 'You can't let that stop you though, because the actual exercise of just poking around the debris is worthwhile.'

Treasure Island: A visit with Viggo Mortensen
Recent Forgeries
Kristine McKenna 1998




'In a way, I am a photographer even when I don't take pictures. I think it's an instinctive thing by now, a part of myself.'

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




"…. you can spend days travelling around, walking around, looking at a window, and just the possibility that it could be a picture, even if it doesn't become one, you're looking at something, you're actually paying more attention. "

Viggo Mortensen Interview
Sunday Arts: ABC Australia
By Virginia Trioli
26 April 2009




'A photo, a painting, a poem or music that we use to express our experience is not the main thing, but what you are expressing. How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.'

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




"For me, [a poem is] like taking apart an engine. You take all the pieces, you put them on a table and when you finish putting it together, you leave some of them aside."

Viggo on writing poetry
"Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
By Eduardo Bejuk
Gente Magazine – translated by Zooey
September 2009




….if you´ve written a poem and you read it, you don´t know what will happen. Something changes between my mouth and the eyes and ears of those who are there reading or listening to my words, my little story. Something changes between writing it and pronouncing the words. I don´t know what the reader receives. There´s no net. For that reason, I'm responsible for what I´ve written and for how I read it.

Viggo Mortensen - All of Us are Mestizos
by Carlos Shilling – translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Zoe
LaVoz
November 2010




"If I thank Saint Francis of Assisi in my book, "Hole in the Sun', it's for a private reason. I don't want to explain any these references - a word, a name or a quotation - which mark my work. Even if the reader does not know exactly why I wrote that, it won't stop them searching for a connection, interrogating themselves. I like that people draw their own conclusions. In life, it's the effort you make to try and understand which keeps you alive and open. It is more important to ask questions than to find answers."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"Viggo's an artist," said a movie exec and Mortensen fan during the Toronto fest. The way he said it underlined "artist."

Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post Film Critic
September 2007



MJ: Do you think of yourself as an actor first?

VM: When I land in a country and they ask for "occupation," I always just put "artist." I think that covers all of it.

Viggo Mortensen, King of The Road
By Michael Mechanic
MotherJones.com
23 November 2009

Quotable Viggo: 25 July 2015

If home is where the heart is, then Viggo's home would be all over the place -unless San Lorenzo became an actual country in which case he would be first in line for a passport. But knowing, as Viggo revealed in his interview with West Australian this week, that home is not a location but a state of being must help. As do all the rituals and favourite talismans that get carried from place to place. If you travel as much as he does then home has to be something you carry within you.



© Ami de Casablanca.


"I don't know if where you are born is where you belong. I was born in New York City but I belong in Argentina and Denmark and New Zealand and Russia and South Dakota (where he filmed Hidalgo). Home is not where you are, it's how you are."

When war forges an unlikely bond
by Helen Barlow
The West Australian
23 July 2015




'I feel at home in many places, and with time, I learned that in life it is more important who you are, what you do and how you feel than where you are.'

Viggo Mortensen Under The Spotlight
Selecciones Magazine
March 2009




Barefoot, carrying a coffee plunger of water and sporting a United Nations badge on his jacket, Hollywood star Viggo Mortensen wandered into his own press conference as though he were planning to sit on the back lawn.

A Barefoot Viggo Lords It Over The Fans
By James Gardiner
New Zealand Herald
29 November 2003




These days he continues to be a citizen of the world or, on the flipside, a nowhere man. He tells me he can be at home anywhere, but I wonder where he is happiest? "I think how you are is more important than where you are," he says sagely. "I can be at home walking around London as much as I am in the woods of South Island, New Zealand. But if I had to pick I would choose to be in nature, whether in the mountains, desert, or by the sea. I like places where there are very few human traces, places where I never feel time is wasted. If I'm stuck in a traffic jam in Los Angeles or waiting in a queue for the bank it's hard not to feel I'm wasting my life in that moment."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




"My house is the Atlas mountains or the Iceland ice, the forest, the rivers or the sea, the stars, the setting sun. If I stop one day, I die."

"You must read Camus if you're plugged in"
By Cécile Lecoultre - translated by Donna Marie
24 Heures
27 January 2015




What country is the real Viggo from?

"Regarding my emotions, my DNA and also my appearance, I would say they are 100 percent Northern European. But there's a part of me that makes me eat late at night, makes me lazy and accentuates my sense of humor. That part is tightly linked to Argentina."

By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




Viggo Mortensen loves rituals. He never changes his habits, no matter where he goes. For example, he enters the villa in Deauville – made available by the French top jeweler Cartier – in bare feet, as if he is in his own living room.

In his right hand, he is holding a cup with his favorite beverage: maté – an herbal drink from Argentina, the country where he spent the majority of his childhood. He also remembered to bring a silver straw, the bombilla.

The actor explains why he always behaves the same way, no matter where he is in the world. "In this business you're travelling half the time. Sometimes I feel like a world traveller who doesn't know where he'll sleep the next day. I am exaggerating a little, but I do value my habits, so I can quickly feel at home. If I don't, it takes me too long to adapt to strange surroundings. That's very important for an actor. That way he can more quickly concentrate on his role."

Viggo Mortensen Goes To Bed With A Shotgun
By - translated by Airwin
Algemeen Dagblad
27 April 2009




'Nobody knows when Viggo is going to arrive, that's the thing [laughs]. It was like, "Viggo will be here one of these days." They started filming with Keira and I first. He arrives, there's nobody at the airport to meet him because nobody knows when he's going to be there [laughs]. He gets a rental car and turns up on the set. And slowly his trailer starts to get all this character. It was the World Cup at the time, so he's a massive football fan, so all these flags started going in his trailer. He had a picture of the Queen of Denmark up. I was watching him from my trailer, "What's he doing today?" [Laughs] He's a very interesting guy.'

Michael Fassbender on meeting Viggo
Michael Fassbender Explores A Dangerous Method with Movie Fanatic
by Joel D Amos
Moviefanatic.com
25 November 2011




'Sometimes I don't know how to answer those who ask me where I'm from, where I feel more at home. Argentina, United States, Denmark...The truth is there are many places where I've made some space for myself, that I carry in my memory and in my heart. I think it's positive to be able to find a way to understand different people in places that initially seemed strange to me.

I grew up like that, flexible, able to adapt. I think in part I cling to CASLA because it is a fixed point for me, an ideal, a flame that never dies.'

Viggo Mortensen
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




'I'm not very fond of passports, borders or flags, but [laughing and pointing at the SL flag behind him] for San Lorenzo de Almagro, I do have unconditional love! They can almost do no wrong!

Out of superstition, that flag, or one like it, is everywhere, on a film shoot or wherever...'

Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




"I have a Scandinavian side," he says, "that mindset of orderliness, a need for a logical explanation for things. I understand the sense of humour and irony that they have. But I also understand the seemingly random and chaotic - but actually just different - way of organising yourself that people have in Argentina and other Latin countries." He smiles. "I can see the humour in it."

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 201
5



He's like a one-man United Nations.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




Always at the peak of the events, do you have some inner, emotional stability?

"Yes, it exists in the equilibrium I successfully create inside me. On one side I do appreciate the moment I live in, on the other side I'm always ready to go somewhere else."

Nobody Is Perfect
By Paola Jaccobi - translated by Ewa
Vanity Fair (Italy)
14 January 2009




There's a UN patch on his sweatshirt and if you ask him where he's based, he says, hippyishly, "Planet Earth, mostly."

'My mother is very happy about it'
By Harriet Lane
The Guardian
February 22, 2008




Where are you from?

At the moment I'm from here.

Viggo Mortensen - Man of the Week
By Einar Falur - translated by Ragga
Morgunblaðið
30 May 2008


Quotable Viggo: 19 July 2015

It's summer. Time of heat, music festivals, mad lazy days, blouses and jumping into waterfalls. OK – I admit it - I'm thinking about A Walk on the Moon. The recent HitFix comment about Viggo's 'paint-peeling smouldering sexuality' in the film got me thinking about how Viggo was just perfect for the role of Walker Jerome, the guy who could sell women's blouses and still manage to be a babe-magnet. Liev Schreiber joked about being intimidated because Viggo had 'already cornered the market on animal magnetism'. Yep. I think we'd all agree with that one.



© Miramax Films/Village Roadshow.


...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker 'Blouse Man' and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015




The rest of the leads also seemed to just click into place during the auditions. Getting Viggo Mortensen was Goldwyn's only "moment of panic," the director says, because he wanted a free spirit type, but definitely not a hippie, and he had his heart set on the actor from "A Perfect Murder," Gus Van Sant's "Psycho."
"When I saw some of Viggo's work, I thought, that's always who I've had in my head. I realized there is not one other actor anywhere who could play Viggo's part other than Viggo. He has this kind of complexity and mysteriousness to him. He doesn't have to say much and you get a lot."

Tony Goldwyn, Director of A Walk on the Moon
Actor Goldwyn side-stepped cliches for summer of '69 directorial debut
By Robin Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire, splicedonline.com
February 24, 1999




"I knew I wanted him for that role in such a way that I was saying, Please take some of my money and give it to him….Because he gives immeasurable depth to what he does, full commitment, full conviction."

Diane Lane
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Walker is no mindless hippie going with the flow. He cares about Pearl. Certainly, he cares about pleasing her sexually. She gets her own flight to the moon at the same time as Neil Armstrong. And what Walker does to her under a waterfall should be bottled.

A Steamy 'Walk on The Moon'
Ruthe Stein
San Francisco Chronicle
Friday, April 2, 1999




As the guy Pearl falls for, Viggo Mortensen drips with sex appeal. He'd attract almost any woman.

Robin Dougherty
25 February 1999
Miami New Times




Liev Schreiber on heading straight for the gym the minute he knew Viggo had been cast as his wife's lover:

'I had to have some definition in my body if I was going to take my shirt off in the same movie that Viggo runs around naked in. Trust me, that's mighty intimidating.'

Liev Schreiber
Calgary Sun, April 1999




As the Blouse Man, Viggo Mortensen is rugged and attractive, but the character is underdeveloped. In a way, this is unimportant, because his primary function is as a catalyst.

....Following its world premiere at the 1999 Sundance Film Festival, A Walk on the Moon received a standing ovation from the 1300 viewers in the Eccles Theater - an occurrence that's a testimony to the film's emotional strength and truth. It's easy to make a bad movie about a woman finding herself by cheating on her husband, but difficult to fashion one that hits most of the right notes.

A Walk on the Moon
Reelviews
James Berardinelli
1999




Mortensen is also perfectly cast, skillfully side-stepping all stereotypes even though he plays a sensitive, seductive beatnik.

Rob Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire
Splicedonline.com




'I know that some people are describing Walker as a hippie, but he really wasn't. He was a little older than that generation and probably more influenced by jazz and the beat generation, so that made him maybe a little more open to things. It wasn't just about Woodstock for him.'

Viggo Mortensen on A Walk on the Moon
Viggo Artist & Actor
by Jae-Ha Kim
Cleveland Plain Dealer 1999




Originally called ''The Blouse Man'' in honor of its traffic-stopping title character, ''A Walk on the Moon'' has its elements of attractive fantasy. The blouse man is one of the peddlers who visit the camp to sell their wares, and it took Ms. Gray many rewrites to turn him into an object of desire. However, as played with silky eroticism by Viggo Mortensen, the gentlemanly Walker Jerome arrives to charm the camp's old ladies and weaken Pearl's knees.

Janet Maslin
New York Times
March 26, 1999




I saw this picture with Diane Lane called A Walk on the Moon. And there was something about his performance in that film that told me that this guy could be Frank Hopkins. I hadn't seen the first Lord of the Rings before we cast him, but I figured anybody that could sell blouses to Diane Lane out of a truck could do anything.

Joe Johnston
Staci Layne Wilson
American Western Magazine
March 2004




"I think being a conventional leading man is something that gives him a lot of trouble," says Goldwyn, recalling Mortensen's fears that A Walk on the Moon's Blouse Man might become a one-note sex god. "Of course, the success that implies is very attractive, but the trappings of that for someone like Viggo, who has so much to offer, can be very scary."

Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002


Quotable Viggo: 11 July 2015

After a week of watery Good Day Viggodoms, how about a watery Quotable? Waterfalls cold enough to freeze a popsicle, icy seas, pools filled with cigarette butts, that's nothing to Viggo who was captain of his school swimming team and is always ready to take the plunge even when others sometimes wish he wouldn't!



© New Line Productions Inc/Miramax Films/Village Roadshow/
20th Century Fox/Haddock Films/20th Century Fox Espana.



If you could begin again as if you were another person, as in the film, what would that new beginning be like?

Swimming leisurely under an autumn sun, without paying much attention to either the temperature of the water or the air.

Viggo Mortensen: "If I'm lost, it's because that's how I want it."
By Juan Luis Álvarez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Vanguardia
9 September 2012




"The waterfall was the coldest thing I've ever swam," said Smit-McPhee, who noted that, luckily, the production had brought in a "portable Jacuzzi" to warm the actors back up. After two takes, though, Smit-McPhee had had enough. "Seriously, that was it. And I said, 'I'm not doing it.' And then Viggo came. He just jumped in the water like it was nothing."

Viggo Mortensen: 'A Grown Man in an Era of Boys'
Jay A. Fernandez
Risky Biz
12 September 2009




"Some supposedly great stars doubt you and call you and say. 'Man, what are you doing?!' But Viggo went for the kill. He was the first one to throw himself into the cold water, into a filthy mud puddle, and the rest followed him."

Agustín Díaz Yanes talking about Alatriste
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




How was it to jump in the ocean?


It was very cold. I asked for another take, but they were terrified. They didn't want me to. They had ambulances. The water was 41 degrees Fahrenheit, and the wind was just really blowing. The air temperature was the same, but because there was howling wind, I was practically frozen. I think the air was probably freezing. It was so extreme. They had an ambulance and they had all these heaters on, and I just sat in there with a bathrobe and said, "Just tell me when you're rolling. I'm just going to run out and go."

Interview: Viggo Mortensen Travels THE ROAD
Christina Radish
IESB.net
9 November 2009




"The insurance company told him not to do it," smiles Penhall, "but he's mad as a snake."

Joe Penhall, novel adaptor
The Ultimate Road Movie
By Nick Roggick
London Evening Standard
4 September 2009




'If Viggo and I convince people we're enjoying every second of that encounter we've really done our job as actors. It was freezing in that river. The water was filled with debris and cigarette butts and the rocks were covered in little worms.'

Diane Lane on the Waterfall scene
A Walk on the Moon
Calgary Sun
10 April 1999




Rain is the universal music - along with the contribution of the wind through a forest or punishing an open window, the roar of the rivers, the sea.

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




Best sporting event you've attended?

The 1972 Olympics in Munich. I didn't have tickets, but there was a huge glass wall at the swimming hall, and me and some other kids illicitly climbed up to the glass to watch. I saw Mark Spitz and Gary Hall Sr. Since I swam it was amazing.

Viggo Mortensen Q&A
By Richard Deitsch
Sports Illustrated magazine
5 August 2004




...I filmed a scene with Viggo Mortensen in which we wore swimming trunks and the fashion then was to wear them over your belly button. Neither of us pulled them up that high - we just couldn't bring ourselves to look that bad.

Jason Isaacs
Live Magazine
12 April 2009




What's the oddest place you've ever been recognized?

I was in Iceland with my son [Henry, 19] once in the thermal pools south of Reykjavik. We were floating, and, all of a sudden, this man wearing no clothes comes out of the mist with a soggy piece of paper and asks for an autograph.

Viggo Mortensen - Brooding Star of Eastern Promises
By Natasha Stoynoff
People
1 October 2007




[Orlando Bloom] Mortensen and Henry, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler (who plays Arwen), and members of the crew took a bus to the countryside. After dinner, Bloom and Henry went for a walk and noticed how beautifully the moon was shining on a nearby river.

"We ran back and said, 'Everyone's got to see this.'" Bloom recalls. "I was having a Viggo moment - running out, getting people to come and check out the moon." Some decided to wade into the river, but Mortensen suggested the more perilous task of crossing the river. "I'm like, '**** off,' and he says, 'Come on.' So were barefoot, waist-high in water, walking on these little rocks to get to the other side and I'm doing it because I'm an idiot and I'm following his lead. Because he's an idiot. And because he's amazing," Bloom laughs. "I can't believe how much this is going to make it sound like I'm in love with the guy."

Orlando Bloom
The Hero Returns
by Tom Roston
Premiere 2003

Quotable Viggo: 5 July 2015

A recent, suddenly returning childhood memory made me realise how much of our lives follow patterns set by the experiences (good and bad) and dreams of our youth. Lucky is the person who can hold on to their inner child and can use that fertile soil, that mixture of wonder, growing pains and fears to create magic in their lives.



© Unknown


One of my first memories as a boy was realizing that animals die and therefore people do. It seemed very unfair to me and I'm sure that I traumatized my parents with these questions.

Viggo Mortensen: Film and Soccer Activist
By Horacio Bilbao - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarín.com
27 November 2014




"…I was always running away. I did that a lot. [Another time] when I was a child, about two-and-a-half, I crawled out of bed and across the road and crawled into someone's house on a Sunday morning. I was in the kitchen playing with all the pots and pans, and they called my parents, who had been calling the police. I think they said: 'You are missing someone, and he is here playing with our kitchen knives.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




"There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show, 2004




"The other kids were miserable, always crying or wetting their beds. But I was pretty self-sufficient. So I guess it must have suited me."

Viggo talking about his childhood boarding school
Back in the saddle 'Rings' hero Mortensen is riding high with 'Hidalgo'
By Nancy Mills
Daily News
25 February 2004




'I was 11 when we moved back to the States. I couldn't believe the swear words, the slang, the music - all the kids were into Blue Oyster Cult and Grand Funk Railroad. I was a closet Carpenters fan. I'd sing 'Top of the World' to myself on the way to school, but when I got close to campus I'd shut up.'

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




In high school, the shy kid began carrying a camera everywhere he went. Structuring his vistas within a viewfinder was a natural impulse. Already he had hopscotched through many disparate worlds, never lingering long enough on any to burn a permanent image.

Viggo Trip
By Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
November 2002




Mortensen says he started taking pictures as a teenager, although he wasn't "really serious about it." For him, the camera not only offered a sense of control over his surroundings but a kind of veil to help him feel invisible from a world he found both intimidating and inspiring.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




'A teacher gave me the taste for poetry. I like the discipline it imposes, I like the reign of precision and the perfect word.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)




"I have written since I was a child. At six or seven, I did my first little stories. I talked about animals, kid things. At about 15, I started with poetry. I always write. In airplanes, in bed, in the bathtub."

"Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
By Eduardo Bejuk
Gente Magazine – translated by Zooey
September 2009




"I wrote [Chaco] while thinking about my childhood, the mental and physical strength children have: the daring, the innocent courage, the absence of prejudice, the visceral connection with nature, with the environment that surrounded me, which seemed to threaten me and embrace me,"

Viggo talking about Chaco
The Hidden Side of Viggo Mortensen
Fernanda Nicolini
Diario Crítica de la Argentina.
Translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
1 July 2009




Myself, I love the rain, especially falling asleep to its music, ideally sounding on a metal roof, and I with a book in my hands and/or an old movie on TV, but I´m actually seduced by the rain´s melody on any surface. The sound of cars and buses passing by on half-flooded streets quiets me; it´s something that makes me remember with absolute clarity my childhood in Buenos Aires and long afternoons in the countryside.

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




'To live in Denmark and South America, and later return to the USA, made me learn there are many cultures, all very respectable, and many ways of seeing life. On the other hand, so much coming and going has left me without any roots (although I feel at home in many places) and has deprived me of good friends. Childhood friends. In truth, I miss that.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical
by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




"But I got to see a lot of things and learn a lot of things. And I learned to rely on my imagination, and on myself."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'Now I see things in hindsight and what I learned in those years is what has made me who I am today. And, even though I recognize that I'm a rather strange guy, I don't think the end result has been so bad.'

Viggo Mortensen on growing up in Argentina
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
30 August 2006



Quotable Viggo: 20 June 2015

One of my best Viggo memories is him giving me a chocolate before his presentation of 'Good' at Esher. It was wrapped in gold foil and sat on my mantelpiece for ages like a little votive to the spirit of all things chocolate. In the end I ate it, but – you've guessed it – I kept the gold foil. The whole thing is so... well... Viggo. That delicious feel-good combination of generous giving and chocolate.

I couldn't find a single photo of Viggo with chocolate but I do have a photo of the chocolate Viggo gave me. Next best thing :lol:.






"...there was never a day that he wasn't plying us with dark chocolate. It was ridiculous. Bags full. Bags full! Bacon–covered truffles. Where was he getting it? He was the chocolate crack dealer."

Renée Zellweger
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




MJ: What's up with you and chocolate?

VM: I love it!

MJ: You also tend to come bearing gifts. Is that a product of the cultures you were raised in?

VM: Maybe. Maybe it's just a product of the way my family is.

Viggo Mortensen, King of The Road
By Michael Mechanic
Mother Jones
23 November 2009




…he stashes chocolate on his person like a marsupial…

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




'I have a sweet tooth; I love candy. They say that chocolate is good for the digestion. But if it wasn't, I wouldn't care. Of course, I love the ones that leave a bitter aftertaste.'

Viggo Mortensen - Actor
By Robert Lindsey - Translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
Esquire (Spain)
3 January 2010




He… presents me with two large chocolate squares, one wrapped in pink paper that has a handwritten "Venezuela" on it, and another in orange paper that has a handwritten "Indonesia".

I am not sure whether he handwrapped them himself or whether they came from a hand-wrapped chocolate shop. I imagine him travelling the world with a suitcase of wrapped chocolates.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




Asked about his favorite kind of chocolate, he e-mailed a detailed answer chronicling the lengthy history of "exploitation and child slavery connected to cocoa cultivation and production." (For the record, he likes single-bean organic chocolate from Venezuela, where such abuses are not the case, he says.)

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




"He's an unbelievable man. He brings chocolates to the set, expensive haute cuisine chocolates, and he hands it out in plastic bags. He writes music and he's painting and doing poems; you feel pathetic around him."

Jason Isaacs
Jason Isaacs Loved Working With Chocolate Man Mortensen
ContactMusic.com
1 March 2012




"Viggo blew me away on a daily basis..…He spent time in Russia and every day he would come to the set with something interesting: a piece of writing or a Russian chocolate..."

Naomi Watts
Matt Mueller, Total Film
October 2007




A few days later, as evening fell, he returned to Valdeteja bringing with him an enormous bag of goodies for the town's kids who by now know that Viggo never arrives empty-handed. There, in Anabel's bar, he resembled Jesus among the children. Scores of kids cavorted around him, watching eagerly as Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like Santa Claus to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
20 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita




He gives, unsparingly, indiscriminately, ceaselessly. What's good for him is good for everyone. So the whole team benefits from his yen for chocolate, going through an entire bagful of chocolate bars every day, at his insistence. He has a weakness for a special variety, a mix of bacon and milk chocolate.

The Road Again
By Gerard Delorme - translated by Chrissiejane
Premiere (France)
June 2008




There was only one thing that I was irritated with: he was on a diet of chocolate, really dark chocolate and red meat. That's it. He brought all of these great chocolates from everywhere in the world and shared them with the crew. I'm still addicted to dark chocolate. I can't get away from it."

John Hillcoat
Hitting 'The Road' with Director John Hillcoat
Matt Mazur
Popmatters
22 November 2009




'There was a chocolate shaped Oscar at the Governor's Ball with gold wrapping and I remember I ate the head off of that.'

Viggo Mortensen Heads Down 'The Road'
By Fred Topel
Crave Online
25 November 2009


Quotable Viggo: 13 June 2015

The recent El Mundo Q&A had two pithy little gems that reminded me what a wicked sense of humour Viggo has. Quite a few of the ones I've rounded up below have been knocking around for a while, but I'm determined to give them regular outings to brighten our weekends!



© Vanessa Ragone.


Have you ever been in the Sahara? What do you expect to find there?

Yes, in Algeria and Morocco. I expect to find a lot of sand. That's the only sure thing.

Encounters - Direct Response from Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
21 April 2015




Do you feel like a Renaissance man?


No, because at 500 years old, I wouldn't be able to get anything right.

Encounters - Direct Response from Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
21 April 2015




What single thing would improve the quality of your life?

Not dying.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
by Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010




"Thank God for special effects, makeup the voice dubbing and all that. They completely replaced Kodi, thank God! We had Andy Serkis do it."

Viggo talking about 'The Road'
Viggo Mortensen sets the record straight about his acting career, 'The Road' and 'The Hobbit'
By Carla Hay
Examiner.com
25November 2009




Me: We have to talk about women, because you are the sexiest man alive.

Him: So there are a lot of dead men who are sexier?

Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish
By Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




"It comes from a very good tailor in Boedo, in Buenos Aires. San Lorenzo de Almagro".

Viggo on being asked who tailored his Golden Globes suit
Mortensen highlights his Argentinian team at the Golden Globes
By E J Tamara - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Publimetro
16 January 2012




Following the press Q&A, as he left the stage, he paused, looked at the huge 'Viggo Mortensen' image on the screen behind him, and said, 'You spelled my name wrong…' There was a horrified moment as the organisers checked in panic – then he smiled, 'No, just kidding….'

Viggo after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




What was it that got you interested in A Dangerous Method? Was it mostly working again with Cronenberg, or the psychological theme ? Or both?


Firstly, working with David Cronenberg again. Secondly, the bait that David threw my way, in the form of an elaborate system of undergarments that Sigmund Freud was reputed to have employed on some of his summer excursions deep into the Alps. They included an elaborate system of miniaturised pulleys and wires that assisted in muscular stimulation for the steeper climbs. I was allowed to wear these undergarments in all scenes whether I was climbing or not.

Viggo Mortensen
Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




"We can do some doll therapy if anyone's interested…"

Viggo talking about 'Sigi' the Freud doll in San Lorenzo colours
at the Venice Film Festival ADM Press Conference
2 September 2011




On the stillness in Nikolai's character:

"They had to freeze-frame me"

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




Viggo Mortensen scrubbed up for the big night. The best-actor nominee prepped by taking "my annual bath. It was an arduous process of refilling the tub many times."

Viggo on Oscar night
Donna Freydkin and William Keck
USA Today
25 February 2008




'Ridley Scott's filming George Orwell's Animal Farm and I'm playing the goat...'

Viggo on being asked if he's grown his beard for a new role
BBC Breakfast Television
13 May 201
4



"I like to live dangerously. Last night I was quietly at home, cooking a meal of chicken, onions and garlic, Cuban style, and then here I am today facing a pack of journalists."

Viggo Mortensen Talks About "Jauja" and "Far from Men"
By Martin Dale
Variety
7 December 2014




"I'm hoping to shoot a movie with an elephant soon, and I've no idea where I'm going to put him."

Viggo asked about buying horses from his films
Long Live the King
By Paul Byrne
Wow.ie
April 2004




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?

My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...


If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005




How are you doing with sins?

Lately, quite well. You do what you can where you can. Without hurting anyone.

Do you think you'll go to hell?

Well, I like to travel.

"When I wake up I think of death"
By Karmentxu Marín - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais
9 September 2012




Hi Viggo, aside from knowing your lines, what's the most important thing you do to prepare yourself before you go in front of camera?


Breathe.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012


Quotable Viggo: 7 June 2015


While doing some recent late night channel flicking I came across Viggo facing off Michael Douglas on the Ferry and stayed so I could get those glimpses of David Shaw hunched on the floor in his paint spattered loft with those enormous works of art. A Perfect Murder is sort of perfect Viggo – a subtle performance, extreme set dressing and, of course, he looks gorgeous. Time to get our your DVDs?




© Warner Brothers.


"Normally I think it's an extreme lack of ideas to make re-makes," Viggo Mortensen says, "but on the other side – when you can make "Hamlet" over and over again why not Hitchcock?"

Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998




"....my movies are a kind of photo album for me. When I look at them some years from now, they'll reflect my feelings and where I was at that time. The pants I wear are some I found in Denmark. Other belongings are some things I got from my aunt in Jystrup. They're just some small things which make me feel at home and more relaxed," Viggo says.

Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998




"Viggo's ability to go into his part is very special. And his demands on himself are unique. For instance, he lived for a long time in his character's shabby apartment in Brooklyn to identify himself with the character," says the producer Arnold Kopelson, who also was very impressed about one of the sex scenes between Viggo and Gwyneth Paltrow, a scene which was obviously too strong and authentic for the studio bosses and was, therefore, cut out of the movie.

Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998




'All three of the main characters in A Perfect Murder are ambiguous. At my first meeting with Gwyneth, I took two photographs of her. I used both of them for the main art work in Murder. It helped me to believe in my character.'

Viggo Mortensen
Versatile Viggo
By Louis B Hobson
Calgary Sun
5 June 1998




Because of his role [as a painter] Mortensen had to face an interesting phenomenon: Would David Shaw's images reflect the artistic feelings of himself, Viggo Mortensen or do they belong to the character of David Shaw?

"I think both are right", answered Mortensen, "I didn't have time to occupy myself too much with this duality. I think that the artwork represents on the one hand my own subconsiousness and on the other hand my ideas on who David is."

Warner Brothers German Press Release
Translated for V-W by always smiling




'...I'm surprised they let me do that, actually. There was just a little time before we were going to start and I just asked, "What if I did this myself? I showed them a couple of small samples and they said sure if I made this bigger and I said OK. So it was one of those things where you're at a job interview and they say can you speak Chinese? Because if you can speak Chinese you've got the job. And, of course, you go, "Yeah sure. You'll water ski or whatever. Then, you just figure you'll figure out how to speak Chinese between now and next Wednesday. Well maybe it's not that extreme... I like to draw and stuff but the reason they used photography in it was because that was something that I did know and I had a certain stock pile of images I could play with. That helped!'

Viggo Mortensen on doing the paintings in A Perfect Murder
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart,
by Carnell,
Carpe Noctem magazine #15, 1999




'I just went crazy. I couldn't sleep. I did about 45 paintings in two weeks.'

Viggo Mortensen on A Perfect Murder
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
by Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




Interviewer: Is it true that you sang serenades to calm Gwyneth Paltrow before the love scenes in 'A Perfect Murder'?

Viggo: How do you know that?

Interviewer: She has said that herself.

Viggo:
That is correct. To calm her and create a certain atmosphere of intimacy I did sing a couple of love songs that I learned in Argentina when I was young. I don't know if that ended up scaring her instead.

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Høi
M/S Magazine
August 2001




Q: What surprised you about your other costar, Michael Douglas?

A: Just before Christmas, Michael was singing Christmas songs all day long, but he'd change the lyrics and he'd make the crew sing along, too. It was just goofy. You don't think of him as being that kind of a dorky guy.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
August 1998




In the end, the actor who makes the biggest impression is Viggo Mortensen, whose gentle presence seems to be masking some diabolical undercurrents. He's the only character who keeps us guessing throughout, and he manages to steal every scene he appears in by slyly underplaying the role.

Judge Clark Douglas
DVD Verdict
12 June 2012




In 'A Perfect Murder' he is - in spite of Michael Douglas's and Gwyneth Paltrow's presence - the star.

Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001




Mr. Mortensen has the movie's richest role as the duplicitous painter who is coerced into agreeing to murder his lover. In the scenes in which he is supposed to appear sympathetic, he insinuates enough surliness to give his character a disquieting undertone of potential violence. But once David has been established as a rat, the actor shows flashes of pained regret for having to kill a woman he half loves.

Stephen Holden
New York Times
June 5, 1998




Viggo Mortensen undergoes an interesting transformation in his key scene with Douglas; we believe him when he's a nice guy, and we believe him even more when he's not; he doesn't do a big style shift, he simply turns off his people-pleasing face.

Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-times
June 5, 1998




But Viggo Mortensen, well heck, now there's an actor with some bite!! If you have yet to hear much about this man, open your ears, and listen wide. This guy can act...and act well goddammit! I have loved almost all of his performances, with his role in THE INDIAN RUNNER (5/10) and last year's G.I. JANE (6/10) standing out in my mind, and certainly a force to reckon for all great future character roles. Watch for him...he's hot!

Berge Garabedian
Joblo.com
November 2, 1998

Quotable Viggo: 31 May 2015

You could call this week's Quotable 'short and sweet', 'got it in one', 'hitting the nail on the head', 'getting straight to the point' or just very, very short quotes...



© Ami de Casablanca.


Cerebral, spiritual, sex symbol in spite of himself.

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)
2 February 2015




Constitutionally incapable of creative blockage.

True Colors
By Margot Dougherty
Los Angeles Magazine
1998




…the very definition of a 21st century Renaissance Man.

Validation for Viggo
Filmstew
Richard Horgan
22 January 2008




Actor, poet, photographer, musician and always exquisitely provocative.

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008




He never had Champagne dreams and caviar wishes.

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say can do better.

The Man Who Would Be King
By Nick Dent
Black & White magazine, #58
December 2001




He's a pretty intense guy — with a mellow sort of presence.

After "The Road" Viggo Mortensen Looks on the Bright Side: "You Could Always Be Dead"
By Jeffrey Podolsky
Wall Street Journal
17 November 2009




He's one of the best actors at not doing anything and making you watch him all the more.

Ty Burr
Boston Globe: Take 2
October 2008




'I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011




Mortensen speaks five languages, and seems happy to discuss football in all of them.

Interview: Viggo Mortensen, actor
Scotsman.com
9 February 2012




The Argentinian. The cuervo. The Lord of the Rings. The one who teaches people to drink mate on million dollar sets.

The Habit Of Giving It All
By Juan Manuel Dominguez - translated by Ollie, Sage and Zooey
Perfil
20 June 2010




Viggo Mortensen doesn't talk with his hands so much as he batters the air.

On 'The Road' and off, Viggo Mortensen walks the walk
By Scott Bowles
USA Today
3 December 2009




No smart pop-quotes fly from his mouth.

The American Dane
by Susanne Johansson
Translation by Majken Steen Thomassen
Berlingske Tidende, 2001




He's like a one-man United Nations.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




In a world of paste reproductions Viggo Mortensen is a rare gem of creative energy.

Viggo Mortensen: An Artist For All Seasons
by Richard Marcus
BNN Blogger News Network
6 May 2005




With Viggo you don't just get a violin, you get a whole symphony orchestra.

David Cronenberg
RT talks Eastern Promises
By Sara Schieron, Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007




Viggo Mortensen is not about the words. He's about being... present. .......

Ray Pride
Movie City News
Review Date: March 4, 2004




When the elements, the weather and the terrain get tough, Viggo gets going.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




He has that incurable, unbearable, enigmatic eroticism of a three in the morning dream you've just awakened from.

Talking With Viggo
George Magazine 1999




Viggo wears his beauty so carelessly and deflects flattery with a wry head-on-the-side smile of modesty.

Ian McKellen
"The White book", Mckellen.com
July 15, 2003




Arguably the most unconventional, maverick A-list actor around.

Five Things We Learned In Toronto From The 'A Dangerous Method' Star
Oliver Lyttelton
The Playlist
14 September 2011




There's a good chance Mortensen has the smallest shoe collection in Hollywood.

Viggo Mortensen Rides Back In 'Hidalgo'
By Jae-Ha Kim
Chicago Sun-Times
29 February 2004




The man has never disappointed us.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."

David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007

[B][COLOR=#ffff00]

Quotable Viggo: 23 May 2015

Wondering through my extensive Quotes Archive looking for inspiration (for sci-fi fans among you, they are now larger than The Library and The Warehouse combined), I wandered into my 'colleagues quotes about Viggo' section. Some are oldies but goodies and they always fill my heart with joy – and yours too, I'm guessing. To quote Michael K Williams who worked with Viggo on The Road, they've all been Viggo-tized (still my favourite word).



Image Larry Horricks.
© Good Films.



"He's a really beautiful, delicate artist of a man. He's nothing like any other actor I've worked with."

Jason Issacs
Good premier, Toronto
7 September 2008




'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"I'm really honoured and privileged to introduce to you a man of conviction, of compassion, intelligence, artistic integrity, a great actor and a fine citizen of the world, a man I'm proud to call my friend : Viggo Mortensen."

Ed Harris introducing Viggo at Deauville
With thanks to Dom and Ellie
13 September 2008




'He's never different,' the guitarist says. There's a long silence. 'He doesn't seem like he belongs in this time.'

Buckethead on Viggo
Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish, by Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




"Viggo's … a real artist. He cares about what speaks to him. He doesn't care about how much he's paid, doesn't care where he lives, doesn't care how nice the hotel is. He's a horse. I feel like he could go all day, work all day and he's polite and creative and generous. That made it easy. Not only is he physically gifted, he's graceful and tough."

Garret Dillahunt
Fred Topel
CraveOnline
20 March 2009




Viggo writes, paints, takes photos, composes music. Is he as remarkable as he seems?


Yes, and there's an obsessiveness that borders on genius. He has such a strong personality and whatever mood he's in you feel. He is an artist in every way.

Hossein Amini, Director of Two Faces of January
Viggo Mortensen & Kirsten Dunst Open Up About New Movie, Paparazzi & Being Boring
By Dorri Olds
The Blot Magazine
26 September 2014




'Viggo is a wonderful mate. He's an unusual and very special guy, and I admire him because he will never adjust to other people's ideas of how he should be.'

Elijah Wood
Viggo: "I'm shy with women"
By - translated by Suzy
Vecko-Revyn #3
30 January 2003




Right now there is a resurgence of the hero but invested with those qualities we are most devoid of. Quite often, most of the time, they are fictional characters that have been wrongly embellished with those things we wanted to see. But at other times, occasionally, the flesh-and-blood hero emerges, stationed on a corner, wandering the streets or simply sharing fragments of his existence. Viggo Mortensen occupies that place of the ultimate present hero.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




Viggo Mortensen was a delight to work with on The Two Faces Of January. There was one occasion where I had a fitting with him in Barcelona but Viggo had just come down with a fever and was completely delirious. He was sweating buckets and he confessed to his girlfriend afterwards that he hadn't a clue what he was trying on, but he remained professional to the core. I wasn't aware how bad he was until he confessed to me later that he could have been trying on bin bags for all he'd known.

Steven Noble
ESQ&A: The Hollywood Costume Designer
By Tom Ward
Esquire Magazine
6 December 2014




'Getting to know him has been a gift from life. During the shooting of Alatriste, he behaved like a true gentleman; he not only made the movie, but he also did many more things. He is a 100% professional, a superb actor.'

Portrait - A Good Friend
By Agustín Díaz Yanes - translated for V-W by Graciela
El Mundo
20 November 2009




"Viggo Mortensen's dedication to his craft and to the world of the story he's telling have been an inspiration to me for years," said Ross. "There is a depth to his art that I greatly admire. Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




'He'll show up at your door barefoot. It's real with him - it's not an affectation. He is very much of the earth. He's relaxed and in the moment and he brings real emotions to the table. He's very human with great artistic sensibilities.'

Dennis Hopper
Super Natural
by Anna David
Daily Telegraph 2002




And Viggo Mortensen -- he is the most beautiful man in the world! He is! He's just like, wow! He's such a special dude.'

Michael Fassbender
Michael Fassbender, future superstar
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
8 March 2011




"He's circumspect around people," says director Tony Goldwyn (A Walk on the Moon). "He has high standards, so he's not Mr. Friendly to everybody. But I think he just tries to be careful, because once he opens up, there's none of the artifice or barriers you find with most people."

Viggo Trip
By Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




"Viggo's a leader, just by sheer dint of his personality. He's an example to us all. He's a massive work-horse, like a massive multiplex. You can go through one door and he's a photographer, then you go through the next door and he's a singer. Then you go and look at his poetry and his art and there's his films! I'm not jealous at all [laughs]. And he's just a great guy and my friend."

Bernard Hill
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




'All great artists reveal themselves more in their work than in interviews. Every time Viggo's in front of the camera or picks up a pen or a canvas or a camera, he's opening the door to his heart. This is where he's telling you the secrets of his life . . . Viggo cannot strike a fake note. I say with absolute experience that if he doesn't believe it, he won't do it.'

Philip Ridley, Director
The Reflecting Skin and The Passion of Darkly Noon
The Telegraph

2002



'It's hard to say too much about how cool he is. If you spend enough time with people they will do something to piss you off, or that shows them to be just a normal human being, but I think Viggo does like to push himself to be just the best person he can, and that comes across. If you believe in reincarnation, he does seem to be quite far along his line. He does seem to have learned a lot of lessons, and seems quite old and wise. But he's not a serious fuddy-duddy. '

Billy Boyd
Lone Star
By Peter Ross
Sunday Herald, 2004




"I love Viggo - it really is a collaboration," Cronenberg says. "It's like a marriage. You might see two people together and not understand why they are, but they know. We know. We feel we can get the best out of each other."

Viggo's 'Promises'
By Sara Stewart
New York Post
26 Aug 2007




"Come on, we've all been Viggo-tized before," Williams says of the 'Lord of the Rings' stud and 'Road' co-star. "He has that charisma, he has a swagger. He's a great dude."

Michael K Williams
'Wire' Hero Michael K. Williams Loved Getting 'Viggo-tized' on 'The Road'
Popeater.com
Bryan Alexander
19 November 2009

Quotable Viggo: 16 May 2015

As the Magical Mystery Tour has travelled around Denmark all week in the Jaujamobile, time to take a look at all things Danish! For all his travels, Denmark is often described by Viggo as 'home', providing a fixed point that anchors him with strong family connections. As a mixture of the 'methodical North and more chaotic South' of Argentina, how does he juggle both the places he loves?



© Images: Ludvig Dittmann


'There is no doubt that my heart beats heavily for Denmark...'

Ekstra Bladet
By Kim Kastrup - translated by Rosen
25 September 2007
Source: Ekstra Bladet




What is it about Denmark that you like?


I don`t know. It`s just home somehow.

Viggo and Aunt Tulle Meet the Press in Denmark
TVA
22 October 2005




I'd like to know about the origin of the name Viggo; do you know anything about that?


It's a name that's been in all the generations of my family, in the Danish part of my family. Like all names, it comes and goes. Right now, it's relatively common but when I was born, it was seen as an odd name, an old-fashioned one. Viggo is a name that can be found in Norse sagas; it's a very old name.

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
20 Minutos
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
6 September 2012




"It would be like being called Herbert…"

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




Following university, he travelled to Copenhagen to discover his Danish roots, exploring, picking up work at the docks and in a flower market. "It felt important that I should know about that part of me."

The Outsider
By Martyn Palmer
The Times
17 September 2005




"In Denmark, I discovered the sense of family and a certain work ethic. I am very close to my uncles, aunts, cousins and I am emotionally very open with them. I am a strange mixture of very methodical North and more chaotic South."

Viggo Mortensen - The Anti-star
By - translated by Kaijamin
Paris Match
2 October 2008




"I very strongly feel that I share a common past with my family in Denmark. And feel connected to the Scandinavian mythology, when I walk in the forest at Jystrup, where there are many tales told of what has happened. The Danish woods look like Tolkien's, they are the kind that doesn't look dangerous, but if you walk alone by night in the forests of Denmark, you can feel the energies of the past. I felt that already as a child, back then when I played with swords there outside my uncle's farm, played and felt like a Viking."

Viggo Mortensen
The American Dane
By Susanne Johansson - Translation by Majken Steen Thomassen
Berlingske Tidende
28 November 2001




How much are you looking forward to becoming a Lego figure?

I already am a Lego figure! Very proud to be a part of Danish industry in that way.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




It was the World Cup at the time, so he's a massive football fan, so all these flags started going in his trailer. He had a picture of the Queen of Denmark up. I was watching him from my trailer, "What's he doing today?" [Laughs] He's a very interesting guy.

Michael Fassbender on meeting Viggo
Michael Fassbender Explores A Dangerous Method with Movie Fanatic
by Joel D Amos
Moviefanatic.com
25 November 2011




"...my father is from Denmark, I´ve lived in that country and speak the strange language they speak there. And for many years, I'd dreamt of working, in Danish, under the helm of one of the great Scandinavian film directors. And so the occasion finally arrived. It took place deep in Patagonia."

Viggo's Best Actor Acceptance Speech at the Fénix Awards
transcribed and translated by Ollie and Zoe
30 October 2014




I take a seat among my compatriots Ghita and Viilbjørk. People laugh several times, the Danes the most. It's because the film, besides being beautiful and profound, has very Danish humor, dry and ironic. Dinesen is a kind of Scandinavian Quixote.

Viggo talking about the Jauja Cannes Premier
Something Material
By Viggo Mortensen, Fabián Casas and Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
31 May 2014




[His] poetry works because Mortensen is Scandinavian (Danish father, American mother), says Manhire, "and there is this Scandinavian myth about how poetry is a mixture of blood and honey - his poetry has that mixture."

Bill Manhire, Victoria University, NZ
"I'm a poet" - Rings star Mortensen
by Josie McNaught
Sunday Star-Times 2003




'In Denmark, I dine at 6 pm and I'm Danish. In Spain, where I live now, I dine at 10 pm and I'm Latin.'

Viggo Mortensen: "Travelling is the best anti-war weapon"
By Yetty Hagendorf - translated by Donna Marie
Le Soir (Belgium)
2 February 2015




So who would Viggo side with if, for example, Denmark and Argentina met in the next World Championship final?


"Oh, that's a very difficult question that I have often asked myself. It's not unthinkable at all, because both Denmark and Argentina play good football," Mortensen says, and adds: "But if they really met each other in the World Championship final, I'd buy both countries national team jumpers and cut them through the middle. And then I'd sew them together again to make one jumper. In that way I could cheer both Denmark and Argentina. But I think it would be very difficult as far as I can see if the two teams play against each other."

I Love Danish Football
By Kim Kastrup - translated by Chrissie
Ekstra Bladet
24 July 2007




Someplace, in the back of your mind, you need to have a fix point, a place you call home, and Denmark is that to me'.

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001




If you could go back in time, where would you go?


To the first Viking ship to land in North America.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
By Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010
The Guardian


Quotable Viggo: 2 May 2015

This last month has seen a whole bunch of Loin Des Hommes (Far from Men) reviews coming out, leading up to yesterday's US release. As there have been so many to read, scattered through several pages of our Loin Des Hommes thread, I thought a little round-up was required. I've concentrated on Viggo's performance, which - along with a wonderful performance from Reda Kateb - has completely blown critics away.



Image Michael Crotto.
© One World Films.



In "Far From Men," Viggo Mortensen, his sharply planed face weathered and solemn, plays a man who looks as if he were quarried right out of the hard red-rock earth.

Manohla Dargis
New York Times
30 April 2015




Mortensen again proves to be one of today's few actors who can evoke quiet self-sufficiency and absolute resolution, à la Gary Cooper. The odd fragility of his features—he truly looks here like a man who has been reduced by solitude and ascetic living to the barest necessary husk of self—convinces us totally that Daru is a modern anchorite as well as an ex-soldier who has known terrible times.

Jonathan Romney
Film Comment
1 May 2015




...filmmaker David Oelhoffen's more significant achievement is in the casting of a never-better Mortensen, who possesses the sort of face that conveys volumes in virtual silence and the similarly expressive French Algerian actor Kateb.

Michael Rechtshaffen
LA Times
1 May 2015




Daru is the kind of unassuming, quiet character immediately made interesting by the fact that Mortensen is portraying him: There's a haunted quality to the actor's presence — to the way he moves, to the way he hesitates before speaking — that makes us pay attention whenever he's onscreen.

Bilge Ebiri
Vulture
1 May 2015




Needless to say the film would fall to pieces if not for some strong central performances, and those are thankfully damn solid. Daru is played by notorious polyglot Viggo Mortensen, who speaks only French and Arabic throughout the entire film. I'm not expert enough in either language to say if he has the wrong accent, but it all sounded very convincing. Unsurprisingly, he is great as the conflicted and sensitive teacher who turns out to be a bad-ass survivor as well (truth be told, Mortensen can probably do such roles in his sleep by now).

Ard Vijn
Twitch Film
30 April 2015




Far from Men often suggests a less defiant cover of The Defiant Ones, yet it's a must-see for Mortensen's characteristically wonderful performance. One of the most subtly physically tactile of great actors, he masterfully dramatizes the war between the said and the unsaid. Daru might cut a startlingly progressive western figure (and, indeed, it's refreshing to see a film that's entirely about the prevention of revenge), but he's still a man's man who's uncomfortable with expressing the totality of his emotions, though they have a tendency to come burbling up. A moment between Daru and a Spanish prostitute is heartbreaking for the various tentative registers that are visible on Mortensen's face as Daru's eventually driven to directly utter his mind's occupation: that it's been such a long time since he's been with someone. This confrontation of expression is later reprised in the film's best scene, in which the teacher nearly cries when telling his students that this is their last class, though he wants it to transpire as any other. This deftly haunting acknowledgment of loss is worth a hundred anti-war sermons.

Chuck Bowen
Slant Magazine
22 April 2015




Viggo Mortensen is terrific as Daru. He shows the conflicts of a principled man living in an unprincipled time, almost exclusively through minor shifts of his face and eyes. Few actors can say as much as he can by saying little.

Dana Lemaste
Thinking Cinema
25 April 2015




The film is an impressive and entertaining achievement in which Mortensen yet again proves he's capable of shouldering a film that lives or dies based on its ability to deliver equal parts action and drama.

Zach Hollwedel
Under the Radar Magazine
27 April 2015




It is through his captive's selflessness and thoughts on war, that Daru discovers the importance of sacrifice and comes to the realisation that he must leave Algeria in order to be safe. These epiphanies register with powerful quietude on Mortensen's face, its own landscape into which all the complexities of his character are etched as well as larger ruminations on identity, heritage and violence. Viggo once again shows remarkable versatility, projecting all these emotions while speaking in French and Arabic throughout; two more languages to add to a growing collection of none-English speaking roles including the recent Jauja.

Jordan McGrath
Vérité Magazine
8 February 2015




Marked by images in which the two travelers are dwarfed by their imposing surroundings, as well as the sound of the wind scraping against the barren landscape, Far From Men crafts a haunting atmosphere of alienation for its story of outcasts forging an unlikely bond. Its plotting is often a tad too plodding, but with the charismatic Mortensen exuding understated internal crisis (in a French- and Arabic-speaking role), Oelhoffen's film proves a compelling portrait of individuals striving to cope with, and at least somewhat overcome, cultural dislocation.

Nick Schager
LA Weekly
29 April 2015




With such recent films as Jauja, Viggo Mortensen has proven himself to be one of the world's finest and most versatile actors. Far From Men brilliantly continues this trend....

...Far From Men, with its rugged North African landscape and its plot of delivering a prisoner to the authorities, evokes classic Westerns in its form. It's essentially a two-hander which slowly reveals the histories and personalities of its two characters, and how they are shaped by their own stories of violence and the sweeping changes that are about to visit their country. The film is a beautifully evocative piece, with mesmerizing central performances and use of landscape, enhanced by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis' brooding and haunting score.

Christopher Bourne
Twitch Film
17 April 2015




Subtle but powerful performances by a steely Mortensen and a languid Kateb elevate the film, along with handsome cinematography by Guillaume Deffontaines and a minimalistic score by Nick Cave and his frequent collaborator, Warren Ellis. Mortensen, a well-known polyglot, speaks convincing French and Arabic.

Chelsea Now
9 April 2015




Nobody moseys like Viggo Mortensen. In The Road, Appaloosa, Jauja, and the new French Western Far From Men, the erstwhile Aragorn masters the tricky art of being a figure in the landscape. When it comes to traipsing either purposefully or desperately across the widescreen frame, he's several lengths ahead of the competition...

By Adam Nayman
AV Club
30 April 2015

Quotable Viggo: 26 April 2015

I have a mixed Bag of quotes this week, old and new, and all centred on acting. We have Viggo's thoughts on choosing roles, awards, why he loves the preparation period most of all and also his thoughts on when it all goes wrong...



© 4L Productions.


'Dreams about becoming famous wasn't what got me into acting to begin with, but the dream about telling stories.'

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




"It takes me a long time to say yes to something. But once I do, I'm there."

Viggo talking about choosing his films
Adam Nayman
Globe and Mail
9 September 2014




'There's no better thing as I'm concerned in my profession than to be called reliable. Sounds boring, but if someone can count on you to do a job well, or as best that you can, that's what I strive for…'

Let's Get Viggo'd at The Coolidge
by Megan Johnson
Boston Herald Blog
6 March 2012




'I don't really have a game plan. I've never really had one. Some people say, "Hollywood prefers this now," and I always go, "What is Hollywood? I really don't know what that is." I don't plan to do big or small movies.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Dangerous Method' Taught Me How to Talk in a Movie
By Michael Hogan
Moviefone
23 November 2011




"I´m getting to know myself bit by bit (laughs) and one thing that always happens is that when I´m on the right path I get a little scared. Rather quickly. Always, after saying "yes", hanging up the phone or coming out of the office... they´ve said to you "OK! We choose you." or "Your test was the best." Or they call you sometimes, and if you are lucky, they say "We thought you´d do this role very well." You read it, you think about the script and make the leap. And everything is fine but at the moment you do it, myself at least, then I get scared and think "Well, they think I can do it, but I don´t know." The truth is that I say it half jokingly, but a lot of times I say "I don´t know how to act. Don´t know how to act!" Because you look at each character..."How do you do this?""

Viggo Mortensen
Lleida Festival Press Conference
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
April 2011




'Working with fantasy is, in a certain way, a childish activity. However, 'it's childish behavior' is often said in a pejorative way. How many times have we heard that phrase? I think that it's something that doesn't have to be negative. Childish behavior? Yes, thanks! Me, I'm really interested in going to that extreme. Perhaps other actors aren't.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"I love that process before you start shooting, because the filming-the-movie experience, the shooting of the movie itself, doesn't turn out to be the movie you thought it might be. The period before, there's no limit. ... I love that period because that's always good – that's never bad."

Viggo Mortensen
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




Photography, like his painting and writing, gives him a sense of completion acting doesn't. "I see them all as the same thing, the only difference being that in acting you have to give it away," he says. "Unfinished paintings, that's what I keep handing in as an actor."

Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
2002




'I don't think there is any such thing as "Method Acting" because method is "what works," you know?'

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




Are you a disciplined actor, one of those that just obeys the director or are you one of those that asks many questions, constantly needing notes from the director?

Of the second kind… Any time of the day or night. I fry the director.

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




"I am not a fan of directors who use scenes that depict violence to show off their camera moves and display their callous immaturity. I find their work unrealistic and generally a waste of time and talent.'

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




'Films are teamwork and there are actors who don't mind saying that the film was a piece of shit but I was just fine. I don't like that. If the film doesn't work, there's nothing. It's like saying, I'm the top scorer, but my team didn't make it to the final.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"When it works, acting is the easiest and most fun job in the world. When everything goes wrong, it can become the most embarrassing and humiliating. And there, unfortunately, no one can help you."

By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




'For me, awards are a lottery; if it's your turn, it's your turn. I don't remember who told me, but it's like Churchill's medals: "You shouldn't go in search of them, but must accept them and never wear them."'

Viggo Mortensen
Alatriste, The Modern Hero
By Robert Andres Gomez - translated by Margarita
El Universal
25 March 2007




''I'm not gonna be rude about it. I'll show up for the ceremony. But I didn't participate in the everyday ... I dunno what they do, cocktail parties, keeping in people's minds, trying to convince people to vote for them. It's like, 'ugh, I'd rather just let the work speak', you know.

Viggo on the Oscars
Viggo Mortensen on his new film Good
Neala Johnson
Herald Sun
8 April 2009




"You put it out there, you promote it, but I can't predict what you or anyone else is going to think of it. I just know if it's a story I want to tell. And, maybe this sounds selfish, but however it turns out, I've still had the great experience of researching it, and studying it, and doing it, and that's the most valuable thing to me. Because that knowledge I've gained — that's something I keep. That's mine."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




MP: So why, with so many outlets to your passion and so many of them making up the components of film -

MORTENSEN: That's a perfect universe, movies. It has everything.

Viggo Mortensen - For The Good Of The People
By Elliot V Kotek
Moving Pictures
Winter 2008-2009

Quotable Viggo: 12 April 2015

My favourite Viggoism of the week comes from the Telegraph where he said that life is 'really not about where you are, but how you are.' This was wrapped in yet another anecdote about getting lost in in the wild, this time on a Lapland trail. He's mastered the art of being alone without being lonely, seeing isolation as those valuable 'little pockets of time for private refection' that he referred to in our latest ' A Question for Viggo'.



© New Line Productions Inc.


'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




'I love the solitude; I need it often. Silence and solitude are necessary for my work as an actor, editor and writer.'

Viggo Mortensen: "You must live your contradictions"
Le Magazine Litteraire
23 March 2015




'I'm a very sociable person, but I love to be alone, to listen to the silence, to not speak to anyone for a while. What would drive some people crazy gives me energy.'

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
Lecturas Magazine
30 August 2006




'The forest, the rivers, being alone in those places, it´s like food to me.'

The Past Is In Everything
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 August 2014




As a child he was a loner, which is unsurprising considering his peripatetic lifestyle. "I wrote stories and did a lot of drawing," he says. "It's why I'm comfortable being by myself and why I yearn for it at times. When you're on a movie set you're with people constantly. So when it gets to lunchtime I just go off by myself. I've always been like that. I'm self-sufficient and I like being with my own thoughts. It prepares me for being around people. But I know others have to constantly check their email or phone messages and if an hour of silence goes by, they panic. I'm just not like that."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




...there is something to be said for being isolated and out of phone range, because you can fall into a habit to such a degree that you don't even realise that you've lost something: silence.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




I can only speak for myself, but I would go crazy if I couldn't get out of the city and go out into the forest for a little while.

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014




'I like feeling very free and open to the world. Any time I'm outdoors, whether it's in a desert or a sea or the forest. I like the elements - whatever the weather is, I don't feel that any moment is wasted at all.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




"I am a loner who flees from stress, I feel good living close to nature, living with the same rhythm as animals and weather, no pressure, no constraints, no deadlines. I write poems, I paint, I read, I phone my friends, I plunge into thought and all of a sudden without my having seen the hours go by, night falls…"

Viggo Mortensen, Beautiful Savage
Richard Gianorio
Le Figaro
26 September 2008




'Aragorn and I shared the same paradox: we are solitary beings, even though we love company. He enjoys being together with his companions during all the various adventures in the story, and I enjoy belonging to a troupe of actors. Aragorn, like me, has travelled long and far and knows many diverse cultures. He also feels at home in nature and I have never hidden my happiness when working in isolated and wild locations. Perhaps there are other similarities that I can't analyse. The best things don't open themselves up to explanation!'

The King Is Mortensen, Long Live The King!
By Marc Toullec
Cine Live #71
September 2003




"My house is the Atlas mountains or the Iceland ice, the forest, the rivers or the sea, the stars, the setting sun. If I stop one day, I die. You must make the difference between loneliness and isolation: between the two, I see a road that can take me farther than I would dare imagine. And wherever this leads me, I still want to take it!"

"You must read Camus if you're plugged in"
By Cécile Lecoultre - translated by Donna Marie
24 Heures
27 January 2015




...the rare Hollywood actor who is happiest when alone with a book, his thoughts and the stars in the sky.

Hot Actor - Viggo Mortensen
By G. E.
September 2003
Source: Rolling Stone (U.S.)




'But sometimes I miss what it's like to soak up metropolitan poisons. I love and am terrified by the great cities of the world, sometimes simultaneously.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013


Quotable Viggo: 5 April 2015

Yesterday's Herald Scotland interview which mentioned the 'spectacularly awful whiskers' cheered me up no end. It's about time I had another quote to add to my collection of bon mots about Viggo's hair which, in the locked vault of my Quotable collection, have a section all of their own. Some below are oldies but goodies (though I managed to resist my all-time favourites: the 'stubble farm' and one journalist's desire to build a 'nest in his beard') and some are new ones I've managed to ferret out.



© New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.


One area the actor always takes seriously, whether in The Lord of the Rings or Eastern Promises, is hair. For Appaloosa, Mortensen grew a thick goatee and bushy mustache while keeping his haircut military short, a reflection of Hitch's training at West Point.

"I showed up with it that way and just kind of maintained it," he says. "I based it on pictures."

As Mortensen discusses his versatile hair options, Harris, 57, chuckles. "I wish I had some versatile hair options," he says. "I actually had a (hair) piece made, and we screen-tested it. It was pretty interesting looking."

Viggo Mortensen, Ed Harris gab about garb, camaraderie in Appaloosa
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
2 October 2008




Two old friends hired to bring law to the lawless, one of whom has ridiculously awesome facial hair? Sign me the hell up. What about you?'

Can the 'Appaloosa' trailer rope you in to see another Western?
by Marc Bernardin
Popwatch Blog, Entertainment Weekly.com
7 August 2008




Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015




Sweating in layers of bulky long johns, and sporting a droopy, weeping moustache, Mortensen carries the film, his human grumbling and surprised, rageful violence conveying the sense of a nervous, basically average man caught on a journey into his own heart of darkness.

NYFF 2014: Jauja
By Mark Asch
Brooklyn Magazine
7 October 2014




'Ridley Scott's filming George Orwell's Animal Farm and I'm playing the goat...'

Viggo on being asked if he's grown his beard for a new role
BBC Breakfast Television
13 May 2014




Not surprisingly, he manages to turn in a good performance and makes a very frightening Lucifer... he even manages the tricky balance of being horrible and seductive enough to slip you out of your soul, a balance few Lord of Darknesses achieve. Plus, he manages it in a mullet. Come on, you always knew that Satan not only invented that hairstyle, but rocks the business in the front and party in the back.

Stars in Rewind: Viggo Mortensen in 'The Prophecy'
by Elisabeth Rappe
Cinematical
12 October 2009




…not only that this is one of the more amusingly preposterous of the 90s run of disaster flicks, but, to my absolute amazement, it features Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave, though still giving the film's best performance by miles as an arrogant survival fetishist who thinks he knows better than Kit.

'Daylight' Review
Shaun Munro
Obsessed with Film
Feb 2011




Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The Soviet Bloc."

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




Unreadable behind his wraparound shades, Nikolai slicks his hair back in a devil-horned quiff and just waits. It's a performance of almost unbearable tension, erotically and otherwise.

Mortensen Is Driving Force In Cronenberg Film
By Ty Burr
Boston Globe
14 September 2007




...his sharp, shiny suit and coiffed hairdo should win an award all of their own.

From Russia With Loot
By Helen Barlow
Sydney Morning Herald
26 October 2007




Wearing a black shirt and brown slacks, the 50-year-old Mortensen is sporting a moustache that would make a circus ringmaster proud.

The Invisible Man
By James Mottram
The Independent
23 October 2007




It is difficult to recognize the sexy star because of the mighty moustache that fills a lot of his face...

Viggo On His Way To Denmark
Billed-Bladet #24 - translated by Westfold
June 2005




... in a movie with a respectable level of production detail, one gets the feeling that he chose his own exquisite facial hair: His mustache and goatee give even Daniel Plainview of "There Will Be Blood" a run for his money.

'Appaloosa' Review
Nicolas Rapold
New York Sun
19 September 2008




Mortensen is kitted out with a killer goatee, as if he needed to hide something, his handsomeness maybe. Thank God, no such thing on the day of this third meeting. Neither crinkly hair, nor a moustache like the previous times. Just him, tanned which emphasizes the crooked scar he has above his upper lip.

Cowboy and Guinea Pig
By Sabrina Champenois - translated by Chrissiejane and Kaijamin
Libération
29 September 2008




How many peculiar things would one need to add to Viggo Mortensen's face before he ceases to be hot?

On the Appaloosa moustache and goatee
Awards Daily
Ryan Adams
8 August 2008

The revelation this week that Viggo auditioned for Reservoir Dogs has made me realise that it's time for another Quotable on all those tantalising might-have-beens. Sometimes things stalled at the audition, sometimes he was cut after filming, often without even being told. The Thin Red Line shows that it doesn't matter how big a name you are, you can still end up on the cutting room floor. Another eye-opener in the case of Oliver Stone and Platoon is the fact that he was just forgotten! A 'might-have-been' is also just an excuse to include, once again, one of my most favourite quotes. Tarzan, Viggo and Apes. The world has been robbed.





"Right out of the gate, I was auditioning for leads in studio movies. It would get down to the last two people," says Mortensen, who recalls the whirlwind of being flown first class to England for the lead in 1984's Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes. "The next thing I know, I'm training with monkeys."

Viggo Mortensen
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"I was sent plane tickets to London, I did a load of tests, and when I thought the part was mine, they gave it to Christopher Lambert."

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




"Although if I'd gotten Greystoke I probably would've been frustrated," he adds, tacitly acknowledging that it's a bit of a stinker.

Viggo Mortensen: first Good - and then goodbye?
By Kevin Maher
The Times
2 April 2009




What happened with The Purple Rose of Cairo, by Woody Allen, was worse as he cut all the scenes I was in. That was frustrating! I looked a real fool, ashamed, especially with my family and friends as I had announced my participation in the films to them. My parents thought I was lying and would say: "Son, tell us the truth! What do you do in New York?"

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




He was cast in Jonathan Demme's Swing Shift, playing a brash young sailor trying to pick up an emotionally fragile Goldie Hawn in a movie theatre. He felt it went well, but when he saw the movie he discovered that they had reshot the scene with Goldie Hawn in the movie theatre alone.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




'The "Blood Red" auditions at the Actors Studio were notable for one other reason: Viggo Mortensen came by every day—barefoot, with long, dirty blond hair—wanting to audition in the worst way for one of my Italian immigrants. His dirty feet and hair scared me just as much as his blue-eyed blondness wasn't right for the cast I was building. After days of just being rude to him, I finally threw him out of the studio and told him never to darken my casting door again. I have since apologized to him for my lack of artistic vision and behavior. It's the one truly bad casting mistake I ever made. He's such a talented actor; he could have played Italian or anything else he made up his mind to do. I often use him as an example of how one-pointed, dedicated, and willing to be rejected an actor has to be.'

Pamela Guess
Backstage.com
July 2010




[Molly Ringwald] drew gasps when she revealed she wanted future Lord of the Rings hunk Viggo Mortensen to play her love interest, Jake Ryan, in Sixteen Candles, after kissing him during auditions.

She said, "It was between two men... It was Michael Shoeffling, who ended up being cast, and Viggo Mortensen, who had just moved from Denmark. I was 15 years old, and I flew to New York to read with everyone. It got to the (final) Jake Ryan shot, and we had the kissing scene. And Michael Shoeffling did not kiss me during the audition - Viggo Mortensen did.

"He made me weak in the knees. Absolutely."

Ringwald pays a visit to John Hughes film class to talk kissing Viggo
Hollywood.com
10 September 2013




'Ironically, he had successfully auditioned for a Panida Theater stage role as Biff Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman before learning of his selection for Penn's movie [The Indian Runner]. Deborah McShane, a Panida board member, clearly remembers the unpretentious, calm and kind man whose audition 'created an energy shift in the theater.

'Karen Bowers (Panida's manager) heard the very quiet, knowing and sensitive voice,' McShane recalls. 'She stopped what she was doing and came down the aisle. We cast him in the role.'

A Visit With Viggo
By Marianne Love
Sandpoint magazine, 2004




Q: Any tapes you wouldn't mind seeing?

A:
One. The test for the part Patrick Swayze got in To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar.

Q: What was your drag queen outfit like?

A: I think it was Chanel, like a Jackie O. thing with Ann-Margaret hair. Before the audition, I wanted to practice a little so I called up a friend of mine, [actress] Valeria Golino, and she helped me to get all dressed up. Then I walked on Broadway in New York in the middle of the day. Nobody even blinked an eye, and some guys whistled.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
August 1998




Well-known actors such as Viggo Mortensen, Mickey Rourke, and Bill Pullman did scenes for The Thin Red Line on location in Australia but went MIA in the finished three-hour print. Billy Bob Thornton's narration was likewise scrapped. Adrien Brody, who shot in Australia for three gruelling months, brought his parents to an early screening to discover that his leading role had been whittled down to a single line of dialogue. George Clooney, who featured prominently in ads for the film, is on-screen for all of 60 seconds. [my note: Martin Sheen, Gary Oldman, and Lukas Haas were also completely cut from the film].

Absence of Malick
By Jessica Winter
Slate
5 October 2010




Oliver Stone cast Viggo as a sergeant in a war movie that he was making. Platoon. Then the financing fell through but Viggo knew that Oliver Stone would get the movie made in the end, and he would be ready as an actor had ever been. For the next year, Viggo read every book on Vietnam he could lay his hands on. "I researched that part as thoroughly as I f******* could," he remembers. "Mentally and in every way. Physically."

One day he heard that the film was going into production and that Oliver Stone had recast his role, giving it to Willem Dafoe. About ten years later Viggo met with Stone again, when the director was looking to make a movie about Manuel Noriega.

"Oh, it's great to meet you," the director told him. Viggo pointed out that they had met several times before (Viggo had also auditioned for a part in Salvador, in Spanish, for Stone).

"He didn't seem to remember much of any of it at all," Viggo reflects. "Pretty shocking because I took it pretty seriously."

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




I think [Tarantino's] really smart and funny. I'd never sat down and talked to him that much, although I did audition for Reservoir Dogs, which he remembered.

Which part did you audition for?
Mister … I don't know which one it was. It was one of them. I might have auditioned for two. I had fun. I did one take where I made the character Hispanic. I remember it was in this tiny office on the Fox lot, I think, and I read with Harvey Keitel.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
By Eric Benson
Grantland.com
19 March 2015

Quotable Viggo: 22 March 2015

Well – it's been quite a month for Jauja which is still sweeping critics away with its unusual ratio, stunning colour and mysterious journey. There's been a lot of long and thoughtful reviews to read. Feel as lost amongst them as Dinesen is in the desert of Patagonia? Time to sort through it all for the gems that really get to the heart of Jauja.



© 4L Productions.


I've now seen Lisandro Alonso's captivating, unearthly Jauja four times, and I don't think I'm any closer to telling you what it's all about; the more I see it, the more puzzled I am. Alonso likes to traffic in the oblique — in the blank, mysterious spaces between the ostensible realities onscreen. That sounds like a lot of hooey, but watching Jauja, which is certainly one of the best films of the year, I never once doubted that I was in the hands of a master filmmaker. For all its seeming austerity, the film pulls you along with incredible force — not unlike the way it pulls its lonely protagonist, played by Viggo Mortensen, along on his quixotic, dreamlike journey....

Jauja is a rapturously bizarre movie that resists knowledge. That's its secret, intoxicating power; the less you understand, the more mesmerized you are.

Bilge Ebiri
Vulture
21 March 2015




Dinesen, with his European manners, books and scientific principles, is at once noble and ridiculous, a civilized man adrift in the wilderness and the embodiment of blind, imperial arrogance. A doting father and a bit of a snob, he seems to absorb the wildness of his surroundings, becoming desperate and almost feral as he wanders the wasteland howling his daughter's name.

O. Scott
New York Times
19 March 2015




It's absurd to think our hero could ever track down his daughter in an alien country, even before things start to turn deeply strange and dreamy. He's off the map even before he's robbed of his horse and most of his possessions; from the start he's destined to be lost in and swallowed up by nature, red in tooth and claw and utterly disinterested in the plight of insignificant humans... Like all of us, [Dinesen's] a rationalist who expects the world to work a certain way, and is helpless when it does not...

Matt Prigge
Metro (US)
20 March 2015




The film is framed in a 4:3 aspect ratio and, most strikingly, sports rounded corners on its images. That relatively constricted vision (somehow the rounded corners highlight how quickly the world slips out of view as the camera pans) is offset by the incredible depth that Alonso and masterful cinematographer Timo Salminen produce in their shots. In the open desert, fading gradually from sharp clarity in the foreground to the soft blur of the horizon, the images seem to connote infinity...

...The film is its own journey, and there's seemingly no end to how far you might travel with it.

Tomas Hachard
NPR
19 March 2015




Everything is right from the start — from the boxy aspect ratio to the way the lighting makes the on-location shots of nature look artificial. Everything looks fake and real at the same time, creating an imaginary space in which it's a pleasure getting lost.

Matt Prigge
Metro (US)
20 March 2015




When the camera moves it is often with straightforward, almost jerky pans. Disarmingly, it feels like we're going through somebody's old home movies on Super 8 reversal film, yet the intentionality of it could not be more clear. As the film continues, something about the formality of the shot compositions starts to feel unfamiliar. They don't have much in common with Antonioni or Ozu, but rather bring to mind the grimly formal shots set up by 19th-century photographers. Though the visual approach has much in common with Alonso's earlier films, here it feels honed, almost eerily appropriate, for the world it depicts.

Aaron Katz
The Talkhouse
16 March 2015




...the landscapes remind us that 'Scope is not indispensable for evoking vastness: the tight parameters of these frames encourage us to imagine an infinity outside their edges. Rich colors suggest both dream and the artifice of Hollywood Westerns: deep blue clouds on a sky fading to yellow at its base resemble a painted backdrop; pools of golden firelight in a night shot are manifestly lit, as if on a studio set. Visual leitmotifs suggest threads through the maze: pools and streams whose mirrored surfaces suggest doors into other worlds, a tin soldier that turns up in unexpected places...

...the real treasure, the mythical object for which the film sets out, is finally nothing more than the very film that it ends up being.

Jonathan Romney
Film Comment
19 March 2015




A shot of Dinesen staring at himself in mote-speckled water rhymes with a later shot of the captain stretched out on top of a mountain staring at the stars — one man contemplating both himself and his place in the cosmos...

Vadim Rizov
Filmmaker Magazine
20 March 2015




Mortensen has the kind of face — both chiseled and mobile, with eyes that hold as many secrets as they spill — that's made for close-ups. But Alonso and his cinematographer Timo Salminen, by refusing to zero in on that fantastic face, give us more by showing us less. Our attention is more deliberately focused on Mortensen's place in the landscape, and in the way his soul inhabits his body, clad in a stiff soldier's uniform. Now and again, we do get to look squarely at his face — Alonso wouldn't be so cruel as to deprive us of that entirely. But by holding the camera back, he intensifies both Mortensen's performance and the visual potency of the movie around him. There's so much to take in here that at times I almost felt as if I were absorbing it through my skin.

Stephanie Zacharek
Village Voice
17 March 2015




...characters' faces are brightly and artificially lit, creating a halo-like effect which, along with the artificial contrasts of the spot-lit nighttime scenes, makes the film seem to be unfolding in a backlot of the mind.

Mark Asch
The L Magazine
11 March 2015




Alonso's previous features have been notoriously—and, for many viewers, off-puttingly—slow and cryptic. Mortensen injects the director's esoteric, anti-psychological themes with a psychological reality that makes them all the more tantalizing.

Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
AV Club
19 March 2015




This lack of solicitude for the audience—the real time, the featureless stretches of land and sky, the incomplete knowledge of events—is a perfect storm of cinematic minimalism. Rather than consume the movie as if it's served to us pre-chewed, we lean in, hold our breath, suspend judgment. We're as lost as Mortensen's protagonist, and we feel the weight of it acutely. The semi-flat steppes all look the same in every direction, and the minutes tick by, until eventually night falls and we lose our bearings completely.

Michael Atkinson
In These Times
18 March 2015




"Jauja" is also thrillingly beautiful, and graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing horse manure.

Farran Smith Nehme
New York Post
18 March 2015



Quotable Viggo: 15 March 2015

The latest Scannia article gives me another cracking quote, one which easily fits into my collection of favourite journalists' descriptions of Viggo's face. Describing his jaw as one you could 'carve a roast with' makes it irresistible. Over the years they have seen his cheek bones like bacon slicers, his jaw as granite and described him as looking like a knight, a saint and... um... a zoo keeper crossed with a mechanic (I guess you had to be there...).



© Focus Features


...he has a defiantly-handsome face, with a jaw so well-defined you could carve a roast with it.

Viggo Mortensen talks Jauja
By Philip Bagnal
Scannia
11 March 2015




Viggo Mortensen has one of the most incredible faces in the world, striking and amazingly versatile. His rough-hewn, chiseled visage allows him to inhabit any character he wants to, regardless of background or ethnicity, and we buy into it unconditionally.

...a face so sharp it looks like it could cut diamonds...

Andrew Smith
Charleston Gazette
29 Sept 2007




Viggo Mortensen is a serious and impassioned actor whose apparent severity extends to his Nordic features: he has hard blue eyes, and a pair of cheekbones that could double as bookshelves.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent 2001




I was successful in not being reduced to jellied awe before his sculpted visage. Imagine if Norse gods had spawned a surfer dude.

It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




......Mortensen's an actor I'm content just to watch: Those riven cheeks, taut against blade-sharp cheekbones....

Ray Pride
Movie City News
Review Date: March 4, 2004




His hair is neat and mid-length, his angular face cleanly shaven. The cleft in his chin is on proud show, as deep and true as if a child had just pressed their pinkie into his flesh.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




...the unyielding face of Viggo Mortensen, as mysterious here as the Sphinx.

Jauja: Viggo Mortensen Lost in Patagonia
By Eric Vernay - translated by Donna Marie
Premiere (France)
19 May 2014




...he's a method, no-restraint genius who looks like a mechanic, crossed with zoo keeper, crossed with a brooding former model turned emotionally-tortured bad boy.


20 Actors Who Deserve Your Support
By Josh
Cinema Blend
22 August 2010




His face is granite, and built on the most imposing jawline in the business since Kirk Douglas….

Viggo Mortensen: first Good - and then goodbye?
By Kevin Maher
The Times
2 April 2009




...cheekbones like lemon juicers.

Nicholas Barber
The Independent
10 January 2010




It has always helped that he looks like a Round Table knight.

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




...as charismatic as Steve McQueen and as beautiful as a saint in a master painting.

Dana Stevens
Slate.com
13 Sept 2007




Viggo Mortensen is a smolderer. He opens those intense, I-know-how-to-build-my-own-kitchen eyes, and he wins my girlfriend over every time. Obviously, I want to hate him because anyone that ruggedly handsome has to be despised on principal alone, but like Paul Newman and his absurdly delicious salad dressing, there comes a day when you just have to admit a dude's alright.

20 Actors Who Deserve Your Support
By Josh
Cinema Blend
22 August 2010




…as weathered and craggily handsome as any butte in Monument Valley.

Richard Corliss on Mortensen, Harris and
Time
19 September 2008




Mortensen is a glowering marvel, locating a great range of expression in impassivity, his stone face prone to compelling split-second fissures.

Indelible Ink
By Adam Nayman
Eye Weekly
30 Aug 2007




The years have written their history on him with traces of lines that turn beauty into wisdom, while the harsh trace of life, which clouds yesterday's glowing eyes, has given them in exchange a deep and warm expression where we find the courage to meet our own fears.

Viggo's Other Look
Diario de León
By María Dolores García - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005

Quotable Viggo: 7 March 2015

This week I thought I'd follow up Witness and A Walk on the Moon with another movie retrospective, The Indian Runner. It's still one of my favourite Viggo films and no matter how many times I watch it, Viggo's performance just blazes off the screen, fresh and astonishing. It saw the start of his friendship with Dennis Hopper, probably put a generation off eating peas, and I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall as Sean Penn prepared him and David Morse for that bar scene.



© Westmount.


Sean Penn [had] by chance had seen one of his films on a cable channel. 'Seeing his face and his expression, I knew it was him. I was praying for such a wonderful actor. I wasn't disappointed,'

Viggo Mortensen: The magician of The Lord of the Rings
by Aurelie Raya
Paris Match
Jan 8, 2004




"He had something, an angularity, a severity to his handsomeness that I perceived as being 'like Frank'."

Sean Penn
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly




'At the start, I preferred the character which was finally played by David Morse. Mine was just described as "the baddy'. But I said to myself that, behind the slightly too obvious behaviour of Frank Roberts, there had to be a really complex reason.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




'I had always thought of Frank as a barking dog that bites,' Penn says, 'so I asked Viggo to spend some time with a friend of mine who's a Hell's Angel who knows the world and also is a fighter - not that there's a lot of fighting in the movie, but I felt that he should know it and be able to feel that physical confidence.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premier
October 1991




Facially, Mortensen looks like a cross between Sam Shepard and echt movie villain Lance Henriksen, a suggestion enhanced by his character's myriad jailhouse tattoos (applied in hours-long makeup sessions) and the unperiodlike leather brace on his right hand and wrist, which he wears constantly and removes only immediately before shooting. Word on the set is that Mortensen busted a knuckle and sprained his wrist during rehearsals for a fight scene, but when asked about the injury, his eyes take on a demonic glint.

'Sean Penn,' he says, 'bit me.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premiere
October 1991




"Charles Bronson I didn't get to know extremely well but I liked him; in fact, there's a version of the scene where I go to my parents' house at the beginning of the story. It was a really interesing scene with Charles and Sandy Dennis playing really well. In fact Charles delivered some of the best acting I've ever seen. Shame it didn't make the movie, but I could understand Sean's reasons. He thought my character should be more messed up. But it was a scene that was very awkward; I was high, and was really insulting. It was horrible, but also fascinating."

Viggo Mortensen
Uncut
November 2007




This is room 202, practically at the top of the stairs, which has been dressed as Frank's crash pad. Mortensen walks in and surveys its detritus. He takes a washcloth from the room's sink, folds it, and drapes it over the railing at the foot of the bed...no, not just yet. First, he goes to the bottle of Southern Comfort that sits on the dresser, lies on the bed, and puts the bottle between his legs to open it. Then he splashes some sour mash on the washcloth and re-drapes it. With his thumb over the top, he sprinkles more over the sheets and replaces the bottle. Finally, he ponders the room's Bible: Should it go over the bed? No. Under the pillow? No.

Then he seems to get an idea: he grabs his switchblade, inserts it as a bookmark, and places the Bible on the bed. There.

Viggo's attention to detail on the IR set
Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premier
October 1991




SEAN PENN: Viggo's inherent kindness as a guy showed in a sort of languid movement. And that was a lesson for me about what parts of people express themselves without trying.

Sean Penn
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly




DAVID MORSE: ...it was harder for Viggo, because Sean identified more with the role of Frank, and he would really try to push him to do certain things. But Viggo just kept holding back. He never really did the scene in those two weeks.... I think Sean was still a little nervous going into the bar scene. Then I remember a real struggle for what was going to happen, what the moments were going to be between the two of them. And something happened, it crystallized, and suddenly Viggo was on fire.

David Morse on the bar scene
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly




SEAN PENN: I think I stimulated Viggo's temper. And, as I remember, I think I got a little bit personal.

When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly




In a pivotal scene in The Indian Runner, Sean Penn's first film as a director, a character named Frank Roberts suddenly attacks a bartender played by Dennis Hopper, who is cleaning blood off the bar. Is the blood symbolic of something that triggers the attack? "No," says Viggo Mortensen, who plays the violent Frank. "It was Dennis's breath."

Tough Guy
Eliza Krause
23 September 1991




'Hopefully what will come across is that he does things he does because he's pure, pure good and pure bad,' explains Mortensen. 'I mean, compared to me and most people I know - we kind of have little controls and little ways of limiting our behaviour and our reactions to people. Frank doesn't really do that.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premier
October 1991




"I remember Sean saying to me on about the sixth week of shooting," Indian producer Phillips recalls, "'Don, Viggo's going to be a humongous star.'"

Don Phillips
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"He's an often solitary, very poetic creature, Viggo, and all of that worked [for the movie]."

History Teacher by Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
August 19, 2005




"He's not a good actor, he's a great ****ing actor," Hopper says. "I'm not a fan of Sean's other two movies, but this is a hell of a movie. Don't live another day without seeing it. Mortensen is it. He's the real deal."

Dennis Hopper
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski,
Vanity Fair magazine, January 2004


Quotable Viggo: 21 February 2015

Having taken a look at Witness last week (and having forgotten it was Valentine's Day), I've been thinking ever since that I should have chosen a walk with Walker Jerome on that moon. Viggo has scorched across a lot of screens since 1999, but The Blouse Man is still top of my list of men I'd like to turn up outside the house with a van full of tie-dyed casual wear. A girl can dream...



© Miramax Films / Village Roadshow.


The rest of the leads also seemed to just click into place during the auditions. Getting Viggo Mortensen was Goldwyn's only "moment of panic," the director says, because he wanted a free spirit type, but definitely not a hippie, and he had his heart set on the actor from "A Perfect Murder," Gus Van Sant's "Psycho."

"When I saw some of Viggo's work, I thought, that's always who I've had in my head. I realized there is not one other actor anywhere who could play Viggo's part other than Viggo. He has this kind of complexity and mysteriousness to him. He doesn't have to say much and you get a lot."

Tony Goldwyn, Director of A Walk on the Moon
Actor Goldwyn side-stepped cliches for summer of '69 directorial debut
By Robin Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire, splicedonline.com
February 24, 1999




"I knew I wanted him for that role in such a way that I was saying, Please take some of my money and give it to him….Because he gives immeasurable depth to what he does, full commitment, full conviction."

Diane Lane
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Mortensen found working with Lane "as good as I'd hoped it would be. She's a good actress and she makes the work really easy. She's very relaxed and very focused on what's right for the scene and not her own vanity."

Talking With Viggo
George magazine
1999




"I think being a conventional leading man is something that gives him a lot of trouble," says Goldwyn, recalling Mortensen's fears that A Walk on the Moon's Blouse Man might become a one-note sex god. "Of course, the success that implies is very attractive, but the trappings of that for someone like Viggo, who has so much to offer, can be very scary."

Viggo Trip,
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




'I was 10 that summer, so I don't remember thinking that period in time seemed really weird,' Mortensen said. 'At that age, you're a kid on the periphery so you just accept what's in front of you. I ended up basing my character a lot on my stepbrother, Jeff, who passed away some years ago. I know that some people are describing Walker as a hippie, but he really wasn't. He was a little older than that generation and probably more influenced by jazz and the beat generation, so that made him maybe a little more open to things. It wasn't just about Woodstock for him.'

Viggo Mortensen on A Walk on the Moon
Viggo Artist & Actor
by Jae-Ha Kim
Cleveland Plain Dealer 1999




Watching the film, Mortensen roots for neither the husband nor the lover but for how Pearl deals with her dilemma. Neither does he believe audiences should belittle Pearl and Walker's relationship.

"I think it was very important to him and it meant a lot that he couldn't be with her, but he was respectful of what she needed. I don't think it was just another [affair]. He's not selfish or stupid. There's a mutual respect on both ends."

Talking With Viggo
George magazine
1999




'I knew I was up against Viggo Mortensen. Come on, the guy is easy on the eyes, and he doesn't wear a lot of clothes in this movie. If anyone was to believe that I might get the girl, I was going to have to do some work. So I jumped rope, I ran, and I didn't eat.'

Liev Schreiber
People magazine
26 April 1999




'I had to have some definition in my body if I was going to take my shirt off in the same movie that Viggo runs around naked in. Trust me, that's mighty intimidating.'

Liev Schreiber
Calgary Sun
April 1999




'Viggo's already cornered the market on animal magnetism.'

Liev Schreiber
The Knoxville News Sentinel
6 April 1999




As the guy Pearl falls for, Viggo Mortensen drips with sex appeal.

Robin Dougherty
25 February 1999
Miami New Times




...played with silky eroticism by Viggo Mortensen, the gentlemanly Walker Jerome arrives to charm the camp's old ladies and weaken Pearl's knees.

Janet Maslin
New York Times
March 26, 1999




[Pearl] gets her own flight to the moon at the same time as Neil Armstrong. And what Walker does to her under a waterfall should be bottled.

A Steamy 'Walk on The Moon'
Ruthe Stein
San Francisco Chronicle
Friday, April 2, 1999




'If Viggo and I convince people we're enjoying every second of that encounter we've really done our job as actors. It was freezing in that river. The water was filled with debris and cigarette butts and the rocks were covered in little worms.'

Diane Lane on the Waterfall scene
Calgary Sun,
10 April 1999




....Following its world premiere at the 1999 Sundance Film Festival, A Walk on the Moon received a standing ovation from the 1300 viewers in the Eccles Theater - an occurrence that's a testimony to the film's emotional strength and truth. It's easy to make a bad movie about a woman finding herself by cheating on her husband, but difficult to fashion one that hits most of the right notes.

A Walk on the Moon
Reelviews
James Berardinelli
1999

Quotable Viggo: 14 February 2015

I love the way that sometimes we think we've turned up everything we can relating to Viggo's earliest films and then something new surfaces unexpectedly. Chrissie has posted a new still from Witness of that now famous barn-building scene and there is our guy on the apex of the roof. Mmm, I thought, can I do a complete Quotable on Witness? I had a fair few quotes stacked away, but more digging amongst the archives was needed to pull together enough to give a real flavour of Viggo's first performance to hit the silver screen.



© Paramount Pictures


Witness is your cinema debut. Is there a film before that which counts?

No, Witness is the first film in which I had a part where they didn't cut me out in editing! (Laughs.)

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"The same day I was offered Witness, I was offered a Shakespeare in the Park production—I think it was Henry V," he recalls. "I made a choice to try something I didn't know much about, which ended up being the right thing, because it was a good story and I got to work with Peter Weir."

History Teacher
By Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
19 August 2005




You have worked with many different directors, from Peter Jackson and David Cronenberg to Jane Campion and Gus Van Sant. In your opinion, what does it take to make a good director?

In my first movie, Witness, I was amazed by the organized and calm way that Peter Weir shot the film and how he listened to his actors opinions. I really had fun. Since then I've realized that most of the time it's not like that.

Inside Viggo Mortensen's Mind
By V Vergou - translated by Iraeth
Athinorama
5 April 2007




Is it true you gave up two months as Hamlet [sic] in New York's Central Park for two days on set?


True, and it's proof of how randomly things can happen for an actor. I ended up staying six weeks! Peter wandered over one day and said "Unless you're busy, we'd like you to hang around." I did and it was invaluable.

Viggo Mortensen
By Angus Fontaine
Time Out (Sydney)
9 April 2009




'[He] said, "It will be interesting for (the character played by) Alexander Godunov to have this brother who follows him everywhere." ...It was in June and July, it was very hot. As I had little to do, I passed the time in roaming around Pennsylvania on a bicycle I had found. I made friends. I was like Tom Sawyer, and they paid me, and I could watch the crew on set as much as I wanted.'

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
[I]Studio Magazine

December 2002
[/I]


That part, which was supposed to be a one-day job, expanded into a speaking role as Alexander Godunov's younger Amish brother.

"I was basically told to shadow him," Mortensen recalled, laughing. "So wherever he went, I followed."

Sensitive Side of Psycho
By Jae-Ha Kim
Chicago Sun Times
16 December 1998




"Viggo had a very small part as Godunov's brother, Moses Hochleiter. We were both eager to be on camera. So we walked together from the barn-raising scene, and we played our harmonicas, thinking that is what young Amish men might do and hoping a camera would notice us."

Pete DeVitry
Lancaster Online
March 2005




'He was really into the building-the-barn scene. I was supposed to be handing him tools and he'd say 'Hand me a whatever,' and I didn't know what the hell he was talking about. He probably built most of that barn himself.'

Viggo Mortensen on working with Harrison Ford in Witness
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
by Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




[Harrison Ford] was most of all professional. Conscientious. Interesting to study. I had the greats before me: Peter Weir, above all, with his calmness and efficiency. In the evening, when I came back from my wandering, they let me watch the rushes. Witness was an idyllic experience.

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




Watching Witness the other day I was reminded again of Viggo Mortensen's immediate star power. He probably had one line in that movie and yet you can't take your eyes off of him.

Sasha Stone
Awards Daily
19 March 2010




"The first time I saw Viggo, of course, it was his physical body I noticed first. That was in Witness, by Peter Weir (1985). Since then that image of him has stayed with me whenever I saw him on the screen."

David Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen the Insatiable
Studio Magazine
By Sophie Benamon
November 2007




Nobody ever seems to have mistaken this actor for an all-American type. In Witness, he was the open-faced, implicitly open-hearted younger brother of Amish farmer stud Alexander Godunov. His features were as clean and untrammelled as a new field of wheat and his eyes were so wide apart you could have driven an Amish buggy between them.

Man Power
By Katherine Mitchell
Movieline
September 2002




Anyone familiar with actor Viggo Mortensen's minuscule role in "Witness" will chuckle at how important he's become to the movie since. Mortensen, known the world wide over now for his heroic roles in the "Lord of the Rings" film trilogy, is interviewed as extensively as any of the major stars for the bonus features.

"I wondered what would happen to him," Weir muses about Mortensen.

Witness Special Collector's Edition Review
By Toni Ruberto
The Buffalo News, 9 Sept 2005


Quotable Viggo: 7 February 2015

Sky Greats are advertising Eastern Promises and A History of Violence back-to-back as a Cronenberg/Mortensen February treat in the UK. So is this a Quotable about those two great collaborative efforts? Er... no. It's about A Dangerous Method. Maybe it wasn't such a spectacular success, but Viggo's performance astonished critics. I mean, Tom Stall, Nikolai and.... Freud? Who would ever have thought it? It also gives me the chance to put one of my most favourite ever quotes back into context. That credit-card busting on-screen maganetism? Yup – it was Freud.



© Hanway/Lago.


Viggo Mortensen is the champ. Hands down. Of all the "say what?" performances some of us first heard about at last fall's Toronto International Film Festival — and which characterized 2011 as a hugely surprising year for film — none of them surprised me more than Mortensen playing Sigmund Freud in David Cronenberg's "A Dangerous Method."

Jeff Simon
Buffalo News
26 January 2012




This is Mortensen's third straight collaboration with Cronenberg following "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises," and the ease and rhythm from working together so often pay off in the effortless grace of Mortensen's portrayal. It is some of his finest film work ever.

Clint O'Connor
The Plain Dealer
25 January 2012




Almost serenading the audience with his Austrian accent, Mortensen is instantly Sigmund Freud without a shadow of a doubt.

Brad Brevet
Rope of Silicon
10 September 2011




...there is no denying that A Dangerous Method doesn't come alive until we get our asses some Viggo. Christoph Waltz was originally set to play Freud, but was forced to drop out. At which time Cronenberg turned to his current muse. I'm sure Waltz would've done some stellar things with the character, but hot damn, Viggo sizzles as Freud.... This is a Viggo you don't think of when you think of Viggo

Joshua Miller
Chud.com
21 October 2011




It was a stroke of inspiration to cast the virile, hyper-secure Mortensen as the godfather of neurosis. Puffing on a cigar, he makes Freud a charismatic control freak, a man all too eager to engage in dream analysis yet too much of a self-designed authority figure to put his own dreams up for dissection.

Owen Gleiberman
Enertainment Weekly
10 September 2011




It's possible that in lusting after Mortensen all these years, we've taken his talent for granted. Of course, we really didn't know how talented he was until he started working with Cronenberg. This is the best thing Mortensen's ever done. His slow, paunchy, hairy Freud has a cavalier authority and a capacity for drollery. He's also seductively wise in a way that makes both Fassbender and Knightley, as very good as they are, also seem uncharacteristically callow. I don't know where Mortensen found this physical and psychological heaviness, this expressive inexpressiveness, but now isn't the time to start a diet.

Wesley Morris
Boston Globe
23 December 2011




Mr. Mortensen again reveals his amazing skills of self-transformation...

Roderick Conway Morris
New York Times
6 September 2011




It is also marvelous to see Freud, that embattled colossus, restored to his human dimensions by Mr. Mortensen. His sly performance is so convincingly full of humor, warmth and vanity that it renders moot just about every other posthumous representation of the patriarch of psychoanalysis.

A.O.Scott
New York Times
22 November 2011




Even in a period film like this one — a picture that runs the heavy risk of being ponderous and stiff — he can slip himself into the scenery with a "Don't mind me, here in my Sigmund Freud getup" naturalness….

Stephanie Zacharek
Movieline
2 September 2011




I was so taken with Mortensen's constantly alert and cunning eyes. He was always thinking, sometimes on a current that flows in opposite direction of his dialogue. It is a very effective performance, and Mortensen, one of the best actors working today, has shown us something new in his repertoire. It bodes well for his life as a middle-aged actor.

By Sheila OMalley
Capital New York
6 October 2011




Mortensen's buttoned-down and highly verbal Freud is something to behold — and also to listen to. The actor has been the quiet man of volcanic physical intensity in two previous Cronenberg films, A History of Violence and Eastern Promises. Here his tongue is more lethal than his fists, as when he tears into Jung for practising "second-rate mysticism and self-aggrandizing shamanism."

Peter Howell
Toronto Star
12 January 2012




Freud, played by the perpetual shape-shifter Viggo Mortensen, slinks around like a silent old Zen master.

by Matthew D'Abate
Your Beautiful New York
14 December 2011




Mortensen, in very much a supporting role, thrives superbly for his third Cronenberg running, summoning a peppery gravitas, and an eye-narrowing fearfulness, as the father of psychiatry might well, about patricidal impulses from his younger colleague.

Tim Robey
The Telegraph
9 February 2012




...the ever-flawless Viggo Mortensen.

Jesse Hawthorne Ficks
San Francisco Bay Guardian
26 September 2011




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012



Quotable Viggo: 31 January 2015

Viggo has appeared in rather a lot of literary adaptions (not surprising for a man who reads and reads and reads...) – A Portrait of a Lady, The Lord of the Rings, Alatriste, Appaloosa, The Road, On the Road, Two Faces of January and Loin Des Hommes - and it's always clear how important the text is to him and that the script honours the book and the author's vision. Sometimes the book has been familiar to him for a long time, sometimes the script has introduced him to the book. Either way it's important that it's a good adaption and you can bet that in every case a copy of the book is always with him, sprouting post-it notes from nearly every page.



© MK2 Productions.


Loin des Hommes

Q. Was the Camus story a strong influence on how you conceived of your character?

A. Both David and I referenced the story as much as possible. I have always admired Camus and thought he didn't get a fair deal from the left in France. History has proven him right; he spoke truth to power and paid a heavy price for it. He thought people should find a way to live together, whatever their differences of skin color or language. I think the character in the story in many ways represents who Camus might have become if he had stayed in Algeria.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Silcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




Two Faces of January


Mortensen appears to be a fine connoisseur of the novelist and her work. He admitted he liked her short stories "even the ones that are a page and a quarter and you go 'oh come on' like the collection 'Little Tales of Misogyny'".

The American Friend, Strangers on a Train and The Talented Mr. Ripley also made the cut but he prefers the approach in The Two Faces of January, a "more graceful" one.

Berlin: Viggo Mortensen knows his Patricia Highsmith
By Tara Karajica
Screen Daily.
12 February 2014




On the Road


"...in the '70s, when I was 17-18 years old and living in America, on the border with Canada. On the Road was an initiation book for many adolescents of my generation, even for me. Much later, I discovered other writers such as Allen Ginsberg, Céline, Rimbaud, Camus ... But I find that Burroughs was the most original, an outsider, a pioneer of the language."

Viggo talking about 'On the Road'
Viggo Mortensen: "Do I look sexy?"
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




I read this novel for the first time as a teenager, and since then three times as a whole and often in parts. I've read everything that was published by Kerouac, Burroughs and Ginsberg. In preparation of the movie, I listened to all available voice recordings of Burroughs... among them were also talks between him and Cronenberg concerning the filming of Naked Lunch.

Viggo talking about 'On the Road'
Viggo Mortensen
"Nostalgia strikes me as being dangerous"
By Dieter Oßwald - translated by Athelin
Frankfurter Neue Presse
1 October 2012




For many people, this novel was deemed unfit for filming. Did you ever have similar qualms?

Viggo:
I never thought this novel unfit for filming, yet it was obviously no easy task. But after reading the script, my concerns were easily resolved. The movie takes over the novel's best elements, stays true to the characters and besides focuses on the women, which for me is a true improvement compared to the original.

Viggo talking about 'On the Road'
"Nostalgia strikes me as being dangerous"
By Dieter Oßwald - translated by Athelin
Frankfurter Neue Presse
1 October 2012




The Road


Viggo did you come to the film from reading the book or the actual script?

I'm a big fan of Cormac McCarthy, I had read all of his books except The Road. The Road came out with great fanfare and went on to become his most far reaching universally appealing work because it's more straight ahead, it's easily understood, the dilemmas are understood by any culture. I hadn't gotten around to reading it just out of shear stubbornness because everyone kept telling me how great it was. I was meaning to read it. I had seen it wherever I went, in airports and so forth and I just hadn't read it. But then I read the script which I thought was a great script, a great story. I realised it was quite an honour to be offered this role. After reading the script I ran to the store to buy The Road and read it all

Viggo Mortensen at the BFI London Film Festival
Flicks and Bits
30 October 2009




What did you learn from your discussion with the book's author, Cormac McCarthy?


I talked to him one long time before shooting on the phone. We basically talked about his kid and my kid and being dads. I had tons of notes and questions to ask him. I was ready to pick his brain. At the end of the conversation, he asked me, "Do you have any specific questions about the book?" I had 50,000 post-it notes in the book and not one but two pens in case it ran out of ink. I mean I was ready. But I said "Nah, I don't really" because I realized the conversation we had was all I need to get going. His book and his words are so heartfelt and so free of any gimmickry. He just transcends cultures and languages.

Viggo on The Road
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun Times
22 November 2009




"…the book was my constant companion. It's pretty well-worn. The interior life of the characters are so beautifully written, so poetic that it was what I kept going back to. But this movie is about man's humanity, this flower that blooms in a desert between two people."

After "The Road" Viggo Mortensen Looks on the Bright Side: "You Could Always Be Dead"
By Jeffrey Podolsky
Wall Street Journal
17 November 2009




After the movie, Viggo came back up on the stage and answered a few questions. When put on the spot to add on a final word he thought for a second then dug into his bag and brought out his personal copy of THE ROAD. There were what looked like a hundred stick-it notes marking different pages and the spine was cracked and worn. It's obviously seen a lot of use.

To close the event he read a bit from McCarthy's description of the sea-area landscape. That was pretty cool…

Quint at the Telluride Viggo Mortensen tribute
Ain't it Cool News
8 September 2008




Appaloosa

Ed Harris read Appaloosa while you guys were still working on A History of Violence. Then you read the book after that, right?


Mortensen:
When A History Of Violence was presented here at the Toronto Film Festival, he was here to do interviews, just like I was for that movie. He handed me this book and in his kind of quiet way said, "Here's this book. You might like it. It could make a good movie." He wasn't very forward about it but that was sort of a big step, I thought. It must mean something, being that he's such a good actor. And he did a great job directing Appaloosa. I thought that it was intriguing. I knew that was what he was driving at - that he wanted to direct this movie.

So you kind of committed to him based on the book?


Mortensen:
The book, yeah. He hadn't written [the screenplay] yet.

Interview With Appaloosa Star Viggo Mortensen
Reelz Channel
3 October 2008




Alatriste

While the texts that this film is adapted from are widely known in the Hispanic world, in the United States they haven't had such a similar recognition. Assuming that fact, how did the opportunity to take part in this production fall into your hands?

I didn't know Arturo Pérez-Reverte's novels. Long ago, I had worked in Spain with Ray Loriga, in My Brother's Gun. One day, Ray told me he was going to be in Berlin, where I was promoting Peter Jackson's The Return of the King. Loriga went with a friend, Tano (Agustín Díaz Yanes), who brought a script that he gave me to read. I liked the plot as a tale, as a story. And it captivated me. So I decided to do it, against everyone and against everything.

The Filming of Alatriste - Viggo Mortensen Interview
By Jesús Martin - translated by Paddy
Acción
July 2006




'When I read the books which the movie is based on, I liked them so much: they told me an interesting and complicated story. The character too is more complicated than my previous ones. For this reason the movie can even catch the viewers unprepared: they expect a lot of action in imperial Spain, and they find themselves deeply lost in events full of shadows.'

Viggo, a movie star forced to fight - "Heroism? It's only propaganda..."
By Claudia Morgoglione - translated by Cindalea
Repubblica
18 June 2007




Lord of the Rings


Basically, I got a call: "Do you want to go to New Zealand for fourteen months to film The Lord of the Rings?" Just, you know, this famous epic trilogy! And my first reaction was "No!" Obviously I'd heard of Tolkien and The Lord of the Rings, but I hadn't read the book, and I certainly hadn't read the script; I usually like to have a lot more time to prepare for a major role; and I really didn't want to be away from my family for that long. I have to say, it didn't sound like a very wise move to me at all!

My son said I was crazy and that I had to do it, even if I was going to be gone a long time. So there I am on the plane for New Zealand, reading that enormous, telephone directory-sized book and then the scripts, and a couple of days later I'm filming. I continued to feel unprepared, but at least I didn't have much time to get nervous, which was probably good!

Viggo Mortensen
Official Movie Guide




Were you a J.R.R. Tolkien fan before the film "The Fellowship of the Ring?"


VIGGO: No. I'd heard of Tolkien and Hobbits and "Lord of the Rings." But I didn't know much about it. l assumed it was about elves and dwarves, maybe fairy tales. When I got the job, I started reading the book immediately so I knew what we were dealing with on film. ... I recognized themes from lots of other cultures, Samurai, Native American myths, not just European fairy tale -- the idea of a heroic journey, characters being tested.

Viggo on locusts, life and kissing Liv Tyler
By Molly Woulfe
Northwest Indiana Times thetimesonline.com
3 August 2004




"While Peter obviously cares a great deal for Tolkien's writing-otherwise he wouldn't have given so much of his life to it-what seems to have drawn him most as a filmmaker was the pure adventure aspect of the tale. The heroic sacrifice of individuals for the common good. All the breathtaking sequences-he really poured himself into those. The more I explored Tolkien, the more I felt I had two bosses: Tolkien and Peter Jackson. I tried my best to be loyal to both of them."

Viggo Mortensen
We Were All On an Epic Journey
by Jeff Giles
Newsweek magazine, 2001


Quotable Viggo: 17 January 2015

While looking for interesting new Viggo vids I came across this beautiful one which celebrates Hidalgo. It's a while since I watched the film and I was struck all over again by what a great horse TJ is (and all the other horses that played Hidalgo) and also what a treat it always is to see Viggo acting with them. So I thought I'd do a whole Quotable celebrating the brave little horse that crossed the Ocean of Fire. Let her buck!



©Touchstone Pictures/Buena Vista Pictures


By the time the cameras rolled, head animal trainer Rex Peterson had selected five paint horses to play the role of the plucky mustang Hidalgo. TJ, RJ, Oscar, Doc and DC each had their special talents and enough of a resemblance that makeup and hair specialists could create one seamless character....TJ demonstrated the greatest bond with his co-star Viggo Mortensen... RJ proved to be the most agile trick horse; Oscar the best ride for actors; Doc took the lead as the main chase horse; and DC was the ultimate endurance racer.

Hidalgo - Animal Action
American Humane Association
March 2004




[Viggo] was on the Morocco set of Hidalgo, his western adventure that opens today, and he felt it necessary to remind director Joe Johnston and the rest of the crew who the star of the movie is.

It's the kind of primadonna move you might expect of a guy who has come off The Lord Of The Rings trilogy, one of the most profitable movie franchises in history..... Except that the usually self-effacing Mortensen wasn't demanding more attention for himself. He was speaking up for his horse T.J., the cream-and-sorrel nag who plays the title mustang of Hidalgo.

"People kept saying, 'Frank this and Frank that.' And I'd say, `Well, last time I checked, the movie is not called Frank Hopkins. So let's keep in mind that the horse needs to be (front and centre)."

A New John Wayne: Viggo Mortensen Saddles Up for Hidalgo
By Peter Howell
Toronto Star
5 March 2004




"[TJ's] a very small horse, you know, technically he's a pony. I mean he's about 14 Hands 2, I guess. And 14 Hands 3 and up is a horse and below is a pony, technically.

Viggo Mortensen on TJ
The Lord of the Rings & Hidalgo Star Discusses Horses, Learning New Languages, Photography and More.
FilmForceIGN
By Spence D, 2004




"They're sort of unruly these horses and they're already a pretty high-strung breed and we're all packed together knee and once the horses realize what we're up to, they're all wanting to go and they're all wanting to kill each other. I'm on this little horse, which is effective visually because he's strong, but even though he's little he's got all this personality. He's a stallion who thinks he's pretty tough so he's wanting to pick fights. It was really the most worrisome moment in a way of the whole movie, was that, not this full-tilt stuff that was kinda scary at times.'

Viggo Mortensen on the start of the race
Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, March2004




"He's very smart. He's good at pretending he didn't hear you. He's very lazy. He definitely had a personality! I thought, "This is going to be a chore!"

Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, March 2004




'You're not going to be able to lie to that horse. You need to ask nicely.'

Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, March 2004




"On his own, he just came up with one reaction after another that was totally appropriate; whether it was jealousy, or possessiveness, or annoyance, or nagging me, or guilting me."

Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Jeffrey M Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
11 February 2004




"...it's amazing to me, he picked up all these tricks and did all these things. Even the acting of being really fried and then falling down, a lot of horses wouldn't just fall like a sack of potatoes, they would go down slowly and protect themselves. And then once down, once you're fussing around and there's cameras and this and that and there's a gun and there's all this movement, they wouldn't stay there, you know what I mean? And for a stallion on top of that, they're just gonna be more touchy. And a stallion whose never worked in the movies before. It's incredible what he did. I mean we were really lucky there. It could have been a lot harder."

Viggo Mortensen on TJ
The Lord of the Rings & Hidalgo Star Discusses Horses, Learning New Languages, Photography and More.
FilmForceIGN
By Spence D, 2004




Of course, this is not to say that the success hasn't gone to the horse's head. "We would finish a scene - I got off T J, and he would follow me around, to make sure he got his close-up," Mortensen laughs.

Hidalgo - Production Notes
Touchstone Pictures
2004




'He wasn't afraid or worried about the lights, camera, or anything. He was totally calm. You know that comic strip Andy Capp? That guy with his hat? I just think of him like that. He would just be there like, 'Whatever.'''

Viggo Mortensen on TJ
The Lord of the Rings & Hidalgo Star Discusses Horses, Learning New Languages, Photography and More.
FilmForceIGN
By Spence D, 2004




Mortensen was fascinated with the David-versus-Goliath nature of the story. "The odds are stacked against Frank," he continues. "Compared to the Arabian horses, the mustang Hidalgo looks like a little dog. A pony, next to their steeds. But though the race is his redemption, it's not winning the race that's important - it's that Frank is there at all.

Hidalgo - Production Notes
Touchstone Pictures
2004




'He was just a fascinating individual and I wanted to stay in touch with him,' Mortensen says.

Viggo on why he bought TJ
'King' Star Returns To The Screen, Riding High
Star Telegram
By Todd Camp
6 March 2004




Mortensen arrives at the Stephen Cohen Gallery caked in mud, having just been riding T.J., who plays the title role in Hidalgo ….and then washing him and giving him a conditioning treatment. "We don't do that all the time," Mortensen says. "He's not a pretty-boy horse."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Source: Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'I've been lucky with both the horses and the people that I have worked with. The same thing applies to the people as to the horses: if you ask politely and earn their trust and respect, the job is a lot less strenuous and you get better results.'

Viggo Mortensen
Our Kiss Was Just a kiss
By John Millar
Hot Stars
27 March 2004



Quotable Viggo: 11 January 2015

One of the great pleasures over the last few months has been watching Jauja woo critics and audiences around the globe. It won the International Critics Prize at Cannes and has just been nominated for Best Argentinian Film by the Argentinian members of the International Federation of Film Critics. The fact that it has now been shown at so many festivals is a testimony to the huge interest in the film, which has been universally well received. There has been a lot more to say about Jauja since I last looked at the film in an April Quotable. Definitely time for an update!



© 4L Productions


'Jauja is not a place, it's more than that, it's an idea. It's an impossible idea or feeling of contentment, satisfaction, tranquillity. It could be anything...'


Viggo Mortensen
Jauja: Interview with Viggo Mortensen
by Pamela Jahn
Electric Sheep
16 October 2014




What´s good about it is that it´s a mysterious, different word that provokes questions and may be a little confusing - exactly what happens to "Captain Dinesen" in our story.

Viggo talking about the title 'Jauja'
Something Material
By Viggo Mortensen, Fabián Casas and Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
31 May 2014




What past did you invent for this Captain Dinesen?

I took things from another Dinesen. A writer and adventurer who also went to the New World at the end of the 19th century. A hunter, he was the father of Isak Dinesen whose real name was Karen Blixen.

Viggo Mortensen: Film and Soccer Activist
By Horacio Bilbao - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarín.com
27 November 2014




'...the Danish that I spoke with my daughter in the film, being quite a simple man, a man from the countryside of Denmark, I chose to speak it like my Danish grandfather who was a guy from the country, intelligent, but who had quite a simple and formal way of speaking, in a very correct way.'

Viggo Mortensen
We speak in Cannes with Viggo Mortensen about Jauja, his second Argentinian experience
By I. J. - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Noticine.com




'Dinesen is a surveyor and scientist, very northern European, very rational, everything has to have a logical explanation. But then he is also a guy who wears a sword and boots with heels and furs while walking through rocks, which is ridiculous – a bit like Don Quixote. Don Quixote is also both serious and specific. And in that way my character is very determined – like if you are going to do a job, you might as well do it correctly, and in a timely fashion. And if someone says, 'Well, we're having tea at 4.30pm on Tuesday', you say, 'Well, I'll be there'. But it's Argentina, so whoever you were going to meet might turn up on Wednesday, or maybe he doesn't.'

Viggo Mortensen
Jauja: Interview with Viggo Mortensen
by Pamela Jahn
Electric Sheep
16 October 2014




"The Danes were involved in two wars in the 1800s: in 1848 and 1864. For my role, I found a uniform from this 1848 war, as well as a sabre from this war, and a double-medal for a man who served in both wars. This medal was very important. Most of the people back then were farmers, but they would be out with the pigs, with their medals, that is how important these medals were."

Viggo Mortensen
A Conversation with Viggo Mortensen at Cannes
Karin Luisa
Huffington Post
21 May 2014




"...there's a particular sort of irony in Danish humor and sort of physical humor also that the Danes are really going to get — more so than other people because it's very particular."

Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Watch: Mortensen' s linguistic challenge
Associated Press
21 May 2014




The actor acknowledges that working with a director known for his off-the-grid methods – such as using primarily with non-professional actors – was a bit of an adjustment. "It took a little getting used to," he says. "For one scene I asked Lisandro who was doing the continuity on the set, and he asked me, 'What's that?' The way he works, he's never had to worry about things like that before."

Adam Nayman
Globe and Mail
9 September 2014




Lisandro Alonso says that, during the shoot, you'd knock on his door at 7:30 in the morning to suggest ideas to him. Are you an interventionist actor who constantly contributes ideas?

Yes, you have a limited window of time to say something that you hope lasts and you have to make the most of the opportunity. And with an open director, like Lisandro, it's much easier. He can make use of whatever he likes.

Viggo Mortensen: "People don't think of me only as Aragorn."
By Àlex Montoya - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Fotogramas
23 September 2014




"Viggo is incredible. He has the triple role of actor, producer and musician and along with that, he was thinking about how to improve the film 24 hours a day. In addition he rigorously corrected every French, English and Danish subtitle."

Lisandro Alonso
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN 2014




'It was interesting to work with a director who does long shots, without being afraid of the calmness and the length of time: in front of the camera, everything you do becomes interesting. It's the first time that he was using professional actors, but in the film, we don't look like actors, we just look like people. People who are having real experiences. In these conditions, it's impossible to make a mistake. It's a strange feeling as an actor. What you do will be in the film. That gives you confidence and peace of mind.'

Viggo Mortensen: "If The Lord of the Rings can win 12 Oscars, I don't see why Avatar wouldn't win the Oscar for best film."
By Eric Vernay - translated by Donna Marie
Premiere (France
21 May 2014




'...finding myself with a small team in the middle of nowhere, in the superb landscape I knew because I spent my childhood there, it made me happy. And it was liberating.'

Viggo Mortensen: "If The Lord of the Rings can win 12 Oscars, I don't see why Avatar wouldn't win the Oscar for best film."
By Eric Vernay - translated by Donna Marie
Premiere (France
21 May 2014





"It was a crew of about ten people walking over the rocks. We were all tired but we had a lot of fun. By nightfall, since we were 150 km from the internet and telephones, we made a little fire, an asado [grilled meat], we talked... It was a family experience."

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN
August 2014




I take a seat among my compatriots Ghita and Viilbjørk. People laugh several times, the Danes the most. It's because the film, besides being beautiful and profound, has very Danish humor, dry and ironic. Dinesen is a kind of Scandinavian Quixote. At the end, there's a prolonged silence in the theatre and then loud applause begins. To see the movie finished with image and sound for the first time has been moving. I feel very proud of what we just finished presenting.

Viggo talking about the Cannes Premier
Something Material
By Viggo Mortensen, Fabián Casas and Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
31 May 2014




"When we went up on the stage for the presentation, for a moment I thought like a producer and told myself, "I'm going to try to explain, to orient [the audience]. But then, I reconsidered - no, we're going to continue doing silly stuff and have fun. If you have to explain it, it's not worth it. It has to reach you or it doesn't."

Viggo Mortensen on receiving the International Critics prize
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN
August 2014




Alonso creates moments of absolute beauty, where in a single shot - square, like in the oldest and most noble films - suspense and horror are manifest...

Jauja Review
Leonardo D'Espósito
Perfil.com
27 November 2014




For me, Jauja is a film that attempts to comment on just how small our existence is in the scope of time and space, but there are many interpretations to be made, which is what makes Jauja a challenging but rewarding experience.

Jauja Review
Rowe Reviews
9 November 2014




....a beautiful, mystical, intoxicatingly wonderful film.

Paddy Mulholland
Awards Daily
20 October 2014




I never enjoyed a collective effort more than I did during the ultra-creative, multilingual collaboration we experienced as a team in those beautiful natural landscapes deep in Argentina.

Viggo Mortensen
Something Material
By Viggo Mortensen, Fabián Casas and Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
31 May 2014

Quotable Viggo: 3 January 2015

Another fresh new year has arrived. Have you made your New Year's Resolutions for 2015 yet? Mine is to live more in the moment, something Viggo seems to have down to a fine art. He may be always restless, busy and on the move, but he still seems able to find enough stillness to pay attention to every moment. He's admitted it's partly because he realised at a very young age that life is short, but it's also bound up in his approach as an artist. So savour every experience and pay attention because what is most rewarding is the journey and not the destination.



© 4L Productions.


"We may not know why we're here, or where we're going after we die, but if you're here, you might as well be here. And being here means paying attention, I think."

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008




What keeps you awake at night?

Yesterday and tomorrow, but I eventually fall asleep because neither exists.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
by Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010




"….I must confess that I'm interested in collecting as much experience as I can from wherever I go because I don't know what happens in the next world. I'm not counting on anything happening. That's one of the great things about making movies – you get to explore these things."

Viggo Mortensen
Crimes and Misdemeanours
By Phillip Berk
Filmink
October 2007




You act, write poetry and paint. Do you still struggle to achieve everything you want to do?


Yeah, I wish life was longer. I wish that I didn't have to sleep. I like sleeping, and dreaming especially. But I wish sleep was a luxury, that I could just lie under the covers, listen to the rain but that I didn't have to if I didn't want to.

The Inner Viggo
By Jenny Ewart
New Zealand's Woman's Weekly
2003




"Life is so short! I tell myself frequently to "Go slow to go fast", to remind me to take my time in order to sample as many things as possible."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




The brevity of life and the importance of grasping the day are, one quickly learns, big themes for Mortensen. The sound of time's winged chariot is very loud in his ear, it seems, and the imperative to "use time well" crops up repeatedly in his conversation…

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




'One of my first memories as a boy was realizing that animals die and therefore people do. It seemed very unfair to me and I'm sure that I traumatized my parents with these questions.'

Viggo Mortensen: Film and Soccer Activist
By Horacio Bilbao - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarín.com
27 November 2014




With so many active interests, Mortensen admits he used to be impatient. "It felt unjust that we were given such a limited period on earth, but I don't feel that way any more. Maybe it's because I'm getting older, but I just figure, eh, what's your hurry?'"

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




"...I know I can't read all the books or watch all the movies in one lifetime." Does he find that frustrating? Mortensen fixes me with his intense blue gaze. "Mostly no," he says. "If we could run out of books and movies, then we would be bored."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




An encounter with Viggo is sitting on a porch, drinking a bombilla of mate and watching time pass in such a way that every now and then new reflections, inquiries, ways of looking at things arise. It can take a whole season. Watching many skies pass by.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




'A photo, a painting, a poem or music that we use to express our experience is not the main thing, but what you are expressing. How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.'

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




"A change of light, a sunset, a sunrise. Things you may never see again. You grasp those moments. You don't see a bear in the wild and walk on, thinking: Oh, I'll see another bear. You just wait and watch."

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




"We each have only a limited amount of time here. We have to do more with it - pay attention, explore, be open to all of life. Because we have only one chance, we have to make life seem longer than it really is."

Viggo Mortensen
I Still Ask Why
Dotson Rader
Parade magazine, 2004




Mortensen likes sotto voce details; he gives his attention to instants that would otherwise have passed by unobserved, or more significantly, unregistered - things that in a literal sense were simply there for him because he was there for them - things that would have easily passed by as all else passes by, as we ourselves finally do.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




"I think it was Robert Louis Stevenson who said this," Mortensen says, "it was about meandering through a career, or the arts in general, without seeming to have a deliberate plan. He said, 'To travel hopefully is better than to arrive, and the true success is in the labor.' That's a great line, 'To travel hopefully.' That's what I'd like to do."

Viggo Mortensen
The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003




How long would he like to live?


"Forever." Without hesitation.

Really? Wouldn't you get bored?


"There's no excuse to be bored," Mortensen says. "Sad, yes. Angry, yes. Depressed, yes. Crazy, yes. But there is no excuse for boredom, ever."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine, January 2004

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Last edited: 24 December 2015 06:18:34

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