Quotable Viggo

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Quotable Viggo 2014

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Quotable Viggo: 28 December 2014

2015 is on the near horizon – time for a bumper look back at all the best quotes of 2014. Most are film related in a year which saw Viggo appear in three new movies, visit more film festivals than he had hot dinners and stun critics with some linguistic fireworks. Along the way we have had Sobrevueloscuervos, covering every topic under the sun and giving us laughter and tears, and always something to think about when the reading is done.



© Viggo Mortensen/One World Films/4L Productions/StudioCanal


'I think that you have to be able to speak without fear, that one can, and at times must, name things, facts, freely speak your mind. Free discussion without fear of anyone or anything.'

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




Mortensen, who radically rejects any clichés and stereotypes, has become one of the most interesting and idiosyncratic actors of his generation. And incidentally, so to speak, a world star of cinema.

Venniale Tribute publicity
August 2014




'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




Viggo Mortensen is one of the most fascinating stars in contemporary cinema. The image of his penetrating gaze and wide jaw seems to have traversed all the corners of the globe and of Planet Cinema.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




"Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




'Suddenly, there's foreign sales and they can sell the idea. It suddenly went from "this is too dark," "the characters are [too] unlikable and complicated,"- it was suddenly, "Well it's Viggo."'

Hossein Amini
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




There's been a lot of good-looking men at this year's 2014 Toronto International Film Festival, but none of them can compare to the sexy beast that is Viggo Mortensen.

The Huffington Post
9 September 2014




Is there a language Viggo Mortensen doesn't speak?

Jill Lawless
Associated Press
2 September 2014




Viggo Mortensen can do anything. Until recently, that wasn't true. We could all look at him and think, "Yeah sure, but can he speak French?" The answer was no, and our world had a modicum of balance. Now it turns out that answer was yes, and we are all ****ed.

Evan Saathoff
Badassdigest.com
25 August 2014




A wonderful reflection on the evocative power of cinema. And, incidentally, the umpteenth confirmation of Viggo Mortensen´s great talent. Mustachioed , astride his horse in a cavalry uniform, sword in sheath and a splendid hat on his head, he is reminiscent of John Wayne in the early John Ford films.

Jauja review
Franck Nouchi - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Le Monde
19 May 2014




Sweating in layers of bulky long johns, and sporting a droopy, weeping mustache, Mortensen carries the film, his human grumbling and surprised, rageful violence conveying the sense of a nervous, basically average man caught on a journey into his own heart of darkness. Increasingly, as the other characters drop away, Mortensen has nothing to play against but nature and himself.

Jauja review
Mark Asch
Brooklyn Magazine
7 October 2014




Anchored by a rumpled, naturalistic performance by the great Viggo Mortensen...

Jauja review
Angelo Muredda
Torontoist
5 September 2014




The voice on the phone is husky, familiar, and just a little menacing. "I was told to call this number," the speaker says. I give a little shudder before realising it's Viggo Mortensen, calling as planned to talk about his new film, The Two Faces of January. Phew.

The many faces of Viggo Mortensen
By Karl Quinn
Sydney Morning Herald
5 June 2014




'I liked the psychological acuteness, the darkness, the immorality that was in the script and all of this immersed in a dream setting. Just like something left rotting away in the sun.'

Viggo Mortensen: "I love the darkness and immorality of The Two Faces of January"
By Thomas Agnelli – translated by Celine
Premiere (France
June 2014




Viggo Mortensen surely wasn't just cast because he's a great actor; it's because no one can rock a 1960s cream linen suit quite like him.

Leigh Singer
IGN.com
19 May 2014




'I wasn't aware how bad he was until he confessed to me later that he could have been trying on bin bags for all he'd known.'

Steven Noble on Viggo being ill with fever through his costume fitting
ESQ&A: The Hollywood Costume Designer
By Tom Ward
Esquire Magazine
6 December 2014




"Viggo really embraces the ugly side of characters… not a lot of stars do."

Two Faces of January review
Dave McNary
Variety
22 June 2014



...one of the great little pleasures of cinema in our day - seeing Mortensen tilt his head and sketch a knowing half smile with the corner of his mouth.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




Mortensen is terrific. His post-'Lord of the Rings' films have been an idiosyncratic mix. His my-way-or-the-highway approach doesn't always pay off, but it does here with this engrossing drama.

Loin des Hommes
Cath Clarke
Time Out
2 September 2014




"It takes me a long time to say yes to something. But once I do, I'm there."

Viggo talking about choosing his films
Adam Nayman
Globe and Mail
9 September 2014




...he packs all the qualities of the archetypal strong and silent man as he has been constructed in the mythology of classic American westerns.

Loin des Hommes review
Flix
2 September 2014




...a face that paints a thousand unknown memories...

Loin des Hommes review
filmuforia
1 September 2014




Viggo Mortensen:
We went through a lot of actors.

David Cronenberg:
This is not the original Viggo.

Viggo and Cronenberg talking about the dangers of filming the fight scenes
Listening in: Cronenberg and Mortensen introduce AHOV at Tiff 2104
Next Projection.com
14 January 2014




Muddy paths, the grey rampart that advances relentlessly and swallows the sky, the threat of something big, powerful, unstoppable. Rain is the universal music - along with the contribution of the wind through a forest or punishing an open window, the roar of the rivers, the sea.

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




Now the thunder and lightning are multiplying and it's starting to rain. I'm tired, but I think we've shot some good scenes today. I put the Cuervo flag in my backpack, next to that of Real Madrid and the Montreal Canadiens, others that I usually hang wherever I travel for work. An old habit, superstitious things.

The Past Is In Everything
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 August 2014




'Ridley Scott's filming George Orwell's Animal Farm and I'm playing the goat...'

Viggo on being asked if he's grown his beard for a new role
BBC Breakfast Television
13 May 2014

Quotable Viggo: 20 December 2014



Nikolai had a horrible feeling that he'd been given a false address for
the Staff Christmas Dinner and everyone else was at Nando's.


© Focus Features



It's Christmas time and what better seasonal subject than home cooked food and lots and lots of chocolate? In fact when it comes to the chocolate, Viggo definitely has a bit of the Santa Claus about him...


I managed to catch some nice trout in the states of Washington and New Mexico, where the movie was shot. Only kept one, a badly hooked brown trout taken from the Chama, in Northern New Mexico. Had my fishing license, by the way, which I recommend to all anglers, be they beginners or veterans, fishing on public or private land. I ate the trout, fried with some onions and apple slices. Delicious. Thank you, Universe.

Viggo-Works Christmas Interview With Viggo
By Viggo-Works and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo-Works
14 December 2014




This myth of the poor lonesome cowboy, the guy who has no need of others to be happy, is it really a trick to attract women?

On the contrary! Each time I have tried to charm them with my poetic cowboy side, it's ended in total failure. To seduce a woman, food is more effective than poetry. I love to make complex dishes. That always works!

Viggo Mortensen
Grazia Magazine
Translated by Chrissiejane
December 2009




When we speak, Mortensen is in the kitchen of his home in Venice, California, drinking strong, green Argentinean maté tea, brewed from twigs, and cooking himself dinner (Korean dumplings).

Hot Actor - Viggo Mortensen
By G. E.
Rolling Stone
September 2003




"My kitchen is my studio. I don't have a real working studio. But it's nice to paint in the kitchen: while the canvas dries, I can take a break and eat something. I like cooking, especially for my son. I'm not sure that you'd like my cooking. It's not at all conventional ..."

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"I like to live dangerously. Last night I was quietly at home, cooking a meal of chicken, onions and garlic, Cuban style, and then here I am today facing a pack of journalists."

Viggo Mortensen Talks About "Jauja" and "Far from Men"
By Martin Dale
Variety
7 December 2014




...when it came his turn to enjoy an executive producer's morale-buffing dinner invitation for cast members, the producer, Mark Ordesky, never got a chance to reach for his wallet.

"When I called Viggo, he said, 'Pick me up at 8,' " New Line Cinema's Ordesky recalls. "I get there and he cooks. He's a Renaissance man. He paints, he acts, he writes poetry, you could bounce a quarter off of him and he cooks the way our mothers cook -- from scratch."

Valiant Effort: A Late Substitution, Viggo Mortensen Dived into Rings.
By Irene Lacher
LA Times
21 December 2002





"I love to cook," he admits. "When we did Lord of the Rings, I'd help cook these big Thanksgiving feasts on the set."

The Renaissance Man adds, "I do all the trimmings plus even make pies."

Viggo Starring In Different Sort Of Psychological Thriller
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun-Times
8 December 2011




…he stashes chocolate on his person like a marsupial…

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




"He's an unbelievable man. He brings chocolates to the set, expensive haute cuisine chocolates, and he hands it out in plastic bags."

Jason Isaacs
Jason Isaacs Loved Working With Chocolate Man Mortensen
ContactMusic.com
1 March 2012




He… presents me with two large chocolate squares, one wrapped in pink paper that has a handwritten "Venezuela" on it, and another in orange paper that has a handwritten "Indonesia".

I am not sure whether he handwrapped them himself or whether they came from a hand-wrapped chocolate shop. I imagine him travelling the world with a suitcase of wrapped chocolates.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




He gave presents every day.....An example of what Viggo Mortensen's participation in this Spanish project has been like is explained by Unax Ugalde: "When he knew about my big childhood fondness for Sugus sweets, one day I found on the floor of my dressing room the shape of my name all made out with sugus."

Unax Ugalde
The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García, El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




There was only one thing that I was irritated with: he was on a diet of chocolate, really dark chocolate and red meat. That's it. He brought all of these great chocolates from everywhere in the world and shared them with the crew. I'm still addicted to dark chocolate. I can't get away from it."

Hitting 'The Road' with Director John Hillcoat
Matt Mazur
Popmatters
22 November 2009




...there was never a day that he wasn't plying us with dark chocolate. It was ridiculous. Bags full. Bags full! Bacon–covered truffles. Where was he getting it? He was the chocolate crack dealer."

Renée Zellweger
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




A few days later, as evening fell, he returned to Valdeteja bringing with him an enormous bag of goodies for the town's kids who by now know that Viggo never arrives empty-handed. There, in Anabel's bar, he resembled Jesus among the children. Scores of kids cavorted around him, watching eagerly as Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like Santa Claus to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
20 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita




Name six historical figures you would like to invite to a dinner party.


Again, far too many to choose from, but I can give you the first ones that come to mind at this moment: Albert Camus, Minerva Chapman, Buffalo Bill Cody, Karen Blixen, Johnny "Appleseed" Chapman, Clara Barton, Bertrand Russell, Alfredo Alcón, Padre Lorenzo Massa, Rosa Luxemburg, Noam Chomsky, Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Alfonsina Storni, Rolf Krake, Ada Falcón, William Shakespeare, Wangari Maathai, Crazy Horse, Hannah Arendt, Gautama Buddah, Hypatia, Heidegger, Schopenhauer, Santa Teresa de Avila, Oscar Wilde, the Prophet Muhammad, Mother Teresa, Albert Schweitzer, Jorge Luis Borges, R. M. Rilke, Marguerite Duras, Leonardo da Vinci, Jesus Christ, Carl T. Dreyer, Maria Falconetti, Stefan Schweig, Sigmund Freud, Ludvig Holberg, Mohandas Gandhi, Howard Zinn, Saxo Grammaticus, Artemisia Genitleschi, Leo Messi and Allan Simonsen seated together... that's probably enough for a long table.

And what would you cook for them?


I would make a giant salad from my own garden, provide good home-baked bread, and, to be safe and not offend anyone, a big rice dish with options of meat and vegetarian, with lots of hand-picked forest mushrooms in both. Also oven-baked potatoes, carrots, garlic, turnips, onions. For those interested, I'd provide fresh-caught wild rainbow trout and salmon, grilled with a bit of lemon, olive oil, salt and pepper. Blackberries, raspberries, thimbleberries, blueberries, huckleberries, apples, plums, wild grapes, and whatever else I could find in my ideal orchards and surrounding forest. Lots of good water from a spring, and plenty of red and white wine from Spain, Argentina, Italy, France, and New Zealand.

Viggo-Works 10th Anniversary Interview With Viggo
By Viggo-Works and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo-Works
30 May 2014

Quotable Viggo: 6 December 2014

In the October 9th Sobrevuelos column (just translated by our intrepid duo Ollie and Zoe,)
Viggo quite rightly defends the right to speak freely and voice opinions on controversial issues, and to have those opinions respected and presented in context. The freedom to speak is something that he has returned to again and again over the years. Only when all sides and arguments have been expressed can truth and balance emerge.




Voices of a People's History of the United States
Image Frazer Hamilton.
© Frazer Hamilton.



'activism is not a dirty word.'

Viggo Mortensen
SLU Commencement Address
May 21, 2006




'Not speaking something that you know or think is the truth is complicity.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Other Mortensen, by Mariana Enriquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
Página 12,
20 November 2005




Mortensen has got himself onto the subject of politics and personal responsibility and he is quietly rapping away. It has rhythm, it has blues: you almost feel like tapping your feet. Not a grandiose oration, nor a preachy lecture (or one you can actually stop or interrupt) but his audience nevertheless starts to feel a creeping sense of guilty moral turpitude.

Viggo at the Rome Film Festival
Mr Good Bard
Sydney Morning Herald
28 February 2009




'I think that you have to be able to speak without fear, that one can, and at times must, name things, facts, freely speak your mind. Free discussion without fear of anyone or anything. We can disagree, but we need to try to learn what's going on, what others think - everyone - in order to maintain a more or less sensible conversation, a healthy dialogue.'

Viggo Mortensen
If The Rain Gets Here
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
9 October 2014




'If we don't talk about these things - with respect and good manners, and informing ourselves as well as possible - they get worse and worse, darker. There are more misunderstandings and problems. As in any relationship, the things that aren't talked about come out later in another way.'

Viggo talking about the ETA and forgiveness controversy
The World of Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez Torres - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
March 2012




'I consider myself very fortunate to have a platform. I don't take it lightly, and I don't abuse it. I don't speak up about something unless I feel strongly about it and until I've researched a subject extensively and have an informed decision about it. But I think if you don't say something it's lying by omission. I personally think it's immoral. Yeah, it might cost you a few fans, but you have to say something.'

Viggo Mortensen on speaking up for his beliefs
By Nina Siegal
The Progressive
November 2005




"There's a well-promoted notion: "Why are you speaking about things you don't know anything about? You're not in politics, you're not a senator or a congressman. You have no right to speak about these things. You are an actor, or a teacher, a cab driver, a nurse, and therefore you have no right to worry about or express concern over the moral decision-making of the government you have elected to represent you." Which is absurd, of course."

Viggo Mortensen
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




"On one hand I fully believe in artistic freedom and freedom of speech, but at the same time I feel that you should react wisely and show your respect for other people," says Viggo and he continues: "As an artist I express my opinion about everything, but I never talk about a subject I have no knowledge of. And I always think about how other people would interpret my expressions. Once in a while it is smarter to shut up. Think and listen to what other people say.

My Heart Beats For Denmark
By Kim Kastrup - translated by Rosen
Ekstra Bladet
25 September 2007




'Every kind of government, however democratic it might be, is naturally against freedom, because its number one objective is to remain in power. So, for government to work well, people have to get involved, to insist on freedom of speech, on gender equality, on all that. Because they aren't things that are a done deal, that we won them and that's it. They have to be renewed every day.'

The World of Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez Torres - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
March 2012




'I believe in this nation and I think that, you know, as Howard Zinn, paraphrasing him, being patriotic is not supporting your government, being patriotic is supporting your country, your nation.'

Charlie Rose Show Interview,
transcription for V-W by Chrissie
22 September 2005




People say I'm negative – not true. I'm aware. The spread of the internet leads us to think that people are more informed than ever. They're not. People are tired of scandals and corruption and want to know less than ever."

Viggo Mortensen
A Most Beautiful Mind
L'Uomo Vogue
September 2011




'A couple of days ago, a man wrote a letter to the Watertown Daily Times saying, in effect, that he would not vote for Bob Johnson just because Viggo Mortensen thought he ought to. He was absolutely right.'

Viggo Mortensen's Watertown Speech in support of Dr. Bob Johnson,
Democratic party candidate for congress
Watertown, NY
9 September 2006



Quotable Viggo: 30 November 2014

In the recent Variety interview we learned a little more about the music in Jauja, which got me thinking about Viggo's long term collaboration with Buckethead on a whole string of albums including Pandemoniumfromamerica, Intelligence Failure, Reunion, and, most recently Acá. First getting together in 1997 for One Less Thing to Worry About, it's become an enduring partnership between an actor who insists he's not a musician but likes messing around, and one of the world's most innovative and shyest guitarists.



Album covers ©Perceval Press/TDRS. ©Photo Unknown


'I like to play with music. But I would not define myself as a musician, but as a sound modulator. I love to be with musicians and play, to see what comes out from the mess that we do together.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Painter Hero
By Giulia D'Agnolo Vallan
CIAK
March 2002




It's the opening night of Viggo's photo exhibition and the room is packed with his friends and associates. They're all here to see the debut of his haunting, abstract images, the ones shot during the making of "Hidalgo", Disney's upcoming $90 million epic in which Mortensen stars as the first American to race across the Sahara Desert on horseback.

More to the point, everyone's also here to see the man himself, yet no one seems to know where he is.

As it turns out, the reluctant "The Lord of the Rings" star is out back with six or seven spiky-haired youths in the parking lot. He's the tall one in the center looking uncharacteristically polished in a charcoal suit and black leather shoes. At the moment, everyone's huddled around his dirty blue Toyota Prius, listening to some loud, swampy, guitar noise pumping out of his dashboard.

"Is that Buckethead?" asks the guy in baggy jeans, the one standing next to Elijah Wood.

"Yeah, that's him," says Mortensen, referring to a certain guitar wail. "I'm not sure about the mix, though. What do you think? Should it be brighter?"

This is vintage Viggo. While crowds of people are anxiously waiting inside to talk to him about one thing, he's already on to the next, in this case his next album with the Japanese [sic] experimental guitar legend known simply as Buckethead.


The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




'...[Lisandro] said that we didn't have any budget at all to go find what he was thinking about, so he needed somebody to propose something. And I said there is a guitar player named Buckethead whom I've known for years, I've done lots of records with him. A lot of the music is kinda strange, but some of it is pretty lyrical. It has a sort of circular quality that would suit the story. I sent Lisandro ten songs, and he picked the one you hear and I thought "great choice." I wouldn't have thought of it, but he could see that. It was one of those things that happen.'

Viggo discussing the music in Jauja
Viggo Mortensen on 'Jauja,' Producing, Protecting Directors' Visions
John Hopewell
Variety
25 November 2014




"I think for him, to work with me, I'm obviously not, you know, a professional musician or a professional music producer or anything like that, so I don't work in a conventional way and I don't have set rules for how we are going to do each take or how long it's going to be or what approach we are going to take, so I think it's probably refreshing for Buckethead to just go ahead and play. And be safe, he can be safe in making mistakes, doing whatever. I'm never going to make him do something and I would never use something he didn't like so I think it's a safe atmosphere for him to be really creative."

Viggo Mortensen on working with Buckethead
CHUD magazine
by John Makarewicz
2004




A number of years ago I reviewed a collection of Mortensen's photographs and poems and commented on how with either media he seemed to have the innate ability to capture specific moments in time with both his words and his camera.

Maybe it's through his work as an actor, where you have to be in the moment at all times when you're portraying a character in order for it to be believable to your audience, that he has gained this ability.

However he does it, this recording shows he's equally capable of bringing an audience into a specific moment in time with his music. Acà is a beautiful and evocative collection of music which will allow you to travel into your own memories of time and place like few others I've heard.

DanVTMuzrzr reviewing Acà
Music Blogs
22 February 2014




"I met him like seven or eight years ago when I'd made a recording of...I'd participated in a poetry recording for children and each poet or writer had to invent something about a theme, well, from Greek mythology. I did something about Poseidon and he put it to music. I listened to the music afterward, when the recording was ready and I asked, "Who's the guitar player?" Then I called him and we began to work [together]."

Viggo talking about working with Buckethead
"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




"I'm so glad that in my life that I've gotten to know him a little and work with him. He's one of the most original, genuine, most sincere, and most gifted individuals I've met in my life. He's incredible."

Viggo Mortensen & Buckethead: The man who portrayed Aragorn talks about recording with the king of horror guitar.
By Spence D.
FilmForceIGN. com
3 March 2004




'He's never different,' the guitarist says. There's a long silence. 'He doesn't seem like he belongs in this time.'

Buckethead on Viggo
Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish, by Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




Taking lyrical cues from William Blake, Rumi, and Jonathan Swift (whose "Holyhead" gets murky, standout treatment), the album could almost be called the dissonant but similarly adventurous Sgt. Pepper of its age, or, more rationally, the My Life in the Bush of Ghosts.

On Pandemoniumfromamerica
Holding Court with the King: Viggo Mortensen heralds the return of the renaissance man
by Gregory Weinkauf
East Bay Express, 2003




One listen to The Other Parade, his rereleased 1998 album with Buckethead, ex-wife Exene Cervenka, and a host of others, reveals total artistic fearlessness...

Holding Court with the King: Viggo Mortensen heralds the return of the renaissance man
by Gregory Weinkauf
East Bay Express, 2003




Now if he just changes his handle to something catchy like "V-Go," the fellow might prove quite the pop star.

On Pandemoniumfromamerica
Holding Court with the King: Viggo Mortensen heralds the return of the renaissance man
by Gregory Weinkauf
East Bay Express, 2003




Being in the studio with him and just spending a day at work, I walk out of there always feeling a little lighter, all my problems and responsibilities just feel a little less daunting somehow. It's like going for a nice walk in the woods. You just feel a little more able to deal with thing 'cause you know that you've used your time well and gotten something special out of the day. I feel that working in the studio and in particular working with him."

Viggo Mortensen & Buckethead: The man who portrayed Aragorn talks about recording with the king of horror guitar.
By Spence D.
FilmForceIGN. com
3 March 2004




Writing or acting or playing music, I need to feel like I'm connecting with something. And although acting brings me many moments like that I'm probably most relaxed sitting down at a piano. I don't read music and I've never had lessons but it's fun and I find it very relaxing. I'm okay with mistakes and people not liking what I play. I just do it.

Viggo Mortensen on Good
By Angus Fontaine
Time Out, Sydney
9 April 2009

Quotable Viggo: 23 November 2014

Reading through old interviews last week, I came across one where Viggo summed himself up as 'curious', pointing out that it could be read in two ways – a curious guy who is curious about the world. It didn't surprise me as the word 'curious' is one Viggo uses again and again to describe the way he approaches life. Being curious is what drives him. He wants to know about pretty much everything.



© 20th Century Fox/Haddock Film


What would you like as your epitaph?

"He was curious," which you can take more than one way.

Viggo Mortensen Interview
By Tim Wilson
Metro
December 2003




Honor? Power? Glory? Don't even bother him with this!

The noble warrior Aragorn from "The Lord of the Rings" fights for only one treasure: to stay curious llike a child.

Viggo Mortensen
By Bernd Volland Translated by JoannaP
Stern Speziel Biografie
April 2003




...and yet, in his many careers, ego has no place...and if ego has no place in his career, apathy has no place in his life. Viggo Mortensen has earned a reputation for having endless energy, for being consummately curious. He drives himself hard in all aspects of his life.

Daniel F. Sullivan
St. Lawrence University
March 1, 2003




'I'm a very curious guy and I stick my nose in everything. I travel a lot because I'm interested in knowing how the rest of the world lives. I love to learn about other cultures, to submerge myself in them, to learn of points of view that are different from mine.'

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm a guy who sticks his nose in everything"
By Stuart Gollum, Gala Magazine
30 August 2006




'Deep down I'm curious, so it doesn't matter what I do, if only my curiosity is satisfied. I would never had imagined that I would become an actor in so many years. And I've thought about quitting many times, cause it can be frustrating again and again to see your work being made in such way, that the final result is bad; when the thing, you've put in the movie, can't be viewed on screen. But I have learned many years ago, to enjoy the things you are doing, while you're doing it.'

The Star Is Named Viggo
By Rolf Pedersen
M! magazine
November 2001




MT:Is there a common denominator to all your various artistic endeavors?

VM: Curiosity, I suppose. I've been aware for as long as I can remember of the fact that I was going to die. I don't remember not being aware of that. And that, therefore, life is limited. And no matter how many movies you see or how many conversations you have or how many people you listen to or how many books you read or how many travel experiences you have, how many times you return to the same street or the same tree, you can never do it enough. So why not make the effort? You can't put everything off until tomorrow.

A Sense of Finality
By Markus Tschiedert
Green Cine, 2003




His work is a trace of his own adventure, lived openly and exploratively, with curiosity and a constant sense of surprise.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




Viggo Mortensen is, besides a great actor, an inexhaustible conversationalist, so full of curiosity that he doesn't hesitate to occasionally take the role of the interviewer.

The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




Are you a politically-motivated person?

I don't know that I'm more politically motivated than anyone else. I'm curious about the world and I have a resistance to just assuming that what I see on TV is the gospel truth.

The Horse Whisperer
Daily Mirror, by Honie Stevens
16 April 2004




How are you with your artistic side nowadays? (He is known as a musician, poet, photographer and painter.)

I think I´m alright. I continue wanting to learn new things, and to do better the things I already know [how to do]. Whether you have a profession that's considered artistic or not, curiosity is indispensable if a person is to grow in life. As has been the case for so many years, this year I am acting, writing, publishing, taking photographs, and I keep looking all I can at other people´s art. I still travel a lot, and that's always inspiring for me.

Viggo Mortensen demonstrates to this newspaper that the great never lose their humility.
TiempoSur.com.ar
3 July 2013




What was it that inspired you to start making photos?

Nothing in particular. Perhaps it has something to do with a sort of incurable, persistent nosiness.

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
by Natalie Dodecker
American Photo magazine 2000

Quotable Viggo: 15 November 2014

I was thrilled to see the video again of Viggo talking about his Track 16 Recent Forgeries Exhibit, which Philipa posted a few days ago. It filled me with nostalgia for Viggo's paintings. Each painting was like a multi-media journal of his life, full of scraps of writing and bits of photos. They emerged from the paint like half-hidden secrets which we loved to try and unravel on our art threads. So I couldn't resist doing another painting quotable, combing the archives to try and find some fresh insights. I would love to see new Viggo paintings and perhaps his comment in the exclusive interview he did for V-W last April gives us grounds for some hope!





Mortensen is an artist and he is a trifle obsessed. Every inch of his house is given over to artworks... ...The place is so layered with art that when Mortensen offers a guest a soda, he has to liberate the refrigerator from behind several large paintings in order to get to it.

Kristine McKenna
Recent Forgeries
Smart Art Press
1998




Viggo Mortensen's friend, the actor Dennis Hopper, was once asked to define Viggo's art, and he summed it up this way: "It comes from the subconscious. You take it back into your subconscious and have your own conscious reaction."

That's about as good an explanation as any for the art of a man as complex and enigmatic as Viggo Mortensen.

Celebrity Artist - Viggo Mortensen
By Ken Hall
Art & Frame Review
May 2002




Written words, printed words, often drowned in paint, fragments of paper, images, photographs, the shape of a tree, scratched on to the canvas.

The Painter Hero
By Giulia D'Agnolo Vallan
CIAK
March 2002




Here he puts some paint, there he adds a verse from his poetry, a piece of cloth, sponge, some sand then he paints the half over again, attaches a piece of wire...

One Man Band
By Beata Sadowska (translated by JoannaP)
VIVA Magazine
December 2003




[He] doesn't pay attention to critics' voices: "Many of them would send me to a basic painting workshop, but what is most important to me is that I have fun doing this. Everybody should do what he likes".

One Man Band
By Beata Sadowska (translated by JoannaP)
VIVA Magazine
December 2003




"I operate on instinct and intuition rather than an intellectualized approach to art-making," he said. "Every so often, somebody will tell me about a rule, but eventually I always end up asking myself, 'Why does it have to be this way?'"

Celebrity Artist - Viggo Mortensen
By Ken Hall
Art & Frame Review
May 2002




"In the canvases on which I have been working a while, there are phrases, maxims, extracts from personal diaries or newspapers ... I even use these as the material for my paintings, like the paint. These days I've stopped copying them, so as not to lose them, in notebooks or on the kitchen wall. However they are still there, in my paintings, like so many indications of my past points of view and my experiences ..."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




For Mortensen the canvases are like 'a diary, a representation of my memory, of the way my mind works. They reflect precise experiences and moments, even if I don't necessarily remember them.'

The Painter Hero
By Giulia D'Agnolo Vallan
CIAK
March 2002




"I have a tendency to always leave things for another day. Before I make the first mark on a canvas, it always ends up seeming much more urgent for me to have another cup of tea [laughter]. And then I only have 45 minutes left before some other appointment, so I've already made myself late to begin with..."

Viggo Mortensen
"Freud was a great public relations person"
By Alex Vicente
Público.es – translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
4 September 2011




"If I have a day off, I'm not at a Hollywood party. I'm not the type of actor who lives in the press. I'd rather be home in shorts and a T-shirt surrounded by paint brushes, a blank canvas and have a few candles burning as the day fades into the night."

Superstar Viggo's a serious soul at heart
by Cindy Pearlman,
Chicago Sun Times
9 Sept 2007




"I'm aware that some people came to see the actor and not the painter. But once they are here, maybe they will like my pictures".

Viggo talking about his art exhibitions
One Man Band
By Beata Sadowska (translated by JoannaP)
VIVA Magazine
December 2003




Do you still create any visual arts like paintings or drawings?

Drawings, and hope to get back to painting when I move to a bit larger home later in the year.

Viggo-Works Exclusive Interview with Viggo
12 April 2014




Drawings from childhood, computer experiments, canvas, cloth, photographs, rub, scratch, splash, dash. Go for it, Viggo.

Dennis Hopper
Introduction to Recent Forgeries
Smart Art Press
1998

Quotable Viggo: 8 November 2014

After Thursday's gorgeous 'Good Day' Nigel Parry photo and Alix Lambert's wonderful film of Viggo padding around his pool with his feet all au naturel, I'm sure we are all feeling nostalgia for the barefoot King. Can I do a quotable all about Viggo's feet? You bet your life I can. Vintage Viggo!!!



© Westmount


…there's a good chance Mortensen has the smallest shoe collection in Hollywood.

Viggo Mortensen Rides Back In 'Hidalgo'
By Jae-Ha Kim
Chicago Sun-Times
29 February 2004




We wander our way to the Japanese garden, where the cherry blossoms bloom and sit on a steep grass bank. As is his wont wherever and whenever possible, Viggo wears no shoes. He spots an oval-headed balding man, with wisps of gray hair, walking with two younger women.

"Is that Arthur Miller?" he whispers. "Wait till we see his face."

We watch, and even before we see his face, we agree that there is something about the way this man walks that is not the way we somehow know Arthur Miller would walk. And the women are somehow not the women Arthur Miller would walk with in a Japanese garden.

"Let's just say it was," Viggo says, and by this I don't think for a moment he is suggesting that we should conspire to lie about it. Just that, with some willpower and a creative refusal to join the dots and draw a line we will no longer be able to cross, we can delay even this small disappointment and keep alive our moment in the park with Arthur Miller a little while longer.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




Barefoot, carrying a coffee plunger of water and sporting a United Nations badge on his jacket, Hollywood star Viggo Mortensen wandered into his own press conference as though he were planning to sit on the back lawn.

A Barefoot Viggo Lords It Over The Fans
By James Gardiner
29 November 2003
Source: New Zealand Herald




Viggo Mortensen rolls his own cigarettes, totes his own teapot, does his own driving, opts for his own bedroll over hotels when travelling in New Zealand, performs his own stunts and cultivates his own casual take on fashion that precludes the wearing of shoes and socks.

But one thing the soft-spoken "Lord of the Rings" star won't do is beat his own drum.

V IS FOR VIGGO
By Hugh Hart
San Francisco Chronicle, 2003




'He'll show up at your door barefoot. It's real with him - it's not an affectation. He is very much of the earth. He's relaxed and in the moment and he brings real emotions to the table. He's very human with great artistic sensibilities.'

Dennis Hopper
Super Natural
by Anna David
Daily Telegraph 2002




'Viggo has no idea how attractive he is to women,' says friend Elijah Wood. 'He finds all the attention embarrassing. He is really not the celeb type, prancing around at fancy Hollywood premieres. Dear god - we're talking about a guy who runs around barefoot and speaks about spiritual art!'

Elijah Wood
Viggo: "I'm shy with women"
By - translated by Suzy
Vecko-Revyn #3
30 January 2003




'The "Blood Red" auditions at the Actors Studio were notable for one other reason: Viggo Mortensen came by every day—barefoot, with long, dirty blond hair—wanting to audition in the worst way for one of my Italian immigrants. His dirty feet and hair scared me just as much as his blue-eyed blondness wasn't right for the cast I was building. After days of just being rude to him, I finally threw him out of the studio and told him never to darken my casting door again. I have since apologized to him for my lack of artistic vision and behavior. It's the one truly bad casting mistake I ever made. He's such a talented actor; he could have played Italian or anything else he made up his mind to do. I often use him as an example of how one-pointed, dedicated, and willing to be rejected an actor has to be.'

Pamela Guess
Backstage.com
July 2010




The executive producer insisted that the actor spent the entire day, "I think even the weekends, filthy and with his make up on, because he said that he had to feel as uncomfortable as the character in order to portray it correctly." The difference is that, when he wasn't shooting, due to doctor's advice, he would take off his boots and walk barefoot, "so in Seville he walked into a store and the owner, an old man who did not know who Mortensen was, gave him a pair of used canvas shoes."

Pérez-Reverte
"En España no hay suficientes actores jóvenes buenos para rodar 'Alatriste"
By L.M.-L. Alatriste conference in Murcia
El Faro de Murcia




Wandering around the gallery in bare feet sporting a Lord of the Rings shirt, Mortensen describes how one series of photographs on show were a bit of a fluke. Lost 1,2,3 and 4, he jokingly calls them, were taken when he was geographically challenged in the bush on the West Coast one night. The photographs were snapped so that the flash might give him light to get his bearings.

"I eventually had to lie down under a tree for a while till the moon came over me and I could figure out where I was."

Viggo Mortensen at the Massey exhibition, NZ.
Viggo Says Thanks in Pictures
by Bess Mason
Dominion Post, 2003




"He is so kind and playful and funny off set. He's almost like a hippie. We picked him up at the airport one time, and he wasn't wearing shoes. I still have no idea how he got through the airport barefoot."

Fran Walsh
On 'The Road' And Off, Viggo Mortensen Walks The Walk
By Scott Bowles
USA Today
3 December 2009




Barefoot and clad in a pair of sweats that have seen better days, Viggo Mortensen walks over to introduce himself. His hands and arms are covered with names and phone numbers he has scribbled on himself after checking his answering machine. And his hair is tousled and flecked with tiny bits of paint. None of this can hide Mortensen's deadly good looks.

Viggo Artist & Actor
By Jae-Ha Kim
Cleveland Plain Dealer
Los Angeles, CA 1 April 1999




Viggo Mortensen loves rituals. He never changes his habits, no matter where he goes. For example, he enters the villa in Deauville – made available by the French top jeweler Cartier – in bare feet, as if he is in his own living room.

In his right hand, he is holding a cup with his favorite beverage: maté – an herbal drink from Argentina, the country where he spent the majority of his childhood. He also remembered to bring a silver straw, the bombilla.

The actor explains why he always behaves the same way, no matter where he is in the world. "In this business you're travelling half the time. Sometimes I feel like a world traveller who doesn't know where he'll sleep the next day. I am exaggerating a little, but I do value my habits, so I can quickly feel at home. If I don't, it takes me too long to adapt to strange surroundings. That's very important for an actor. That way he can more quickly concentrate on his role."


Viggo Mortensen Goes To Bed With A Shotgun
By - translated by Airwin
Algemeen Dagblad
27 April 2009




'I'm not usually a suit person… You're lucky I'm wearing shoes!'

Viggo Q&A after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




What some might see as LOTR affectation - such as rocking up to interviews barefoot - is actually the real deal. "No, I'm not doing a hobbit thing or a Peter Jackson thing," he told a reporter who queried his lack of footwear. "I'm doing a Viggo Mortensen thing."

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph, 2003




We can only hope that there is room on the A-list for a shoeless poet looking for beauty in Hollywood's seedy patchwork, who is gamely making it up as he goes along.

Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002

Quotable Viggo: 2 November 2014

This week I thought I'd take an overdue look at Two Faces of January with a roundup of the comments and anecdotes I've been collecting since last February. Along the way we find out where Viggo's influences for the character came from, how he nearly set fire to Kirsten Dunst and the fate of the beautiful cream linen suit which, according to critic, Leigh Singer, no one can 'rock' quite like him.




© StudioCanal.


After Viggo Mortensen committed to playing Chester MacFarland, Amini slightly tweaked his conception of the character. "Viggo looks heroic and there's an element of Gatsby in the character, which doesn't exist in the book so much," says the British-Iranian Amini. "I love that element of striking, handsome, charismatic men who are destined to be defeated somehow; Chester struck me as that sort of character, whereas in the book he is a little more wasted from the very beginning."

"The Two Faces of January" - Production Notes
StudioCanal
February 2014




"Chester is kind of a slob, all sweaty and paranoid; he's crazy from the start, really."

Viggo Mortensen
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




How did you research to play Chester?


I was mainly interested in what kind of generation he was from. I spoke with my father's friends, men who came of age during the Great Depression and served in WWII, like Chester. And that informed how he'd wear his clothes, how he'd speak, his gestures and his attitude towards women. The one thing about these men that I found most interesting was that, even at their most downcast, their appearance was paramount. Every day, they ironed their shirts and smoothed their hair, no matter what.


Actor Viggo Mortensen
Vanessa Keys
Sunday Style Magazine
13 June 2014




"But there's another side, too. There was a certain intolerance of foreigners. And if you yourself had any kind of leanings or unusual interests — jazz, say — you could be a little suspect, too... It was interesting to look at all that, my father's generation, through a magnifying glass."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Two Faces of January,' LOTR and what his movies teach him
By Stephen Whitty
The Star-Ledger
21 September 2014




'...it's part of his con, the look, he wants to look like he came from money and all that. I don't think his origins are those clothes that you see.'

Viggo Mortensen on "Lord of the Rings" — and playing an American at last
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon
24 September 2014




"I liked that suit because it's a great suit. It's an additional character in the story. It has its own transformation. By the time we get to the end of the movie the suit has its wrinkles, it's a little torn, a little soiled and it ends up in the dark and rain in Istanbul."

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014





"[As an actor], you lie as well as you can, that's what you're paid to do. And in this case I'm lying about a guy who's lying about being this person who's lying about being another person. It's kind of like a hall of mirrors. Instead of looking in one mirror and trying to be that person as an actor, it's a whole series of mirrors. It's fun."

Viggo Mortensen
The many faces of Viggo Mortensen
By Karl Quinn
Sydney Morning Herald
5 June 2014




"Everybody's got their secrets; even the nicest, calmest nun has got the possibility to think strange things or have resentments. All these characters have their secret desires and resentments, and their own sense of morality. Chester's just an opportunist. No one's purely good or purely bad in this story."

Viggo Mortensen
"The Two Faces of January" - Production Notes
StudioCanal
February 2014




'The people have these beautiful clothes and these idealized lives. You wish you could be them. And then it starts to descend rapidly. You go down this crazy wormhole. It gets darker as you descend. And by the end, you go from the sunny hilltop and this happy life to this sad life in the gutter, in the rain on some nameless street in Istanbul.'

Viggo Mortensen explains rooting for the bad guy in 'The Two Faces of January'
By Chris Lee
Entertainment Weekly
26 September 2014




...no matter how badly they behave you're on their side somehow. You don't want the cops to catch them."

Berlinale Press Conference
Dawn.com
11 February 2014



"It was kind of fun to speak with an atrocious accent. He's speaking in a muddle of Greek and Italian; that was sort of a funny little touch."

Viggo Mortensen
The many faces of Viggo Mortensen
By Karl Quinn
Sydney Morning Herald
5 June 1014



That one shot when you focus on Viggo gripping the bed frame, was that inspired by Nicolas Winding Refn?

It wasn't really. That was something that Viggo did at the time. I found with the actors, with Oscar as well, the scene I have in the ferry when the two of them are staring at each other, I could see them working themselves up into moods and I'd always thought as a director you go in and tell them what you want. Sometimes I learned that it was best to stay away and see what they were going to try to do. That bedroom scene, things where he's squeezing the bed frame and also when he's ruffling the sheets and smelled his fingers, that was all really Viggo. We let the camera roll and watched him and then decided where to put the camera afterwards. There were days where it was much more discussion and whatever, but other days they're such great actors I think just watching what they come up with was really fascinating.

[I]Hossein Amini
The Two Faces of January: Hossein Amini on Adapting Patricia Highsmith
By Fred Topel
Crave Online
28 January 2014[/I]



Can you talk about that very fateful moment in the cave, or would you prefer not to spoil it.

KD: Well, Viggo had to illuminate that scene with a lighter, and he was holding it and he burnt me and he was wailing and being emotional, and I couldn't say anything. The light was out was out but it was still so hot. I think I still have a scar. I didn't want to mess with Viggo.

VM: Scarred her for life.

Kirsten Dunst & Viggo Mortensen Talk Bonding On Set, Paparazzi, & 'The Two Faces of January'
by Hillary Weston
Black Book
1 October 2014




"(Viggo's) such a goofball, that's what I was most excited about, he's very funny and just likes having a good time."

Oscar Isaac
London Premier Interview
Press Association
14 May 2014




"One of the first things we did, where it still had to be kind of neat and tidy, we were filming in a bus that travels around Crete," he said. "It was a vintage bus, a 1959 Mercedes bus, and the seats were red leather, beautiful seats. But it was so hot, and we were sweating so much that when I stood up, all the dye from the seats got on it, so I had this big red ass."

Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst Experienced the Downside of Wearing Vintage Costumes in The Two Faces of January
By Bennett Marcus
Vanity Fair
17 September 2014

Quotable Viggo: 25 October 2014

I loved David Oelhoffen's recent comment that it was 'difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen'. What a great professional compliment. We know that this is partly because once he's committed to a film he is totally dedicated to it, partly because he's a perfectionist and partly because he wants the best for everyone involved in the production. As Cronenberg so memorably said, when you get Viggo you don't just get a violin, you get a whole symphony orchestra. This is even more evident now that he is increasingly joining productions he believes in as Producer.



© One World Films.


'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"It takes me a long time to say yes to something. But once I do, I'm there."

Viggo talking about choosing his films
Adam Nayman
Globe and Mail
9 September 2014




'Viggo liked the story, and he saw we didn´t have enough structure to address it. He joined in because he backed it and believed it was worth it; for that, I will be eternally grateful. I think he is one of the best producers I've ever had in my entire film history.'

Lisandro Alonso, a well-known face at Cannes
by Pablo O. Scholz
Clarin
17 April 2014




"Viggo is incredible. He has the triple role of actor, producer and musician and along with that, he was thinking about how to improve the film 24 hours a day. In addition he rigorously corrected every French, English and Danish subtitle."

Lisandro Alonso
The Lord of the Roles
By Pamela Biénzobas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
In-LAN




"He was incredibly gracious and generous — I hadn't directed anything," Amini says. "He said as long as it's done properly, as long as we shot in Greece, as long as there was a sufficient budget. He became almost like a partner, sort of a patron saint to the whole movie. That allowed me to go and get the financing."

Hossein Amini
New director turns to an old favorite, '2 Faces of January'
By Pam Grady
San Francisco Chronicle
1 October 2014




"...he phoned to make sure I was alright as soon as I'd arrived at my hotel, he walked to my hotel to meet me and took me out to dinner. He paid. He wouldn't let me pay. That's just an example of what a kind and gracious man he is. He made me feel very, very comfortable. I never felt like I had to prove that I can write or convince him to do it. We had an equal discussion of ideas."

Hossein Amini
Viggo Mortensen & Kirsten Dunst Open Up About New Movie, Paparazzi & Being Boring
By Dorri Olds
The Blot Magazine
26 September 2014




"It suddenly [went] from "this is too dark," "the characters are too unlikable and complicated,"- it was suddenly, "Well it's Viggo."'

Hossein Amini
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014




"Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




"With the entry of Viggo, what wasn't viable became possible,"

Vanessa Ragone, producer, Todos Tenemos Un Plan
Local filmmakers use Hollywood stars as lure
By Charles Newbery
Variety
15 May 2011




"I kept working on [Ana Piterbarg] and said, "I want to be a producer. I've never done it before, but I want to do it." I wanted to make sure that whatever happened, her vision got to the screen. As a producer, I had a little more say, and I could say, "Well, let me see the script with subtitles and let me correct them."

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




What's Viggo like to work with, honestly?


He's a little obsessed. He's a little bit of a perfectionist, but then so am I so that's ok!

Ana Piterbarg
Still Waters Run Deep
by Shelley Marsden
Film Juice
27 October 2012




'Without Viggo this wouldn't have been built up ever. Viggo could have done any film, especially after The Lord of the Rings. He fell in love with the project. He insisted on it and this could be done thanks to him.'

Arturo Pérez-Reverte talking about Alatriste
Mano a Mano
XL Semanal, 20 August 2006
Translation for V-W by Paddy




'We really trust each other's sensibility. I did talk to a director once who said, "You know this guy Viggo you worked with? I sent a script to him, and he sent me notes!" I said, "Yeah? Well, were they good notes?" He looked at me like I was crazy.'

David Cronenberg
'Dangerous Method' helmer talks working with Pattinson, Giamatti on 'Cosmopolis'
By Christy Grosz
Variety
13 December 2011




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013

Quotable Viggo: 12 October 2014


With all the recent festivals, more movie critics have been commenting on Viggo's performances in Jauja and The Two Faces of January since I last highlighted them in June. Time for another round-up of reviews!




Image Guadalupe Gaona.
© 4L Productions.


Jauja


...superb performance at the physical boundaries of acting.

Venniale Tribute publicity
August 2014




Anchored by a rumpled, naturalistic performance by the great Viggo Mortensen—who also produces, contributes guitar compositions to the score, and gets to speak in his native Danish—Jauja is a beguiling little head-scratcher.

Angelo Muredda
Torontoist
5 September 2014




"Jauja" will not appeal to everyone. But those willing to play by Alonso's rules will be treated to a gripping introverted turn from Viggo Mortensen and some truly fantastical imagery.

By David Salazar
Latin Post
27 September 2014




At the beginning... there is something intriguing enough in this story of a Danish military engineer pursuing his love-struck fifteen-year-old daughter, running away across Patagonia in the 19th century, while in the background a genocide of indigenous people is going on. Especially when the possessive and vengeful father has the unyielding face of Viggo Mortensen, as mysterious here as the Sphinx.

Jauja: Viggo Mortensen Lost in Patagonia
By Eric Vernay - translated by Donna Marie
Premiere (France)
19 May 2014




Sweating in layers of bulky long johns, and sporting a droopy, weeping mustache, Mortensen carries the film, his human grumbling and surprised, rageful violence conveying the sense of a nervous, basically average man caught on a journey into his own heart of darkness. Increasingly, as the other characters drop away, Mortensen has nothing to play against but nature and himself.

Mark Asch
Brooklyn Magazine
7 October 2014




The intensity of Mortensen's performance stands in sharp contrast to the non-professional actors Alonso previously cast as leads. Alonso's earlier protagonists spoke as little as possible and largely existed on screen as unknowable, primal mysteries, but Mortensen gets to shade in his part...
...Despite the lack of vanity in Mortensen's résumé, it's still surprising to see him in a mostly silent performance roaming the Argentinian wilderness, and it's equally fascinating to see how the pressures of this low-budget, minimally crewed shoot in remote locations gradually manifest in the actor's increasingly fraught performance.

Jake Cole
Slant
20 September 2014




Two Faces of January


If it's almost impossible to feel sympathy or compassion for Chester, who does unforgivable things, Mortensen accomplishes the difficult task of compelling you to respect him, even in failure and defeat.

Viggo Mortensen on "Lord of the Rings" — and playing an American at last
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon
24 September 2014




Mortensen has always seemed to be an underutilized chameleon in film despite acclaimed and recognized performances in "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy and Eastern Promises. As Chester, he lavishes in a new type of slimy demeanor that stands out as one of the actors most dynamic. He enjoys the aura and demeanor of Chester, unrelenting and unwilling to compromise on an escape but driven by jealousy and rage, Mortensen displays some of his most authentic and creative ticks.

Clayton Davis
Awards Circuit
29 August 2014




Mortensen's elegant-until-cornered Chester is a layered character with quite a moral range, from nefarious swindler to a man able to make a grand redemptive gesture. He cuts an ugly but human figure vis-a-vis Rydal's petty con man. But as Chester points out, it's only a matter of time before the younger man turns into him.

Deborah Young
Courier Post
3 October 2014




Viggo Mortensen is excellent playing a drunk who's spinning out of control, and it's unlike anything I've seen him do before.

Neil Rosen
NY1 Movie
4 September 2014




Mortensen flexing his knuckles and jaw in ways that insinuate the ruthless steeliness beneath the pressed-suit sophistication...

Mike McCahill
Movie Mail
25 July 2014




Mortensen can transition from rakish to villainous with the slightest facial expression...

Stephanie Merry
Washington Post
3 October 2014

Quotable Viggo: 4 October 2014

You may have noticed (how could you not!) that we have had Viggo the Swordsman every day this week as our 'Good Day Viggodom' offering. I do like a bit of swash-and-buckle so I have been teasing you in readiness for a whole quotable of swordplay from The Lord of the Rings and Alatriste and, of course, from that true King of Swords, the great Bob Anderson.



© Estudios Picasso / Origen Producciones.


Alatriste


It is the return to the big screen of the king of swords...

The Soul of Viggo (El Alama de Viggo)
By Miguel Juan Payan, Accion magazine, April 2005
translated by Chrissie




In the darkness, Alatriste's sword glows like Luke Skywalker's lightsabre. By day, his steel blade would be the envy of The Three Musketeers.

Alatriste: The Great Spanish Hero
By Carlos Maranon - translated by Margarita
Cinemania
September 2006




What was the physical training like for this role?

I worked not only for the swords, including the "vizcaína", but also to get used to the character. I went to the sword fighting rehearsals with those boots, the hat, the cape, to get used to handling the cape, to swirl it around, just like the "gauchos", that's where it comes from.

Viggo Mortensen ZonaCinemania Alatriste Interview
By - transcribed/translated by Graciela
ZonaCinemania
29 March 2007




I remember a practice session with Bob [Anderson] which was attended by several highly experienced fencers who were my opponents, including one who was internationally ranked. This man was attacking me with some ferocity when Bob suddenly halted the practice. He asked him to come closer, that he wanted to ask him something. Bob wasn't feeling well at that time; he had a lot of problems with his health, and was seated in a chair. He wasn't able to fight with us to show us how he wanted to put the sequences together. He remained seated, watching the practice, occasionally giving us instructions with absolute calmness and authority. He didn't miss a single detail. He asked the fencer if he felt comfortable. He said yes. Bob asked him if he wouldn't feel a little more comfortable if he slightly changed the way he held the sword, a matter of a centimeter. The swordsman said it wasn't necessary, that he'd done it that way for many years, and quite successfully. So Bob grabbed a sword that he had on the table beside him and asked the guy to put himself en garde. "Are you ready, sir?" asked the master fencer. "Yes, always," said the swordsman with a small smile, probably thinking that Bob was joking. "Are you really ready?" "Yes, sir." With a light but very quick movement of his wrist, Bob struck the man's sword, and it flew some 10 meters. The swordsman stood there amazed and a little upset. We were very still, amazed..

Warrior Geniuses Sought For 2012
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevuelos
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
17 January 2012




'Enrico Lo Verso was there, a great discovery for this film, a tall guy who plays the baddie, and Unax Ugalde and Viggo. They were rehearsing and I saw it: they were sweating like pigs, he insulted them and beat them with a stick..."You're a sissy, this isn't done like that! You would have been killed already, you son of a bitch! Come on, do it again!!, Do you want to kill?. You can't kill s**t!!. You're a mug!!' Do not expect "ornate postures" in the duel scenes, because you're looking for the right moment to move in (for the kill), because if you make your move too early you'll lose. That's what Bob Anderson transmitted to the actors, that's how it was done in the Golden Century.'

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Talk About Alatriste at the Alatriste y su mundo exposition
By Luthien 66 (transcription) - translation by Paddy
4 April 2006



The Lord of the Rings


... Mortensen... has already entered into cinematic folklore as one of the great screen swordsmen of our time.

The Reluctant Hero,
by Douglas Andrews
Sunday Express 2002




Well the first day I met the fight choreographer, Bob Anderson, who's been around a long time - he taught Errol Flynn to fence and represented the UK at the Olympics. I went into this room and there were all these stunt people standing there and screaming and yelling. He had them all pumped-up and he stood me in front of them and said "Okay, go!" And they all started running at me, and I was like, "Holy shit!" He said "stop" and they all stopped. Then he told me: "This is what you're going to be dealing with so let's get to work..." He gave me a sword and it was just, like, crazy for two days. The first thing I did on camera was swordplay and I liked it. It was fun.

The Ranger - Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn
by Martyn Palmer
Total Film magazine
2002




Mortensen's facility with the sword became immediately apparent. "The people who were teaching him said that he was insanely talented," says Miranda Otto, who plays the Lady Eowyn, who falls for Aragorn. "There's one scene [at the end of] the first film where a knife is thrown at Aragorn, who clocks it with his sword. One of the stunt guys who was meant to be his double said, 'I've been practicing that and I've never been able to [hit the knife] once, and Viggo hits it on the first take. I hate him.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




Bob Anderson once called Mortensen as good a fencing student as he'd ever instructed.

A History Of Defiance
By Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




'...I had to get a sense of not only what it was like to fight, but also to walk around with a sword around your belt. Just getting the physical baby steps of the character helped.'

Lord of the Horse
By Anne and Lynne Huddleston
Manawatu Evening Standard
8 December 2003




"It was very important to me to make everything as believable as possible. That's why, even when I was exhausted, I always fought with the [heavy] steel sword rather than the lighter one," he explains. "I wanted to make sure the fight scenes were realistic. I shouldn't be able to just throw my sword around like Errol Flynn did, especially when I'm really tired. It should be hard to fight with it! Even when I was just walking around, I'd still wear the steel sword because it was heavier and it affected the way I moved."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson,
Pavement #62, 2003




Mortensen... has already entered into cinematic folklore as one of the great screen swordsmen of our time.

The Reluctant Hero,
by Douglas Andrews
Sunday Express 2002




'I was given the ranger sword, not the re-forged sword, but the one that I used on my first day of shooting in October of "99 that was really well worn and that I kind of took care of and used throughout.'

Viggo Mortensen on his end of filming gift
Journey's End
By Patrick Lee
Science Fiction Weekly #348
December 2003




One day he suggests we go to a beautiful place he knows, Huntington Botanical Gardens, in Pasadena. He picks me up in his hybrid, clearing a scattering of CDs and a small ornamental dagger of Henry's from the passenger seat. Only later, when we park, do I notice the full-size fencing sabre across the shelf by the back window.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




Do you prefer fighting with a pistol or a sword?

"I'm not such a big fan of fighting, I prefer to try to work things out."

Two-Minute Interview
By Anwar Brett
Ultimate DVD magazine, 2004




Storytellers and stories change, but the opportunity to do well or ill by others and ourselves will always be present. The right to choose how we coexist is ours unless we willingly surrender it. There can be no quick fix, no easy or permanent answer to the troubles of today or tomorrow. A sword is a sword, nothing more. Hope, compassion and wisdom born of experience are, for Middle-earth as for our world, the mightiest weapons at hand.

Viggo Mortensen
Introduction to The Two Towers Visual Companion


Quotable Viggo: 27 September 2014

With all the recent Festivals I think it's time for a Quotable on Loin Des Hommes (Far from Men), and a round-up of some of the comments and reviews that have been coming out since August. Reading back over them all one thing is very clear and that's how this is so much a 'Viggo' film with its wide landscapes, inward and outward journeys and the bringing together of two very different people who have to learn to adapt and live together.



Image Michael Crotto.
© One World Films



'I had dreamed of bringing Viggo Mortensen on board; his singularity made him the perfect fit for the role.'

Director David Oelhoffen
labiennale.org
21 August 2014




Q. Was the Camus story a strong influence on how you conceived of your character?

A. Both David and I referenced the story as much as possible. I have always admired Camus and thought he didn't get a fair deal from the left in France. History has proven him right; he spoke truth to power and paid a heavy price for it. He thought people should find a way to live together, whatever their differences of skin color or language. I think the character in the story in many ways represents who Camus might have become if he had stayed in Algeria.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Silcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"I think Camus would have been Daru -- his point of view in terms of violence, and his moral stance in this story, dealing with each situation in turn, and not having a blanket rule -- this is who I am, this is my point of view -- I deal with each person, each situation, and I don't always have an answer but I try to be honest with myself -- all of that is very much Camus."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




How long did it take you to master the French and Arabic?


I think I worked a lot. I worked for months and in Spain, where I live, I found someone who was from North Africa, and he helped me a lot. I looked at the whole script, and I made sure I could say it all in Arabic and made sure it was Arabic from that region.

Venice: Viggo Mortensen Talks Mastering New Languages
by Ariston Anderson
Hollywood Reporter
2 September 2014




"In a way, it ended up being more of a job to work on my French for the film, and change my accent, which was a bit Québécois. Before filming, I mostly worked on the Arabic because I had to learn that from scratch. I learned the basics before we started and we had an Algerian teacher who worked with both Reda and me on the set. There are differences between Algerian Arabic and other strands, so we had to be careful and accurate about that. I actually spoke a lot more Arabic in the film originally, but we cut quite a lot of crowd scenes to focus on the isolation and the two men."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Silcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




'Sometimes I asked people I met on the street or in the cafes about things that could help me to finish building the character in the film we are soon going to shoot in the Atlas mountains. Specific things about phrases or historical references in our script - trying out my very limited Arabic vocabulary, mixed with the French that I'm refining for the shoot - but in general just seeking out human contact, to go along touching, even if it was only ephemeral brushing against, the history of the many cultures that have passed through this city. The character that I'm going to play grew up here and I want to imagine his childhood and adolescence as best I can. I've always liked research like this, letting places, the weather, people and my own physical condition inform the adventure.'

Viggo on preparing to film while in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




"...the landscape pushed us together, and we're really small... I like that David chose to do several shots where we're so small, that you really have to look, even on a big screen -- we're that tiny -- when we're leaving the school..."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




"It's a story that shows that people can overcome prejudices they didn't even know they had. Both men have to make an effort to understand something that they thought they knew and in the end they are more alike than different."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"The title applies to Daru at the beginning, to the way he lives, keeping away from people as a way to protect himself... but the story catches up with all of us. At the end of the film the title no longer applies to Daru, because he comes back to where people are, but rather to Mohammed, who goes into the unknown into the wilderness."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




...from the first scenes of Viggo Mortensen, playing a teacher running a school and teaching local kids to read and write in 1954, you realize that he packs all the qualities of the archetypal strong and silent man as he has been constructed in the mythology of classic American westerns.

Flix
2 September 2014




Daru's war veteran turned pacifist has something of Henry Fonda's nobleness and Mortensen is one of the few actors working today (Mads Mikkelsen is another) who can make straightforward goodness into a rich and interesting character

John Bleasdale
Cine Vue
1 September 2014




...this is Mortensen's film. As with Lisandro Alonso's exquisite Jauja, which had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival back in May, Far from Men finds Mortensen inhabiting the kind of enigmatic, erudite character you wouldn't hesitate to follow under similar circumstances. In many ways it's one of his less conspicuous, more lived-in roles, although he is given the chance to add a couple of strings to his multilingual bow, confidently switching between Arabic and French.

Adam Woodward
Little White Lies
1 September 2014




Mortensen is eminently watchable as the craggy-faced Daru (it's a face that paints a thousand unknown memories)...

filmuforia
1 September 2014




The warm candle light extending rapid strokes of red and orange in the dark, as in a painting by Georges de La Tour, outlining Daru´s (Viggo Mortensen) chiselled and beautiful profile and that of his young and unpleasant (at least initially) guest Mohamed (Reda Kateb).

Alessia Pelonzi
Bad Taste – translated by Ollie
30 August 2014




'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014


Quotable Viggo: 14 September 2014

Face it Viggo – any hope of living down your image as one of the World's Sexiest Men by donning strange hats, sideburns and bushy beards died the minute you washed up on the shores of Tiff in a sun-kissed slightly tousled crop. Just to pass the time, and because The Huffington Post called you a 'sexy beast' this week, I thought I'd scour the Quotable Archives for all things gorgeous.[/B]



©BTBreakfastTV


There's been a lot of good-looking men at this year's 2014 Toronto International Film Festival, but none of them can compare to the sexy beast that is Viggo Mortensen.

The Huffington Post
9 September 2014




At least we can take solace knowing that in this parched desolate land populated by filthy, unshaven vagrants that Viggo Mortensen is still the sexiest man alive.

'The Road'
By Al Alexander
Echo Pilot
25 November 2009




Viggo Mortensen is everything you'd want and expect him to be: shaggy-haired handsome, passionate, thoughtful, and smart.


'Road' Warrior
By Lynda Gorov
Boston Globe
22 November 2009




Just look at him: handsome, square-jawed and angular, but no trace of Hollywood jackass

A History Of Defiance
By Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




Are you are aware of being very seductive?

"Only when I get into a character. And only if I believe in it myself."

By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




He is just the most handsome man you can imagine -- distractingly handsome. But when you are with him, it's not that you forget, but he is so elegant and so kind and also very interested in photography...

Photographer Brigitte Lacombe
GQ Blog
30 June 2009




"I think he has a quality of self-knowing that challenges everyone that he meets - perhaps unwittingly. But the electrical charge of that challenge of 'How well do you know yourself? Cause I know myself real well.' You know, that's kind of the unspoken Viggo experience. He's also fascinated by other people. And when you combine those elements, it's very charismatic. It can definitely be interpreted as sexy."

Diane Lane
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




...as charismatic as Steve McQueen and as beautiful as a saint in a master painting.

Dana Stevens talking about Eastern Promises
Slate.com
13 Sept 2007




He's sexy and alluring in a dangerous way.

Behind The Screens - Tough Guy
By Eliza Krause
New York Magazine
23 September 19
91



Me: We have to talk about women, because you are the sexiest man alive.

Him: So there are a lot of dead men who are sexier?

Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish
By Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




I'm a middle-aged father of two and I'm sitting in Wellington's Duxton Hotel eyeing Viggo Mortensen's bum. If a man's wife tells him often enough what a privilege it is to meet Mortensen, what physical perfection he is, what a sex god, this is what happens.

To thine own self be true
By Guy Somerset
NZ Listener
6-12 June 2009




Casually dropping his name into conversations with the girls over the past 48 hours has produced more gasps, heaving bosoms and sighs of jealousy than a Lotto win.

"I'm a poet" - Rings star Mortensen
By Josie McNaught
Sunday Star-Times 2003




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?

My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...

If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005




Q: What do you think makes you sexy?

VM: I don't really know how to deal with that question. I'm sure that there's just as many people who think I'm a grizzled hack.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




When, a while back, an American magazine decided I was one of the 50 sexiest men in the world, my mother told everybody. Honestly, those kinds of things just make me laugh.

"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated by Margarita
Lecturas
30 August 2006


Quotable Viggo: 6 September 2014

So – Viggo has a film out where he speaks exclusively Spanish and Danish, and a film out where he speaks exclusively French and Arabic. No wonder reporters and critics are picking their jaws up off the floor and can't stop commenting about it. Viggo is probably the only actor in the history of the world who has insisted on stuffing more foreign language dialogue into a film than was already scripted, giving us a happy surfeit of Elvish and Russian where most actors would have been clinging to their vocal coach while refusing to leave their Winnebago. That's our Guy!



© One World Films.


Is there a language Viggo Mortensen doesn't speak?

Jill Lawless
Associated Press
2 September 2014




Viggo Mortensen can do anything. Until recently, that wasn't true. We could all look at him and think, "Yeah sure, but can he speak French?" The answer was no, and our world had a modicum of balance. Now it turns out that answer was yes, and we are all ****ed.

Evan Saathoff
Badassdigest.com
25 August 2014




Viggo Mortensen is one of those people. You probably sat near one in high school, or have one on your floor at work. Good looking, effortlessly talented across a range of fields, just so perfect at everything you want to run them down with your car.

Because he probably had time between art exhibitions, dashing off a book of poetry and ridding Middle Earth of Sauron, the man has managed to become fluent in more than a half-dozen languages.

Viggo entertains in evil twin role
Cris Kennedy
29 June 2013




He's like a one-man United Nations. As well as speaking about eleventy billion languages, Mortensen has made films all over the world and unites the film industries of Spain, the US and Middle-earth.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




Kateb and Mortensen put in utterly convincing performances, the latter showing that he can act in about five different languages.

Loin des Hommes review
Jo-Ann Titmarsh
Hey U Guys
1 September 2014




Whereas some actors have yet to master their native tongue, in this touchingly humane performance, Mortensen convincingly adds French to the already impressive list of languages he can speak onscreen — a list that includes English, Elvish ("The Lord of the Rings"), Danish ("Jauja"), Spanish ("Alatriste") and Lakota ("Hidalgo"), for those keeping track.

Loin Des Hommes review
Peter Debruge
Variety
30 August 2014




"...he has a musical ear for languages."

David Cronenberg
Mortensen, director discuss their noirish Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 September 2007




So how many tongues has he used onscreen?


"Lakota, Elvish -- two kinds of Elvish -- Dwarvish, Arabic, French, Danish, Russian," he listed. "I think I spoke Swedish one time, German, Spanish."

It's possible he may have left out one or two. [My note: Japanese (American Yakuza)]

Jill Lawless
Associated Press
2 September 2014




'I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.'

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011




The Empire Icon award this year went to the disgustingly multitalented Viggo Mortensen, who speaks more languages than God...

Jameson Empire Award Winners Announced!
Helen O'Hara
Empire Online
30 March 2009




He's shy, but a bit of a motormouth (and can run on in at least six different languages).

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




Viggo Mortensen isn't just a celebrity, as you're probably aware. He isn't even just a fine actor. He's also a painter, a poet and a photographer, and he makes records, too, often in collaboration with Buckethead, the masked wizard guitarist. In addition, he's also conversant in half a dozen languages — yet another body blow to an interviewer's self-esteem. But I soldiered on.

Viggo Mortensen On 'The Road,'
By Kurt Loder
MTV.com
25 November 2009




"Now, Viggo, you speak seven languages, you write poetry in three languages, Danish, Spanish and English, you ride horses superbly and you're a great swordsman and all our womenfolk are in love with you… do you understand how annoying you are?"

Radio interview with Richard Glover
ABC Sydney
24 March 2009




Viggo, I heard you're fluent in English, Danish and Spanish, conversational in French and Italian AND you can also understand some Norwegian and Swedish. That's seven languages with which I can woo your beard, and I like those odds because your beard makes me want to write sonnets.

Be Mine Beard: Viggo Mortensen Edition
Sarah Dawley
fora.mtv.ca
19 February 2014


Quotable Viggo: 31 August 2014

How's the weather where you are today, nice and balmy, hot enough to melt tyres or whipping up an icy storm? Extreme weather is all grist to Viggo's acting mill. When you or I would be collapsing in the heat calling for an iced lemonade, or huddling in our woollies with double thickness thermal gloves, Viggo is packing multiple layers of thick leathery costume under a beating sun, or stripping buck naked and leaping into freezing seas – all the while using the elements to add to the authenticity of the performance and making it look like the easiest thing in the world.



© New Line Productions Inc.


When the elements, the weather and the terrain get tough, Viggo gets going.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




"When we needed more wind, and after a long dead calm, Viggo sniffed and said: "This afternoon it's going to rain.' And so it was.'

Agustín Díaz Yanes
Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León, by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




You made some pretty radical climate shifts during the filming [of Hidalgo], from midwinter South Dakota to the sand-blown heat of the Sahara Desert, and all while sitting on top of a whole lot of unpredictable horseflesh. Was the shooting of Hidalgo as gruelling as it looks?

I wasn't suffering as much as an endurance rider is going to. But you're in the saddle a lot of days, all day long. And you've got your hat and that's about it. And there's dust storms and the elements and just the tiredness, but it's also really interesting.

'King' Star Returns To The Screen, Riding High
By Todd Camp
Star Telegram
6 March 2004




'The crew was a little surpised by the climatic conditions. I remember one time when we were trying to shoot in the Sahara, where you get these atrocious winds; it was hot, there was sand in the cameras. I heard everywhere: 'this is hell!' and, deep down in my heart, I thought 'this is a giggle compared to Lord...'."

Viggo Mortensen on Hidalgo
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




Just as they had done for the Wounded Knee reenactment, the dancers took their responsibilities in the ritual very seriously; there was an atmosphere that was created through the sheer earnestness of their effort. It transcended anything else that was going on with regard to the filming of the scene. When the dancers had finished and it became my turn to be filmed observing the dance, a pair of dust devils and weird crosswinds suddenly blew in on what had been a completely still day. As soon as the last take of the scene had been shot, the winds instantly and completely ceased, leaving everyone and everything calm and silent for several moments."

Viggo Mortensen on the Ghost Dance
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




Your character's very dapper. Was it tough spending all day in smart suits when you were filming in serious heat?


The stuff we started filming at first was the stuff where Chester [Mortensen's character] was starting to unravel – he was starting to drink more, he was sweaty and kind of all over the place. So it was helpful, because it was still hot in Crete at that time – it worked well for that crumpled, dishevelled look.

Viggo talks about The Two Faces of January
ShortList.
7 May 2014




"Different actors have different processes that they use. What I've seen with Viggo is that he is able to use the environment more so than any other actor I've worked with before to put him where he needs to be emotionally….And maybe it's pouring down rain, and he'll walk away from umbrellas, raincoats. He'll walk away from any tent that's being offered or any blanket to be intentionally cold and wet, and it seems to take him to a place that's quite remarkable. I've seen it happen over and over again in the snow, the rain, cold, the fog – anything that he is able to use that puts him in the world of the character. He's a very physical actor as well, and it's been a remarkable process to watch that. I would imagine it takes an enormous amount of concentration to be able to not let the cold ground or the rocks on the road or whatever it may be break your concentration, but it's taken him to a place that is pretty amazing over and over and over again."

Simmons (producer) The Road
Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




"The waterfall was the coldest thing I've ever swam," said Smit-McPhee, who noted that, luckily, the production had brought in a "portable Jacuzzi" to warm the actors back up. After two takes, though, Smit-McPhee had had enough. "Seriously, that was it. And I said, 'I'm not doing it.' And then Viggo came. He just jumped in the water like it was nothing."

Viggo Mortensen: 'A Grown Man in an Era of Boys'
Jay A. Fernandez
Risky Biz
12 September 2009




How was it to jump in the ocean?

It was very cold. I asked for another take, but they were terrified. They didn't want me to. They had ambulances. The water was 41 degrees Fahrenheit, and the wind was just really blowing. The air temperature was the same, but because there was howling wind, I was practically frozen. I think the air was probably freezing. It was so extreme. They had an ambulance and they had all these heaters on, and I just sat in there with a bathrobe and said, "Just tell me when you're rolling. I'm just going to run out and go."

Interview: Viggo Mortensen Travels THE ROAD
Christina Radish
IESB.net
9 November 2009




'It was a good decision to shoot in the winter because it gave character to the movie. But it put us under more pressure, too, because there were fewer hours of daylight. It was cold, and the weather was quite changeable. But it was beautiful.'

Viggo Mortensen talking about Todos Tenemos Un Plan
Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




During the filming of the pivotal Battle of Helm's Deep in The Two Towers, he said, "We shot for three and half months straight of night shoots in the cold, wet weather. And that was pretty tough for everybody concerned.

"But it kind of drew everyone together at the same time. It created kind of a special bond with people who went through that together."

Viggo talking about The Two Towers
Ready for Round 2
By David P DeMar, Jr
Watertown Daily Times
15 December 2002




'We were dirty, freezing cold or dying of heat. We were really uncomfortable. That was the beauty of the project. I felt like it was true.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004




He seems to gravitate towards films that involve wet, cold and physical privation. ''I suppose I must thrive on it,'' he agrees, recalling shooting The Road under heavy cloud, sometimes in snow, always in the cold. ''Sometimes it's tiring or annoying but there is a certain satisfaction, especially when you're going through it with the crew and everyone is wet and cold with you, when you go and have a drink together at the end of the day and say: 'Well, we got that done.'''

Walking at world's end
By Stephanie Bunbury
TheAge.com
14 January 2010


Quotable Viggo: 17 August 2014

Everyone has to start their career somewhere and Viggo, as we know, famously started at 8 years old as the 'ass end of a dragon'. Luckily that wasn't the only moment steering him towards becoming one of the most respected actors in the business. Along the way there were inspiring movies, curiosity and rather a lot of serendipity.



© NBC.


"I remember trying out for a play once in junior high school, and as soon as the audition started, they said 'Speak up! Speak up!' And I just stopped and took off. I wasn't really cut out for it."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




….I went to see films with my mother when I was a child. Towards twenty, I lived for a year close to London, and I went to a cinema which only showed classics. I discovered Bergman, Ozu, Pasolini, Dreyer ... It was a revelation. It wasn't just that I liked going to the movies, it was that on leaving the theater I wanted to enter this world……To discover Bergman, Pasolini, Ozu, Dreyer, at twenty, that was a revelation. Could that be it, the movies? My jaw dropped in admiration. These filmmakers really inspired me. I like the simplicity of Ozu, I like the films of Carl Dreyer, which capture so well the pain of the human condition. I like the purity of Bergman and Pasolini. It was after I discovered their films that I became very curious about film as a means of expression.

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
December 2002
Source: Studio Magazine




"When I saw Death in Venice, by Visconti, I had a big shock. It is one of the movies that has really inspired me. I saw it again recently, it's a little dated, especially the flashbacks, but still ... That mixture of beauty and sadness ... And also the performance of Dirk Bogarde is so extraordinary! Its impact on me has been enormous."

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
December 2002
Source: Studio Magazine




"I was living in Denmark, and I followed a girlfriend to New York. I saw an ad in the paper for the Actor's Repertory Company, so I made an appointment for an audition. I prepared something by Isak Dinesen, a monologue by this character who may or may not be Jack the Ripper. I did that, and this poem I'd memorized, thinking I was reading for a play. Afterward they thanked me and told me to come back every Wednesday. I'd enrolled in a class."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo From 5 to 7
By Dennis Hopper
Flaunt magazine
Venice, California 4 April 1999




'I never thought it would last,' he says. 'I just tried it to see what it was like and it just clicked, I guess.'

No More Heroes
By James Mottram
Sunday Herald
25 September 2005




"......I had a good teacher, a man named Warren Robertson. He worked with me, and kind of encouraged me, and felt I had some, you know, raw talent or whatever. Everybody needs a little encouragement."

Viggo on his early acting days
VIGGOOOOOAL!
Scott Feinberg's awards season analysis
andthewinneris.blog.com
20 December 2007




'The "Blood Red" auditions at the Actors Studio were notable for one other reason: Viggo Mortensen came by every day—barefoot, with long, dirty blond hair—wanting to audition in the worst way for one of my Italian immigrants. His dirty feet and hair scared me just as much as his blue-eyed blondness wasn't right for the cast I was building. After days of just being rude to him, I finally threw him out of the studio and told him never to darken my casting door again. I have since apologized to him for my lack of artistic vision and behavior. It's the one truly bad casting mistake I ever made. He's such a talented actor; he could have played Italian or anything else he made up his mind to do. I often use him as an example of how one-pointed, dedicated, and willing to be rejected an actor has to be.'

Pamela Guess
Backstage.com
July 2010




"I was a bit older than most when I started acting. I was around 27, while many start as teenagers, even earlier. I came to acting because of simple curiosity: I wanted to know how movies were made."

The King Is Mortensen, Long Live The King!
By Marc Toullec
Cine Live #71
September 2003




"When I would see a really seamless, fully realized performance or an ensemble performance, I would wonder, How did they do that? How did they make it so effortless?"

Viggo Mortensen
Good Fellow
By Jamie Painter Young
Backstage West
5 January 2004




He approached acting with a photographer's perspective, examining the mechanics of the craft from every angle. "I started watching more movies and looking at things in that light as a potential performer. You get kind of hooked on it, the workings of it. You start thinking about how to make something interesting."

Viggo Trip
By Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
November 2002




"The same day I was offered Witness, I was offered a Shakespeare in the Park production—I think it was Henry V," he recalls. "I made a choice to try something I didn't know much about, which ended up being the right thing, because it was a good story and I got to work with Peter Weir."

History Teacher
By Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
19 August 2005




'Ironically, he had successfully auditioned for a Panida Theater stage role as Biff Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman before learning of his selection for Penn's movie [The Indian Runner]. Deborah McShane, a Panida board member, clearly remembers the unpretentious, calm and kind man whose audition 'created an energy shift in the theater.

'Karen Bowers (Panida's manager) heard the very quiet, knowing and sensitive voice,' McShane recalls. 'She stopped what she was doing and came down the aisle. We cast him in the role.'

A Visit With Viggo
By Marianne Love
Sandpoint magazine, 2004




"In the beginning everyone was very obsessed with getting my name changed. 'Viggo Mortensen - that's too long and too strange', they said. I suggested as a joke to change it to "Vic Morton'. That sounds like one of those movie private investigators in the 40's... "Vic Morton, private eye'. No, my name is Viggo Mortensen, I am Viggo Mortensen, and Hollywood will have to live with that'.

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001


Quotable Viggo: 9 August 2014

All this week I've been celebrating The Lord of the Rings with some yummy photos of Viggo as Aragorn. I suppose with the release of the latest Hobbit trailer I've been feeling nostalgic for something that – at the time – took hold of me in completely unexpected ways. It led me here, it made me interested in Viggo's approach to art which eventually led to me working full-time as an artist, it led me back to Tolkien and the chance to take part in some amazing Tolkien events. It's been quite a ride, and all because Viggo said 'yes' to that extraordinary last minute call from Peter Jackson.



© New Line Productions Inc.


You can have your wee hobbits and wizened wizards. Give me the man who would be king.

It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
16 December 2003




We knew we were blessed in having Viggo - who is part-Danish descent - step into the role of Aragorn when he arrived carrying a copy of the Volsunga Saga that he had taken from his bookshelf! Viggo not only has an actor's sense of bringing his character to life, but also an innate understanding of 'the warrior code' and Tolkien's philosophy of heroism.

Philippa Boyens
The Making of the Movie Trilogy




How do you 'dive' into fight scenes?

Well the first day I met the fight choreographer, Bob Anderson, who's been around a long time - he taught Errol Flynn to fence and represented the UK at the Olympics. I went into this room and there were all these stunt people standing there and screaming and yelling. He had them all pumped-up and he stood me in front of them and said "Okay, go!" And they all started running at me, and I was like, "Holy shit!" He said "stop" and they all stopped. Then he told me: "This is what you're going to be dealing with so let's get to work..." He gave me a sword and it was just, like, crazy for two days. The first thing I did on camera was swordplay and I liked it. It was fun.

Viggo Mortensen
The Ranger - Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn
by Martyn Palmer
Total Film magazine, 2002




Mortensen's facility with the sword became immediately apparent. "The people who were teaching him said that he was insanely talented," says Miranda Otto, who plays the Lady Eowyn, who falls for Aragorn. "There's one scene [at the end of] the first film where a knife is thrown at Aragorn, who clocks it with his sword. One of the stunt guys who was meant to be his double said, 'I've been practicing that and I've never been able to [hit the knife] once, and Viggo hits it on the first take. I hate him.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"It was very important to me to make everything as believable as possible. That's why, even when I was exhausted, I always fought with the [heavy] steel sword rather than the lighter one," he explains. "I wanted to make sure the fight scenes were realistic."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




'Viggo came late to the project, but he brought a dedication and an understanding of the role that became an example, particularly to the younger cast members. You have to remember that this was Orlando Bloom's first movie. Not only was Viggo valuable in his performance, but he was valuable as a leader of the cast.'

Barrie Osborne
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004




"He got this reputation as an eccentric because he would carry his sword around, but I found it quite inspiring. There was a glimmer in his eye - he was aware of how other people were perceiving him - but he really reawakened in me a sense of the possibilities of what it can be as an actor enjoying a role."

Sean Astin
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today, 2001




"At the end of shooting one day, we went out and had a drink and Viggo was just so encouraging of everybody he'd worked with, including the extras. He always had a kind word to say to everyone. And I don't know anyone who has a bad word to say about him. He bought flowers for all the extras on one incredibly rainy day. He was just really generous with his time but he never talked himself up. He's quite shy about talking about his own achievements. They were really lucky they got him for this. He kind of makes the film for me."

Jed Brophy
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




"For our love scenes, he would come to me the night before and say he wanted to change all the lines to the Elvish language. He was trying to make that connection stronger, and I thought it was beautiful that they'd speak Elvish to each other because it adds a layer to their history that you wouldn't otherwise see."

Liv Tyler
Mellow Warrior
By Anthony Breznican
South Coast Today
15 December 2003




"On the fifth take, Viggo kicked the helmet, screamed, clenched his fists and dropped to his knees. I thought he was just doing some powerful acting. But then I noticed after I said 'cut' that he wasn't saying anything. Finally, he did the next scene limping."

Once they had finished filming, Jackson made the actor take off his boot.

"His toes were broken. Normally, an actor would yell 'ow!' if they hurt themselves, and stop the scene. Viggo turned a broken toe into a performance that's a great moment in the film."

Two Towers 'bloodier, more compelling'
New Zealand Herald
7 December 2002




…I would say probably 95% of the work that you see as Viggo onscreen is completely computer generated, because he has a wooden leg and he can't run.

IGN Interviews Dominic Monaghan
December 2003




Instead of the standard luxury lodging demanded by most stars on set, Viggo and co-star Orlando Bloom shared a converted bus while filming Rings. Viggo stocked the bus with a wine cellar and wallpapered the inside with candid behind-the-scenes photos. A source on the set said the bus was the site of frequent cast parties, with the motto, "Everyone is welcome, but when it's time to go, get out!"

Could Viggo Mortensen Be The Perfect Man?
By Nathan Cooper & Mike Glynn
Star
23 December 2003




Corey, Triple M, Melbourne: Viggo you're now at the stage where you could get the majority of roles you wanted. You've had love scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow and now Liv Tyler. Is there anyone you aspire to have a love scene with, in the world?

Viggo: Gimli? That was cut from the movie - maybe it'll be in the extended version.

Return Of The King Press Junket: Viggo Mortensen
By Nazz
December 2003
Source: Nazz




"I heard Lord of the Rings win their first one and I thought, 'Well, I can lie here in the dark like an idiot, or I can go out and be a man and sit in the kitchen and watch it with everybody else."

Viggo Mortensen on trying to avoid the Oscars at a friends house
David Letterman Show
2004




Viggo has that dark, mysterious, quiet-man quality. He's also very intelligent and private. A lot of people have said these movies are going to make Viggo a big star. I nod and smile, knowing that being a big star is the last thing in the world that Viggo wants. He's completely unimpressed and disinterested in that world. I think he'd prefer to stay home and paint, write his poetry, and enjoy himself rather than play the Hollywood game. That's an aspect of him that I respect a lot.

Peter Jackson
Movieline Magazine




"In a story like Lord of the Rings, whether the Ring and Sauron are evil is incidental to me. Even if we were not to get the Ring anywhere near Mount Doom. Even if we all died. It doesn't really matter," Mortensen says. "It's the fact that everybody got together and decided to go on this trip. That's the thing. That's the miracle."

Viggo Mortensen
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003


Quotable Viggo: 3 August 2014

Reading our latest Sobrevuelos translation where Viggo describes his latest fillm, Captain Fantastic, it's obvious that no one could play the part of the Father but Viggo. Living in the Wilderness, hunting, growing vegetables, preparing the food, giving the kids an education through a library of books. Heck – Viggo doesn't need to act, he can do all that for real!



Image Macall Polay.
© 2929/Dimension Films.



We are undertaking an ambitious project. I will work almost the entire film with six "children" who are between six and eighteen years old, living together in a big "tipi," hunting deer and other animals, growing vegetables, living off nature. We have stacks of books, the "children" read Schopenhauer, Chomsky, Socrates, Einstein, Yeats, Shakespeare, Borges, and talk about all kinds of philosophy, science, poetry, etc. Their "mother" and I teach them, they don´t go to any other school, we don´t have TV.

Viggo Mortensen
Circular Wood
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
12 July 2014




"I arrived on set and there was a library in my trailer."

Charlize Theron
Beautiful Dreamer
By Holly Millea
Elle (U.S.)
October 2009




He's a very cerebral man. He turned up with these beautiful old antique books from the time, like Baudelaire, and things that his character would have had... I thought, 'this guy is f**king cool.' I was quite intimidated.

Sam Riley
Sullivan on Cinema: Sam Riley
By Chris Sullivan
Redbull.com
9 June 2011




He was the one who read the most about the Golden Century's history. He sent books and CDs for all his casting colleagues to savour that time - "not to seduce or control what the others did, but to share what I had found out," Mortensen informs.

Viggo Mortensen
The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García, El País Semanal
6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




He smells of woodsmoke, as though he's just returned from some manly pursuit like chopping logs in a forest.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




When the elements, the weather and the terrain get tough, Viggo gets going.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009



If anyone could survive in a post-apocalyptic world, the director [John Hillcoat]
says, it would be Viggo.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




'We lived in Buenos Aires, but most of all in the Chaco, where I learned to ride with my three brothers. My father, who is Danish and a farmer, would take us fishing and hunting. I shot a rifle for the first time when I was three years old. It's one of my first memories."

The Late Show with David Letterman
November 2005




"I was 20 years old, I was travelling in the north of Norway," he recalls, like an old war veteran. Trying to go "as far up as possible," young Mortensen got lost, survived by lighting a fire and being rescued by the inhabitants of the region, the Samis, a native people of Finno-Ougric descent. "They sheltered me in exchange for work. Afterwards they tried to convince me to spend the winter there. They offered me a big coat and kilos of meat. And when I said no, they offered me a small fat girl of about 16. Maybe I should have stayed. It would have been an interesting experience.

Viggo Mortensen
Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France)
May 2013




VM: Rabbits sometimes run out in front of your car, right? Well, I hit this rabbit on this lonely road in the South Island and I wanted to make sure it was dead. If it wasn't, I'd put it out of its misery. And it was quite dead, so I thought, 'Well, why waste it?' And so I made a little fire and ate it.

Q: Is this something that you thought Aragorn would have done?

VM: As he was driving down the road and if he hit a rabbit? Yeah, he might. If he was hungry, I guess.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




'He came in and started talking about the character, and said, 'If I live out in the wild, I'd have a small hunting bow for catching food. It would never be a big deal, maybe you'd just see it while I'm making a campfire.' We said, 'Yes that makes complete sense, we didn't think of that, so let's make you a bow'. It was always great to have those kinds of discussions with the actors.'

Christian Rivers
Hail To The King
by Lawrence French
Starburst #305, 2003




"He is... a substantially better fisherman than I am. He can catch more fish, and I hate him for that!"

John Rhys-Davies
Could Viggo Mortensen Be The Perfect Man?
By Nathan Cooper & Mike Glynn
Star, 2003




"I like to write and paint and make music and go walking on my own and garden. In fact, gardening is probably what I enjoy doing more than anything else."

Really? Anything else?

He looks at me, his gaze is quite level. "I like gardening a lot."

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




Like the philosopher Thoreau, Viggo likes to lose himself in the woods, into the wild, in a trip into nature to find beauty and freedom, and to find the essence of life, as he explains with a deep, quiet voice, between long pauses and a cigarette rolled by himself.

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
July 2008
Source: Panorama First




When the world goes boom, I want Viggo Mortensen to be my dad.

Marshall Fine 'The Road' review
Huffington Post
24 November 2009

Quotable Viggo: 27 July 2014

In last week's Quotables I looked at the way Viggo, as an actor, can say a lot without actually saying anything. Staying with the acting theme, another recent comment from a critic has stuck in my mind. Dave McNary commented last month in Variety that Viggo was a rare actor who 'really embraces the ugly side of characters'. Plunging into the darkness has led to some of Viggo's most outstanding performances, mining especially rich veins in the complex characters he likes to play most, where the dark and light side jostle for victory within the characters psyche. The 'ugly side', when it emerges, can be truly frightening, as in a Tom Stall or a Frankie, or it can be weak and shameful as in a dithering Halder or a seedy Chester.



© Westmount.


"Viggo really embraces the ugly side of characters… not a lot of stars do."

Dave McNary
Variety
22 June 2014




"The only thing I would say is that the characters need to lie and lose, and it needs to end badly for everyone." Mortensen said characters should always have a secret. "That's what the story's generally about: the masks, and the masks fall away, and what you end up seeing about these people is often ugly and embarrassing..."

Viggo talking about Two Faces of January
Berlinale Press Conference
Dawn.com
11 February 2014




"These complicated men feel no great love for one another. But they both carry good and evil within themselves. That's why I needed Viggo to make them real....Viggo's talented and cultured, but he can also be brutal on screen. Without that quality this film would have flopped."

Ana Piterbarg
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013




"There's a great kind of personal stamp that's idiosyncratic for the character. [Viggo] explores extreme parameters within the character on his own terms and therefore creates something entertaining and thrilling for an audience to get involved with on their own imaginative level."

Actor Geoffrey Rush after seeing Eastern Promises at Tiff
Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy, Denver Post Film Critic
14 Sept 2007




Once again, Viggo Mortensen demonstrates he is a powerful actor willing to take risk (yes, I am referring to the fight scene). He also shows how he is able to capture the nature of a character - good or bad (the scene where he threatens the uncle was chilling and he doesn't say a word).

Patrick Luce 'Eastern Promises' review
Best DVDs of 2007
monstersandcritics.com
10 January 2008




Mortensen, often cast as tough men of action and boundless rectitude, persuades us here that his John Halder has the skills to present to the world and himself a façade of decency over the spine of a jellyfish. It's a very skillful, commendably self-effacing performance.

'Good' Review
Abbie Bernstein
If Magazine
31 December 2008




Mortensen gives the most complete performance of his career here, creating an everyman with a talent we have to believe he's instinctually capable of, yet weary to have. He has to be noble, oblivious and lethal at a moment's notice. Like his family, we want him to be our protector but will still fear him once the box where he's been hiding has been opened.

A History of Violence Review
Erik Childress
E Filmcritic
23 September 2005




"If there's something in a story that might be good for me to explore and learn about, that pricks my conscience or even scares me on some level, then that's where I try to go.

Viggo Mortensen
"Life's Too Short to Do All This Work and Not Do It Right": An Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm.com
6 April 2004




At Dorothy's admonishment- "Frank don't talk like that!" - Frank switches. If we weren't so caught up in the film itself, we would be in awe of Mortensen's skill here. His acting is breathtaking, as he builds from disappointment through hurt to a mean sarcasm - "Did I say the wrong thing?" that turns quickly to simmering anger - "Is it that we're strangers? We're not strangers". He is genuinely frightening to watch, the whole scene feels as if we are onlookers at a real-life domestic dispute. By the time Dorothy tells him "I don't know what you're talking about. Let's eat", he is ready to explode.

Frank's floodgates are wide open, and he unleashes a torrent of pent-up hatred on Dorothy, standing over her, glowering, taking handfuls of food from his plate, stuffing it into his mouth and spitting it into her face. "You eat! You. Eat." Even as Lucifer in The Prophecy, Viggo was never nastier.

Why I love… Viggo Mortensen's Frank in The Indian Runner
Rowan Righelato
The Guardian
27 September 2013




...if there is in recent cinema a more convincing scene of psychological torture than the moment when Mortensen rages against a teeny-weeny Patricia Arquette, spattering her with mouthfuls of food, I'd really rather not see it, thank you.

On Viggo Mortensen
By Ryan Gilbey
Filminfocus.com
4 December 2007




Mr. Mortensen, a magnetic actor capable of both scary outbursts and eerie, reptilian calm... It is some measure of Mr. Mortensen's savage, mocking ferocity that in a final confrontation with Dennis Hopper, who plays a bartender given to in-your-face philosophizing, Mr. Hopper seems easily the tamer of the two.

Janet Maslin talking about The Indian Runner
New York Times
20 September 1991




...did the bad guy roles never give you problems with your conscience?

Yes, a couple of times. Like in the Sean Penn movie. But whenever I had to face up to a bad guy, I looked for the reasons he was bad (no-one is totally bad). If I could find those reasons, I took the role. A couple of times I turned down roles which displayed gratuitous violence. However the bad guy roles are nearly always better written, they are richer characters and are more interesting. A character like Aragorn can be so good it's boring.

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




'I like to get to know the characters and I have never played a character, no matter how hideous his actions were, that I didn't really like the person I was playing somehow or feel a bond with this character in a sense.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
by Carnell
Carpe Noctem magazine #15
1999




He's played a family man with a dark past, an untrustworthy Russian mobster you wouldn't want to run into in a North London bathhouse, and a saucy Sigmund Freud up to no good. Viggo Mortensen's not the kinda guy you'd want holding a step ladder for you, is he?...

Rob Young
DIY
15 May 2014

Quotable Viggo: 20 July 2014

It was interesting to learn from Viggo's interview last month with Premier that the film he had 'most pleasure shooting' was Appaloosa. Also interesting was the fact that it was 'probably because my character could communicate without talking'. When it comes to saying a lot without actually saying anything, then Viggo is the Undisputed King.



Image Javier Aquirresarobe.
© Dimension Films/2929 Productions.




'This may surprise you but the film I had most pleasure shooting remains Appaloosa... Probably because my character could communicate without talking.'

Viggo Mortensen: "I love the darkness and immorality of The Two Faces of January"
By Thomas Agnelli – translated by Celine
Premiere (France)
June 2014




His always fresh and relaxed expressions, with dark subtexts dancing just below the surface, never cease to astound me.

Rex Reed
The New York Observer
17 September 2008




Mortensen is predictably fantastic. That dude can say 5 different things with his face in one ten second take.

Quint
Ain't it Cool News
8 September 2008




...Holding one's body still in front of a movie camera while also giving the sense of a mind in motion is a specialized art, one with few masters. Paul Newman comes to mind, notably in his later career, as does Robert Duvall, a perennial movie cowboy who will surely wish that Appaloosa had come his way. And now, it would seem, there is Mortensen, who steals this film by doing nothing much more than lean against doorways and bar counters.

Chuck Wilson
Village Voice
17 Septmeber 2008




...he's pure physical presence, strength and frailty combined.

Jauja Review
Quintín
Cinemascope
June 2014




There are some actors who work with the gesture: the fold of Robert Mitchum's eyes while he takes the last drag off a cigarette; Bogart's voice and the tic of his hand lightly touching his ear lobe to accompany a thought... Viggo Mortensen, on the other hand, can be completely expressive just by walking.

Alatriste - Opinion
By Susana Fortes - translated by Xabo
El País
21 September 2006




Mortensen is wonderful. He's one of the best actors at not doing anything and making you watch him all the more.

Ty Burr
Boston Globe: Take 2
October 2008




A single close-up upon realization of his daughter's disappearance and the quest it will entail becomes a tender conduit, a portraiture of a historical human that is unspeakably, indefinably beautiful. And from there he plunges away from his tent-and-soldier edge of civilization into a beyond that is only the older world.

Jauja Review
Daniel Kasman
Mubi.com
21 May 2014




Mortensen shows his character's rage and capacity for violence in subtle fashion, simply by the sudden way he will clench his fist or frown.....

Two Faces of January Review
Geoffrey MacNab
The Independent
15 May 2014




...a manner of acting that relies upon physicality rather than the spoken word; few actors can emote so strongly and evidently.

Hel Jones
Eat Sleep Live Film
26 October 2012




In Viggo Mortensen, Hillcoat is working with one of the current cinema's great quiet everymen, and if anyone can make the novel's stolid, unnamed hero empathic and emotionally alive on screen whilst remaining loyal to the novel's aesthetic minimalism, it's this immensely physical, restrained performer. It's a masterstroke of casting...

Kris Tapley on 'The Road'
InContention.com
August 2009




...when an actor like Viggo Mortensen is in front of the camera, it's best to just let the camera run and let him be. Mortensen gives a brilliant, genius performance. His character's every breath is not just his own, but a breath for his son, a breath for hope, and Mortensen conveys that with harrowing accuracy.

'The Road' review
Brandon Lee Tenney
FirstShowing.net
25 November 2009




He is one of the few actors who can tell a story with his eyes, and these are eyes so full of pain. It is the best kind of acting, pure and honest.

John Foote
In Contention
15 September 2009




…..keep your eyes on Mortensen. You could make an entire movie about the way that guy just stands in a room and quietly scans the atmosphere for even the slightest molecular disturbance.

Come to think of it, Eastern Promises may be that movie.

By Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
6 Sept 2007




The way Mortensen enters each scene, you know you're watching an actor with presence -- that's the easy part -- but more importantly an actor who can suggest two or three aspects of a character simultaneously.

Mortensen answer to 'Promises': Cronenberg crafts a winner
By Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
September 14, 2007




Mortensen, with his slicked back pile of steely dark grey hair making his violin-like face look even longer, provides an unassailable core of authenticity and empathy throughout this often ludicrous film. He's a master of minimalism – what most actors need a monologue to express, Mortensen can convey in one wordless close-up, from behind sunglasses.

Ryan Gilbey
New Statesman
18 October 2007




Mortensen's power comes directly from his eyes. They speak much more than any line he delivers in the film and offer an astounding glimpse into the psyche of his character.

'A History of Violence' Review
Christopher Childs
Twitchfilm.net
May 31, 2005




I tell him [Viggo] I've interviewed two directors he's worked... and both said almost the exact same thing about him: Viggo Mortensen doesn't have to say much and you get a lot..

Sittin' On The Ritz
SPLICEDwire, by Rob Blackwelder
26 March 2004




Viggo Mortensen is not about the words. He's about being... present. .......

Ray Pride
Movie City News
Review Date: March 4, 2004

Quotable Viggo: 13 July 2014

At the moment (when not watching football) Viggo is shooting Captain Fantastic, playing a man who has retreated to the depths of nature like Aragorn, Clay, Agustín and, well, himself. One thing we know about Viggo is that he really loves trees and the more the better. The title of his Icelandic exhibition, Skovbo, means 'home in the forest'. Even the title of his publishing company, Perceval Press, is named after an Arthurian character who journeys into the Forest. Forests are a place of the imagination, of lost and found paths where anything can happen.



© New Line Productions Inc.


What skills do you think every man should possess?

What's that old adage? "To become a man you have to build a house, plant a tree, raise a child…" I can't recall the whole thing but I know planting a tree is one of them. I think that's true. If you live in the city you have to go to the park. In England you have four seasons so make the most of it. It's going to affect your mood, it's going to change the way you feel, but you may as well just go and explore anyway. I can only speak for myself, but I would go crazy if I couldn't get out of the city and go out into the forest for a little while.

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014




Interviewer: The pictures are from many places, many different places. A tree is a tree in all places? Or what?

VM: Every tree is something special, just like people are. All different, but...
I look at them as I look at people. I get along well with most trees. I don't get into arguments with them, and if I do it's probably my own fault. If I don't watch where I'm going when I'm in the forest, it comes back and smacks me in the nose, and I only have myself to blame."

RUV Interview
Skovbo Exhibition, Iceland
Translated by Mums
30 May 2008




I decided to take photos of trees for this show because there are no trees in Iceland. I decided to bring trees to Iceland.

Viggo Mortensen on the Skovbo Exhibition
Capable Of Many Things
By Hanna Björk Valsdóttir - translated by Ragga
Fréttablaðið
30 May 2008





Even Mortensen's memories of early childhood are deeply spiritual. He tells me about the time he crawled into the woods and fell asleep. "I was sleeping under a tree, and it was very peaceful," he says. "And then a dog started barking, and that's how my parents found me."

You are always escaping, I say.

Yeah, he says. He calls his mother - on my cell phone, because he doesn't have one - to double-check his recollection. "Hi, it's Viggo. Sorry to be calling so late," he says. "Oh shit. You're in the middle of it? That's funny. Is it the tape? [She was watching a tape of The Two Towers.] O.K., sorry, it's just a quick question and then I'll let you get back to what you're doing. Remember there were a couple of times I ran away? And the time the dog came and found me in the woods? How old was I then? About one and a half. O.K. But, anyway, the dog came and found me and I was sitting under a tree? Happy? Sleeping, right?"

Big look of consternation.

"I was sitting in the middle of the woods crying? I thought I was sleeping. Are you sure?"

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine




"I very strongly feel that I share a common past with my family in Denmark. And feel connected to the Scandinavian mythology, when I walk in the forest at Jystrup, where there are many tales told of what has happened. The Danish woods look like Tolkien's, they are the kind that doesn't look dangerous, but if you walk alone by night in the forests of Denmark, you can feel the energies of the past. I felt that already as a child, back then when I played with swords there outside my uncle's farm, played and felt like a Viking."

Viggo Mortensen
The American Dane
By Susanne Johansson - Translation by Majken Steen Thomassen
28 November 2001
Source: BT (Berlingske Tidende) a Danish newspaper




'…when you are wandering in a hardwood or in the mountains or stand in a big, cold, mirroring lake, fishing. Then you are close to being happy - and what more can a man want.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001





"I thought of the New Zealand landscape as one of my acting partners," he says. "Those forests and mountains - Aragorn knows them. He understands the language of the birds and beasts." He takes a long drag on his cigarette. "He has a special reverence for trees."

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
By Ryan Gilbey
The Independent
14 December 2001




'The character I was playing was someone who had not only an affinity for living in the wilderness, but by necessity had to be good at it. That was my way of getting comfortable, especially not having a lot of time to prepare. I enjoyed being in the woods. '

Viggo Mortensen talking about Aragorn
Film Review #37




'The sets were unbelievable and the natural environment-incredible. You're walking in a beech forest and-I'm not sure these are the beech trees that you would see in northern Europe that you're most familiar with, but it's that same feeling-very eerie and peaceful and just beautiful.'

Viggo Mortensen
Veni, Vidi, Viggo
By Bilge Ebiri
Yahoo Internet Life magazine
23 November 2001




'I also like trees in their own right, to be honest, and photographing them is a way of paying them respect and remembering them.'

Skovbo Exhibition Brochure
May/June 2008




PA: If you were a flower, viggo, what kind would you be?

VM: Today, I'd be one of those spiky little red bottlebrush trees.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




'Still today I wander in the forest, work, read....I really need to spend time alone each day. Otherwise I'm out of sorts, irritable.'

Portrait - Viggo Mortensen - Mona Lisa
By Sabrina Champenois – translated by Chrissiejane, Kaijamin and Ewa
Libération
2 December 2009




'The consequences of human interference with Nature speak for themselves, and so do trees. We just need to listen a little more. God Fornojeise!'

Skovbo Exhibition Brochure
May/June 2008

Quotable Viggo: 6 July 2014

Leigh Singer said in a recent Two Faces of January review that 'no one can rock a 1960s cream linen suit quite like him'. Indeed, seeing Viggo 'rock' various costumes is always one of the great pleasures of watching his films because so much of the way the costume looks comes from him, and from the way he works on it and inhabits it. It's interesting that Viggo describes that white suit as another character (something that could also be said about Aragorn's worn leather clothes). Getting the costume right is all part of the ritual of preparing to be someone else. Finding the bits and piece that add to it, scuffing it up a bit and, in the case of The Road, sleeping in it, even the way it's put on before filming all adds to the magic.



Image Jack English.
© StudioCanal.



"I have all kinds of little rituals, when I'm getting ready", he confesses with a slightly embarrassed laugh. "Before takes I dress in my costume in exactly the same way every day. If I do it wrong, I will do it all over again. I always put on my clothes in a certain order with my left sock first. There are also objects that I always carry around."

Viggo Mortensen
Verdensborgeren
By Patricia Danaher
Ekko Magazine
Translated by Estel
May-August 2012




Viggo Mortensen surely wasn't just cast because he's a great actor; it's because no one can rock a 1960s cream linen suit quite like him.

Leigh Singer
IGN.com
19 May 2014




"I liked that suit because it's a great suit. It's an additional character in the story. It has its own transformation. By the time we get to the end of the movie the suit has its wrinkles, it's a little torn, a little soiled and it ends up in the dark and rain in Istanbul."

Viggo Mortensen talks The Two Faces Of January, singing with Fassbender and throwing a nappy at Al Pacino
by Tom Ward
GQ
16 May 2014




"The Danes were involved in two wars in the 1800s: in 1848 and 1864. For my role, I found a uniform from this 1848 war, as well as a saber from this war, and a double-medal for a man who served in both wars. This medal was very important. Most of the people back then were farmers, but they would be out with the pigs, with their medals, that is how important these medals were."

Viggo Mortensen
A Conversation with Viggo Mortensen at Cannes
Karin Luisa
Huffington Post
21 May 2014




Indeed, Mortensen's study of Freud included his dress, as he explains: "Freud continued to dress in the same way for many decades, a nineteenth century way of dressing. He wrote German the way German was written in the eighteenth and nineteenth century, and he never really changed."

Viggo Mortensen As Freud
By Emanuel Levy
Emanuel Levy.com
28 August 2011




…Viggo would sleep in his outfit. When he went into a local shop one day, security was called to remove him from the premises, thinking he was a homeless bum.

The Road
John Hillcoat
No Country for Any man
Telegraph Magazine
January 2010




"The clothes are bits and pieces of suits," he said. "It's sort of a mixture of what's left. He's clean and tidy, but he doesn't have much money. His way of riding and speaking are, in some way, remnants of being at West Point or being from that area."

Viggo Mortensen talking about Appaloosa
Viggo season
Watertown Daily Times
21 September 2008




'I did not like it, I felt uncomfortable. The first time I tried it on, I told the costume designer: "Is the hat that tight, are the boots that stiff?" I realized I felt bad because of the meaning I assigned to that uniform.'

Viggo on wearing the SS uniform in Good
The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




"…Denise Cronenberg, who's a long time collaborator with David, she came up with the clothes and we just sort of fine tuned and picked particular kinds of shoes and suits. And it was - the outward - you know, the presentation outwardly of a character is obviously very important, especially because so much is concealed within. And the hair, the squareness and the certain rigidity and streamline look to the hair, the clothes, sunglasses, the watch, the - you know, all went with the posture and the behavior. It was all of a piece, but it was done in complete collaboration which I really enjoy."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Talks Eastern Promises
By Andre Rivas
Ropeofsilicon.com
December 24, 2007




You worked on the costuming yourself?

Yeah, one braid for each hat. You know, I had double hats, in case one got messed up. And usually people don't think about this, but you're in different terrain, and the dust is different colors, so I had different hats for different periods, as the hat got more worn out through the story. So I had to make more than one braid, because we jumped back and forth throughout the sequences. They made these really nice hats, and I broke them each in and made a headband for each one. That makes you feel more involved. Until you start shooting, and you get your feet wet, it's just a way to get into it, and to connect with a role. And it's something that a guy like that might have made.

Viggo Mortensen
By Tasha Robinson
The Onion
10 March 2004




'Who knows, perhaps it was because [Viggo] washed and repaired Aragorn's clothes himself that he so perfectly came to inhabit them-to a point, indeed, where the costume seemed almost to blend with his body. [pause] You know, I really do think that particular costume is incredibly beautiful. It seems funny, perhaps, to talk about something that is so worn and broken down, so darned and patched, as being beautiful-but it is to me.'

Ngila Dickson, The Lord of the Rings
The Making of the Movie Trilogy




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?


My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...


If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005

Quotable Viggo: 28 June 2014

You may have noticed that to amuse myself I've been posting Western photos all week. Maybe because Viggo looks so darned good in Cowboy gear. So to continue the theme I thought I'd take another look at Appalooa (still one of my favourite Viggo films) and Hidalgo (West meets East with horses). All together now.... Yee-ha!



© New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers.


Appaloosa

Are there two more stronger, silenter types in modern movies than Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen?

Richard Crouse
CTV.ca
6 September 2008




Viggo Mortensen follows a classic cowboy code in the Western "Appaloosa": Speak softly and carry a big honkin' gun.

Mortensen Packs a Big Gun
By David Germain
Associated Press
17 September 2008




With his chiseled, windburned, mustachioed face, Mortensen is a dead ringer for men you'd see in an actual frontier photo.

Jim Vejvoda
IGN
18 September 2008




Mortensen's performance is flawless – so real that the film seems more like a look into the past, rather than a fictional slice of entertainment. You can see his power, his strength, and his intelligence as easy as you can see the all-prevalent dusty wind.

Monika Bartyzel
collider.com
8 September 2008
Early Films




"I like characters who find themselves at the brink of change. Everett is in the centre of the transition from anarchy to civil law in America. My characters always stand for crossing a ford. Years ago, Everett studied at West Point but I love imagining him as the black sheep of the family because he has gone West, looking for adventure and he has found it."

Viggo Mortensen
Appaloosa - 5 Questions For Viggo Mortensen
By Antonella Catena - translated by Ewa
Max
16 January 2009




"It's not a revisionist Western," states Mortensen. "It's not a movie about 1882 seen through our eyes as much as it is a picture that's without judgment of people as they seem to have behaved back then. The standards of behavior were very different. In some ways, there were higher standards of politeness and chivalry, but in other ways, people were much more direct and brutal towards each other."

Viggo Mortensen
Appaloosa: Shooting Ed Harris' Western
Emmanuellevy.com
August 2008




Watching Viggo Mortensen positioning himself in grand style in the preparation for the climactic shootout offers visual pleasure as well as reaffirmation of a code of honor that may be too mythical but helps maintain the tradition of the Westerner as a gentleman guided by strong inner conscience and sense of self.

Emmanuel Levy
Emmanuellevy.com
7 September 2008




…as the scene unfolded, Mortensen stood rock solid, waiting to draw his Colt .45. And then his hat went flying away, a Frisbee on steroids. Harris reset the scene, and then cinematographer Dean Semler ("Dances With Wolves") ran out of film. "That's why I like to shoot digitally," he muttered to Harris.

Filming the final scene of Appaloosa
Ed Harris ramrods unconventional western 'Appaloosa'
By John Horn
Los Angeles Times
7 September 2008




Hidalgo


Mortensen was clearly chosen for the role in Hidalgo for more than just his acting skills. He is genuinely concerned with things being done correctly, respectfully, and honestly---and it shows...It is a tribute to the creators of Hidalgo that they chose Viggo Mortensen.

Native Voice Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King,
Pine Ridge Reservation
South Dakota
December 2003




'It is good to have a movie that's old-fashioned and treats cowboys with respect. But all that can get lost when you get the 'Oh, I heard it's not true' comments. I can't believe that I had to spend half my time on the press tours dealing with that. My job became primarily to defend the movie's right to exist! It's a movie based on a true event, not a documentary. And it is a hell of a ride. That ought to be good enough - is for most movies - few of which can hold a candle to Hidalgo.'

Viggo Mortensen on the Frank Hopkins controversy
A Visit With Viggo
By Marianne Love
Sandpoint magazine
2004




"I found out a while back that I'm related to Buffalo Bill - distantly, on my mother's mother's side of the family," he says. "It's true: I went to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, and saw the records that prove the connection." Mortensen finds J.K. Simmons' performance as Buffalo Bill "terrific" - and it gave him an interesting opportunity to play in scenes with a distant relative.

Viggo Mortensen: The Straight-Shooting Star of the New Western
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys & Indians
April 2004




There is a genre knowingness to a claim like "God didn't make all men equal, Mr. Colt did," but I have to love a movie that lets someone say, "Easy, boys, it's a long way to Damascus." This is not the tin-eared grit of the misbegotten The Missing. Marvel at how Mortensen can all but whisper his lines: "Ain't no money worth a man's life, the way I see it"; "Nobody hurts my horse." He plays tired real good. Idealism resonates all the way through.

Ray Pride
Movie City News
Review Date: March 4, 2004




While the film can waver from itself, Mortensen is steadfast like a throw back to the old school smoldering actors that paraded about the prairies, years ago; sexy and very iconic American cowboy.

Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review
2004




'This film will help shape what people will think about the Old West, the Ghost Dance and Massacre at Wounded Knee, etc., into the future. You've got to be careful. Ten years from now this movie will say more about how we looked at things than it will about the historical things that are touched on in the story of Frank T. Hopkins and Hidalgo.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004


Quotable Viggo: 22 June 2014

I've just spent a whole week exhibiting – wrestling with bubblewrap, going up and down step ladders, trying to get things to hang straight (one of the inner circles of hell) and then trying to explain to visitors why on earth I've done it all. Time to turn to Viggo's always refreshing comments on creativity and his belief that just through the everyday act of imagining we are all artists, creating a unique vision the world around us through the prism of our thoughts.



Sådanset Art Exhibition - Roskilde, Denmark
© unknown.


"He allows the art to move through him like a vessel..."

Find 4 Change and AMFM Fest co-director Robert Galarza talking about Viggo being awarded the 4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award
The Wrap
23 May 2013




"Creative expression is social change. Wear your feelings on everything you do. It will help people open up their minds and see themselves and their communities in new ways."

Actor Viggo Mortensen urges expression
by Kaci Yoder
Desert Sun
7 July 2013




'I'm an observer. An artist. But I think that all people are artists. You go walking down the street and hear something that a person says and already you're imagining something about the life of that person. Then, someone is speaking on their phone in the line at the bank and he says, "No mom, that's not going to fall down" and hangs up. And you've already invented a complete story about who he's speaking to, who or what is going to fall down. The way you pay attention is already an artistic activity. To survive in the world, we have to interpret our sense of what is happening and at times, it's important to know. People can separate artists and those that think they aren't [artists], but all of us are artists. It's something that we do all the time, interpreting signs that are given to us and other situations, imagining consequences. It's a way to get involved, to link yourself with the environment, with what surrounds you.'

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




'A photo, a painting, a poem or music that we use to express our experience is not the main thing, but what you are expressing. How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.'

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




"You ask the question, you investigate, you make that extra effort to be aware and express your reaction to your surroundings," he says. "Whether you paint or act or write, you're giving importance to a given moment, a place, an emotion, and you're communicating the discoveries you've made as you engage in that process. So in that sense, everything is connected."

Viggo Mortensen, Photographer
Massey University, 2003




"…..you know, no one looks at the world like it really is. Everyone looks at the world like they want it to be. When it comes down to it, everyone is in their own 'dream world', we could become crazy if we thought of the world like it really is."

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




"This world is a dream we all contribute to, in one way or another. We are part of the dream, if we are aware or not, if we like it or not. These pictures are a part of my dream, of the way I exist and act in the world."

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
July 2008
Source: Panorama First




'To be an artist is to remain conscious of your surroundings, and I believe that we all have that capacity. Children have it and, as they grow up, they lose it.'

Viggo Mortensen
I wouldn't look the Alatristes of today in the eye
By Oskar L. Belategui, translated for V-W by Margarita
Hoy Sociedad
3 September 2006




'In a way, I am a photographer even when I don't take pictures. I think it's an instinctive thing by now, a part of myself.'

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




'I've always loved the kind of isolation that comes from intensely devoting yourself to art forms like painting or poetry or whatever. That's also what makes being an actor so fulfilling in that you can share the creative process and get out of your own head.'

Viggo Mortensen Goes Back to His Roots for 'Everyone Has A Plan'
Staticmultimedia.com
19 April 2013




'Inspiration is a notion, an impulse that has its own shape, before you stumble onto it. If you're in too much of a hurry, you try to tell it what it is, instead of having it tell you what it is. And I think if you do that, you're gonna miss out.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen ('80) Remembers
By Macreena A. Doyle
St. Lawrence University, 2003




"I think I'm essentially hopeful and the reason that I paint or photograph or listen to someone who is speaking to me is that I hope something might happen."

The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent
Black & White magazine 2001




"If I thank Saint Francis of Assisi in my book, "Hole in the Sun', it's for a private reason. I don't want to explain any these references - a word, a name or a quotation - which mark my work. Even if the reader does not know exactly why I wrote that, it won't stop them searching for a connection, interrogating themselves. I like that people draw their own conclusions. In life, it's the effort you make to try and understand which keeps you alive and open. It is more important to ask questions than to find answers."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002


Quotable Viggo: 14 June 2014

John Wayne, Robert Mitchum, James Stewart, Clint Eastwood, Gary Cooper. What might these doyens of vintage cinematic manliness have in common. Well... that would be Viggo. Peter Howell of the Toronto Star called Viggo the 'New John Wayne' after seeing Hidalgo, while live Sinclair of The Times Literary Supplement called him a 'latter day Gary Cooper'. This likeness to gritty movie stars of the past has come to the fore again with several comparisons made in Two Faces of January reviews and articles, and even in Jauja. Over the years even his relationship with Cronenberg has been seen as mirroring some of the great movie partnerships of the past such as John Ford and John Wayne, and Sergio Leone and Clint Eastwood. I guess what they all have in common is a plentiful helping of True Grit.



©Two Faces of January: StudioCanal/various unknown.


Jauja is a film of great formal beauty... And, incidentally, the umpteenth confirmation of Viggo Mortensen´s great talent. Mustachioed , astride his horse in a cavalry uniform, sword in sheath and a splendid hat on his head, he is reminiscent of John Wayne in the early John Ford films.

Jauja: Viggo Mortensen, Following John Wayne's Footsteps
By Franck Nouchi - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Le Monde
19 May 2014




Mortensen tends to play listeners – whether the laconic adventurer-king Aragorn in The Lord of the Rings, or Nikolai, his Russian mobster in David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises.

It's part of what makes the 55-year-old Danish-American star an old-fashioned sort of movie idol. He's cut from the same chiselled, masculine material as Robert Mitchum, with whom he shares a dimpled chin and a taste for complex heroes.


The Two Faces of January
By Tim Robey
The Telegraph
15 May 2014




Viggo Mortensen turns 50 next year, and he's one of those movie actors whom you want to see age. There's a menace that lurks beneath Mortensen's cool, taut exterior and it never comes as any surprise when it spills over and scalds anyone unfortunate enough to jar that smoothly lined lid open.

This is the quality of an old-school action star, the ability to hint at lifetimes of unspoken and unseen experience that kept drawing directors like John Ford back to actors like John Wayne, Anthony Mann back to James Stewart, Sergio Leone back to Clint Eastwood, and -- twice now -- David Cronenberg back to Mortensen. And it's a quality that only gets more menacingly potent with time.

As Cronenberg crawls deeper into the psychology of violence, his cool leading man soars
Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
20 September 2007




Viggo, speaking vintage Castillian Spanish with his own voice, dominates the film as a kind of Medieval Clint Eastwood, short on words, long on deadly action when required…

Alatriste
Viggo Mortensen - Heroic On And Off Screen
By Alex Deleon
Fest21
16 October 2006




When there's action to be had, Mortensen looks like a real pro. He's got the cowboy drawl down pat; shoots a Colt .45 with confidence; delivers sharp one-liners like a kinder, gentler Clint Eastwood...

Hidalgo review
Leigh Johnson
Hollywood.com




'He's just somebody I spotted as having a kind of appeal that I don't see a lot of actors having anymore. It's just mainly from when I grew up that I'm always on the prowl for guys who could kind of play the roles Clint Eastwood played 30 years ago. And he sort of seems to be that kind - with some real serious acting chops.'

Josh Olson on Viggo Mortensen
Interview with Jock Olson, by Rebecca Murray
About.com. August 2005




"He is methodical, exacting in his work, he carries out meticulous labors to do something that looks true, and projects it. He is like Robert Mitchum or William Holden, the class of actors whose work seems effortless."

Ray Loriga
Chiaroscuro: Viggo, Light And Dark
By Rocio Garcia - translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
El Pais
26 June 2009




What Viggo Mortensen does with the character [Alatriste] is extraordinary, not just because of his splendid appearance, but because of his acting, full of subtleties, sober intensity, as well as looks and gestures that serve to convey a story in a way that has rarely been seen onscreen since the deaths of actors like John Wayne, James Stewart or Robert Mitchum.

Alatriste
An Accordant Man
By Javier Marías - translated by Xabo
El País Semanal
17 September 2006




It's not as if we haven't seen movies like "Hidalgo" before -- the cowboy, the horse, the hat -- and yet there's something fresh about it all the same. Part of it comes from Viggo Mortensen, an actor who has the measured pace and steady gaze of a Cooper or a Stewart.

Wild West to wild Mideast
Mortensen saddles up as former cowboy racing across desert
Mick LaSalle
Chronicle, 5 March 2004




Viggo Mortensen – increasingly a latter-day Gary Cooper – and epigone Kodi Smit-McPhee that we never doubt the answer for a moment.

'The Road' Review
Clive Sinclair
The Times Literary Supplement
2 November 2009




There's a scene in that film, Eastern Promises, where his character, Nikolai, stubs a cigarette out on his own tongue. At that moment, all was made clear: Mortensen was an old-fashioned star, as confident and as taciturn as Gary Cooper.

Viggo Mortensen
By David Thomson
The Guardian,
10 April 2009




Mortensen, who became a hunky heartthrob as the warrior Aragorn in the "Lord of the Rings" series, carries himself like Gary Cooper here, radiating earthy charm and easy humor, as well as a quiet determination.

Hidalgo Review
James Sanford
Kalamazoo Gazette 2004




Joe Johnson said that you reminded him of a matinee idol of a bygone era, such as Gary Cooper, how does that make you feel?


Very flattered, because they are very good actors. What they were good at, beyond what they looked like, or whatever their presence, is the same thing that I admire in Omar Sharif, which is a kind of acting that is often under-rated and under-valued.

Hidalgo - Viggo Mortensen Q&A
Indie London
By Jack Foley
2004




With his aqua blue eyes and chiselled jaw, he is every bit the American film hero - a Harrison Ford or a John Wayne, but with a darkness lurking beneath.....

Sasha Stone
Santa Monica Mirror
28 September 2005




It should come as no surprise to learn that Mortensen is an admirer of Greta Garbo, the "I vant to be alone" diva, and also John "The Duke" Wayne, star of Howard Hawks' Red River, a classic western and one of Mortensen's favourites.

"I just think John Wayne was wonderful, and I'm not looking at him as just this icon," said the chisel-jawed actor, a study in seriousness behind innocent blue eyes.

A New John Wayne: Viggo Mortensen Saddles Up for Hidalgo
By Peter Howell
Toronto Star
5 March 2004




HP: Does it mean anything to you when large movie magazines compare you with Clint Eastwood, John Wayne and James Stewart? And say that you have the same "uugrundelige", under the surface madness?

VM: That's something, but you need to be lucky. If it happens you say "thank you", but you can never count on it.

Go'Aften Danmark Interview
TV2
By - transcribed/translated by Rosen
23 September 2007


Quotable Viggo: 8 June 2014

With the World Cup about to start, this week's Quotable just has to be about The Beautiful Game. As a follower of our favourite Footie Fan par excellence and San Lorenzo Ambassador, Viggo, I'm going to unashamedly post all those oldies but goodies we've enjoyed over the years, along with a few new ones. Personally I'm a complete Soccerphobe but sometimes the tide is against you!



Visting the Inonu Stadium, home of Besiktas
© Besiktas JK.



'I ran from one side of my hotel room to the other, jumping and shouting like a man possessed. I opened the window and shouted the goal at the crescent moon.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers watching San Lorenzo
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




CUERVO, WE ARE CHAMPIONS!!!
I woke up with my clothes on, my head wrapped in a flag with the image of Pope Francis, as if it was some sort of turban, and the TV full blast showing The Mummy with Boris Karloff, but we are still champions!

Viggo Mortensen
In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




"Every time I go to Argentina, I go to the San Lorenzo store and I buy all the decals they have because I have the habit of sticking them up in cities, airports, in the stadiums of other teams, " he recounts and ends with a sly smile, "to mark territory."

"We are all artists" - Viggo Mortensen
By Susana Parejas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
7 Dias
2 September 2012




Mortensen speaks five languages, and seems happy to discuss football in all of them.

Interview: Viggo Mortensen, actor
Scotsman.com
9 February 2012




So who would Viggo side with if, for example, Denmark and Argentina met in the next World Championship final?

"Oh, that's a very difficult question that I have often asked myself. It's not unthinkable at all, because both Denmark and Argentina play good football," Mortensen says, and adds: "But if they really met each other in the World Championship final, I'd buy both countries national team jumpers and cut them through the middle. And then I'd sew them together again to make one jumper. In that way I could cheer both Denmark and Argentina."

I Love Danish Football
By Kim Kastrup - translated by Chrissie
Ekstra Bladet
24 July 2007




'I think in part I cling to CASLA because it is a fixed point for me, an ideal, a flame that never dies.'

Viggo Mortensen
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




'I have enough shirts to field a whole San Lorenzo team…'

Viggo Mortensen Q&A
By Richard Deitsch
Sports Illustrated magazine
5 August 2004
Sports Illustrated magazine




When asked why he always sports San Lorenzo gear during interviews (today it's a pullover with their logos) he jokes, "mind control."

Viggo does 'Good'
Mortensen shows us his softer side
by Tina Chadha
Metro New York
9 January 2009




Oh God, no! Viggo Mortensen is wearing the sweatshirt of San Lorenzo, the Argentine soccer team of which he is a big supporter. The effect is what I feared: all male journalists present at the meeting with the actor unleash questions about who will win this game, this season, the derby ... with the result that the first 20 minutes with one of the most fascinating men in the world are wasted with talk about sports!

Viggo Mortensen: "Do I look sexy?"
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




"Have I behaved? I haven't talked about San Lorenzo too much, right?"

Viggo Mortensen in a Todos tenemos un plan interview
Soledad Villamil - Viggo Mortensen: Brothers In Arms
By Nazareno Brega - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012




"I don't play soccer well… I sing just like I play soccer! But I like it, so I do it anyway, it's just a matter of starting, fear is useless…"

Viggo Mortensen
A Hollywood star in RSM
Argentinean TV interview with Mariana Fabbiani
11 October 2008




I met Maradona once on Susana Giménez' program.... The idea was that his arrival would be a surprise at the end of the broadcast, but someone got excited and told me a few hours before going to the station. I took with me in my pocket a CASLA t-shirt with "10" and gave it to him during the program. I told him that there was a gap in our lineup because of injuries (maybe it was Walter Montillo that was hurt, I don't remember now) and that the following day, since we were playing against River, maybe he would like to join us. The idol took it very well and Susana, who's a Cuervo, laughed too.

In the last minutes of the program, I took off my boots to give him the San Lorenzo socks I was wearing and I think I told him that he'd have to look for the shorts himself. He also accepted that gift with a lot of dignity and in an extremely generous spirit. If he thought that I was an idiotic Cuervo, he didn't say so.

Viggo Mortensen
In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




Go San Lorenzo! My membership card says "supporter from another country", but I am not a supporter from another country; that does not describe me properly… I am a "local" supporter, [a supporter] from the bottom of my heart, from a heart that is ours, that belongs to all the "cuervos", in the past, in the present and for ever.

Viggo's speech
100th year San Lorenzo celebration
Buenos Aires
Translated by Silver
2 April 2008




'Yesterday, my limousine was blockaded by people. The fans were banging against the windows. I opened the door and escaped down a small alley. And who did I run into? King Pelé and his bodyguards. I asked for an autograph...but his bodyguards stopped me. King in his limousine, poor beggar in the street. A good lesson,' concludes Mortensen, who invites you to reflect on the morality of such a story.

Viggo Mortensen - The Lord Touches All
By François-Guillaume Lorrain - translated by Margarita
27 October 2005
Source: Le Point



Quotable Viggo: 1 June 2014

Crack open the V-W champagne, and not just because we are 10 years old. Jauja has stormed Cannes after premiering in En Certain Regard and becoming one of the most highly praised films in the Festival, winning the film critics Fipresci Jury Prize. I know we are all thrilled for Viggo, Lisandro Alonso and Fabián Casas. As always, there have been so may reviews pouring out over such a short space of time, it's nice to take a retrospective look at some of them to savour that success.



© 4L Productions.


From the first moment, Jauja presents a confounding and exciting approach to cinema. A block of text explains the title, a reference to a secret land of abundance and happiness that has caused many men to go mad, disappearing in their feeble searches to find it. It then cuts to a striking composition in 4:3 (with curves that recall old photography), where Captain Dinesen (Mortensen) and his daughter, Ingeborg (Viilbjork Agger Malling), discuss her desire to get a dog. The shot is striking in the density of the colors of the grass and the sky (shot in 35mm, though presented in a digital transfer) and the stillness of the characters (Mortensen has his back to us), as if it is a living painting.

Peter Labuza
The Film Stage
19 May 2014




It's easy to accuse films like Alonso's — not just this one, but all of them — of being thin on narrative incident, a kind of journalistic euphemism for wishing such filmmakers would either get with the program and make "normal" movies like everyone else or stop wasting our precious time. But those open to other possibilities in cinematic language may marvel at Alonso's ability to hold a viewer rapt through little more than landscape, movement and sound, and ideas (about parents and children, colonialism and its lingering discontents) that emerge implicitly rather than being directly stated.

Scott Foundas
Variety
28 May 2014




As ruminative as Alonso's other films, Jauja ends up taking us to completely unfamiliar terrain, the film hinting at the sort of mystical or metaphysical journey one might normally associate with films such as Jodorowsky's El Topo or indeed 2001: A Space Odyssey (obliquely hinted at in the coda). Timo Salminen's photography makes the box if the unusual ratio, the images precisely composed, whether people are in imposing close-up or way off in the desert distance, with reds, greens and blues magnetically heightened.

Jonathan Romney
Screen Daily
20 may 2014




The highly tactile textures of the 35mm cinematography imbue even these moments of serenity with a sense of unease, which Alonso slowly actualizes first as foreboding occurrences, then as potentially pagan personifications. A third act shift into a new dimension dissolves temporal boundaries and turns the film on its head, and in its brave willingness to intelligently recalibrate its own narrative constituents, the film offers Dinesen, his daughter, and indeed, Alonso himself, an entirely new plane of consciousness to explore.

Jordan Cronk
Reverse Shot
31 May 2014




..."Jauja" offers immense payoff for anyone willing to invest in its mysteries.

Eric Kohn
Indie Wire
26 May 2014




The waiting has been more than worth it. In a nutshell, Jauja is the greatest and most overwhelming movie in Lisandro Alonso´s filmography and probably one of the most captivating and beautiful experiences in this new edition of the Cannes Festival. Fantastic...
.... Viggo Mortensen breaks the tradition, being the first professional actor starring in a Lisandro Alonso film. His incorruptible charisma and imposing physicality confirm that there couldn't be a more suitable choice.

Joan Sala
El blog de filmin
19 May




A wonderful reflection on the evocative power of cinema. And, incidentally, the umpteenth confirmation of Viggo Mortensen´s great talent. Mustachioed , astride his horse in a cavalry uniform, sword in sheath and a splendid hat on his head, he is reminiscent of John Wayne in the early John Ford films.

Franck Nouchi - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Le Monde
19 May 2014




Viggo is on screen most of the time, and again he makes clear that he can carry a movie on his own and also his versatility when taking on physical, emotional roles, and the two things in the same story. And a versatility in languages: this time he gets to speak Danish, the language of his paternal family.

Matías Orta
A Sala lLlena - translated by Ollie
20 May 2014




Filmed almost entirely on location, in square postcard-like format (with rounded corners,) by the director of photography of Aki Kaurismäki (Micaela Buye) [sic], the overwhelming beauty of Jauja seems actually to belong to a dream in which fantasy and the physical, reality and dream, come true in one body....

...Having reached the festival´s halfway point, the film deserving the Palme d´Or doesn´t even qualify for the prize. Paradoxes of Cannes.

Carlos Reviriego
El Cultural - translated by Ollie
19 May 2014




The film is made up of postcards of a time and place closer to the primordial, which makes the efforts of men upon and within it seem ridiculous, though with the firm possibility of attaining nobility. Mortensen's Dane certainly does, in a tremendously moving performance literally and emotionally, a performance that moves itself and one. A single close-up upon realization of his daughter's disappearance and the quest it will entail becomes a tender conduit, a portraiture of a historical human that is unspeakably, indefinably beautiful. And from there he plunges away from his tent-and-soldier edge of civilization into a beyond that is only the older world.

Daniel Kasman
Mubi.com
21 May 2014




Mortensen turns the captain into a clumsy, huffing and puffing clown in his fine double-breasted uniform, sword and rifle, who has trouble mounting a horse. Though mostly a risible character, he's partially redeemed by his burning love for his daughter that keeps him searching for the rest of the film. His brushes with the mysterious Zuluaga are fleeting but deadly, marked by ancient looking totems and barbaric savagery... Mortensen also gets co-producer and music credit for a couple of fine modern pieces saved for the end of the film.

Deborah Young
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 2014




On se dit qu'Alonso va se faire écharper. C'est l'inverse qui s'est passé : standing ovation de dix minutes, réputation de meilleur film du Festival (avec cette interrogation : pourquoi ce film est dans la sélection Un Certain regard alors qu'on lui a longtemps promis la compétition ?).

Philippe Azoury
Le Nouvel Observateur:
20 May 2014




This is the kind of philosophical, deeply visual filmmaking which many will be able to appreciate, and my respect for Viggo Mortensen (who is a magnanimous minimalist here) has sky rocketed.

Nikola Grozdanovic
Wat Too Indie
18 May 2014




It is said there that the great authors in the history of cinema always make the same film. This sounds a bit derogatory to any film-maker as it mistakes style for repetition of formulas. However, if we were to apply this (set) phrase to Alonso´s films we should refute it immediately. Jauja is the most rebellious example.

Andrés Nicolás Martín
escribiendocine.com - translated by Ollie
19 May 2014


Quotable Viggo: 18 May 2014

So that we have it all together (and in case you misssed any) I've gathered together a selection of the Two Faces of January reviews of Viggo's performance as Chester. They go right back to February when the film was first shown in Berlin. As always, the consensus is that it's an outstanding performance in a trio of leads at the top of their game.



© StudioCanal.


All hail Patricia Highsmith. As well as being a great writer she was an astute film critic...

...You suspect "her highness" would approve of Viggo Mortensen, the lead in this handsome period thriller based on a novel Highsmith wrote in 1964. As a dodgy, low-born, alcoholic American businessman, the 55-year-old actor is magnificently unhinged.

Soaking up the highlights of Ancient Greece, Chester MacFarland resembles a spick-and-span palace. In fact, as becomes apparent, he's a ruin. Every time he gets drunk another partition collapses; when he sobers up, the grand edifice dazzles again.

It's the best thing Mortensen has done in years.

Charlotte O'Sullivan
London Evening Standard
16 May 2014




Mortensen shows his character's rage and capacity for violence in subtle fashion, simply by the sudden way he will clench his fist or frown... In terms of his actions, Chester is despicable. In his manner, he is genial and charismatic. Mortensen understands this contradiction. He doesn't try to overplay Chester's villainy but nor does he set out to ingratiate himself with the audience. It's a very clever and understated performance. Even in the scene in which Chester becomes blind drunk, he is still inscrutable.

Geoffrey MacNab
The Independent
15 May 2014




The sight of a sweaty, drunken Viggo Mortensen – his suit crumpling in solidarity with the worry lines on his face – is increasingly horrific in this pleasingly old-fashioned, unhysterical 1960s-set thriller. ....Dunst handles her sidekick role with a mature ease that's new to her, but it's the men you remember: Mortensen in psychological freefall and Isaac always tough to read and hiding something behind a handsome, controlled exterior.

Dave Calhoun
Time Out
14 may 2014




Mortensen is superb as a fraud whose facade crumbles but who retains his craftiness even in despair.

Angie Errigo
Empire Magazine
April 2014




Yet this is Viggo Mortensen's movie, his best work since A History of Violence (2005), another film about an apparently decent fellow with a dark past. Mortensen, playing a handsome, impassive mystery of a man, gives one of the year's best and subtlest performances.

David Gritten
Saga
17 May 2014




He's played a family man with a dark past, an untrustworthy Russian mobster you wouldn't want to run into in a North London bathhouse, and a saucy Sigmund Freud up to no good. Viggo Mortensen's not the kinda guy you'd want holding a step ladder for you, is he?...
... the chemistry and forced friendship between the gents is outstanding. Isaac's still oozing that cool Inside Llewyn Davis confidence while Mortensen - who always brings that special something to all his roles - is one more on superbly scornful form.

Rob Young
DIY
15 May 2014




Mortensen expertly darts from raffish rich bastard to sympathetic cuckold, his age giving Chester authority over Rydal until the younger man's sexual magnetism in Colette's eyes exposes it hopelessly as he stumbles around, drunk and pathetic.

Ed Williamson
The Shiznit
15 May 2014




This also marks a striking return to form for Viggo Mortensen (who left us a little cold in Everybody Has a Plan) – despite initially carrying the film with a smooth charm, there is a gritty inner darkness behind the welcoming facade that makes Chester so watchable – especially when seeing the lengths the character will go to to survive.

Andrew McArthur
The People's Movies
14 May 2014




Mortensen is in his element with a rage that builds slowly but surely, eventually flipping his lid with devastating consequences.

Stella Papamichael
Digital Spy
12 May 2014




Although the film is dependent on twists and dramatic tension, the plot is also driven by character performances. Mortensen, in particular, gives a standout performance as a deteriorating husband lost in a haze of alcohol and jealousy

Keir Smith
The Upcoming
13 May 2014




The powerhouse acting of Isaac opposite veteran Mortensen is electric, like watching two alpha males circling each other, planning their moves while keeping as much control and faux respect left to last the journey they are bound together to make

Filmgaze.com
10 May 2014




Mortensen and Isaac excel at the push-pull of this wary partnership, a pact between swindlers.... Mortensen, who can wear the hell out of cream linen suits, is at his intellectually acerbic best.

Tim Robey
The Telegraph
11 February 2014




Mortensen's elegant-until-cornered Chester is a layered character with quite a moral range, from nefarious swindler to a man able to make a grand redemptive gesture.

Deborah Young
Hollywood reporter
11 February 2014




...Mortensen's elegant Chester is a multilayered creation with a beautifully enacted sense of moral ambiguity.

Tara Karajica
Indiwire.com
17 February 2014




Rydal is a great partner for Viggo Mortensen to play against, but Mortensen's performance shines the most out of all three. From a handsome man in his best years, he turns into a weary crook who took too many wrong turns in life, and is now torn between regret and the urge to keep on going on a dangerous path.

Nora Hiller
FlicksandtheCity.com
28 February 2013


Quotable Viggo: 11 May 2014

In this week's Irish Times, Donald Clarke described Viggo as 'at home to the odd ramble', something which must delight and frustrate interviewers in equal measure. Over the years I've chuckled over their comments on way he takes over conversations and 'doesn't hesitate to occasionally take the role of the interviewer' (Marie Claire). And I still treasure Ty Burr of the Boston Globe's conclusion that he was a 'Chatty Cathy'. I think we all love the fact that he never sticks to the script and I have my fingers crossed for plenty of rambling in the up-and-coming Two faces of January interviews!



© StudioCanal/Working Title.


Viggo Mortensen thinks deeply about his art. A slow talker, at home to the odd ramble, he comes across as the sort of sober fellow who will only make a joke when absolutely certain the situation demands it. He's a hard man to concisely assess (a good thing for an actor, one assumes).

Viggo Mortensen: "I run into a lot of actors who seem to have had itinerant childhoods"
By Donald Clarke
The Irish Times
9 May 2014




Mortensen may take a bit of warming up, but once he's off, he goes at it like a fire hose, frequently switching subjects in mid-sentence as a new thought strikes him. Looking through the transcript of our interview afterwards is like reading Molly Bloom's soliloquy at the end of Ulysses.

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




...he's a disconcerting interviewee. The conversation goes like this. I ask question A, expecting answer B. He listens carefully, considers, and gives me answer E, and then we find ourselves on point K, V, or Z.

'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




I've had four or five conversations with Mortensen over the years, and they've all followed the same pattern: He takes your measure for a minute or two, just to establish some basic comfort level and make sure he's not talking to a total idiot, and then it's hard to get the guy to shut up.

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




An encounter with Viggo is sitting on a porch, drinking a bombilla of mate and watching time pass in such a way that every now and then new reflections, inquiries, ways of looking at things arise. It can take a whole season. Watching many skies pass by.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




...he's content to go lolloping off after his own train of thought and in the end, the best option is to give up and drift along for the ride. In Mortensen's view, the journey is always more entertaining than the destination anyway.

The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




[He] speaks quietly and thoughtfully, and often at length, on every question, hammering his subject from all sides until it submits to the truth.

Viggo Mortensen v the apocalypse
By Kevin Maher
The Times
3 October 2009




A conversation with him tends to lead wherever he wants it to go. Try to ask a follow-up question or change the subject, and he'll gently, politely raise his voice and continue talking over you.

Rocky Road
By Ben Kenigsberg
Time Out Chicago
13 November 2009




Viggo Mortensen is, besides a great actor, an inexhaustible conversationalist, so full of curiosity that he doesn't hesitate to occasionally take the role of the interviewer.

The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




Mortensen speaks slowly and in each one of his answers it seems there are endless concepts that could need an extra explanation.

Viggo Mortensen tiene un plan
By Justina Berard
Vos/La Voz
25 May 2011




The surprising thing about Viggo Mortensen is how talkative the guy is. Seriously: The smolderingly still presence of "Eastern Promises," "A History of Violence," and "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy turns out to be a regular Chatty Cathy in person.

An actor lured by western promise
By Ty Burr
Boston Globe
September 28, 2008




…the actor tends toward abstractions and diversions in conversation. Entire paragraphs can pass by without a concrete noun, but you don't mind because he's friendly and easygoing - a man with the attitude of a surfer, the eyes of a killer, and the brain of a slacker bookworm.

An actor lured by western promise
By Ty Burr
Boston Globe
September 28, 2008

Quotable Viggo: 26 April 2014

After what seems like a very long wait, we finally have a title for Lisandro Alonso's collaboration with Fabián Casas and Viggo: Jauja. Even better, it will be shown at Cannes. As we have had nearly a year of articles and comments sporadically appearing, I thought we'd celebrate by refreshing our memories! So here are some of the many Quotes about the film that I've gathering since last April.



© 4L Productions.


Some months ago, unthinkable, unpredictable news appeared: the famous American (and Danish) actor, Viggo Mortensen, the one from The Lord of the Rings, would be the star of the new Lisandro Alonso film, still untitled, spoken in Danish...

The Lord of Independence
By Roger Koza - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Voz
7 April 2013




Would you have ever thought that someday you would work with a movie star like Mortensen?

I met Viggo at the Toronto Film Festival. He was premiering Alatriste in 2006, and I was there with Fantasma. I exchanged a few words with him while we were drinking a couple of beers at a party; he seemed like a likeable guy and I thought about him, the way someone would fantasize about playing on the national soccer team.

Lisandro Alonso
The Lord of Independence
By Roger Koza - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Voz
7 April 2013




'...he gave me a San Lorenzo pin - he's always going around giving people those things. I liked him very much; right then I realized that we could treat one another as equals.'

Lisandro Alonso
"It´s a mixture of spaces, times and languages."
By Diego Brodersen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Pagina 12
27 October 2013




'Viggo liked the story, and he saw we didn´t have enough structure to address it. He joined in because he backed it and believed it was worth it; for that, I will be eternally grateful.'

Lisandro Alonso, a well-known face at Cannes
by Pablo O. Scholz
Clarin
17 April 2014




'At first I thought I would make a film about an English family, which would have been plausible as in Argentina the first settlers were the Spaniards before the English arrived. But I didn´t want to give the film a historical dimension and that people could pay attention to the clothes or the behaviour of the English who lived in the 19 century. It turns out that Fabián Casas [co-writer] is a good friend of Viggo Mortensen; they are both supporters of the San Lorenzo soccer club. The fact of choosing him as an actor and making the film about a Danish family seemed to me more strange and, therefore, more appropriate.'

Lisandro Alonso
When Viggo Mortensen films with Lisandro Alonso
Cahiers du Cinema – translated by Ollie and Anavel
January 2013




'The first thing I wanted to say to you is that all of us in the film crew are waiting for you with great joy. All the beautiful moments in my life were collective achievements, never individual. Lisandro rented a garage to house the film's office and I liked that, because just like there's garage rock (during my scholarship in Iowa City I saw endless garage bands in a downtown basement), now we are going to create a new concept which is garage film, an intense and punk cinema set in a state of questioning and never answering.'

Fabián Casas discussing the film Viggo
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




'... like most of [Lisandro Alonso] movies, it will have its own kind of unique pace, like something out of Tarkovsky's world. But unlike his other movies this one actually has professional actors, and somewhat more of a conventional blueprint for a script. His other movies are – they're not totally free-form, but he's not worked with actors before. It's a totally new thing for him.'

Viggo talking about Lisandro Alonso
Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




How was it working with Viggo Mortensen? Is it hard to direct a big movie star considering that in your previous films they were non-professional actors?


Viggo is directed by himself, doesn´t need my help; he is an amazing actor, a unique person, a dream producer.

Lisandro Alonso
Nueva voz: Lisandro Alonso y el cine de los hombres solos
El Deber
28 December 2013




"...I´d say, [he was] thinking about the film 24 hours a day."

Lisandro Alonso
"It´s a mixture of spaces, times and languages."
By Diego Brodersen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Pagina 12
27 October 2013




'I don't see Viggo Mortensen as a Hollywood star. He is an extremely charismatic actor who doesn´t speak too much, he is all physicality. His acting gives priority to body-language and the gaze.'

Lisandro Alonso
When Viggo Mortensen films with Lisandro Alonso
Cahiers du Cinema – translated by Ollie and Anavel
January 2013




'He´s an actor who takes risks, as he proves by acting in my film. According to him, it´s an experimental movie, and coming from him it might seem this is a film by Andy Warhol. But he knows very well what he´s doing. He´s seen Los Muertos four times and he´s completely aware of the risks he´s taking, the same as me.'

When Viggo Mortensen Films With Lisandro Alonso
By Lisandro Alonso - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cahiers du Cinema
January 2013




"It's an interesting challenge for me, because I have to speak Danish with her (the daughter) and with other characters, which I manage to do thanks to my father, but later on I have to speak Spanish with a noticeable Danish accent. I think I'm going to have to imitate my father," says the actor, laughing.

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen is immersed in a "strange story."
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Universal
1 March 2013




"This accent reminds me of many things from the years I was growing up in Buenos Aires and Chaco. It also brings to mind, as I said, the summer trips we could take to this beautiful province. I also like that my character rides a horse for a great part of the film. I've always liked horses."

Viggo Mortensen: "It's a shame that the government has cleared the way for open-pit mining."
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Noticias Net-Rio Negro
21 April 2013




'Dinesen is a man who seems to cope well with loneliness, but finally he becomes lost in it. He goes out in the desert trying to find his daughter, but in the end we realize that he is also tracking down his wife, his mother, all women and men in the world, his own childhood, his country and his death'

Viggo Mortensen
An Anarchist in the Closet
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Chrissie and Ollie
Pagina 12
27 October 2013




'It´s increasingly clear to me that our existential "Western" has to do with the endurance and determination of the man to understand how time works, what it is that life wants from him. We are constructing a race with death, not against death.'

Viggo discussing the film with Fabián Casas
From the South
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
21 April 2013




'I think that, in his poetry, Fabián resembles Lisandro in something essential: conveying without embellishment the particular beauty of his creative point of view. The two have a process that seems to look for distillation, the essential thing in their stories, without fear of contradiction or unanswered questions. It is one thing wanting to achieve this sort of cleanliness as an artist and another to be able to convey it with grace and originality. Those who can do that, who can move you with what they are telling you, are few.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Anarchist in the Closet
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Chrissie and Ollie
Pagina 12
27 October 2013

Quotable Viggo: 20 April 2014

Having looked at GI Jane a couple of weeks ago, I thought that this week we would revisit another film which was expected to launch Viggo's career into the Hollywood A lists – A Perfect Murder. Revolving around the changing relationships of three lead characters, Viggo more than held his own against established stars Douglas and Paltrow, bringing all the ambiguous complexity to the character that we've now come to expect. The film is also an important because Viggo created all the artworks attributed to David Shaw in the film. A combination of photography and paint, they are Viggo's obsession with bringing his own props to a set writ large, and were the springboard to a whole bunch of paintings - leading to Kristine McKenna, in the Intoduction to Viggo's book Recent Forgeries, describing him as 'residing in a paintbox'.



© Warner Brothers.


In 'A Perfect Murder' he is - in spite of Michael Douglas's and Gwyneth Paltrow's presence - the star.

Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine), 2001




"Normally I think it's an extreme lack of ideas to make re-makes," Viggo Mortensen says, "but on the other side – when you can make "Hamlet" over and over again why not Hitchcock?"

Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998




'I played a painter and I needed to have all of this artwork around me, so I asked if I could do some paintings myself. I just went crazy. I couldn't sleep. I did about 45 paintings in two weeks.'

Viggo Mortensen on A Perfect Murder
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
by Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




'All three of the main characters in A Perfect Murder are ambiguous,' he warns. 'At my first meeting with Gwyneth, I took two photographs of her. I used both of them for the main art work in Murder. It helped me to believe in my character.'

Viggo Mortensen
Versatile Viggo
By Louis B Hobson
Calgary Sun
5 June 1998




'...I'm surprised they let me do that, actually. There was just a little time before we were going to start and I just asked, "What if I did this myself? I showed them a couple of small samples and they said sure if I made this bigger and I said OK. So it was one of those things where you're at a job interview and they say can you speak Chinese? Because if you can speak Chinese you've got the job. And, of course, you go, "Yeah sure. You'll water ski or whatever. Then, you just figure you'll figure out how to speak Chinese between now and next Wednesday. Well maybe it's not that extreme... I like to draw and stuff but the reason they used photography in it was because that was something that I did know and I had a certain stock pile of images I could play with. That helped!'

Viggo Mortensen on doing the paintings in A Perfect Murder
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
by Carnell
Carpe Noctem magazine #15, 1999




Because of his role Mortensen had to face an interesting phenomenon: Would David Shaw's images reflect the artistic feelings of himself, Viggo Mortensen or do they belong to the character of David Shaw?

"I think both are right", answered Mortensen, "I didn't have time to occupy myself too much with this duality. I think that the artwork represents on the one hand my own subconsiousness and on the other hand my ideas on who David is."

Warner Brothers German Press Release
Translated by always smiling




"...there's also some other personal belongings in the movie because, as he says, "my movies are a kind of photo album for me. When I look at them some years from now, they'll reflect my feelings and where I was at that time. The pants I wear are some I found in Denmark. Other belongings are some things I got from my aunt in Jystrup. They're just some small things which make me feel at home and more relaxed," Viggo says.

Viggo Mortensen
Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998




"Viggo's ability to go into his part is very special. And his demands on himself are unique. For instance, he lived for a long time in his character's shabby apartment in Brooklyn to identify himself with the character."

Producer Arnold Kopelson
Nice And Sensitive Movie-Star
By Susanne Johansen - translated by Majken
Berlingske Tidende
10 October 1998




Interviewer:
Is it true that you sang serenades to calm Gwyneth Paltrow before the love scenes in 'A Perfect Murder'?

Viggo:
How do you know that?

Interviewer:
She has said that herself.

Viggo:
That is correct. To calm her and create a certain atmosphere of intimacy I did sing a couple of love songs that I learned in Argentina when I was young. I don't know if that ended up scaring her instead.

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Høi
M/S Magazine
August 2001




'He's a method actor. He is able to scream loudly if he has to - just watch G.I. Jane. He's an excellent actor, but a shy actor'.

Michael Douglas
By Cindy Pearlman
The Chicago Sun-Times
1998




Q: What surprised you about your other costar, Michael Douglas?

A: Just before Christmas, Michael was singing Christmas songs all day long, but he'd change the lyrics and he'd make the crew sing along, too. It was just goofy. You don't think of him as being that kind of a dorky guy.

Viggo Mortensen
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
August 1998




In the end, the actor who makes the biggest impression is Viggo Mortensen, whose gentle presence seems to be masking some diabolical undercurrents. He's the only character who keeps us guessing throughout, and he manages to steal every scene he appears in by slyly underplaying the role.

Judge Clark Douglas
DVD Verdict
12 June 2012




Mr. Mortensen has the movie's richest role as the duplicitous painter who is coerced into agreeing to murder his lover. In the scenes in which he is supposed to appear sympathetic, he insinuates enough surliness to give his character a disquieting undertone of potential violence. But once David has been established as a rat, the actor shows flashes of pained regret for having to kill a woman he half loves.

Stephen Holden
New York Times
June 5, 1998




But Viggo Mortensen, well heck, now there's an actor with some bite!! If you have yet to hear much about this man, open your ears, and listen wide. This guy can act...and act well goddammit! I have loved almost all of his performances, with his role in THE INDIAN RUNNER and last year's G.I. JANE standing out in my mind, and certainly a force to reckon for all great future character roles. Watch for him...he's hot!

Berge Garabedian
Joblo.com
November 2, 1998




Viggo Mortensen undergoes an interesting transformation in his key scene with Douglas; we believe him when he's a nice guy, and we believe him even more when he's not; he doesn't do a big style shift, he simply turns off his people-pleasing face.

Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-times
June 5, 1998

Quotable Viggo: 12 April 2014

Last Week Kirsten Dunst observed how funny Viggo is and suggested he should do a comedy. I'm sure we all inwardly agreed because we know just how much humour he can inject into seemingly serious roles - those which sometimes call for light touches of irony or telling looks. As he said to Dominical in 2006, he often slips irony into his roles and certainly found the funny side of Freud. He may have never played in a comedy, but he does play comedy, from Hitch's constant vocabulary suggestions, to his take on Burroughs in On the Road and Freud's drier than dry observations.



© Hanway/Lago.


"He's surprisingly hilarious. The first time I met him, he was reserved. It was in an elevator. I was like, 'Hi.' He was like, 'Oh, hi.' I learned later he was very shy. So I was nervous, even a little scared, to work with him. I thought, 'This is going to be intense.' Then I got the whole other side, which I don't think many people know. He should do comedy, I've told him that... I'm sure he wouldn't be happy with people knowing how funny he is."

Kirsten Dunst
By Ajesh Patalay
Harper's Bazaar
May 2014




'I've never been offered comedy and don't know why. But sometimes I subtly slip ironic touches into my roles.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




Cleverly, the actor likes to slip a bit of that absurdity into his characters, whether they are On the Road´s Old Bull Lee or the methodical killer from A History of Violence. "For me, in all serious films, there are moments of humour." In that case, wouldn´t you like to play in a comedy? "I don´t think they would consider me for those kind of roles," says Viggo, almost regretfully. "I don´t know why, but they´ve never given me the chance."

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France
May 2013




In a brilliant cameo, Mortensen gets Burroughs's flat, wry voice exactly right as he denounces Moriarty as psychotic, exposes how the English translation of Voyage au bout de la nuit bowdlerises Céline's original, and hilariously demonstrates his version of Wilhelm Reich's ludicrous, once fashionable orgone boxes for the control of psychic energy.

Philip French
The Observer
14 October 2012




Even though the Beats were expert at perpetuating their own PR (so much of their work is about how great they all are) they were, you know, just guys. Young guys who thought they knew a lot more about life than they actually did. (That is, except for the spaced-out sage William Burroughs, played for marvelous laughs in quick scenes by Viggo Mortensen).

Jordan Hoffman
Film.com
7 September 2012




'I wanted to show another Freud, not the strict looking grandfather we all know, but someone in his fifties who, it's said, was handsome, funny and charismatic. How was I not to think of Viggo?'

David Cronenberg: "Nunca he ido a terapia, pero me parece una situación fascinante"
Rafa Vidiella
20minutos.es
3 November 2011




'I realized from the research is that [Freud] was very funny. He doesn't crack jokes in an obvious way, but he found a way to slip that wit and that irony into things, and in some sense, I guess that character is the comic relief in the movie. The humor helped make Freud feel like not such an impossible task to play…'

Viggo Mortensen Wants the Oscars to Start Noticing David Cronenbe
By Kyle Buchanan
New York Magazine
22 November 2011




I have no idea what Freud was like in real life, so I have no idea how well Viggo plays the Freud, but he gives the character a smug electricity that makes every moment he's on camera pop. He's quite funny too, in a droll and sarcastic sort of way, savoring Freud's many witticisms. This is a Viggo you don't think of when you think of Viggo.

Joshua Miller
Chud.com
21 October 2011




'Viggo and I tried to find the comedy in it, as much as possible. That was fun. I've always been a massive fan of him. He's an impressive human being.'

Michael Fassbender
Michael Fassbender Explores A Dangerous Method with Movie Fanatic
by Joel D Amos
Moviefanatic.com
25 November 2011




'Viggo Mortensen is an absolute joy really, he has his work very methodically put together, he's very precise. But he's also got a great sense of humour, we had a lot of fun, a lot of fun doing our scene's together. The more we did the more fun we had (laughs). It's important as well I think when you're dealing with very heavy material and serious material, that you keep a lightness in-between takes. So when you come to the scene a bit more loose and a bit more relaxed. That helps you find the little nuances within it.'

Michael Fassbender
Michael Fassbender Interview For David Cronenberg's 'A Dangerous Method'
Flicks and Bits
21 November 2011




As an admitted Viggo fanatic, it was nice to see Mortensen play second fiddle in Appaloosa. Ed Harris is Marshal Virgil Cole and Mortensen is his trusted friend and fellow gunmen Everett Hitch. The way the actors play off one another is hilarious, with Mortensen's Hitch continually assisting his partner's attempts at reading any word longer than two syllables.

Most under-appreciated performances list
Brian Zitzelman
Seattle Movie Examiner
December 2008




Mortensen is funnier than we tend to remember, and he successfully pulls of Everett's jealousy about Virgil and Allie's relationship without pushing it into homoeroticism or farce.

Katey Rich
Cinema Blend
18 September 2008




….a perfect, dryly comic Viggo Mortensen.

Tom Hall reviewing Appaloosa
The Back Row Manifesto
6 September 2008




"Good luck talking someone into that: ' History of Violence , The Road – that guy? Forget it.'"

Viggo after the interviewer suggests a comedy
On the Road, signs of the apocalypse hit home
Johanna Schneller
Globe and Mail
27 November 2009

Quotable Viggo: 5 April 2014

G I Jane is one of those films. You know, the ones where Viggo gives an outstanding performance but it rarely sees your DVD player (or is that just me?). Finely Directed by Ridley Scott, it should have been a massive hit and many thought it would catapult Viggo into Superstardom, but instead it failed to do as well at the box office as expected, and it took a very different kind of fighting man to bring Viggo to everyone's attention. Despite all the testosterone (and that's just Demi Moore) it's worth giving it the occasional outing just to see those shorts, admire the neat-as-a-pin moustache and hear Urgayle beat an entire company of would-be Marines into submission with D H Lawrence.



© Hollywood Pictures/Trap-Two Zero.


For the role of Master Chief John Urgayle, Scott wanted "somebody fresh and new." He did not have to look far. "I'd had my eye on Viggo Mortensen since seeing him in Indian Runner. It was a very dark movie, but he was a very interesting presence. Then my brother Tony used him in Crimson Tide."

G.I. Jane Press Notes
Hollywood Pictures
1997




'The quality that really stood out to me was his quietness,' says Ridley Scott, who cast Mortensen in GI Jane as the Navy instructor who makes life miserable for aspiring SEALs, including Moore. 'He has a still, modest quality to him that was perfect for these guys. I noticed that in some of the movies I'd seen him in, and he also had it in real life.'

Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond
US Magazine #236
1997




"I just met Ridley and got the job," confirms Mortensen. "It was flattering to be cast without any apparent hesitation on his part in such an important role. I am very grateful to him."

G.I. Jane Press Notes
Hollywood Pictures
1997




For Mortensen's first scene, in which his character addresses some 40 prospective SEALs, Scott was looking for something more unusual than a normal drill instructor's spiel. Mortensen brought in a short D. H. Lawrence poem ('I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself...') that the director says showed richer and more intriguing sides of a character whose ensuing act of violence are so horrific that many viewers may not get past them. The poem, in fact becomes a crucial part of the film. For a key scene in which Mortensen's character gives a copy of the book to Demi Moore's character, the actor used his own dog-eared copy.

Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond
US Magazine #236, 1997




'...the book which I give to Demi Moore, in which there is that poem, it was mine, all battered, really old ...'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




'He is absolutely dedicated to the process,' says Ridley Scott. 'He was constantly revisiting me with questions and notes and suggestions, none of which I ever got tired of.'

Ridley Scott on GI Jane
Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond
US Magazine #236, 1997




'While Demi and the entire cast endured a mini-boot camp in Florida preparing for the film, I worked with Navy SEAL guys, but on my own for several months. The other cast members, with the exception of Demi, were pissed I didn't go through what they had to go through. And that's what I wanted.

Vim and Viggo
By Merle Ginsberg
September 1997
Source: W




'The profile of the average survivor of the underwater demolition training is a guy like me. Not a big guy, they're not big monsters, you know, "cause it's really more about mental toughness. It's like, in spite of being exhausted, wet and cold and tired and injured and browbeaten and all that, you stay focused on your objective."

Do you think you'd pass this sort of test?

"I'd like to think so, but I don't know until I do it."

Viggo Mortensen
The Master Chief
by Michele Manelis
Marie Claire
November 1997




"A lot of people thought [my] character was just a sadist," he laments, pointing out that the master chief is arguably doing the honourable thing in treating Moore as harshly as he would one of the male candidates.

Viggo Mortensen on fighting with Demi Moore in GI Jane
The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent,
Black & White magazine 2001




"She actually got me in the balls a couple of times," he recalls with a laugh, "but it was unintentional, I'm sure."

Viggo Mortensen on fighting with Demi Moore in GI Jane
The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent
Black & White magazine 2001




His work in GI Jane was brave - he brought understatement to the kind of role that offers grandstanding opportunities on a silver platter.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk, 2001




Doing his best to steal the film, however, is Mortensen, who is simply terrific as the Master Chief who brings everyone to the brink and uncharacteristically loses it when a mock prisoner interrogation with Jordan gets out of hand. This fine actor has been an arresting presence in numerous films in recent years, but he cuts such a strong profile here that he may finally have found his breakthrough role.

Todd McCarthy
Variety
7 August 1997




...the pivotal role of her commander, known as Master Chief, is played with cool, charismatic aplomb by Viggo Mortensen. The role, as underwritten, becomes fascinatingly ambiguous in its mixture of veiled sadism and unconcealed patriotic fervor.

Janet Maslin
New York Times
August 22, 1997




Mortensen, who appeared in Portrait of a Lady and Crimson Tide, has rarely looked so sleek, appealing and ready to play romantic leads as he does this time, gleaming out from behind a clipped mustache and a dangerous attitude. This ought to launch his career into the highest spheres.

Barbara Shulgasser
San Francisco Examiner
22 August 1997




'The other day I came across a Mad Magazine. For the first time I felt like I had arrived when I saw a GI Jane parody of me called GI Shame. [Laughs] My favorite part was the idea that the candidates were dropping out of the SEALs not from the physical abuse but from my awful poetry readings.'

Viggo Mortensen on GI Jane
The Hot New 39-Year-Old
by Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998

Quotable Viggo: 29 March 2014

As a child who was 'curious about injuries' Viggo has certainly sustained a lot of them, some of them while filming and some from real life, including injuring his lip and breaking each leg more than once while 'playing soccer, skiing and in an accident at a Danish smelting plant'. It was hardly a surprise when we learned in the latest interview with Empire that he was filming Albino Alligator after a knee operation, gritting his teeth through a major infection and hiding a pair of crutches in the car. He has said more than once that ordeals can be good for you and once said that "However simple the task, I always turn it into an ordeal" (GQ Magazine 2004). He has never been shy of taking chances when a film demands that extra mile. Sometimes that extra mile could have been taken by stuntmen, but Viggo has always wanted to give the Director the best that he can. This has led him into some pretty hairy situations but Viggo doggedly works through the broken toes, the broken teeth and bruises. No one 'Viggo's it up' like Viggo.



© New Line Productions Inc.


'Guy Foucard is a French-Canadian businessman, a slippery customer. I'd had a knee operation days before starting, but didn't tell them because I didn't want to lose the role. It got massively infected. When I went to work on the first day I was on a massive amount of painkillers and sweating all the time, which turned out to be right for the character. Kevin Spacey (who directed) didn't know; I'd hide my crutches in the car, but I was a mess.'

Viggo Mortensen talking about Albino Alligator
The Many Faces of Viggo
Empire Magazine
May 2014




As a child, Viggo Mortensen was unusually curious about injuries. In lieu of bedtime stories, he would press his mother to describe any injuries she knew of in her family. Then, when she'd exhausted her tales of damaged kin, he'd ask her to tell him of injuries to anyone she knew. Then even of any injuries she'd merely read about. "One person in the family was swimming and accidentally got too close to the propeller of a boat," he recalls. "I always think of that."

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




....he has broken both legs twice; playing soccer, skiing and in an accident at a Danish smelting plant where he once worked. But the most visible evidence of injury is the scar that runs between his nose and lip, above the left side of his mouth.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




'[It was] a combination of a fist and a barbed-wire fence. I was drunk on Halloween, and so were the other people I was with. It was mistakes of youth.

I was 17 and we went to a clinic and the doctor was 80 at least and it was 2 or 3 in the morning. He just started sewing because he realized I wouldn't feel a thing, which I didn't. My friends outside ordered pizza. I remember after, they were feeding me these pin-sized bites that night.'

Viggo Mortensen on his scar
Mooning Over Viggo Mortensen
By Stephen Schaefer
USA Today 1999




Facially, Mortensen looks like a cross between Sam Shepard and echt movie villain Lance Henriksen, a suggestion enhanced by his character's myriad jailhouse tattoos (applied in hours-long makeup sessions) and the un-periodlike leather brace on his right hand and wrist, which he wears constantly and removes only immediately before shooting. Word on the set is that Mortensen busted a knuckle and sprained his wrist during rehearsals for a fight scene, but when asked about the injury, his eyes take on a demonic glint.

'Sean Penn,' he says, 'bit me.'

Sean Penn Bites Back
By Christopher Connelly
Premiere
October 1991




Was there a time on the [Lord of the Rings] shoot when you felt genuinely afraid?

We were on the Greenstone, the river that flows into Lake Wakatipu, and I was being filmed floating down the river. I went off course. I got caught in a current, and I got stuck at the bottom. I had the sword and the cloak and all the wool and the boots. That was one time I was really scared. I was just about on the verge of passing out. I guess I must've kicked against a rock because I kicked out of the current and popped up.

Did you get the shot?

I wasn't sure. I asked and said, "Be honest." I said I would be willing to do it again. But they didn't want to.

Viggo Mortensen Interview
By Tim Wilson
Metro
December 2003




"On the fifth take, Viggo kicked the helmet, screamed, clenched his fists and dropped to his knees. I thought he was just doing some powerful acting. But then I noticed after I said 'cut' that he wasn't saying anything. Finally, he did the next scene limping."

Once they had finished filming, Jackson made the actor take off his boot.

"His toes were broken. Normally, an actor would yell 'ow!' if they hurt themselves, and stop the scene. Viggo turned a broken toe into a performance that's a great moment in the film."

Peter Jackson
Two Towers 'bloodier, more compelling'
New Zealand Herald
7 December 2002




'He got hit in the mouth and broke his front tooth. It was literally gone, and he found it on the floor. He was like, 'Get me some superglue, we've got to keep going.' That clearly describes Viggo. Everyone was like, 'No, no, we have to get you to a dentist.' And he was actually angry that they stopped filming to take him to a dentist.'

Elijah Wood
Ringleader - Viggo Mortensen
By Ian Nathan
Empire
January 2002




The story may go down in the annals of Rings lore, but the modest Mortensen has already tired of hearing it. By his heavy sigh, one can tell he thinks its old news. To him, that incident, and his broken toe (suffered when kicking a meddlesome orc's helmet) and other assorted injuries incurred over the 16-month shoot were part and parcel of the job. And, to him, he did nothing out of the ordinary, and it "feels a little strange" to keep calling attention to it.

King Of The Ring
By Melissa J Perenson
Sci Fi magazine
February 2004




MT: Shooting these movies was especially painful for you. You broke a tooth...

VM:
Yeah, but no more than... I don't know how painful in relation to other jobs or other things people suffer in life. Everybody involved in those battle scenes, for example, all the stunt players and all the actors, every single one of them, had similar injuries. It's just because I did so much of it, because my character probably fights - compared to how much I get to say and how much I fight, I probably fight more than anybody else. [laughs] I guess. Or right along with Gimli and Legolas, same thing. But we all got hurt. Everybody that was involved did.

A Sense of Finality
By Markus Tschiedert
Green Cine
17 December 2003
Source: Green Cine




"The shoot took several months and the more tired we got, the more risks we took. You slip, you fall, you get cuts and bruises. That's the price you pay when you want it to look real."

Don't Look For Analogies In 'Rings', Says Mortensen
By Chris Betros
Japan Today
10 February 2003




Is it true that you and your British co-star, Zuleikha Robinson, could have been killed while shooting Hidalgo?

That was scary! We were both riding this horse, and it just took off and headed for this really high wall. I knew that there were trucks and equipment on the other side, and two huge storage jars on top. I was sitting behind Zuleikha, just hanging on. Somehow we stayed on, but Zuleikha lost the reins and I jumped off and grabbed them, and miraculously no one - not even the horse - got hurt. We could easily have been killed. Zuleikha was giggling - I think the shock hit her later. It wasn't caught on camera, but it would have looked like a great special effect. It was unbelievable!

Our Kiss Was Just a kiss
By John Millar
Hot Stars
27 March 2004




"I've always liked to ride, and it sort of reminds me of when I was a little boy. When you're a kid, you're kind of fearless. You can get afraid of things, but you're not as conscious of your mortality or of getting hurt as when you're an older guy and you're kind of like, 'Well, you know, if I come off goin' full tilt...this is gonna hurt.'"

Viggo on riding bareback in Hidalgo
'King' Star Returns To The Screen, Riding High
By Todd Camp
Star Telegram
6 March 2004




"I knew I was going to have to talk to Viggo about what he'd wear in the [Eastern Promises fight] scene, but as soon as we started to he said, 'It's obvious I'm going to have to play this nude.' And that was that. We shot the fight over two days, which was really fast. But I wanted to minimize Viggo's exposure to injury.

"Viggo is so dedicated ... he would never admit it to me then, but the makeup guy later told me he was spending more time covering up Viggo's bruises than putting on his tattoos."

David Cronenberg
A Violent Tour De Force
By Robert W Butler
Kansas City Star
15 September 2007




"Ordeal has a negative connotation, I guess," he says, "but I think mostly it's a positive. I think of ordeal in terms of a test. The challenge of a long and difficult journey. I do think that when you go for a walk by yourself or travel, when you test yourself, all the distractions fall away. Everything gets focused. Whether ordeals are brief or long, they clarify; the purify your life."

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004

Quotable Viggo: 15 March 2014

A few weeks ago I was trying to explain to a friend why a rather dark, rather blurry black and white photo of a tree which I have hanging on my wall was, in fact, an atmospheric work of art. That there is more below the surface than initially meets the eye. That the profile of the tree looks, to me, just like a face. That it appears to be shouting at a distant factory like an enraged Ent. I don't think I convinced her, but that doesn't matter. It convinces me. The photograph, of course, was taken by Viggo Mortensen and he chose it as one of his many tree pictures for his Skovbo Exhibition in Iceland in 2008. I like to think it's because of Viggo's ability to find 'find small wonders and flashes of surprise'. And because it's an Ent...



Skovbo Exhibit in Reykjavik, Iceland
© Abaca.



In high school, the shy kid began carrying a camera everywhere he went. Structuring his vistas within a viewfinder was a natural impulse. Already he had hopscotched through many disparate worlds, never lingering long enough on any to burn a permanent image.

Viggo Trip
By Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
November 2002




…as an adolescent, he felt comfortable behind the lens of a camera. Mortensen says he started taking pictures as a teenager, although he wasn't "really serious about it." For him, the camera not only offered a sense of control over his surroundings but a kind of veil to help him feel invisible from a world he found both intimidating and inspiring.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




What was it that inspired you to start making photos?


Nothing in particular. Perhaps it has something to do with a sort of incurable, persistent nosiness.

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
by Natalie Dodecker
American Photo magazine
2000




Mortensen's photography is decidedly low-tech, utterly spontaneous, and free of preconception, employing no staged lighting or posing. He literally takes pictures of what is right in front of him. But there is certainly saturation to his colors and a mystique to the content which captures the sometimes obscure significance in the ordinary moments pictured. Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19
1999




'There are a lot of photographs of people that I've seen where it's obviously a very staged scene - something really choreographed, designed, lit a certain way. I don't know if it's just laziness or preference but I like to shoot just with what's there, whether it's night or day. Just what's happening - what I see, without interfering. I mean, things are weird enough, and people do strange enough things, that I don't think you have to try.'

Viggo Mortensen
Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19, 1999




Mortensen's best photographs capture the partial, the fleeting and the unnoticed with surprising ease. One critic described them as "perfectly colloquial." In other words, he makes great snapshots.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003




"Great artists tell us the task is to train and polish the attention within the brilliance of our small shipwrecks. Viggo does that both insistently and obsessively; he trains his eye to find small wonders and flashes of surprise, and these things are polished by the way he frames them. It is this framing that clearly - both formally and unconsciously - corresponds to his sense of how things are."

Kevin Powers
The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003




'In a way, I am a photographer even when I don't take pictures. I think it's an instinctive thing by now, a part of myself.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
July 2008
Source: Panorama First




Did you and Viggo Mortensen use homemade cameras?

We're not that renaissance. Viggo's got an old hasselblad that he takes forever to focus & shoot. But I must admit he's got some real talent behind the lens. . . not too bad in front either.

John Doe
John Doe finds Emily at a Crossroads
By Emily Strange
Emilystrange.com
June 2012




"I've photographed a lot with Leica and Hasselblad cameras but last year I started using disposable cameras. They won't be available a short time from now so it was good to use the opportunity while I could and play with them. I often expose the pictures for a long time, shoot directly into the sun. A lot of interesting things happen when the light goes through these unclear plastic lenses. The photos become different. Sometimes I throw the cameras to the ground to loosen the lens a little bit, then interesting things happen. Then you check out the films and choose the best ones. I have an opinion of how I want them to be."

Viggo Mortensen
Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




He got the idea for the exhibition [sadanset] while he was looking at pictures and discovered that two of them sort of continued in each other. He got interested and the next 14 days he worked his way through a pile of pictures to find photos that could continue the horizon-line and make the puzzle more complete.

Also five pictures from one of Mortensen's earlier books raised his interest. The five photos are very similar, but originate from different continents. The pictures show, according to the artist, that people and landscapes are connected.

From movies to photos
Jyllandsposten
Jette Hansen
19 October 2008




I decided to take photos of trees for this show because there are no trees in Iceland. I decided to bring trees to Iceland.

Viggo Mortensen on the Skovbo Exhibition
Capable Of Many Things
By Hanna Björk Valsdóttir - translated by Ragga
Fréttablaðið
30 May 2008



Viggo Mortensen's photographs can be explained as poetic; sometimes the focus is shallow, a lot of movement, light sometimes leaks into the pictures and makes weird influences.

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




'Two years ago, I spent a few days in Montana with Viggo while he was shooting Hidalgo, and I swear he was never without a camera. One moment he was slamming on the brakes to photograph a horse on a hill, and the next, he was slowing down to take a picture of a cloud.'

Tom Roston
Editorial
Premiere, November 2004




So how good a photographer is he? I've looked at two of Mortensen's books and from that evidence I would hazard the opinion that he is very good indeed.

Mark Power
The Salt Mine
3 September 2008

Quotable Viggo: 8 March 2014

Virginia Madsen's revelation yesterday that Viggo wrote at least the first of his Lucifer scenes in 'The Prophecy' deserves a bigger outing than our 'other movies' thread. In fact, perhaps Viggo's whole performance 'perched on a post like a big, black-plumaged bird of prey' deserves a bigger outing. He is, after all, the favourite Lucifer of most connoisseurs of all Devilish on screen. Even Pacino and De Niro didn't eat a rose or howl while nibbling a freshly plucked heart, and no one else has made 'I love you' sound like the very last thing you would ever want to hear.



© Neo Motion Pictures/Overseas Film Group.


So when you did The Prophecy, did it strike you as interesting or potentially controversial that religion was the basis for this horror?


No, that was kind of a ridiculous situation actually because the script was not complete. The director was the writer of Backdraft [Gregory Widen] so we thought he was going to write this extraordinary script. We all knew each other and once Walken signed up, who's going to say no? We all sort of arrived and kept expecting new and exciting pages, and he was not forthcoming with these new and exciting pages. We were in fact writing the script as we went....

...Viggo Mortensen came, he wrote that scene where he came in to play the Devil. That was just beautiful, and I didn't know Viggo until he got there. I just sat there watching him tell me this beautiful story. It was incredible what he came up with. That was an amazing performance. I was like, "Who is this guy?" Of course, then I had a big old crush on him but never saw him after the movie. Isn't that weird? Don't you think Viggo and I should work together?

Virginia Madsen
SXSW 2014 Interview: Virginia Madsen on The Wilderness of James
By Fred Topel
Craveonline.com
7 March 2014




Every journalist's dream is to get an interview with the Devil. Yesterday I had the chance to meet Lucifer, even if he was a fictional version. There were no black suits, evil horns, spiky tail or charred smells. Modernly dressed in an olive suit, lost in the sofa's depths, there he was. He stood up slowly when he saw me. "Mortensen, Viggo Mortensen," he said...

Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
By Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión
8 September 1995




His participation in this movie was agreed at a moment's notice. It went all so quickly that he read the script while flying out to Arizona, where the scenes in which Mortensen appears were shot. "I accepted, in part because I had always wanted to work with Christopher Walken," the actor says while sitting on the sofa's edge. His face lights up when saying Walken's name. It's evident that Christopher Walken is a cult actor for many young actors nowadays. "I would do any movie with him, no matter what [it was]."

On "The Prophecy'
Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995




"Even though I didn't have much time to prepare for the role, the character interested me and I explored his story. I see him as the prodigal son, very gifted but such a rebel that his father throws him out of paradise. I asked myself how he would have reacted. He certainly would have felt misunderstood, because he was the most intelligent and brightest of all the angels. Inevitably he would ask himself, 'Why has he rejected me?' So he would have had ego problems. Ultimately he's very human…"

Viggo Mortensen
The King Is Mortensen, Long Live The King!
By Marc Toullec
Cine Live #71
September 2003




You've played a variety of roles, including Lucifer (The Prophecy, 1995).

Lucifer? Ah...that was fun, but difficult, because the truth is that I couldn't prepare the role the way that I usually do...going to Lucifer's house or meeting him or meeting his family. But I think that we all have a dark side and so I had to think a little bit about that.

"If they give me a Salvadorian script, I'm game."
By Isabela Vides - translated by Margarita
La Prensa Grafica
7 March 2007




Hailed as 'mordantly witty', a young vaguely edgy actor named Viggo Mortensen wound up stealing the remainder of the film from Walken, creating one of the most memorable embodiments of evil ever put to screen. 'The devil doesn't really need to yell at people and slap 'em around,' says Mortensen now, six years later, 'because he knows he's powerful. That was one superficial guiding principle I tried to keep in mind. You are it. You are the Dark One and you don't have to prove it.'

On "The Prophecy'
His Occult Fellowship,
by Lisa Maccarillo
Fangoria magazine #208, 2001




'There were some silly things which I felt were interesting that were cut out of that movie for reasons of whatever, shots didn't look right, or they wanted to speed the movie up. I think [the studio people] were afraid we were too kinda wacky. "It's the devil, man. You can't do stuff like that. I go, "What are you talking about? I can do anything I f***** want. '

Viggo Mortensen on The Prophecy
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
by Carnell
Carpe Noctem magazine #15, 1999




It's evident that Lucifer is a bad guy, but he's not the only one. "We are all a little bit evil," says Viggo, "but at the same time, everybody is convinced that they are good and aren't aware of the small residue of evil that they hide." Not bad, coming from Lucifer himself. "I won't defend him," the actor says, referring to the Devil. "I believe in good as well as in evil."

Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995




Very few actors can convincingly play the Prince of Darkness. Jack Nicholson is one, and Viggo is the other. Mortensen plays the devil with a malicious glee that can only be seen in psych wards.

Colin Briggs
Gotcha Movies
4 July 2013




But for what may have been the only time in his career, Walken has a movie plucked out from underneath him. Viggo Mortensen shows up in the third act as Satan and steals the show. Widen writes Satan as being put in the awkward position of helping humanity to make sure that Gabriel doesn't tear down Heaven – for a horror-filled Heaven is just another Hell – and Viggo eats it all up. Widen chooses to emphasize the fact that Satan used to be an angel and Viggo plays his role with the same charisma and gentleness that Eric Stoltz used, just turned in on itself. When he begs the humans to join him in Hell – hissing, "I love you, I love you, I love you, more than Jesus!" – you get a glimpse at the bright future the actor had in store.

Matthew
Paracinema.net
11 march 2011




Cast as Satan, he's really the only one in the whole movie who actually holds his own with Walken on screen, and while you feel like Walken did this for kicks, you really do feel like Mortensen was doing his level best to channel evil in a way we haven't seen for quite some time.

Box Office Prophets
Scott Lumley
23 October 2008




Not surprisingly, he manages to turn in a good performance and makes a very frightening Lucifer (I would bravely argue that makes a scarier Satan than Al Pacino or Robert De Niro, but I'm not sure the fingernails and rose eating will help my case). He even manages the tricky balance of being horrible and seductive enough to slip you out of your soul, a balance few Lord of Darknesses achieve. Plus, he manages it in a mullet. Come on, you always knew that Satan not only invented that hairstyle, but rocks the business in the front and party in the back.

Stars in Rewind: Viggo Mortensen in 'The Prophecy'
by Elisabeth Rappe
Cinematical
12 October 2009




Gabe's hubris gets so out of hand, he raises Hell -- that is, Lucifer. Perched on a post like a big, black-plumaged bird of prey, beautiful Viggo Mortensen is a long-haired, soft-voiced, doe-eyed seducer. But this devil's something else again when he reaches into Gabriel's chest, tears out the angel's heart and devours it -- uttering a chilling little burp of satisfaction as he swallows. Sauron would be proud.

Sympathy for the Devil
Kathleen Murphy
MSN Movies
MSN.com 18 April 2005




Mortensen…chose a performance that is far from the usual portrayal of how one imagines the Prince of Lies should be. Mortensen, with long hair and full beard - his outward appearance reminding one more of Jesus Christ - played Lucifer with an impressiveness that was burnt into the audience's mind forever. He didn't yell, he didn't lash about, but he still seemed to be menacing. The devil knows his power. It is not necessary for him to demonstrate his power and to seek self-affirmation - all his terrible strength lies in his calmness.

With that, Mortensen provided a portrait of the devil, as it had not been seen to date.

Portrait: Viggo Mortensen - The Actor As Artist
Translated by Sally
DVD Special (Germany)
June 2008

Quotable Viggo: 1 February 2014

My frustration knew no bounds this week when A History of Violence appeared a yet another list of 'underrated films'. Underrated, that is, in terms of audience figures, not critical acclaim. When it's not A History of Violence it's The Road. Or that hugely underrated Western, Appaloosa. And my frustration is mainly because one thing that is NEVER underrated is Viggo's ability as an Actor. Directors, Critics and (even more importantly) fellow Actors think he is one of the premier actors in the business. They would probably turn up to watch him read a telephone directory because they know he would make it extraordinary. Yup. I'm suffering from a bad case of Box Office.



© New Line Productions Inc.


As for Mr. Mortensen, his whole career seems to have been a set-up for this moment where he finally comes into his own and claims his own place among the best actors of his generation.

Sasha Stone reviewing 'A History of Violence'
Santa Monica Mirror
28 September 2005




'Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats.'

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




Philip Seymour Hoffman, certainly one of the great actors of our time, told us in a Venetian hallway of the Hotel Excelsior how he regarded Viggo Mortensen as one of the masters of the profession. A point of view that is totally shared.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




'Viggo Mortensen probably gave the best performance I have seen in a motion picture in as long as I can remember in A History of Violence .... Bill Hurt got a nomination for a rather bizarre, overly done performance in that film, but Viggo Mortensen is probably the premier actor in the business.'

Dale Olson, publicist
Oscar, You Insensitive Lout
by Sara Vilkomerson, New York Observer,
February 2006




'I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011




'To me, there's a lack of self-consciousness to the great actors. I think the performance of Viggo Mortensen in Eastern Promises is brilliant: he's living the guy's life on screen and you can't take your eyes off him. It's the same with Marlon Brando. You might not know why you're drawn to him, but you are.'

Actor Richard Jenkins commenting on Viggo
Metrolife film
29 June 2008




I saw "Eastern Promises," in which Viggo Mortensen is giving one of the great, great powerful screen performances. It's absolutely amazing.

Geoffrey Rush
Geoffrey Rush Revisits The Golden Age
By Edward Douglas, Coming soon.net
5 Oct 2007




...when an actor like Viggo Mortensen is in front of the camera, it's best to just let the camera run and let him be. Mortensen gives a brilliant, genius performance. His character's every breath is not just his own, but a breath for his son, a breath for hope, and Mortensen conveys that with harrowing accuracy.

Brandon Lee Tenney reviewing 'The Road'
FirstShowing.net
25 November 2009




What was it that drew you to Viggo. Why was he right for the role?


I think he one of the best actors in the world. In his body of work he plays such a range of different characters that I knew that he could play the two diverse roles in this movie. He is a well travelled and cultured person as well as being sensitive he can be brutal at the same time.

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012




"Mortensen is wonderful. He's one of the best actors at not doing anything and making you watch him all the more."

Ty Burr
Boston Globe: Take 2
October 2008




The best actor nomination for its star Viggo Mortensen made me happier than any other on Tuesday's ballots.

Jack Matthews
New York Daily News
23 January 2003




Viggo has been a fantastic performer for years, he's very subtle, he's never showboating, it's always about the character, and I think that's why it's taken people so long to realise he's not just a good actor he's a great actor."

David Cronenberg
Metro
14 January 2008
Metro.co.uk




There seems to be no end to Viggo Mortensen's talents

Rex Reed
New York Observer
24 November 2009




There's a new Viggo Mortensen movie out and all is right with the world.

Jeffrey Lyons talking about 'Good'
Reel Talk
December 2008




Viggo Mortensen's versatility never ceases to amaze me.

Rex Reed
New York Observer
October 2008




Fantastic performance from Viggo Mortensen.....he is absolutely a brilliant actor, he is the Robert de Niro of his generation, the Marlon Brando of his generation, the man is a genius.

Mark Kermode
BBC Radio Five Live
30 September 2005




In Viggo Mortensen, Hillcoat is working with one of the current cinema's great quiet everymen, and if anyone can make the novel's stolid, unnamed hero empathic and emotionally alive on screen whilst remaining loyal to the novel's aesthetic minimalism, it's this immensely physical, restrained performer. It's a masterstroke of casting that I hope connects with its on-paper potential: if it does, I can see Mortensen leading the film's awards trail.

Kris Tapley talking about 'The Road'
InContention.com
August 2009




... one of the most adventurous, talented actors working in film today (his contemporaries being, in my mind Edward Norton, Mathieu Amalric and Daniel Day Lewis). ...Not unlike the greatest leading men in classic Hollywood westerns, Mortensen is stoic, brimming with quiet fury.

Hitting 'The Road' with Director John Hillcoat
Matt Mazur
Popmatters
22 November 2009




Mortensen is truly a master of his art.

Sebastian Cordoba
TheVine
7 April 2009

Quotable Viggo 23 February 2014

This week saw a paean of praise for Viggo's beard (or ex-beard, to be more exact) from Sarah Dawley on Fora MTV. One thing you can say about him is that he does grow a darned fine beard, but then... you can't see that magnificently dimpled chin. So, stubble or clean shaven? hair 'to build a hut in' or chiselled jaw? Moustache 'that would make a circus ringmaster proud' or lightning strike scar? Todos Tenemos Un Plan very generously gave us the chance to admire both the full beard and the baby-smooth jaw all in one film. Me? I'm going to jump in between and vote for the 'dreamy stubble'.



© New Line/Focus Features/20th Century Fox/Haddock Films.


At first glance, Viggo Mortensen is a symphony of rugged good looks, with a deliciously dimpled chin and captivating eyes...

King Of The Ring
By Melissa J Perenson
Sci Fi magazine
February 2004




Viggo, I heard you're fluent in English, Danish and Spanish, conversational in French and Italian AND you can also understand some Norwegian and Swedish. That's seven languages with which I can woo your beard, and I like those odds because your beard makes me want to write sonnets.

Be Mine Beard: Viggo Mortensen Edition
Sarah Dawley
fora.mtv.ca
19 February 2014




His hair is neat and mid-length, his angular face cleanly shaven. The cleft in his chin is on proud show, as deep and true as if a child had just pressed their pinkie into his flesh.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




Mortensen, bearded, smudged, greasy-haired, has a primal, haggard beauty.

The Road
David Edelstein
New York Magazine
15 November 2009




"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient!" laughs Cronenberg. "And he's got a great chin."

David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




I know this might be a little "cliche" to say on this site, but honestly folks, how can anyone look at Viggo Mortensen's awesome beard and NOT want to build a hut in it?? I mean, even just for the summertimes, you know? Great man...even greater beard!!

Reaction to Viggo's 'Road' look at the Oscars
JoBlo.com
25 February 2008




He is barefoot on the asphalt, in jeans. His hair is sandy-red, floppy-perfect, the provocatively dimpled chin brushed with stubble. He kisses me hello on the cheek. My vision goes blurry for a second, then--steady, steady--rights itself.

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Two old friends hired to bring law to the lawless, one of whom has ridiculously awesome facial hair? Sign me the hell up. What about you?'

Can the 'Appaloosa' trailer rope you in to see another Western?
by Marc Bernardin
Popwatch Blog, Entertainment Weekly.com
August 7, 2008




...the actor with the super heroic chin...

"They brand me as a traitor, a communist"
By Juan Manuel Dominguez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Perfil
26 August 2012




Aragorn has the slinky swagger and dreamy stubble that make him look like a legend created by Tolkien, Sam Shepard and Ralph Lauren.

ROTK
The New York Times
Triumph Tinged With Regret in Middle Earth




With his aqua blue eyes and chiselled jaw, he is every bit the American film hero - a Harrison Ford or a John Wayne, but with a darkness lurking beneath.....

Sasha Stone
Santa Monica Mirror
28 September 2005




Supping a herbal remedy from a mysterious brass pot that looks like it was stolen from Middle-earth, while sporting a bushy mustache liable to make Bill the Butcher green with envy (for his next role as a Spanish soldier in Alatriste), Mortensen exudes a Zen-like calm.

"We're Animals Too, Y'Know?"
By James Mottram
Hotdog #67
September 2005




He is not a man who can walk into a room unnoticed. His father, also called Viggo, is Danish, and Mortensen has inherited his northern European features - the bowed brow and arrowhead cheekbones. His blond hair is neatly parted and he is clean-shaven; there is a jagged scar on his upper lip, a streak of lightning against his tan...


Lone Star
By Peter Ross
Sunday Herald
11 April 2004




Wearing a black shirt and brown slacks, the 50-year-old Mortensen is sporting a moustache that would make a circus ringmaster proud.

The Invisible Man
By James Mottram
The Independent
23 October 2007




Viggo Mortensen actually looks like a real Viking when he is proudly walking around in the garden of the castle in bare feet. The long dark-brown hair fluttering in the wind and a marked scar coming from his upper-lip to his nose are, together with the fixed calm look, showing that this is a man who knows what he wants.

"I found the Viking inside me"
By - translated by Majken
Ekstra Bladet
8 December 2001




Resembling Errol Flynn's Robin Hood, Alatriste boasts a moustache that serves as a lonely guy's double-edged sword: capable of seducing and persuading.

Alatriste: The Great Spanish Hero
By Carlos Maranon - translated by Margarita
Cinemania
September 2006


Quotable Viggo: 8 February 2014

I see from Eriko that the German edition of Cosmopolitan Magazine is inviting readers to send in questions for them to ask Viggo. Wondering what you'd ask if you had the chance? Well here is a taster of just some the hundreds of questions Viggo has been asked over the years and the sometimes pithy, sometimes surprising answers he gives.



© Space.ca


Where are you from?

At the moment I'm from here.

Viggo Mortensen - Man of the Week
By Einar Falur - translated by Ragga
30 May 2008
Source: Morgunblaðið




What was it that inspired you to start making photos?

Nothing in particular. Perhaps it has something to do with a sort of incurable, persistent nosiness.

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
by Natalie Dodecker
American Photo magazine 2000




Why are you an actor?

To fight against forgetting.

I wouldn't look the Alatristes of today in the eye
By Oskar L. Belategui, translated for V-W bu Margarita
Hoy Sociedad
3 September 2006




We hear that you're a good friend who is honest and loyal. Do you have any flaws?

Those descriptions of me were given by my friends, right? Well, don't trust them; you know that friends always believe the best things about us. You're asking me for a flaw? I think that my impatience is one. I want everything 'yesterday' and it takes time for me to adjust to others rhythms.

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
Lecturas Magazine
30 August 2006




What keeps you awake at night?

Yesterday and tomorrow, but I eventually fall asleep because neither exists.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
by Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010




Are you a politically-motivated person?


I don't know that I'm more politically motivated than anyone else. I'm curious about the world and I have a resistance to just assuming that what I see on TV is the gospel truth.

The Horse Whisperer
Daily Mirror, by Honie Stevens
16 April 2004




If you were a member of a tribe, what would be your special role in it, and why?

I am a member of a tribe, and am happy with my role, which is to mind the fire.

ForWord magazine
17 January 2007




This myth of the poor lonesome cowboy, the guy who has no need of others to be happy, is it really a trick to attract women?


On the contrary! Each time I have tried to charm them with my poetic cowboy side, it's ended in total failure. To seduce a woman, food is more effective than poetry. I love to make complex dishes. That always works!

Viggo Mortensen
Grazia Magazine
Translated by Chrissiejane
December 2009




What do you believe in above all else?

"In everything. I believe in everything! However, it makes my life so complicated" (laughs)

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




Are you always so positive?

Almost always, but at times, I'm not. Often I wake up thinking of all the bad things that could happen. It's my way of facing the day; I'm cautious. You could always fall down the stairs…

The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




What do you think makes you sexy?

I don't really know how to deal with that question. I'm sure that there's just as many people who think I'm a grizzled hack.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




Do you have to have the last word in an argument?

Only if I get really incensed. It usually has to do with fairness, or if I feel I've been cornered or misrepresented, then I will lash out. It's good to have the presence of mind to say: 'Can I call you back? Let me take a break and go for a walk.' Always better.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




What is your biggest fear?

Not being honest with myself and not getting the most out of life. This is one of the reasons I stay very active, always doing things that interest me in the field of art, by editing books, writing, drawing, painting, photography…

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Interview: "This film has made me feel closer to my father"
By Laura Sacksville - translated by Ollie, Rio and Sage
Cuore
13 February 2010




On a lighter note, what makes you laugh either on the screen or elsewhere these days?


Total unguarded honesty. It makes me cry, too.

Viggo Mortensen - For The Good Of The People
By Elliot V Kotek
Moving Pictures
Winter 2008-2009




Hi Viggo, aside from knowing your lines, what's the most important thing you do to prepare yourself before you go in front of camera?


Breathe.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




Have you ever thought what you would say if you won an Oscar?

Thank you.

El Mundo Webchat With Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
21 November 2011




How are you doing with sins?

Lately, quite well. You do what you can where you can. Without hurting anyone.

Do you think you'll go to hell?


Well, I like to travel.

"When I wake up I think of death"
By Karmentxu Marín - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais
9 September 2012

Quotable Viggo: 2 February 2014

This week I have a fairly random bunch of quotes with thoughts on cities and wild open spaces, being alone and being with others, and, most of all, finding times to stop and spaces to think. What's clear is that being alone, being quiet and being in nature is Viggo's battery recharger and also a much needed source of inspiration and creativity.



© New Line Productions Inc.


"As a child he was a loner, which is unsurprising considering his peripatetic lifestyle. "I wrote stories and did a lot of drawing," he says. "It's why I'm comfortable being by myself and why I yearn for it at times. When you're on a movie set you're with people constantly. So when it gets to lunchtime I just go off by myself. I've always been like that. I'm self-sufficient and I like being with my own thoughts. It prepares me for being around people. But I know others have to constantly check their email or phone messages and if an hour of silence goes by, they panic. I'm just not like that."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




"I can be at home walking around London as much as I am in the woods of South Island, New Zealand. But if I had to pick I would choose to be in nature, whether in the mountains, desert, or by the sea. I like places where there are very few human traces, places where I never feel time is wasted. If I'm stuck in a traffic jam in Los Angeles or waiting in a queue for the bank it's hard not to feel I'm wasting my life in that moment."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




'I believe that I'm a man of the hills, the woods, the angry sea, a somewhat solitary guy but sometimes I miss what it's like to soak up metropolitan poisons. I love and am terrified by the great cities of the world, sometimes simultaneously.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




'Since I grew up travelling a lot, flying is almost like being at home for me, and a plane is like my second mother.... being in the sky during those hours when you feel as though you've escaped from linear time always seemed like an opportunity for reflection to me.'

Viggo Mortensen
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




'Time passes, the world changes, people evolve and it's nice to stop every now and then and not do anything. I want to imagine things that interest me, to give myself time to get excited about something.'

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm a guy who sticks his nose in everything"
By Stuart Gollum, Gala Magazine
30 August 2006




What's your daily life like? How do you find the time to pursue your other interests?

These days, I'm a little busy. But I steal moments here and there. You don't have to take a picture of something. You don't have to write about it. Or even talk about it. You can just appreciate that it's there. If I don't have moments once in a while where I try to do nothing and think about nothing, so that things can come in, then I'm not very effective in that way.

That's why I like to spend time by myself sometimes, even just to go and see a movie. Or go on a camping trip. It's nice to share it with people. But if you go with someone, let's say you're going for a walk in the woods, you are seeing their point of view. Which can be interesting. And you're discussing it. So you're putting things out.

But if you were by yourself walking through the woods or seeing a movie or whatever it is, it's all coming in. That's why I like to spend time by myself and recharge.

Viggo-rously Reluctant Sex Symbol
By Ruben V Nepales
Phillipine Daily Enquirer
2 October 2005




'This is only me and my camera. I sit down and watch the sky, stop, and maybe sing a little or write something down. When I have time to do that, I am as happy as I can be.'

Viggo Mortensen
Capable Of Many Things
By Hanna Björk Valsdóttir - translated by Ragga
30 May 2008
Source: Fréttablaðið




"I am a loner who flees from stress, I feel good living close to nature, living with the same rhythm as animals and weather, no pressure, no constraints, no deadlines. I write poems, I paint, I read, I phone my friends, I plunge into thought and all of a sudden without my having seen the hours go by, night falls…"

Viggo Mortensen, Beautiful Savage
Richard Gianorio
Le Figaro
26 September 2008




'Every day was a new deal depending on which of the three movies we were working on and what group of people I was with. I used my precious time off to hang out by myself and recharge. Month after month of being around tons of people all the time, no matter how much you might like them, that's just not something I'm used to doing. It was like a family, but sometimes you just needed quiet.'

Viggo Mortensen on filming LOTR
Starburst #281




'I'm a very sociable person, but I love to be alone, to listen to the silence, to not speak to anyone for a while. What would drive some people crazy gives me energy.'

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm permanently dissatisfied", by Amelia Enríquez, Lecturas Magazine
30 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita




"I like to take care of my own problems, shoulder my responsibilities. I don't have a bevy of people assisting me and filtering what I hear or what I say. I'd rather be overworked and underslept and have a good idea of what's going on."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
by Neala Johnson
Herald Sun (Australia), March 8 2007




'I suppose I'm a private person; have been pretty much that way all along. I'm certainly not someone who can't sit for five minutes without calling someone or turning on the television set. I can entertain myself.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Visit With Viggo
by Marianne Love
Sandpoint magazine, 2004




"If I have a day off, I'm not at a Hollywood party. I'm not the type of actor who lives in the press. I'd rather be home in shorts and a T-shirt surrounded by paint brushes, a blank canvas and have a few candles burning as the day fades into the night."

Superstar Viggo's a serious soul at heart
by Cindy Pearlman,
Chicago Sun Times
9 Sept 2007


Quotable Viggo: 25 January 2014

It just has to be an Alatriste Quotable, doesn't it? A reminder of why, for us, Viggo will always be the one and only. A reminder that however the film is judged (more harshly now, I think, than when it was released), Viggo's performance got to the core of the character in the most extraordinary way, so much so that the bar has been set very high for any actor stepping into Alatriste's scuffed and worn boots.

You might like to listen to Rogue Baños's truly awesome music while you read this.




© 20th Century Fox/Estudios Picasso/Origen Produccions


The entire tone of "Alatriste" is set to match Mortensen's harsh, brittle handsomeness.

Kaori Shoji
Japan Times Review
11 December 2008




The film sheds the romanticism of costume dramas. Battle scenes are brutal and bloody. Regular life is dirty and desperate. Heroism is found in intimate human gestures — and in Mortensen's soulful eyes.

Bruce Kirkland DVD review
Toronto Sun
10 June 2010




Viggo, speaking vintage Castillian Spanish with his own voice, dominates the film as a kind of Medieval Clint Eastwood, short on words, long on deadly action when required…

Viggo Mortensen - Heroic On And Off Screen
By Alex Deleon
Fest21
16 October 2006




His clear gaze, firm and serene, his calm, fluid gestures and that loyal spirit he has toward his comrades in arms, serve better than any narrative to tell the story of a man who knows irrevocably what his destiny will be, but still keeps hope alive for a future day when Spain will see better times and break free of the agonized struggles it is presently enmeshed in.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
29 Aug 2006




Mortensen is astonishing, channelling the very essence of Alatriste's fiery integrity.

Diana Sanchez
Toronto Film Festival Promo
Aug 2006




One of the biggest surprises in the film is the competence and perfection with which Viggo Mortensen incarnates the main character.

Alatriste - A Review
by Uno translated for V-W by Paddy
Yahoo.es
1 September 2006




Mortensen, whose odd accent is initially disconcerting and ends up being a perfect fit for his character's taciturn personality, has brought grit and mystery to the screen. Díaz Yanes has given him depth.

The Story of an Empire's Decline is told with panache and grit
By Carlos Marañón - translated for V-W by Margarita
Cinemanía
September 2006




"He is Alatriste, the one I thought, the one I wrote! He's almost the one from the drawings!"

Pérez-Reverte
A Look of His Own
By Juan Cruz
El País Semanal
6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




Just seeing him stand there, his face half-obscured by a tattered black hat, his sculpted frame offset by a long cloak worn over the shoulders — it's no wonder Maria looks as though she's ready for cardiac arrest every time he appears.

Kaori Shoji
Japan Times
11 December 2008




"Viggo was so extraordinary that he surpassed everything that Arturo, and obviously I, could have thought. His physical presence on screen is tremendous," he says emphatically.

Diaz Yanes
The Biography of Captain Alatriste
By Jose Edurado Arenas - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
ABC.es
6 June 2010




"Viggo filled himself with Spain; with our history, with the light and the shadow that made us who we are. And, in that way, in an astonishing process of assimilation, he finished transforming himself into a Spaniard, down to the bone."

Arturo Pérez Reverte
El Semanal, July 2005-08-04
Translated by Elessars Queen




"There's nothing more respectful with the original texts. Nothing more straightforward, fascinating and terrible than the mirror that, through Viggo Mortensen's masterly performance - he looks impressive on the screen, that son of a bitch - is put before our eyes during the two hours and a quarter that the film lasts."

Arturo Pérez-Reverte after seeing the film
That Captain Alatriste
XL Semanal, 20 August 2006
Translation for V-W by Paddy




'Perhaps that's why, after the private screening was finished the lights came on, and with a lump in my throat I looked around, I saw that some of the actors of the film who were on the contiguous seats - I'm not telling any names, let every one of them confess if they want to - remained still on their seats, crying their eyes out. Crying like babies because of their characters, because of the story. Because of the beautiful, dramatic ending. And also because no one had ever done, so far, a film like that of this wretched and damned Spain. As Captain Alatriste himself would say, in spite of God, and in spite of anyone.'

Arturo Pérez-Reverte after seeing the film
That Captain Alatriste
XL Semanal, 20 August 2006
Translation for V-W by Paddy




"No longer can we imagine another Alatriste that is not Viggo".

Unax Ugalde
20 Minutos
Frank Marta
26 the April 2005




That hero will have Viggo Mortensen's face forever. Challenging and tender. Big blue eyes and proud look.

The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García
El País Semanal
6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy

Quotable Viggo: 19 January 2014

Another long Quotable! We've been hearing all week about Viggo's partnership with Cronenberg, a partnership that has brought us three extraordinary films and which we and, I'm betting, every serious film goer and critic out there, hopes will long continue. So how about all those other directors? Taking a look back over Viggo's non-Cronenberg career it's clear that they have all, to a man and woman, appreciated exactly the same things about Viggo that Cronenberg does. The commitment, the risk taking, the dedication and research, his ability to almost read their minds, the complexity he brings to characters and the fact that he becomes a true collaborator.



© Good Films.


Lisandro Alonso: awaiting title


"I liked him very much; right then I realized that we could treat one another as equals. He's an actor I love, among other things for the way in which he transmits emotions physically, gesturally. He's not an actor who's usually given great lines of dialogue, but you see him, for example, in the final scene of History of Violence, David Cronenberg's film, and you realize how incredible his work is, the things you can read in his face."

Lisandro Alonso
"It´s a mixture of spaces, times and languages."
By Diego Brodersen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Pagina 12
27 October 2013




"Viggo is directed by himself, doesn´t need my help; he is an amazing actor, a unique person, a dream producer."

Lisandro Alonso
Nueva voz: Lisandro Alonso y el cine de los hombres solos
El Deber
28 December 2013




Ana Piterbarg: Todos Tenemos Un Plan


What was it that drew you to Viggo. Why was he right for the role?

I think he one of the best actors in the world. In his body of work he plays such a range of different characters that I knew that he could play the two diverse roles in this movie. He is a well travelled and cultured person as well as being sensitive he can be brutal at the same time.

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012




John Hillcoat: The Road


"Actors come with baggage, as well. Sometimes that baggage can help, like Mickey Rourke in The Wrestler. His baggage was part of the performance. With Viggo, there's something slightly elusive about him, and he has quite a wide range, and yet, also, there's this real physicality about him. And there's this tenderness.

"And his face also reminded me of Grapes of Wrath, the Dorothea Lange photos of the Great Depression, Midwest people struggling with the collapse of the environment and the economy."

John Hillcoat
On The Road with Viggo and Kodi:
By Jay Stone
Canada.com
18 November 2009




Ed Harris: Appaloosa


"Not only do I have a great respect for him as an actor but as a human being. He's a really decent guy. He's great on the set, treats everybody really respectfully. I just thought he'd be perfect. These were two guys who had to communicate a lot about being who they were and the knowledge of each other without really talking about it ... If Viggo couldn't have done it, I don't know if I would've made the movie"

Ed Harris
Viggo is one straight shooter
By Kevin Williamson
Toronto Sun
6th September 2008




"I figured if he wanted to do it - if he responded to the material - then he would immediately understand what this was between these guys without us having to talk about for hours on end..."

Ed Harris
Globe and Mail
22 September 2008




Vicente Amorim: Good


"I loved having chosen him, because I liked his performance in "A History of Violence" very much. He has a sweet masculinity and an unusual political consciousness, especially among Americans. Viggo didn't need any explanation, for example, about the contemporary political relevance of "Good" and he was very interested in the dramatic potential of the character."

Vicente Amorim Starts His International Career (and talks about Good)
By Catalina Arica - translated for V-W by Paddy
EGO
29 May 2006




Q: Aren't you scared to work with an actor like Viggo?

A: Of course, I'm scared. I'm anxious. I'm looking forward to it. I'd love to start it right now.

Vicente Amorim (Director)
Rede CBN radio interview
3 June 2006
Translated by Claudia




Agustín Díaz Yanes: Alatriste


CK: What did Viggo Mortensen provide the film?

ADY: Everything; absolutely everything. In Spain, because of the tradition of our cinema, we don't have action heroes, and Viggo combines an impressive physique (that "exact image of the weary hero" that Arturo wanted) with the fact of being a spectacular actor of action (films). He's an extraordinary actor in dialogues, in everything...he has that combination that it's so difficult to find here. Viggo has been the vital centre of the film. The title of the movie is "Alatriste"!!. His experience, his help and his advice have also been very important.

Agustín Díaz Yanes
Action, history...and skilled swordsmen
By Andrés Rubin de Celis - translated by Paddy for V-W
Citizen K Espana
July 2006



"He is the ultimate. He is a confident actor, he expresses everything with his eyes, he is an internal actor of action, who is present in all scenes in the film, some 90, with the exception of 6. It has been like filming with a Spanish actor, you can ask any cinematic favors you wish. He is also very exacting with himself from both an artistic and moral point of view. If I ever had the chance to work with him again, I would be delighted..."

Agustín Díaz Yanes
Alatriste Fights in the Streets
By Rocío García
EL PAÍS 1st Aug 2005
Translated by Elessars Queen




Joe Johnston: Hidalgo


"I hadn't seen the first Lord of the Rings before we cast him, but I figured anybody that could sell blouses to Diane Lane out of a truck could do anything."

Joe Johnston
Staci Layne Wilson
American Western Magazine
March 2004




"He's also completely devoted to the project. He was always there. We worked him a lot more than we should have. He never complained, and he was there dawn to dusk and beyond. He's largely responsible for making that whole aspect of this really work. He's really amazing."

Joe Johnston
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




Peter Jackson: The Lord of the Rings



"Viggo has that dark, mysterious, quiet-man quality. He's also very intelligent and private. A lot of people have said these movies are going to make Viggo a big star. I nod and smile, knowing that being a big star is the last thing in the world that Viggo wants. He's completely unimpressed and disinterested in that world. I think he'd prefer to stay home and paint, write his poetry, and enjoy himself rather than play the Hollywood game. That's an aspect of him that I respect a lot."

Peter Jackson
Movieline Magazine




"After the end of a long day's shooting, when all the other cast would be either in bed or in the bar, [partner and co-screenwriter Fran Walsh] and I would be home grappling with the script for the next week's shooting. At midnight, a nine-page handwritten memo would come rattling through the fax from Viggo, outlining his thoughts about that day's work and the next few days to come. He would suggest passages from the book we should look at. This wasn't an exception - over 15 months it became the rule. In the small hours, it was actually comforting to know there was somebody else out there grappling with the same nightmare that we were."

Peter Jackson
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




Tony Goldwyn: A Walk on the Moon


"When I saw some of Viggo's work, I thought, that's always who I've had in my head. I realized there is not one other actor anywhere who could play Viggo's part other than Viggo. He has this kind of complexity and mysteriousness to him. He doesn't have to say much and you get a lot."

Tony Goldwyn, Director of A Walk on the Moon
Actor Goldwyn side-stepped cliches for summer of '69 directorial debut
By Robin Blackwelder
SPLICEDwire, splicedonline.com



Ridley Scott: G I Jane


'He is absolutely dedicated to the process,' says Ridley Scott. 'He was constantly revisiting me with questions and notes and suggestions, none of which I ever got tired of.'

Ridley Scott Viggo Mortensen
by Steve Pond,
US Magazine #236, 1997




Phillip Ridley: The Reflecting Skin and Passion of Darkly Noon


'Viggo is one of the few people I've worked with who, I feel, is a true kindred spirit. From the moment we first met - when I was casting The Reflecting Skin in Los Angeles - it was as if we'd known each other all our lives. He understands my work totally. By the time we were doing Darkly Noon I hardly had to give him a word of direction. He knew instinctively what I wanted. '

Philip Ridley at the Tokyo International Film Festival
From "The American Dreams: Two Screenplays by Philip Ridley'
Methuen 1997




José Luis Acosta: Gimlet


"He explores to the infinite, not only the character's emotions but also the wardrobe, all the things. He's so honest and generous,"

José Luis Acosta
Chiaroscuro: Viggo, Light And Dark
By Rocio Garcia
El Pais, Translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
17 May 2009




Sean Penn: The Indian Runner


"He was dazzlingly committed all the time. He literally brings the kitchen sink for a character. He's an often solitary, very poetic creature, Viggo, and all of that worked [for the movie]."

History Teacher by Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
August 19, 2005




Jeff Burr: Leatherface: Texas Chain Saw Massacre 111


"Viggo, just like everyone else in the cast was always there, ready to go and had great ideas. Just a joy to work with, and I'm not just saying that. I can guarantee his approach to stuff now is exactly the same as it was then. He's just so committed and he's such a really good guy. All the family members were great."

Interview with Director Jeff Burr
Icons of Fright
by Robg. & Mike C




Renny Harlin: Prison


"I was looking for a young James Dean. Then, Viggo Mortensen walked into the room. I knew almost instantly that he was the one. There was such a charisma about him. I really thought that this film would make him a household name. Unfortunately, since the film wasn't really released theatrically, it took Viggo a little longer to get there, but he still got there eventually."

Review Fix Exclusive: Q & A With "Prison" Director Renny Harlin
Patrick Hickey Jr.
Review Fix
14 February 2013


Quotable Viggo: 11 January 2014

With Viggo about to be interviewed alongside David Cronenberg at Tiff's Canada's Top Ten Film Festival, what better than a Bumper Quotable celebrating their highly acclaimed (and often hilarious) cinematic double-act?



© Hanway/Lago/Sony.


A Dangerous Method


"If I hadn't known that David was kind of crazy already I would have felt he was definitely insane…"

Viggo on being asked to play Freud
TIFF video interview
11 September 2011




"I think my cast has great need of psychoanalysis, which is why I cast them actually, to introduce them gently to the idea that they needed help, a lot of help….And you can see they are much better people. Before they were messes. When I found them, they were neurotics, hopeless," Cronenberg said to great laughter.

Mortensen played along. "Now we dress ourselves," he retorted.

Venice Film Festival Press Conference
Cronenberg 'cures' cast in Freud-Jung drama
Rssbroadcast.com
2 September 2011




"David and I wrote 20-30 emails just about cigars..."

Viggo Mortensen
How Viggo Mortensen Got Inside Sigmund Freud's Head
By Rachel Dodes
The Wall Street Journal: Speakeasy
18 November 2011




"In studying Freud I found many parallels with Cronenberg. I don't know how David sees it, but I found myself using him as a model to create my Freud. Freud was constantly reinventing himself, his theories were scandalous, revolutionary and dangerous. But in everyday life he was an irreprehensible family man, a typical member of the middle class. The same applies to Cronenberg, who makes a lot of disturbing films, constantly studies impulses, desires, repressed aggression and sexuality, always obsessed with physicality. Yet if you talk to him he's calm as can be, innocent, with a great sense of humour."

Viggo Mortensen
A Most Beautiful Mind
L'Uomo Vogue
September 2011




"When people say it´s not a Cronenberg film, I say, whose is it then? I was there; he shot it."

"La Ventana" with Viggo and Carme
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Cadena SER
23 November 2011




DC: As I look at his nose, it appears much more Freudian than it used to.

VM: It's getting bigger, isn't it?

DC: Yeah, it is.

Cronenberg and Mortensen - Dangerous Minds
Shortlist.com
10 February 2012




Would you say you enjoy a similar intellectual relationship as Freud and Jung have on that epic first 13-hour date-slash-conversation?

Mortensen: We can have a conversation about baseball statistics as readily as we could have about psychoanalysis.

Cronenberg:
We are readers, and we do get excited when we say, "Oh, I read that same book!" and things like that, so there is that intellectual connection.

Mortensen: I think one of the things about you that I most like, other than just the exchanges we have intellectually and just the silly jokes we sometimes enjoy, is the fact that, each time you're making a movie, you get as excited as I do or more so about the subject. . . . You have the eternal beginner attitude. Which I think is a great thing to have for an actor, for a director, anybody.
If you enjoy what you're doing, no matter how serious the subject matter, I think you feel that when you watch the movie. I think you watch this movie — and I'm subjective because I'm in it — but I think you can see we had a good time making it.

David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen talk about 'A Dangerous Method'
By Ann Hornaday
Washington Post
12 December 2011




"I never got to talk to Freud but I got to talk to Viggo playing Freud."

David Cronenberg on Freud, Keira and pressing the flesh
Brian D. Johnson
Maccleans.ca
25 August 2010




Eastern Promises


Scorsese and De Niro.
Fellini and Mastroianni.
John Ford and the Duke.
And now … David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen?

By Robert W. Butler
The Kansas City Star
16 Sept 2007




….exuding from their two films together is a sense of ideal alchemy, as if the sculptured physique and the Sphinx like face of the actor were made for the dry and morally complex thrillers of the Canadian film maker.

Sans Viggo, je n'aurai pas fait ce film
Les Inrockuptibles
Serge Kanaski and Julien Gester
12 November 2007




After two collaborations, they're as comfortable together as a pair of old shoes.

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




"It's like a marriage. You might see two people together and not understand why they are, but they know. We know. We feel we can get the best out of each other."

Viggo's 'Promises'
By Sara Stewart
New York Post
26 Aug 2007




"….. weirdly enough, Viggo and I have come from some other planet together. I do feel we're brothers under the skin."

David Cronenberg
Blood Brothers
By Walter Addiego, San Francisco Chronicle
9 Sept 2007




"…with Viggo you don't just get a violin, you get a whole symphony orchestra."

David Cronenberg
RT talks Eastern Promises
By Sara Schieron, Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007




How did they work to create Mr. Mortensen's Nikolai, covered in tattoos and minimalist of motion?


"I just followed orders," deadpans Mr. Mortensen, 48. "And I just told him to do whatever he wanted," says Mr. Cronenberg, 64.

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




VM: Well, is there anything else? It's onerous to talk to me, I know.

DC: It's torment. I actually had to take some codeine pills before we
started.

A Conversation Between David Cronenberg And Viggo Mortensen: The Interview
Transcribed by Patches
28 Sept 200
7



"We both have such bad memories that neither of us could remember we had worked together," says Mr. Cronenberg. "It was only when I saw photographs that I realized."

Behind the banter, 'Eastern Promises' actor and director offer serious insights
By Chris Vognar, Dallas News
12 Sept 2007




A History of Violence



How did you get Viggo onboard?

In my seduction of Viggo, who's very picky about his films, I flew to LA and one of the elements of the seduction was to discuss the political undertones of the movie. If you work with an actor like Viggo, the discussions go very deep and the anticipations of people's reactions to what you're doing is very deep. But there's a part that is mysterious and not controllable, because movies, if they are alive, surprise you. They sometimes take on a life of their own and if they do that, they end up meaning things that you sometimes aren't aware of.

David Cronenberg
Chris in Cannes
Cannes Film Festival Report
15 may 2005
empireonline.co.uk




"When I heard [Cronenberg] was doing it and wanted to meet me, I thought that would be interesting to see what he thinks. The way the script was then and it became leaner and leaner as we approached shooting, there were things in the back of my mind, questions about it. But anything I asked him, any doubt or reservation I had, he also had the same ones. That's what I mean by being in step with him. We right away were in agreement and we were like real partners."

Viggo Mortensen on Cronenberg
Rebecca Murray
About.com
26 September 2005




Olson said he pictured Mortensen in the role of Stall, something the actor found "flattering and disturbing at the same time." Just to keep the star in line, Cronenberg told him Olson hadn't really written the role for him. "You were second to Brad Pitt."

Cannes Press Conference
National Post Cannes Review, by Chris Knight
17 May 2005




"Viggo has the charisma of a leading man, and the eccentricity and naturalistic presence of a character actor," Cronenberg says. "He's the kind of actor I love."

History Teacher
by Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
August 19, 2005




Viggo is just... a great actor."

David Cronenberg interview, by Moriarty
Ain't it Cool News
November 6th, 2005




"David doesn't tell you what to think,'' muses Viggo Mortensen. "He opens a door, you walk into a room, but he doesn't answer questions. It's easier when a filmmaker tells [an audience] what to think, but it's more rewarding when you think for yourself.''

David Gritten
TheDaily Telegraph
September 24, 2005




'He continues what he's always done, which is taking people apart, almost like they were a machine or an engine, but now more taking their brains apart than their bodies, I suppose. It's more a psychological autopsy and the results are always a little disturbing. Not because he's disturbing, but because we are. As an audience and as a subject.'

Viggo on Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen, Actor, poet, photographer
Philip Matthews
New Zealand Listener
March 18-24 2006




After the shoot, he gave Cronenberg an autographed 3-D LOTR character card. It read "Thank you for the best moviemaking experience of my life." Peter Jackson, eat your heart out - but not literally.

Premier Magazine
by Denis Seguin
July/August 2005.





And finally...



When I read interviews about History of Violence, the interviews really emphasized the degree to which you two collaborate. Tell me, how do you two work together?

DC:
It's a total lie. I do everything, Viggo does nothing. I do all the work. But he pays me to say that he does a lot of stuff.

VM: Also to say that I'm thoughtful and considerate.

Talking Eastern Promises with David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen
By Sara Maria Vizcarrondo
Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007



"I think he's probably by far the most talented invisible man in directing history."

Viggo on Cronenberg's lack of awards
Viggo Mortensen and 'Dangerous Method's' Fate
by Melena Ryzik
The Carpetbagger / New York Times
15 December 2011




"In the three movies I've filmed with David (A History of Violence, Eastern Promises, and A Dangerous Method), something pretty strange happens to me. There are movies I like from the first scene, but with Cronenberg's, that never happens to me. During the first ten minutes, his movies always make me feel profoundly uncomfortable. It takes me a while to decide if I'm believing what he tells me, if I'm liking it or not. Until, suddenly, I'm caught up and I can't escape."

Viggo Mortensen
"Freud was a great public relations person"
By Alex Vicente
Público.es – translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
4 September 2011




"When you work with him the excitement is contagious. You feel like you're with a recently graduated film student who is absolutely brilliant. He acts like a kid about shooting every day. It helps you feel excited about it too."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Reveals How He Became Freud in 'A Dangerous Method'
by Thelma Adams
Yahoo Movies
16 December 2011




"I know that the three movies I've done with him are probably my best work or close to it, and I think there's a reason for that. He understands and likes actors."

On the couch with the former King Of Gondor
By Matt Maytum
Total Film
9 February 2012




'I would've nominated him for all three movies I've done with him. No question.'

Viggo Mortensen on Cronenberg and the Oscars
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Dangerous Method' Taught Me How to Talk in a Movie
By Michael Hogan
Moviefone
23 November 2011




"A bond that has pushed me to give my utmost."

Viggo talking about Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine – translated by Ollie
September 2011




"Well, I'd like Viggo to be in any and every movie that I do, frankly," he offers with a laugh. "And if I can possibly find a role for him in anything I do, I will. That's my promise. That's my Eastern promise."

David Cronenberg
Star's Eastern immersion impresses his director
by Steven Rea, Philadelphia Enquirer
16 Sept 2007


Quotable Viggo: 4 January 2014

It may be a week late, but here is the promised 2014 New Year Quiz to get your teeth into. I expect it to be taken very seriously and to rigorously separate the Viggo sheep from the Viggo goats. Start sharpening your brains and see how much you know about the Star of Screen, Stage and Airport Lounges, Viggo Mortensen. When you're finished, highlight the answers at the bottom so that you can see if you are a sheep or heading off to Viggo's Goat Farm.



© Hanway/Lago, Perceval Press, Guadalupe Gaona/4L Productions,
New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers, NBC, John Harris/Haddock Films



1. Viggo has trained with which of the following animals:


a) horses
b) monkeys
c) marsupials
d) bees
e) goats



2. Viggo said in an interview with Patricia Arquette that today he was a:

a) daffodil
b) petunia
c) spiky bottle-brush plant
d) ranunculus ficaria
e) parsley



3. Viggo speaks eleventy billion languages*, True or false?

* The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars, Empire Magazine, 2013




4. Viggo Mortensen has written which of the following books:


a) Linger
b) Recent Forgeries
c) Canciones de Invierno
d) Harry Potter and the Wizard Who's Rather Like Gandalf
e) Hvad hjertet er fuldt af : En Håndbog om Mission



5. Viggo's has just finished filming:


a) Loin of Lamb
b) Lovely Men's Loins
c) Loin des Hommes
d) Lions at Home



6. Which of the following describes Viggo Mortensen?


a) actor
b) painter
c) photographer
d) fisherman
e) Professor of Religious Studies at Aarhus
f) polyglot
g) poet
h) chocolate crack merchant
i) gardener



7. Are there Plumbers in Manchester lovelier than Viggo?
*

*The New Hollywood Male, By Charles Gant, Arena Homme Plus #18, 2002


8. His cheeks have been described as:

a) book shelves
b) blades
c) razors
d) bacon slicers
e) aircraft carriers
f) sun loungers
g) platforms 8 and 9 at Waterloo Station



9. How many peculiar things would one need to add to Viggo Mortensen's face before he ceases to be hot?*


a) moustache
b) beard
c) moustache and beard
d) sideburns
e) fur cheekbone warmers
f) weird furry caterpillar eyebrows
g) mohair eyelash extensions


*Awards Daily, Ryan Adams, 8 August 2008




10. If Aragorn fought Smaug, who would win?


11. Viggo has so much on-screen magnetism he can:

a) pull the fillings out of your teeth
b) bend all your house keys into pretzels
c) wipe the memory of your million-gig smart camera/phone/TV/mobile-microwave/mini-dishwasher
d) destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.


*Wallace Bain, Santa Cruz Sentinel, 25 January 2012




12. Which soccer team does Viggo support?


a) San Diego
b) San Francisco
c) San Jose
d) San Marcos
e) San Lorenzo



13. Viggo has adopted which of the following after filming has finished:

a) a plastic trout
b) a cigar
c) a supermarket trolley
d) an Apis mellifera Linnaeus
e) a horse
f) another horse
g) a goat



14. The title of the film that Viggo has made with Lisandro Alonso is called:


a) Sin City
b) Sinbad the Sailor
c) Singing in the Rain
d) Sin Titulo
e) No One Has Any Idea



15. Viggo has a:

a) Goat Farm in Segovia
b) Stubble Farm north of Sante Fe
c) Fish Factory in Novosibirsk
d) A Hair Gel Factory in San Marcos
e) Ranch in Idaho


Answers (please highlight the text to view).

1 a, b, d, and possibly the marsupials.
2 c: spiky bottle-brush plant
3 FALSE, he only speaks 10 billion
4 a, b, c, and e (under his Danish pen name 'Professor Viggo Mortensen')
5 c: Loin des Hommes
6 all of them
7 no
8 a,b,c,d
9 none. It's impossible for him not to be hot.
10 Aragorn. Aragorn is clearly much hotter than Smaug.
11 d
12 e: San Lorenzo. 'You play in San Marcos you play to lose'.
13 e, f
14 e: No One Has Any Idea (not even Viggo and Lisandro)
15 e: Ranch in Idaho
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Last edited: 3 January 2015 13:11:06

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