Quotable Viggo

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Quotable Viggo 2013

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Quotable Viggo: 21 December 2013

As a Christmas treat and to keep up with tradition, this week's Quotable is a round-up of my favourite quotes of the year. Some have been featured here before and some are new, covering everything from quirky comments from interviewers, football, acting and some philosophical gems to ponder over while you sip the mulled wine and eat just one more cocoa covered praline (what better tribute to the King of Chocolate?).



© New Line Productions Inc.


He smells of woodsmoke, as though he's just returned from some manly pursuit like chopping logs in a forest. Again, highly possible. He does have a home in the remote mountains of Idaho, surrounded by woods. In fact the scent is wafting from his cup of tea.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




Viggo Mortensen is one of those people. You probably sat near one in high school, or have one on your floor at work. Good looking, effortlessly talented across a range of fields, just so perfect at everything you want to run them down with your car.

Viggo entertains in evil twin role
Cris Kennedy
29 June 2013




...he's a disconcerting interviewee. The conversation goes like this. I ask question A, expecting answer B. He listens carefully, considers, and gives me answer E, and then we find ourselves on point K, V, or Z.

'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




I've had four or five conversations with Mortensen over the years, and they've all followed the same pattern: He takes your measure for a minute or two, just to establish some basic comfort level and make sure he's not talking to a total idiot, and then it's hard to get the guy to shut up.

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




He's like a one-man United Nations. As well as speaking about eleventy billion languages, Mortensen has made films all over the world and unites the film industries of Spain, the US and Middle-earth.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




The Dennis Lee Hopper Award is a gorgeous hunk of metal. Camera lenses and spray cans form a spiky bronze sphere. It looks like a naval mine for visual artists. The bomb will look great on Viggo's mantle.

Passion and Fearlessness Take Center Stage As Viggo Mortensen Receives The Dennis Hopper Award At The AMFM Fest
Gordy Grundy
Huffington Post
19 June 2013




"Viggo Mortensen had the biggest impact on me in terms of approach, dedication, intention, and artistic outlook and I'm nowhere close to how good he is as an artist and I wouldn't even put myself in the same category as an actor." said Bloom.

Orlando Bloom
Entertainment Weekly
10 October 2013




"Viggo is a hero of mine."

Actor Ed Asner
Passion and Fearlessness Take Center Stage As Viggo Mortensen Receives The Dennis Hopper Award At The AMFM Fest
Gordy Grundy
Huffington Post
19 June 2013




"I'd always thought I'd love to be able to say I'm part of its movie history,"

Viggo talking about filming in Argentina
'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




'I've walked I don´t know how many kilometers, from alley to alley, going up and coming down thousands of steps around the Casbah and the old European neighborhoods, letting myself be drawn towards a nameless destination, going forward or retracing my steps according to noises and colors, mental associations, memories, questions I was asking myself. Everything perfect, everything inconclusive, everything valuable, the city came into me, and I into it.'

Viggo on preparing to film in Morocco
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




"There's a saying in Spanish: Without risk there's no glory," Mortensen explained. "You can live a safe little life, but if you don't take a chance once in a while you'll imprison yourself. That's the whole point of our movie."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013




'My goal is just to make movies, whether they're big or small, that I'd like to see 10 years from now. That's sort of the way I gauge it.'

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




'I think in part I cling to CASLA because it is a fixed point for me, an ideal, a flame that never dies.'

Viggo Mortensen
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




"He's a Cuervo," I kept shouting. "The Pope is a Supercuervo!"

This hell where we live
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Perceval Press
15 March 2013




'I ran from one side of my hotel room to the other, jumping and shouting like a man possessed. I opened the window and shouted the goal at the crescent moon.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers watching San Lorenzo
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 201
3



'If CASLA loses, I'm devastated for a while and when they win, the world seems like a stupendous place.'

Viggo Mortensen demonstrates to this newspaper that the great never lose their humility
By - translated by Ollie and Zoe
TiempoSur
9 June 2013




"In the past, I might have believed that my actions and feelings were inherited from the impulses of my ancestors - warriors, pirates, peasants, adventurers, painters, survivors in terrible circumstances - anything that would have seemed interesting to emulate in the accounts that have tried to make up an exclusive fabric of biological links I'd have with the Mortensens, Rasmussens, Gambles, Atkinsons, Chapmans, Codys or any other angel or devil of our family that has left a mark on his time. But now I believe that all of us are unprecedented individuals, potentially dangerous animals, creatures of brain and bone who can tame themselves or be tamed, who can learn to get along with others - or not."

Viggo Mortensen
Against Hopelessness
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Perceval Press
10 February 2013




"...I know I can't read all the books or watch all the movies in one lifetime." Does he find that frustrating? Mortensen fixes me with his intense blue gaze. "Mostly no," he says. "If we could run out of books and movies, then we would be bored."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




"Creative expression is social change. Wear your feelings on everything you do. It will help people open up their minds and see themselves and their communities in new ways."

Actor Viggo Mortensen urges expression
by Kaci Yoder
Desert Sun
7 July 2013




"One of the best pieces of advice I ever got was from a horse master," he tells me. "He told me to go slow to go fast. I think that applies to everything in life. We live as though there aren't enough hours in the day but if we do each thing calmly and carefully we will get it done quicker and with much less stress."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013

Quotable Viggo: 15 December 2013

Now the second film in The Hobbit trilogy has been released, the media is full of comments comparing Luke Evans' Bard and Richard Armitage's Thorin to Viggo and Aragorn. Are they the new 'Vigorn' (or would that be 'Araggo')? A perfect blending of actor and character that takes heroic hotness to a level previously only dreamt about? I don't think so...



© New Line Productions Inc.


I am being seduced by royalty. And not your garden variety Windsor, either. Admittedly, he looks more like a gypsy in his earthy tunic repaired to within an inch of its life, his hands and nails bearing the ingrained grit of a farmer. But he's a king all right: the King, the Lord of Men. He is Aragorn, son of Arathorn, and any minute now he's going to reach out one of those taut brown arms, lift me up on his trusty steed and whisk me away from all this...

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph
23 November 2003




The fiery passion that blazes in his eyes can do what no extra-large popcorn can: sustain a grown woman through six-plus hours of viewing pleasure for the past two years. It has been a torrid, if one-sided, affair, though I suspect many others have fallen for his unwashed charms.

On Viggo as Aragorn
It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




You can have your wee hobbits and wizened wizards. Give me the man who would be king. Rough-hewn Aragorn is as manly as they come as he slays loathsome orcs and woos elf princess Arwen, whispering sweet nothings into her pointy ears.

It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
16 December 2003




Casually dropping his name into conversations with the girls over the past 48 hours has produced more gasps, heaving bosoms and sighs of jealousy than a Lotto win.

"I'm a poet" - Rings star Mortensen
By Josie McNaught
Sunday Star-Times 2003




....even sitting in a plastic chair under the unflattering glare of fluorescent, in a drab office at Miramar Productions' headquarters in New Zealand, Viggo Mortensen is by far the dishiest bloke ever to have donned a crown.

The King and I
By Julie Hosking
Sunday Telegraph, 2003




"He has a great physical ability coupled with a real sensitivity. It's sort of a contradiction between the two, that he can kill so many orcs and ride a horse like he can."

Miranda Otto
It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
16 December 2003




There is something other-worldly about Mortensen that makes him so suited to playing the dashing Aragorn who, along with Russell Crowe's toga-hero Maximus in Gladiator, has already entered into cinematic folklore as one of the great screen swordsmen of our time.

The Reluctant Hero,
by Douglas Andrews
Sunday Express 2002




Eyes ablaze and sword aglint, Mortensen proved a captivating warrior who stirred the hearts, souls and in many cases the loins of the first blockbuster film's audiences. The very first moment he is glimpsed-silently sitting in the shadows inside the Prancing Pony inn, his eyes shielded by the hood of his cloak-signalled the arrival of a New Hollywood Hero, a dynamic man of mystery, action and romance. Tall, graceful, handsome, athletic, charismatic-these are qualities that Mortensen has always possessed, but before this had never projected them with such vigour.

The New Hollywood Male
By Charles Gant
Arena Homme Plus #18
December 2002




Viggo Mortensen stuns as the tormented, destiny-shucking warrior Aragorn, exuding a bravery that will make men admire him and an intensity that will make women want to hop into his leather jerkin.

FOTR
Tor Thorsen
Reel.com 2001




Picture Han Solo without the wisecracks mixed with and Indian scout mixed with Sir Lancelot stirred together with the leadership and loyalty of a leader we all wish we had.

FOTR
Nick Nunziata
CHUD
December 2001




Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn easily dons the mantle of epic hero that used to be worn by Charlton Heston, and he's a lot sexier.

TTT
Christopher Tookey
The Daily Mail
December 20, 2002




Aragorn has the slinky swagger and dreamy stubble that make him look like a legend created by Tolkien, Sam Shepard and Ralph Lauren.

ROTK
The New York Times
Triumph Tinged With Regret in Middle Earth
Elvis Mitchell
December 16, 2003




Viggo is noble, Viggo is powerful, Viggo is resplendent. He's a young Sean Connery but with a grittier style. More than anyone else, this is Aragorn's film.

ROTK
Film Hobbit
Cinemablend.com
16 December 3003




It's crucial that the film, like the journeys it narrates, is straggly. I spent the duller sections thinking about how flaxen-haired Legolas looks like a Milky Bar hippy as he pings his egg-slicer-strong arrows at the barbarous monsters. I also drifted off looking at Viggo Mortensen: has a more virile, dynamic actor ever appeared on the silver screen?

TTT
Sukhdev Sandhu
The Daily Telegraph
December 18, 2002




When Star asked the actor what he makes of being called a sex symbol, he joked, "I think you should ask Orlando Bloom that question!" Mortensen, it seems, considers himself more geeky than sexy: "They call me the 'Dork of New York'," he says.

Could Viggo Mortensen Be The Perfect Man?
By Nathan Cooper & Mike Glynn
Star, 2003


Quotable Viggo: 7 December 2013

For fun this week – and because I was idly thinking how hard it is to sum a man like Viggo up – I've put together a compilation of single sentences all of which succinctly capture at least one facet. Not exactly Viggo in a nutshell but pretty darned close. If any of you want to have a go at your own 'Viggo in a sentence' I'd love to read them!

And here is my attempt to sum Viggo up in one photo:




In the dunes of La Loberia
Image Guadalupe Gaona.© 4L Productions.



Actor, poet, photographer, musician and always exquisitely provocative.

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
[I]Vanity Fair (Spain)

November 2008
[/I]


If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say can do better.

The Man Who Would Be King
By Nick Dent
December 2001
Black & White magazine, #58




The one who teaches people to drink mate on million dollar sets.

The Habit Of Giving It All
By Juan Manuel Dominguez - translated by Ollie, Sage and Zooey
Perfil
20 June 2010




Mortensen has a disposition towards an archaeology of emotions, of things that are buried, weathered but surviving along with the rest of us

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




The very definition of a 21st century Renaissance Man.

Validation for Viggo
Filmstew
Richard Horgan
22 January 2008




Mortensen is not what Tolkien's Treebeard would call "hasty."

After Aragorn
By Jeffrey Overstreet
ChristianityToday, 2004




Viggo Mortensen is a study in contradictions: rugged and undeniably virile, and yet thoroughly and irresistibly sensitive.

Interview: Viggo Mortensen
By Todd Gilchrist
Cinematical
26 November 2009




With so many of Hollywood's movie stars seeming like overgrown kids, Viggo Mortensen is the rare American actor who is both muscular and humane, tough and sensitive, fighter and lover.

36th Telluride Film Festival Program Guide
September 2009




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




He has that incurable, unbearable, enigmatic eroticism of a three in the morning dream you've just awakened from.

Talking With Viggo
George Magazine 1999




He's shy, but a bit of a motormouth (and can run on in at least six different languages).

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




No smart pop-quotes fly from his mouth.

The American Dane
by Susanne Johansson
Translation by Majken Steen Thomassen
Berlingske Tidende, 2001




Viggo is afraid of nothing, not on the screen and not in life.

Viggo Mortensen: The magician of The Lord of the Rings
By Aurelie Raya
Paris Match
Jan 8, 2004




He's like a one-man United Nations.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




The Cuervo ambassador to the world.

Jorge Barros
San Lorenzo Supporters Subcommittee interview
Transcribed/translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
SCH tv
20 May 2011




Mortensen is a matinee idol with a philosopher's soul — Jean-Jacques Rousseau trapped in the body of Rudolph Valentino.

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




When the elements, the weather and the terrain get tough, Viggo gets going.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




The man has never disappointed us.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011


Quotable Viggo: 1 December 2013

After my Quotable a few weeks ago where Charlize Theron described Viggo as a 'Caretaker', I thought I'd gather together a bunch of 'leading lady' quotes including, of course, some old favourites! So here we have, amongst many other compliments paid, Viggo the 'Dude', the 'Tramp' the 'Byron-esque' and... the 'Chocolate Crack-Dealer'.



© Warner Brothers.


"At work he is one of the crew, a great workmate, deeply involved in the film in every aspect and not only with his character. He is a person with enormous warmth and great honesty."

Soledad Villamil
Soledad's Gaze
translated by Ollie
Clarín
8 July 2011




"There's rarely a day he doesn't show up bearing gifts of some sort from his different weekend jaunts, where he'll go find some really obscure village behind Taos somewhere and visit an artists' colony and bring back some wares to share. And there was never a day that he wasn't plying us with dark chocolate. It was ridiculous. Bags full. Bags full! Bacon–covered truffles. Where was he getting it? He was the chocolate crack dealer."

Renée Zellweger
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




'I thought that he was certainly going to be an intense guy, from everything that I've read about him. (laughs) And he's not. He's so lovely and light. He's a beautiful human being.'

Maria Bello on working with Viggo
JoBlo.com, by Thomas Luepp
27 September 2005




"I knew "Vig" as an artist before I knew he was an actor, like eight or nine years ago, I went to an art show in L.A. and saw these incredible paintings and photographs and said "Who is this man?" and found out he was an actor. So I've always had an artistic, intellectual crush on him, and people told us throughout the years, we'd be friends, and when we met, it was certainly like that."

Maria Bello on A History of Violence
Coming Soon!, by Edward Douglas
September 23, 2005




"I think he stayed in character pretty much the whole time. And that's great. It really helped me… I saw Viggo yesterday for the first time since we finished the film and it was like a whole different person. I almost didn't recognise him."

Naomi Watts
Matt Mueller, Total Film
October 2007




"A dude. An absolutely brilliant, brilliant guy. He's really soft, he's really generous – in all senses of the word: as an actor, as a human being. I don't know anyone who's met him during filming Good or any of the press we did afterwards that could find anything pretentious or starry in him. He's just a really passionate actor and he's a proper actor, he really works hard and he picks his films. He's not in it for money, he's not in the magazines being papped everywhere, he's a very focused guy and he's incredibly multi-talented, he's got so many side projects that he's involved in, whereas I'm really good at… cooking? I'm rubbish at everything."

Jodie Whittaker talking about Viggo
by Ellen E Jones
Little White Lies
April 2009




"From the moment that I saw him onscreen," says Otto, "I thought, 'Shit, he looks incredible. Here's a character I don't have to pretend to be in love with.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"He has a great physical ability coupled with a real sensitivity. It's sort of a contradiction between the two, that he can kill so many orcs and ride a horse like he can. But he's taken an anti-hero approach to playing Aragorn. He's so much an artist that he takes everything very seriously."

Miranda Otto
It's Good to be "King"
By Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
16 December 2003




"For our love scenes, he would come to me the night before and say he wanted to change all the lines to the Elvish language. He was trying to make that connection stronger, and I thought it was beautiful that they'd speak Elvish to each other because it adds a layer to their history that you wouldn't otherwise see."

Liv Tyler
Mellow Warrior
By Anthony Breznican
South Coast Today
15 December 2003




'Viggo is a real artist. He lives for creating art and be absorbed by it - not for talking.'

Gwynneth Paltrow
By Cindy Pearlman
The Chicago Sun-Times
1998




"He was a little awkward, which was sweet. He has all that humor and bravado, but that gave him a fragility. Viggo's a Campion man. Her favourite men are Byron-esque."

Nicole Kidman
Beautiful Dreamer
By Holly Millea
Elle (U.S.)
October 2009




"I knew I wanted him for that role in such a way that I was saying, Please take some of my money and give it to him….Because he gives immeasurable depth to what he does, full commitment, full conviction."

Diane Lane
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"He's being true to himself. And people here are not really used to that or comfortable with that. And I love the fact that, as far as I have been able to see, he has not given away any of his mystery. People want to figure you out so they can move on. But he's the one who moves on." His muse, Lane says, is the tramp. "He can be as debonair as he wants. For that afternoon. But then the tramp will call him again."

Diane Lane on Viggo and Hollywood
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski,
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"I find peace in Viggo´s eyes. Confronted with the giddiness of the text, you can take risks with him, walk the tightrope."

Carme Elías, Purgatorio
Viggo Mortensen And Forgiveness
By Ulises Fuente - translated by Ollie and Rio
La Razón
1 November 2011

Quotable Viggo: 23 November 2013

While mulling over what to do this week, I realised that it was high time we had another Quotable on Viggo and music. Not – as you would probably think - about Viggo's musical creativity (although I do love to highlight the fact that Viggo can play a motorcycle muffler), but about listening to it. What goes in the CD player, what gets hummed or sung. What songs did he play in his youth,? Which have got stuck in his head? What music helps with a creative mood or fires up his spirit. I've been trawling the Quotables Vault (yes, I really do have one), and come up with quite a mix...



© Miramax Films/Village Roadshow.


Viggo Mortensen talks so eloquently about the joys of getting lost that 10 minutes into the interview I'm lost as well. The actor likes cutting loose and roaming free: partly for research but also for his own enjoyment. Maybe he'll browse around some out-of-the-way bookshop, or drop in at some museum, or visit some old-time record shop and listen to the music from times gone by. Try as I might I can't drag him back on track.

"What music does your dad listen to?" he asks.

My dad? My dad likes jazz, I tell him. Old jazz, trad jazz; 30s and 40s stuff.

"Chet Baker?" says Mortensen.

Er, that's probably too late for him, I say, with a nervous eye on the clock. Now, about your new film ....

"Coltrane?" says Mortensen.

The Happy Trails Of Viggo Mortensen
By Xan Brooks
The Guardian
17 April 2009




Didn't you live in South America for about nine years as a kid?


Yeah, I was 11 when we moved back to the States. I couldn't believe the swear words, the slang, the music - all the kids were into Blue Oyster Cult and Grand Funk Railroad. I was a closet Carpenters fan. I'd sing 'Top of the World' to myself on the way to school, but when I got close to campus I'd shut up.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




"I still keep a collection of old tango songs and I listen to them all the time. I also listen to some other Argentine singers of the moment."

Viggo Mortensen Goes Back To His Roots For 'Everybody Has A Plan'
Static
19 April 2013




"...I like to sing tangos every now and then, in private... I don't want to bother other people; I bother them enough with my movies."

Viggo talking about his Argentinian Childhood on Radio Cooperativa, Chile
By - transcribed/translated by Graciela
Radio Cooperativa
27 March 2007




"I love this Argentine song from the 1930s called Envidia by Ada Falcon. It's very special."

Viggo Mortensen Goes Back To His Roots For 'Everybody Has A Plan'
Static
19 April 2013




And in music, what are your essentials?

I don't know if I have essentials; the selection depends on the moment. This morning I've been listening to Ray Barretto, The Ramones, Andrés Calamaro and Janis Joplin.

Viggo Mortensen: "If I'm lost, it's because that's how I want it."
By Juan Luis Álvarez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Vanguardia
9 September 2012




[John Doe] is an outstanding "live" performer, unique in his ability to connect with the words, the tune, and the audience in just the right heartbeat as he builds the long, exquisite moment. You'll hear it and feel it tonight, and you will be so glad you were here.

Viggo's programme notes for John Doe's performance at the Lincoln Centre
Americana
By Viggo Mortensen
American Songbook at Lincoln Center
28 January 2011




What kind of music do you enjoy while you are reading?

It depends what I'm reading, where, and when--and what music is on hand. No music is good sometimes, too. At moment I am listening to selected opera arias sung by Mark Reisen, the great bass voice of Russia, recorded in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Before that I was listening to Buckethead's Colma.

ForeWord Magazine.
31 October 2007




"There's a YouTube footage where we were singing outside the Belvedere [in Austria]. We used to sing a lot. That's something I do a lot of, anyway. It's like somebody will say a phrase and I'll sing the rest of the line. It's like a way to be relaxed."

What songs did he and Viggo sing? "Anything really," said Michael, "like 'Young Girl'" (by Gary Puckett & The Union Gap). He was told that the song's refrain, "Young girl, get out of my mind," was a fitting one for his characters in both "Shame" and "A Dangerous..."

"I remember Viggo and I came bursting into the makeup room and singing. Keira (Knightley) was getting her hair done. We made her and the makeup artist jump out of their skin," said Michael.

Michael Fassbender
No 'Shame' in Michael Fassbender's sex-addict role
By: Ruben V. Nepales
The Inquirer
5 January 2012




"Should I stay or should I go?", is what the famous song from the The Clash's "Combat Rock" album asks. Below I put a link to the song, in case Caruso Lombardi or any other people working for CASLA feel plagued by existential doubts before the key match against Tigre (or the two other very important matches we have left in this tournament) and they need to psych themselves. I recommend listening to the song at an excessive volume, maybe together with some mate with gin to stand the cold of the fall´s early morning."

Viggo Mortensen
"Should I stay or should I go?"
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
1 June 2012




What about music, what kind of music makes you happy?

It depends. I do like the Swan of Tuonela by Sibelius. Aren't swans supposed to be like geese, in that they mate for life? That's the ideal. So be careful before you kill a swan because you are probably killing a very important relationship.

Viggo Mortensen: The New Box Office King
By Jenny Ewart
Bent
January 2004




Q: How did the screen test go [For To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar]?

A: I asked if I could sing 'When I Fall in Love' a cappella, figuring if I could make that much of an ass of myself I'd be less embarrassed saying the dialogue.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine
August 1998




We break up; collect nicely all out stuff, all orange peelings, bottle tops, and plastic glasses, and head back to his car, a Dodge Ram 2.500 pick-up diesel. On the dashboard lies dried flowers and what seems to be an Indian rosary, in the CD player is fusion music (new age and jazz), and Viggo Mortensen puts on a classic ranger hat. He seems to be very much at ease, as he sits here well above the driving lane and like a pinball navigates us through the brutal traffic.

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001




"Like others who grew up in the 1960s and 1970s, I took an interest in not only Kerouac, but also in what supposedly inspired them - apart from literature - during those post-war decades: the jazz figures (Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk?), painting (Abstract Expressionism), and movies (Italian Neorealism, Nouvelle Vague, etc.)."

Viggo Mortensen: Furrowed Burroughs
By Aureliano Tonet - translated by Anita Conrade
Trois Couleurs
May 2012




After that, [Viggo] came two more times, always dressed in the San Lorenzo colors or with something related to the club (he brought the flag twice, and he used it as a tablecloth...), until one day he made a reservation for the "end of shoot dinner". So he came again with David Cronenberg and a group of people who don't seem to sleep very often, to wrap up the shoot. What's more, towards the end of the night I played some music by Ray Barretto, and Viggo shouted at me from his table: "Acid!" For a moment, I froze because I thought he was asking for dessert, but then I remembered that Acid was the name of the Barretto disc I had just started playing, which is not only one of my favorites, but also one of his. Twin souls, shall we say.

Letter from London - Behind the Scenes on Eastern Promises
By John Rattagan - translated by Graciela
Clarin
5 March 2007

Quotable Viggo: 16 November 2013

I loved Viggo's description of Algiers in his October Sobrevuelos column. He wanted to soak up the atmosphere that his character grew up in, and it reminded me of his disappearing into Russia before the Eastern Promises filming and adopting Leon as Alatriste's homeland. He describes his time on the streets of Algiers as an adventure and it's not just part of his acting process, but everything to do with who he is and what he enjoys: travelling alone, meeting people and learning.



© Mastín Español.


'Sometimes I asked people I met on the street or in the cafes about things that could help me to finish building the character in the film we are soon going to shoot in the Atlas mountains. Specific things about phrases or historical references in our script - trying out my very limited Arabic vocabulary, mixed with the French that I'm refining for the shoot - but in general just seeking out human contact, to go along touching, even if it was only ephemeral brushing against, the history of the many cultures that have passed through this city. The character that I'm going to play grew up here and I want to imagine his childhood and adolescence as best I can. I've always liked research like this, letting places, the weather, people and my own physical condition inform the adventure.'

Viggo on preparing to film while in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




"He's very deep in his way of preparing the character," Godino said, referring to Mortensen. "He's living in Tigre, he dresses like somebody from there and I admire this. He's an actor that connects with the character and he's a little crazy, crazy enough to play these characters that he plays."

Javier Godino, Todos Tenemos Un Plan
Viggo Mortensen at home in first Argentine film
By Luis Andres Henao
Reuters Canada
22 July 2011




"I visited Pribor, his birthplace, which is now located in the Czech Republic, and spent a lot of time in Vienna walking around the places Freud must have frequented. I went to his house and scoured the bookshops, buying his books. It never worried me that it was a real character…"

Viggo Mortensen talking about Freud
"Freud was a great public relations person"
By Alex Vicente
Público.es – translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
4 September 2011




"I listened to music, looked at paintings, trying to find my face in those pictures. Walking down streets that you wouldn't have walked down. And you never know where that's going to take you. You're lost. I didn't have people with me smoothing the way, because then I wouldn't have learned anything."

Viggo doing research for Good in Germany
The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




"I wanted to go to Auschwitz, which I did, and I was looking around. I'd found a map that showed all the places where the camps were. I went to every single one. I drove like a maniac, day after day, and sometimes it was difficult to find them. People don't want to talk about it so much, and in most cases, there's just a plaque. The thing that was valuable was just standing there. It was spring, there were flowers, and the sky was blue. You sit on the grass and yes, you're moved by all these things and the ghosts that you can feel. I was thinking about the guards, the prisoners, the kids... but there were things that I didn't expect. It's hard to explain, but it just keeps opening and opening, and you can never stop learning."

Viggo Mortensen on preparing for Good
Play It As It Lays
By Philip Berk
Filmink
April 2009




The typical Hollywood leading man travels with an entourage between his palatial homes, five-star hotel suites and luxury trailers. He does not disappear alone for two weeks to meet the Russian mafia in the name of research.

Actor joins the underworld's shadowy cast
Ben Hoyle
The Times
October 17, 2007




"You say, 'Well, where's Viggo today?' " says David Cronenberg, recalling the conversation that happened more than once on the London shoot, last year, of the exceptionally fine new thriller, Eastern Promises. "And they say, 'Oh, he's in St. Petersburg.'

"And you say, 'What!? I thought he was at the hotel.' "

Star's Eastern Immersion Impresses His Director
By Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
16 September 2007




"I know everyone was a little bit worried because I disappeared for two weeks. They said I should have someone go with me into the underworld, but the whole point of me of going was not to get a filtered version of what Russians do and what they're like. "I just wanted to draw my own conclusions."

Viggo on his trip to Russia for Eastern Promises
Contactmusic.com
13 Sept 2007




"I met some people who were marvellous, who had backgrounds like my character, who had been in prison and were no longer involved with that life - or maybe they were, I was never sure," says the actor.

On travelling in Russia for Eastern Promises
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




'He called me once to talk about certain aspects of his character and history, such as Alatriste's birthplace. I had never detailed it in any of the five novels published up until now, but Viggo was interested in the fact. 'In Old Castile,' I responded. 'Could it be Leon?' he asked after thinking about it for a while. 'It could,' I responded. So then he went to Leon and walked about covering it inch by inch, remaining in each town, in every bar, talking with whoever happened to be in front of him. In effect, he finally concluded that Alatriste was Leonese. And he said it with such conviction that even I didn't question or argue the point.'

Arturo Pérez Reverte
El Semanal, July 2005-08-04
Translated by Elessars Queen




"I also tried to discover the Captain's soul; that's why I went to León..."

Viggo Mortensen on preparing for Alatriste
The Desired One
By Ester Aguado, Women Magazine, August 2006
Translated for V-W by Graciela




"You have to take into account,' he says, 'that Viggo is a cultured man and he finds out about the places he is going to shoot. In the case of León I know he has read a large number of books about that ancient realm, he knows its poets, writers, painters, its history and geography, and anything that refers to that land is followed with attention and kept.'

José Luis Pérez on Viggo's interest in León
Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León, by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




"I think this is the best way of getting into in the role (under the character's skin), knowing his roots, his environment, how the places where he grew are, how their houses are, what they eat, how the people live and speak. Without these premises you can never bring a character to life with credibility".

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen finds Alatriste in Curueño
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno, Diario de León, 20 March 2005
translated by Paddy




"It doesn't matter if your roots are in other place, the important thing is that when you arrive in some unknown place, that place captures you and you begin to be part of its idiosyncrasy".

Viggo Mortensen
One of León called Viggo
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
April 29, 2005
translated by Paddy




"Among actors, Viggo is completely unique in my experience because of his attention to detail; the research he did - months before we started to film - was incredible. He is an artist in his own right and brings an artist's sensibility to the process, as well as an actor's craft."

Paul Webster
Eastern Promises Production Notes
20 August 2007
Source: Focus Features

Quotable Viggo: 10 November 2013

I recently read a short article about 'unconventional heroes' – the main characters of graphic novels who aren't superheroes. Flawed men, often with a dark past, forced to act in heroic (though often questionable) ways by extraordinary circumstances. As A History of Violence is based on a graphic novel it had a brief mention. Of course, Cronenberg's film and Josh Olson's adaption moved a long way from the original story, but Tom Stall is still a flawed and ambiguous hero, so much so that critics couldn't decide – even when the truth was revealed - whether he was really a family man or a monster. A testimony, I think, to the power of Viggo's performance.



© New Line Productions Inc.


Stories about quiet men who unleash their gift for violence to save their families aren't exactly rare in American movies. After reading the script, which was inspired by a graphic novel, actor Mortensen wondered why Cronenberg took the project on. "I thought it was interesting, but most directors would make an exploitation movie out of it and it might have been interesting to look at, but not very thought-provoking. Obviously, he makes thought-provoking movies, so I wondered why he wanted to do this one. I asked him immediately. He gave -- and continues to give -- interesting answers."

American brutality, Globe and Mail Cannes Review
by Liam Lacey
May 17 2005




"It's true to when returning to the character of Joey, that we had also considered that that he wasn't necessarily a very violent person, but it was his environment in Philadelphia, with his brother who was from the mafia. He used this period of violence to survive like one of those things he knew about from cultural pressure it's that which moulded him. So, from the outset we don't necessarily see him as a violent person, pathologically violent, but like a normal person formed by social conditions. That's not to say he is more innocent than Ritchie for example. Because he feels remorse, we can see the physical consequences, but also the psychological consequences of violence: on his family and on him."

Viggo Mortensen
FNAC Masterclass - A History of Violence
22 October 2005
Translated for V-W by Kaijamin




'Tom is an anti-hero more than anything else. He's calm and composed from the outside, almost holding back. It allowed me to explore different realms than what I'm being offered right now.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Anti-Hero,
by Renaud Baronian,
Metro
18 May 2005




'Tom doesn't go from wearing a white hat to a black hat....David's hope, like mine, was that his transition would be subtle and that you couldn't really fix exactly when you feel it happens because it's normal for people not to show what they are thinking or feeling.'

Viggo Mortensen
Interview: Viggo Mortensen, By Ingrid Randoja
Famous, September 2005




His features themselves seem to evolve, soft at first and then growing hard, progressing (regressing) from cherubic choirboy to flinty-eyed thug and back again.

Rick Groen
The Globe and Mail
23 September 2005




One of the reasons why this film works so well is that Mortensen does a brilliant job at being such a humble, honest, hardworking man that we want to believe that's who he actually is. The more violent Stall's persona progresses, he is still the person we are initially introduced to. At least that's what I kept telling myself.

Christopher Childs
Twitchfilm.net
May 31, 2005




Viggo Mortensen is amazing, going through a subtle, slow-burn transformation, going from a sympathetic, harmless Everyman to a murderous monster.

Montreal Film Journal
19 September 2005




....equal parts Marlboro Man and Terminator.

A Nice Place to Film, but Heavens, Not to Live
Manohla Dargis
New York Times
11Sept 2005




Anchoring this fine film is Mortensen's Tom Stall - as iconic a cinematic hero if ever there was one - the kind of man everyone wants to be - all of the good things on the outside but a masterful warrior on the inside. The kind of man everyone fears because he is skilled and ruthless when he needs to be.

Sasha Stone
Santa Monica Mirror
28 September 2005




The horror creeps in slowly and when we become his captives, we too, face the dilemma like the un-knowing wife and the son who discovers a father he didn't know. Viggo Mortensen succeeds in presenting this human schizophrenic with those innocent blue eyes that can equally hide infinite cruelty.

Cronenberg's Violence
GLZonline Cannes Review, by Gidi Orsher, translated by Natica
May 2005




If you see this film twice, you'll see two different performances from Viggo, and that's the real genius of the movie. The first time through, you're watching him the same way his family is, accepting him as Tom Stall, loving family man, quiet and kind and nearly invisible. But when you see it a second time, you'll see Joey Cusack lurking behind those eyes, pushing through even in the moments before the thugs bring violence back into his life.

Moriarty
Ain't it Cool News
29 September 2005




With the smallest of moves, the most understated of plays, he connects us to Tom in ways few actors could. And it's this connection that allows 'Violence' to run so very deep, to shake us to the bone, to wake us up and get us asking questions.

David Cornelius
EFilmcritic.com
1 October 2005




Like his family members, we don't know whether to fear for him, or just fear him, in a world that's suddenly turned upside down.

Steve Murray
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
October 2005




Mortensen gives the most complete performance of his career here, creating an everyman with a talent we have to believe he's instinctually capable of, yet weary to have. He has to be noble, oblivious and lethal at a moment's notice. Like his family, we want him to be our protector but will still fear him once the box where he's been hiding has been opened.

Erik Childress
E Filmcritic
23 September 2005




'I think in the end the movie says, to me anyway, violence exists. It will always exist. But as a human being you have a choice to reject it, in the end you do have a choice, and that's what it's about.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen - Cannes Interview
ARTE TV, by Lionel Julien, transcription by Chrissie
16 May 2005



Quotable Viggo: 3 November 2013

Viggo has said repeatedly that you should never stop learning and we know it's one of the reasons he loves making films. He's often spoken of actors from his past that he's worked with and learned from. Now, it seems, it's his turn to inspire, with comments from Orlando Bloom, Karl Urban, Michael Fassbender and others revealing how much they gained from working with him. Barrie Osborne describes him as 'valuable as the leader of the cast' – not just because of his acting experience but because of his whole approach to making a film. It's nice to see the full circle of sharing. As Viggo says, 'It's a team sport'.



© Paramount Pictures.


"I think everybody finds Viggo to be a bit of a mentor because he's becoming a kind of—and certainly this is nothing that he would want—but I think he's becoming a kind of iconic figure in terms of how you should be an actor. Just your demeanor, your seriousness, but your sense of humor and the kind of research you do and your professionalism, and your loyalty to the project and to the people who are creating the project."

David Cronenberg
On the Analyst's Couch with David Cronenberg
Jenni Miller
GQ Magazine
21 November 2011




Bloom didn't skip a beat in saying fellow Lord of the Rings co-star Viggo Mortensen is the actor he's worked with who's had the most influence on his career....

"Viggo Mortensen had the biggest impact on me in terms of approach, dedication, intention, and artistic outlook and I'm nowhere close to how good he is as an artist and I wouldn't even put myself in the same category as an actor." said Bloom.

Orlando Bloom
Entertainment Weekly
10 October 2013




'Viggo came late to the project, but he brought a dedication and an understanding of the role that became an example, particularly to the younger cast members. You have to remember that this was Orlando Bloom's first movie. Not only was Viggo valuable in his performance, but he was valuable as a leader of the cast.'

Barrie Osborne
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan, Empire, December 2004




Who have you learnt the most from working with?

Viggo Mortensen, in terms of he way he approaches a scene, his commitment to the people he's working with and his follow-through in support of the film that he's made.

Karl Urban: I had 14 weeks of intense training to get fit for Dredd
By Andrew Williams
Metro
7 September 2012




"...he really reawakened in me a sense of the possibilities of what it can be as an actor enjoying a role."

Sean Astin
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today, 2001




'He's a very interesting guy. He writes poetry. He takes photographs. He's very artistically rich. I just tried to watch him and learn as much as I could.'

Michael Fassbender on meeting Viggo
Michael Fassbender Explores A Dangerous Method with Movie Fanatic
by Joel D Amos
Moviefanatic.com
25 November 2011




"Viggo is generous, he is constantly bringing small gifts. That must be a result of his education and the numerous trips he takes. And when you act with him in a scene, even when his part is done, he stays close to the camera in order to help you. We function very differently, especially in the way we channel our energy. He is always calm, and speaks softly. I have a more brutal side. I learned a lot from knowing him."

Vincent Cassel
Viggo Mortensen the Insatiable
Studio Magazine
By Sophie Benamon
November 2007




'I would say there's two roles that I would have liked to play and that I came within a hair's breadth of playing. One was right in the beginning, Greystoke—to play Tarzan. The other was the Willem Dafoe part in Platoon. The thing is, I didn't have the experience to deal with the consequences of being in a big studio movie playing a lead. I wouldn't have kept learning. I've been lucky to learn by playing all kinds of roles and watching all kinds of really good cinematographers, actors, and directors for many years before people were even aware of me in terms of audience.'

Viggo Mortensen, King of The Road
By Michael Mechanic
MotherJones.com
23 November 2009




"I loved working with Al Pacino. He was unusually generous for someone in his position. He has a very open mind, and a very open heart."

Viggo Mortensen
Uncut
November 2007




"He is a very interesting man, with a great sense of humour, very hard working and, above all, very generous and humble. You learn a lot from people like him."

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




Viggo talking about Omar Sharif:


"Not only was I working with this wonderful actor I knew best from Lawrence of Arabia - we were working in some of the same locations in Morocco where they shot parts of that movie 40 years ago. That was an amazing experience for me," Mortensen says. "I mean, to be working there with the man himself, Omar Sharif, was great just in terms of being a witness to film history.

"But it was even better to get to know that man as a human being. He's a very generous, extremely professional actor. It doesn't take more than a few minutes to tell that he's also a genuinely intelligent, well-read person. And he's got this aura about him that's beyond anything a lighting designer or a cameraman can do. He just has a certain gleam in his eye ... and that smile of his. He's so in the moment and so alive. He just radiates a love of life."

Mortensen wishes they'd had even more scenes together. "But I think the relationship between our two characters is a good one, a unique one. It shows how two very different cultures can connect."

Viggo talking about Omar Sharif
Viggo Mortensen: The Straight-Shooting Star of the New Western Hidalgo Talks about Movies, Myths, Cowboys, and Codes of Honor
By Joe Leydon
Cowboys & Indians
April 2004




"I accepted [the part of Lucifer], in part because I had always wanted to work with Christopher Walken," the actor says while sitting on the sofa's edge. His face lights up when saying Walken's name. It's evident that Christopher Walken is a cult actor for many young actors nowadays. "I would do any movie with him, no matter what [it was]."

On "The Prophecy'
Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995




'Watching Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington was pretty interesting; to be at several scenes when they're arguing in speeches and stuff. I'd say that's fun to watch those actors go at it like a sporting event and I had a front row seat. '

Viggo Mortensen on Crimson Tide
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
by Carnell
Carpe Noctem magazine #15, 1999




'[Harrison Ford] was most of all professional. Conscientious. Interesting to study. I had the greats before me: Peter Weir, above all, with his calmness and efficiency. In the evening, when I came back from my wandering, they let me watch the rushes. Witness was an idyllic experience.'

Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
By Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




"If I've learned anything these past years it's that everyone is in some way your superior. Every movie I've made has confirmed the fact that this is a team sport."

AFI Fest: Viggo and The Road
The Bloggomist: The Local Boy
Evil Monito Magazine
17 November 2009

Quotable Viggo: 19 October 2013

While filming recently with Lisandro Alonso, Viggo recalled in several interviews how he was revisiting places he'd been to as a child while on camping trips with his family. And during the filming of Todos Tenemos Un Plan we discovered that that as a boy he'd also been to the Tigre on fishing trips. His childhood in South America is something he's often asked about and has been the source of a lot of anecdotes about riding, hunting, adventures with animals, school, football, and a certain wistfulness that a disjointed childhood often left him without friends. It's a mix that has left a huge mark on him, influencing who he is today.



Viggo and Lisandro Alonos. Image Guadalupe Gaona.
© 4L Productions.



Do you feel nostalgic about that kid you were, who lived here?

"Ah…What one remembers from childhood is often mixed with things we are told. Memory is like poetry, just one version of reality..."

Viggo Mortensen: "Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
By Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Zooey
Gente
25 August 2009




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




'According to my mother I never went anywhere as a child without a pencil, and I drew all the time. Recently she gave me a notebook with some of my old drawings. I especially noticed one I drew when I was 7 - it was rather wild. On the top it said: 'Little Red Riding Hood', and then there were a lot of oil colours mixed together, almost abstract. I really liked it. But across the drawing it said with a red pen - and underlined: VERY BAD! Some teachers still think that is motivating...'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001




When Viggo was 7, his parents sent him to boarding school in Argentina. "It was a strict school, isolated in the foothills of the mountains," he said. "Other than holidays, I really didn't see my parents. The other kids were miserable, always crying or wetting their beds. But I was pretty self-sufficient. So I guess it must have suited me."

Back in the saddle 'Rings' hero Mortensen is riding high with 'Hidalgo'
By Nancy Mills
Daily News
25 February 2004




As an 8-year-old, Mortensen played "the ass end of a dragon" in a school play…

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"Every once in a while you do something really dumb when you're a kid and you realize when you're an adult that that's dangerous, but.. you know.. There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show, 2004




"I think by the end of the movie I had gotten back to where I was almost as good [at riding] as when I was a little boy. I'll never be that good because when you're a kid you're more flexible and more fearless. You don't care if you wipe out or fall off. As a kid you don't have the concept that you'll never break every bone in your body. Life is interesting and fun as a kid."

Viggo Mortensen talking about riding in Hidalgo
190 North Interview by Janet Davies, transcription by Mararan
Chigago, IL, 22 February 2004




'We lived in Buenos Aires, but most of all in the Chaco, where I learned to ride with my three brothers. My father, who is Danish and a farmer, would take us fishing and hunting. I shot a rifle for the first time when I was three years old. It's one of my first memories. He took me duck hunting, didn't have any luck, and when we were leaving I think that to amuse himself he asked me whether I wanted to kill a duck. It was dark and he said, "You're going to hear the flock pass over us. That's when you shoot.' He held me in his arms, if not the rifle would have made me go flying. The flock flew overhead, I shot and a dead bird fell out of the sky. My father was so shocked that he didn't stop me when I went into the lake to get the dead duck. It was very cold. He noticed, followed me shouting, and pulled me out of the water. We walked for a couple of kilometers. I remember I was trembling, soaking, and carrying the duck. I didn't want to let it go for anything in the world. At a nearby house, a family lit a stove and then dried my body a little; my clothes were soaking. My father carried me almost naked, wrapped in a towel. When we arrived home, my mom didn't understand at all. "Why is the baby blue? Why is he naked and trembling? Why is he clutching a dead duck?' She decided to give me a warm bath so I wouldn't get sick, but I wouldn't let go of the duck. She complained, but my dad convinced her to let me keep the duck. So that's how I took my bath, with the dead duck in my arms, I was towelled off with the duck, I had dinner without letting go of the duck and I finally fell asleep hugging the dead duck in my bed. When I woke up, it wasn't there anymore. I complained to my mother and she told me that we were going to eat it for dinner, because it was going to go bad. I think I didn't understand very well. But anyway, those are the kind of things that happened to me in Argentina with my father.'

The Late Show with David Letterman
November 2005




"I wrote [Chaco] while thinking about my childhood, the mental and physical strength children have: the daring, the innocent courage, the absence of prejudice, the visceral connection with nature, with the environment that surrounded me, which seemed to threaten me and embrace me,"

Viggo talking about his poem, Chaco
The Hidden Side of Viggo Mortensen
Fernanda Nicolini
Diario Crítica de la Argentina.
Translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
1 July 2009




"In the 60's, when I was between 7 and 9 years old, my father brought my brothers and I and our mother to that part of the country several times. Camping trips. At that time the roads were not as good as they are now. We travelled slowly and the landscapes seemed immense and beautiful to me. I remember that we once passed through Viedma (I suppose by way of Highway 3 from Bahía Blanca) and went along the coast as far as Península Valdés. Our car had a serious breakdown and we waited several days in Puerto Madryn until our car could be fixed. The peninsula and its animal life were not yet protected. We swam very near seals, elephant seals. At that time, there were people who killed many of those magnificent creatures with rifles and shotguns. My father loved those animals and that place - so much that I remember he wrote several times, as others did, to people in the federal government to ask that the peninsula be designated a National Park. I don´t know whether his letters helped, but finally it was decided to suitably protect that special place.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's a shame that the government has cleared the way for open-pit mining."
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Noticias Net-Rio Negro
21 April 2013




As a child he was a loner, which is unsurprising considering his peripatetic lifestyle. "I wrote stories and did a lot of drawing," he says. "It's why I'm comfortable being by myself and why I yearn for it at times."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




Up to what point has such a wild childhood, close to the land and in the middle of nature, shaped the way you see the world?


A great, great deal. Mother Nature is the first school. She makes you wise if you watch her. You learn the cycles and life and death. And you learn what it is to work hard from sun up to sun down (and get your hands dirty) and fight against (and with) the weather conditions. To live in Denmark and South America, and later return to the USA, made me learn there are many cultures, all very respectable, and many ways of seeing life. On the other hand, so much coming and going has left me without any roots (although I feel at home in many places) and has deprived me of good friends. Childhood friends. In truth, I miss that.

Multi-talented Hero
By J. A. - translated by NacidaLibre
Dominical
27 August 2006




".... there wasn't any sense of continuity like that, but I got to see a lot of things and learn a lot of things. And I learned to rely on my imagination, and on myself."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004

Quotable Viggo: 13 October 2013

Whenever Viggo is filming, one of the most often repeated stories from cast and crew is his gift giving – chocolates, sweets, books, bits and pieces relevant to the production. Alongside these are thoughtful gestures aimed at including and welcoming people, anything in fact to make the rigours of filming easier for all those involved. Charlize Theron called him a 'caretaker' and I've always thought what an apt description that is - and a great compliment.



Filming in Rio Gallegos, 27 May 2013.
© Rafi Castillo.



"I first got to know him on the phone," says Charlize Theron, who plays Mortensen's wife in flashbacks in The Road. "We would have lovely, long conversations. Viggo made such a point of wanting me to know that I was going to be completely supported. He's definitely a caretaker, which is a really beautiful quality, and a man of many passions – poetry, photography, books.... I arrived on set and there was a library in my trailer."

Beautiful Dreamer
By Holly Millea
Elle (U.S.)
October 2009




He gave presents every day.....An example of what Viggo Mortensen's participation in this Spanish project has been like is explained by Unax Ugalde: "When he knew about my big childhood fondness for Sugus sweets, one day I found on the floor of my dressing room the shape of my name all made out with sugus."

Unax Ugalde
The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García, El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




In addition to his charm and normalcy, Mortensen had given t-shirts designed by himself, mate and trinkets - every day he would arrive on set with bags of caramels, gum and more - given to the members of technical and artistic crew.

Alatriste Fights in the Streets, By Rocío García
EL PAÍS 1st Aug 2005
Translated by Elessars Queen




He was the one who read the most about the Golden Century's history. He sent books and CDs for all his casting colleagues to savour that time - "not to seduce or control what the others did, but to share what I had found out," Mortensen informs.

Viggo Mortensen
The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García, El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




"Viggo's like an ambassador of the production. He is incredibly generous, and has a wonderful effect of involving everybody."

David Cronenberg, Director
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




Each time the tracks in the street were swept away rapidly by the crew including Dennis 'the horseman'. All of a sudden Viggo Mortensen apppeared, grabbed a big broom and started sweeping vigorously alongside the crew Now that was different. Viggo Mortensen is definitely not afraid of hard work and dirt.........

Blogengeezer daflikkers.blogspot.com
24 October 2007




"There's rarely a day he doesn't show up bearing gifts of some sort from his different weekend jaunts," says his Appaloosa costar Renée Zellweger, "where he'll go find some really obscure village behind Taos somewhere and visit an artists' colony and bring back some wares to share."

Renée Zellweger
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




'Viggo Mortensen is the nicest, most artistic and most generous person I've ever met. And not only towards me, but he also has eye for the 'little/small people'. He gives you things all the time: his poems, paintings, pictures. I have to take all these things home with me to Paris.'

Omar Sharif
Source unknown




"At the end of shooting one day, we went out and had a drink and Viggo was just so encouraging of everybody he'd worked with, including the extras. He always had a kind word to say to everyone. And I don't know anyone who has a bad word to say about him. He bought flowers for all the extras on one incredibly rainy day. He was just really generous with his time but he never talked himself up."

Jed Brophy
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




Mortensen's humility and generosity turned his Rings co-stars into some of his biggest fans. They tell you of the time when a snowstorm shut down production. The cast was being transported to safety when Mortensen seized a four-wheel drive vehicle and drove back to the set in order to save the hobbits' four-feet-tall scale doubles from getting snowbound.

The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere
January 2003




'Viggo is just the coolest guy,' says Billy Boyd, the Scottish actor who played the hobbit Pippin in Lord Of The Rings. 'It's hard to say too much about how cool he is. If you spend enough time with people they will do something to piss you off, or that shows them to be just a normal human being, but I think Viggo does like to push himself to be just the best person he can, and that comes across.'

Billy Boyd
Lone Star
By Peter Ross
Sunday Herald, 2004




"He's a really beautiful, delicate artist of a man. He's nothing like any other actor I've worked with. I was doing Brotherhood, and he came to Rhode Island to hang out with me and my family so we could create a history between us."

Jason Issacs
Good premier, Toronto
7 September 2008




"It was a generous gesture of Viggo to do that. I don't want to get too soppy, but it made me feel incredibly warm towards him."

Jason Isaacs
Viggo Mortensen and Jason Isaacs Address Good and Wax Philosophical about the Nazis
by Brad Balfour
Huffinton Post
13 January 2009




A really nice box-office clerk (I'm not naming names) at a downtown Madrid theater discovers that Viggo Mortensen, whose girlfriend, a famous Spanish film star, was acting in a version (very poor, to be sure) of a famous play which was playing right there, has come to buy a ticket.

Quite possibly, Mortensen could have asked his partner for an invitation and that would have been that. Instead, he insisted on paying like any regular guy. The box-office clerk recognised him, and smiling, gave him a guest ticket. "How much do I owe you?" said Mortensen in his cheerful Argentinian accent. "No, no, nothing, you are invited," answered the box-office clerk. The Hollywood star thanks her cordially, goes, and ten minutes later returns with an ice cream for the box-office clerk! He insisted that she should take it, although she said she was on a diet, so he sweetened her afternoon. Anyway, when I grow up, I want to be Viggo Mortensen.

Where I said Viggo (Mortensen), I say Diego (Alatriste)
By Juan Luis Sánchez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Decine21.com
25 November 2011




"There is quiet leadership to him, and it's not intentional, and I think it's simply because he takes care of the people around him."

Elijah Wood
The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004


Quotable Viggo: 29 September 2013

In a couple of recent Sobrevuelos columns Viggo has mentioned his San Lorenzo shirts and it's pretty obvious that he attaches good luck for the team by having them around him. He even wrapped Schmidt's glass plates in them to keep them safe. It shouldn't be surprising that he's superstitious when it comes to San Lorenzo's success or failure as actors are a superstitious bunch generally. It's 'Break a leg' not 'Good luck' (it's bad luck to say good luck in a theatre) and, of course, never mention the Scottish Play. Viggo has a whole barrage of routines and lucky items when he's in production, but it's clear that it's not only about creating luck but also keeping to a ritual. Doing things properly so there is no invitation for things to go wrong. Keeping some order in the disordered life of someone who travels around a lot, so wherever he is he always feels at home.



© Viggo Mortensen.


What are those medals you're wearing?

Viggo Mortensen: For luck, this is San Lorenzo. This is Saint Christopher.

Viggo Mortensen Talks A History of Violence
By Julian Roman
23 September 2005
Source: Movieweb




"I believe in luck and in the thousands of ways attracting it. I can go into a Mosque, or into the San Isidoro of León Collegiate Church, and sit there until things happen. I love visiting temples, churches, places that are supposed to be sacred, and that includes a cinema or a theatre. Where there's acting, there's communion."

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008




"I have all kinds of little rituals, when I'm getting ready", he confesses with a slightly embarrassed laugh. "Before takes I dress in my costume in exactly the same way every day. If I do it wrong, I will do it all over again. I always put on my clothes in a certain order with my left sock first. There are also objects that I always carry around."

Viggo talking about getting ready to act
Verdensborgeren
By Patricia Danaher
Ekko Magazine
Translated by Estel
May-August 2012




Mortensen, who plays Sigmund Freud in the David Cronenberg film A Dangerous Method, says that he brought the spirit of his grandfather to the set with him.

"I have my grandfather's cigar box, a round, mahogany container," Mortensen says. "There's a scene in the movie where I hand Jung a cigar from a box and he declines. It was the one cigar left in my grandfather's box and one of my good-luck pieces."

Viggo Starring In Different Sort Of Psychological Thriller
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun-Times
8 December 2011




The actor, who constantly carried his sword and slept in his cloak during the whole year that the Lord of the Rings shooting lasted, this time walks around covered with a hat and wearing the boots of his Danish military character. Every evening, at dinner time, he goes round the tables reciting the scenes for the next day. He repeats, his lines with the other actors from the film, once, twice, ten times. He goes to see art director, Sebastián Roses, to spin him some ideas. Or, sometimes, present him with a bit of a dead animal. "I saw a fox at the edge of the road and I wanted to cut off his tail to be used in Zuluaga´s hairstyle (Ed. note: a war chief who dresses up as a woman and leads a gang of robbers.) But I was in a hurry and I thought it was a lack of respect towards the animal to do it like that. So I waited and went back another day; I did a little ritual and cut off his tail while asking forgiveness."

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France) May 2013




"I have Danish and American nationality. I have very strong ties with the country of my upbringing, Argentina, with many places. I'm not very fond of passports, borders or flags, but [laughing and pointing at the SL flag behind him] for San Lorenzo de Almagro, I do have unconditional love! They can almost do no wrong!

Out of superstition, that flag, or one like it, is everywhere, on a film shoot or wherever..."

Viggo Mortensen
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




"I put the script here, although I already know the text. I always have the script backstage. I have this owl with the bracelet in San Lorenzo colors; I touch the two eyes of the owl every night before I go on. I have a photo of San Lorenzo's first championship team in 1923, Father Lorenzo Massa, the Silesian who founded San Lorenzo, I have chocolate. I'm always eating..."

Viggo Mortensen talking about Purgatorio
Inside The Dressing Room
By - transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Mundo
15 December 2011




"The Danish managing team are drinking beer and wine in the bar where I´m chowing down before going to bed. Here, like everywhere in the North of Europe, people have dinner early, so the bar at the hotel was the only option to get a sandwich at this hour. I guess the players will all be in their beds, but when I saw the red sweatsuits of the managing team, especially Olsen´s gray-haired head, I thought I had to send them a round of drinks for good luck - theirs and San Lorenzo's. You never know..."

Against Hopelessness
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevuelos
Perceval Press
10 February 2013




The originals on glass plates on which Schmidt "meticulously captured the soul, the culture" of these peoples, were taken to the United States by Mortensen himself to submit them to a restoration process before returning them to the museum, which, by the way, has the poorest of budgets, he explained.

Mortensen himself related a pretty hilarious anecdote about the move to California: "I was very nervous," he said while dragging his "r's" in a perfect Porteño accent. "I took the hand luggage packed with these glass plates. I wrapped them in San Lorenzo t-shirts, partly from superstition and also for protection. I was afraid something would happen to them. I felt like [I did] the first time I put my son on a plane."

Viggo talking about Hijos de la selva [Sons of the Forest]
Rescued at the hands of Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Zoe
Terra.com.ar
17 September 2013




We had to win "do or die," I said. But no. I understand the rage you felt. It was the same with me. Here in Europe it was almost four in the morning when the match ended. I slept a bit during half-time and, since it was very hot here, I took off the Cetto t-shirt that I was wearing. I forgot to put it back on when the second half started. After the cannon shot from González, the result of the f****** rebound of a corner from Quilmes, I was deeply depressed. Looking at the floor, I saw the white "2" on the azulgrana t-shirt I had taken off. "I´m a jerk; that´s why we lost! Why did you throw the t-shirt on the floor like a miserable prick!" I said to myself aloud. "What?," asked my girlfriend, raising her head from the pillow, more than half-sleep. "Nothing. Sorry I woke you up, dear." Although, out of superstition, I have many rituals and habits, especially regarding CASLA, I know, of course, that we didn´t lose because I took the t-shirt off while I was watching the match on my laptop, thousands of kilometres away from Buenos Aires. I know it has nothing to do with it, but on the other hand, I also know you have to give everything everywhere as a supporter. That´s the way it is, you never know...

A Perfect Day
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
29 August 2013





During production on David Cronenberg's thriller A History of Violence last fall, Viggo Mortensen carried around a fish--a 12-inch, anatomically correct plastic trout. It was a peripheral prop, a toy brought in for his character's young daughter, but Mortensen decided to adopt it as a secret talisman of sorts. Every day, he tucked it into his back pocket, his cowboy boots, his bag, anywhere that was out of Cronenberg's sight. "It was like a compulsive thing after a while," the actor explains. "I felt like it was unlucky not to have the trout, so I would sneak it in. It became this game to see if I could keep getting away with it." He did--until the last day of shooting, when his finnish friend fell out...on camera. Says Mortensen, with just a touch of mischievous pride: "David saw it and was appalled."

History Teacher
by Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
19 August 2005




'Going to the airport last week, near Barcelona, someone stole my wallet with my license, bank and credit cards, CASLA membership card, family photos, a small antique medal, almost everything I need to travel....Today, a couple of hours ago, when I was already getting over the incident, the mossos called me to tell me that they'd just found my wallet. They told me that unfortunately the only thing in the wallet was my membership card. This could be seen as an insult - that the thief didn't think that such a thing could have any value - or simply as a bit of luck, a good sign. In reality, I think the thief didn't have enough intelligence to understand that that card was the most important of all the things in the wallet. Next week they're going to give me the wallet and my card, and I'll give them my thanks. I'm going to be very happy.'

Piece of Luck
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
25 July 2012




Viggo Mortensen loves rituals. He never changes his habits, no matter where he goes. For example, he enters the villa in Deauville – made available by the French top jeweler Cartier – in bare feet, as if he is in his own living room.

In his right hand, he is holding a cup with his favorite beverage: maté – an herbal drink from Argentina, the country where he spent the majority of his childhood. He also remembered to bring a silver straw, the bombilla.

The actor explains why he always behaves the same way, no matter where he is in the world. "In this business you're travelling half the time. Sometimes I feel like a world traveller who doesn't know where he'll sleep the next day. I am exaggerating a little, but I do value my habits, so I can quickly feel at home. If I don't, it takes me too long to adapt to strange surroundings. That's very important for an actor. That way he can more quickly concentrate on his role."


Viggo Mortensen Goes To Bed With A Shotgun
By - translated by Airwin
Algemeen Dagblad
27 April 2009

Quotable Viggo: 5 October 2013

The recent Empire Top 100 Sexiest Movie Stars made me laugh with its tongue-in-cheek comment that he spoke 'eleventy billion languages'. His multi-lingual capabilities always causes comment, from awe to mock-envy and everything in-between. As well as speaking English, Spanish and Danish fluently, and French and Italian pretty well (the former more than the latter), he's also braved Russian, Lakota, Elvish and a smattering of Japanese on screen. As he hones his French and learns some Arabic for Loin des Hommes it's no wonder that everyone's lost count...



Image Guadalupe Gaona.
© 4L Productions.[/SIZE]


He's like a one-man United Nations. As well as speaking about eleventy billion languages, Mortensen has made films all over the world and unites the film industries of Spain, the US and Middle-earth.

[I]The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




The Empire Icon award this year went to the disgustingly multitalented Viggo Mortensen, who speaks more languages than God, paints, writes poetry and still finds time to do a bit of acting.

Jameson Empire Award Winners Announced!
Helen O'Hara
Empire Online
30 March 2009




Mortensen speaks five languages, and seems happy to discuss football in all of them.

Interview: Viggo Mortensen, actor
Scotsman.com
9 February 2012




"... he has a musical ear for languages."

David Cronenberg
Mortensen, director discuss their noirish Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 September 2007




Viggo Mortensen isn't just a celebrity, as you're probably aware. He isn't even just a fine actor. He's also a painter, a poet and a photographer, and he makes records, too, often in collaboration with Buckethead, the masked wizard guitarist. In addition, he's also conversant in half a dozen languages — yet another body blow to an interviewer's self-esteem. But I soldiered on.

Viggo Mortensen On 'The Road,'
By Kurt Loder
MTV.com
25 November 2009




"Now, Viggo, you speak seven languages, you write poetry in three languages, Danish, Spanish and English, you ride horses superbly and you're a great swordsman and all our womenfolk are in love with you… do you understand how annoying you are?"

Radio interview with Richard Glover
ABC Sydney
24 March 2009




He's shy, but a bit of a motormouth (and can run on in at least six different languages).

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




Fandango:
This is your fourth Spanish language film. Will you be tackling any other languages in the near future? How many languages do you speak?

Mortensen:
This is my fourth Spanish language film but my first Argentinian movie. I learned Spanish and English at the same time. I'll be playing a Danish character next so I'll be speaking Danish, thanks to my father's side of the family I learned. At the end of the year I'll be playing a role in which I have to speak French and Arabic.

Viggo Mortensen on 'Everybody Has a Plan', 'Two Faces of January' and His Own Favorite Film
By Elisa Osegueda
Fandango Cine Latino
20 March 2013




Because he probably had time between art exhibitions, dashing off a book of poetry and ridding Middle Earth of Sauron, the man has managed to become fluent in more than a half-dozen languages.

He makes Spanish look effortless in this Argentinian film, where he plays twin brothers. Not can-you-direct-me-to-the-disco holiday Spanish, but that authentic, guttural Spanish that is spoken like machine-gun fire....

Viggo entertains in evil twin role
Cris Kennedy
29 June 2013




"I learned Spanish and English at the same time as a child, growing up in Buenos Aires. My brothers have told me that when I speak Spanish I'm slightly more relaxed. When I speak English I'm a little more careful. It has to do with the sound, with the language...."

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




"...if you learn a second language when you're young, it's easier to learn a third, and learn a different sound, a different rhythm, a different cultural background to the way you're communicating. I don't know what it would be otherwise. Maybe it would be my nature to be curious about the world even if I only spoke English and had never left the United States. There are people like that."

In Conversation With Viggo Mortensen
By Dorian Lynskey
Empire
March 2008




How come your Italian is so flawless?


VM: Because I spent many years in Argentina, where the Italian culture is deep-rooted, so I spoke Italian and Spanish fluently.... Moreover, ten years ago I even worked in Rome, and I have to admit that I deeply love the musicality of your language..."

Viggo Mortensen hero in Alatriste in the Spain of King Philip IV
By - translated by Cindalea
Corriere 17 October 2006




"Language changes you. The accent too, but the language, speaking a Latin language, compared with English or Danish in my case, is different; it changes you. I like the challenge, the transformation. I'm comfortable learning, adapting."

Viggo Mortensen - Todos Tenemos Un Plan Production Notes
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Todos Tenemos Un Plan website (Spain)
July 2012




'I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011

Quotable Viggo: 15 September 2013

Last week's LOTR Quotable contained a comment from Viggo about the Return of the King Premier: "I heard in my head a voice, my voice, saying, 'Remember this.'" The words sounded naggingly familiar. There was, I was sure, another moment that he never wanted to forget. One of those astonishing moments in life that are so exhilarating you want to catch them and hold on fast before they slip through your fingers forever. A little bit of digging and I'd found it ? a moment surrounded by hundreds horses in Montana. Which brings me to this week's horse theme. As Renée Zellweger commented during Appaloosa, "Look at that man ride!"



© Touchstone / Buena Vista Pictures.


That guy who looks great on a horse...

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




"You know, every actor you work with, you ask them, 'So, how do you ride?' And they always say, 'I ride excellently.' Viggo says to me, 'I ride O.K.' He gets on the horse, and he rides better than me."

Rex Peterson talking about Hidalgo
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine, January 2004




"I worked with him 12 years ago on horses, we rode together down by the Mexico border in Arizona while working on Young Guns 2.... when I heard that he was interested in the role [of Hopkins] I anticipated that kind of commitment to research and sure enough, days after he was cast he called me and said, 'Who do you know on Pine Ridge reservation and can I go there?' Within a week he was out with these Lakota horsemen and riding with them, and on a long ride to Wounded Knee."

John Fusco
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




"He did things on the horse that the stunt man had difficulty doing. He fell off the horse, he rode bareback, he jumped on the horse at a gallop, which is difficult to do, and he you know, he fell off a few times and he got knocked down and he got kicked a few times, but you know, he also got right back up and wanted to do it again. I think he knew that if there was anything that was really life-threatening, he would come forward and say, 'I don't feel comfortable doing this.' But he never did."

Joe Johnston
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




"I pretty much got to do [all the riding]," Mortensen says. "That's because I worked hard with the trainer, with Rex Peterson and with the stunt guy Mike Watson and with all the horses and because I rode as a kid, so I was comfortable, so they felt it was a worthwhile risk. I'm sure the producers sometimes were sweating it but sometimes you do take some chances in order to get something that you can't really buy otherwise, digitally or otherwise, especially with a movie like this which isn't a special-effects driven movie, you can follow me in one shot without cutting. You can be close on me and see what I'm doing. "

Viggo Mortensen
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




"There's a part of the body that we weren't aware of called the 'nacho'. In other words, it's sort of right in the middle, it's not your, uh, you know, up front and it's not your...and that got pretty sore. We got a nacho pad, but it was a little too late."

Viggo Mortensen on the agonies of riding bareback
'King' Star Returns To The Screen, Riding High
by Todd Camp
Star Telegram
6 March 2004




"They're sort of unruly these horses and they're already a pretty high-strung breed and we're all packed together knee to knee and once the horses realize what we're up to, they're all wanting to go and they're all wanting to kill each other. I'm on this little horse, which is effective visually because he's strong, but even though he's little he's got all this personality. He's a stallion who thinks he's pretty tough so he's wanting to pick fights. It was really the most worrisome moment in a way of the whole movie..."

Viggo Mortensen on the start of the race
Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, Mar '04




"TJ had a strong personality. He was smaller than the other horses and like a dog he thought he was BIG. Like the dachshunds that run around chasing big dogs. He's very smart. He's good at pretending he didn't hear you. He's very lazy. He definitely had a personality! I thought, "This is going to be a chore!" But we got to know each other and he's a smart animal. You're not going to be able to lie to that horse. You need to ask nicely."

Singin' in the Reigns
by Emily Blunt
The Blunt Review, Mar '04




"Last week we were filming Hidalgo in High Plains, Montana, where there was no fence for miles; you could just imagine that it was 1890 or 1790," he says. "I was in the middle of a herd of six or seven hundred horses. I was really aware of the fact that very few people would ever get to be in such a place. Nobody in the world gets to be in the middle of that many horses, running as fast as you can." And where does that thought lead you to, I ask. He pauses. "Just, 'Don't forget this'."

The New Hollywood Male
by Charles Gant
Arena Hommes Plus #18
2001




"I wanted the guy who I could ride next to on a horse for ten hours and never say a word and feel totally comfortable, and I figured he'd be the guy. He's the only man I wanted to play the role."

Ed Harris
TIFF: Riding Into Appaloosa with Ed Harris, Renee Zellweger, Viggo Mortensen, and Jeremy Irons
By Jordan Riefe
The Dead Bolt
13 September 2008




"Rex selected two very impressive steeds for Cole and Hitch to ride because when they first come into town, they want to make an impression. They come in on horses that are much bigger than the other ones in town."

Viggo Mortensen
Appaloosa: Shooting Ed Harris' Western
Emmanuellevy.com
August 2008




"When I first had it, I said, `Do you really need it to be an eight-gauge, Ed?'... It's not that manageable, it's not going to be accurate at much distance. I said, `I'm not going to shoot that thing off a horse, because I'd get blown off the horse, realistically.'"

Mortensen Packs a Big Gun
By David Germain
Associated Press
17 September 2008




The two horse team was getting a little fidgity. Viggo Mortensen walked over to the horse nearest him and started caressing its right flank slowly, and repeated it over and over, while talking to Renee, standing in the buckboard. The horse relaxed along with its teammate.

Blogengeezer daflikkers.blogspot.com
24 October 2007



"I can't lie to you, I had a lot of fun riding around on horseback?"

Viggo Mortensen on filming Appaloosa
CBS News Interview
8 September 2008




It takes a thoroughbred star like Mortensen to make the bond between man and horses believable...

From hobbits to horses
Jennie Punter
The Globe and Mail
5 March 2004

Quotable Viggo: 8 September 2013

It's that time of year again ? the nights are drawing in and I'll be digging out my LOTR box sets and spending a few hours with our favourite Ranger. And the Hobbits (of course!). Along with the films I'm going to indulge myself by watching all the extras again, as it's been a while! To get myself in the Middle-earth mood I thought I'd do a round-up of LOTR quotes that capture some of the spirit of one of the best movie adventures ever, along with a photo from one of my favourite moments:



© New Line Productions Inc.


"I guess in the end I did it because I would feel that I had been chicken shit really. I had to leave the next day, so I'm on the plane reading, looking at this gigantic book and thinking, 'What the hell have I done?"

Viggo Mortensen on accepting the role of Aragorn
The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent
Black & White magazine 2001




"...the first day I met the fight choreographer, Bob Anderson, who's been around a long time - he taught Errol Flynn to fence and represented the UK at the Olympics. I went into this room and there were all these stunt people standing there and screaming and yelling. He had them all pumped-up and he stood me in front of them and said "Okay, go!" And they all started running at me, and I was like, "Holy shit!" He said "stop" and they all stopped. Then he told me: "This is what you're going to be dealing with so let's get to work..." He gave me a sword and it was just, like, crazy for two days. The first thing I did on camera was swordplay and I liked it. It was fun."

Viggo Mortensen
The Ranger - Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn
by Martyn Palmer
Total Film magazine, 2002




"...the costume seemed almost to blend with his body. [pause] You know, I really do think that particular costume is incredibly beautiful. It seems funny, perhaps, to talk about something that is so worn and broken down, so darned and patched, as being beautiful - but it is to me."

Ngila Dickson
The Making of the Movie Trilogy




"From the moment that I saw him onscreen," says Otto, "I thought, 'Shit, he looks incredible. Here's a character I don't have to pretend to be in love with.'"

Miranda Otto
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"Viggo's our king. He's one of my favourite people in life."

Elijah Wood
Viggo Mortensen
By Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




"I read an article that said, 'Finally, someone's found the niche for Viggo Mortensen: the rugged hero who has a deep intellect and a great humanity. That's what Aragorn is, because Viggo has brought that to it. He's very like that as a human being."

Bernard Hill
It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




"Watching the dedication of Viggo Mortensen is really inspiring. He is Aragorn. One time I wanted to film the sunrise and sunset for a Fellowship scene. Viggo said, "I'll just camp out," and pretty soon, we had everyone there--the makeup crew, Orlando Bloom and other cast members who weren't in the shot, like Miranda Otto and Bernard Hill. We made a big fire, camped out, filmed our early sunrise shot and went fishing. It was great!"

Barrie Osborne
Source Unknown
2003




"On the fifth take, Viggo kicked the helmet, screamed, clenched his fists and dropped to his knees. I thought he was just doing some powerful acting. But then I noticed after I said 'cut' that he wasn't saying anything. Finally, he did the next scene limping."

Once they had finished filming, Jackson made the actor take off his boot.

"His toes were broken. Normally, an actor would yell 'ow!' if they hurt themselves, and stop the scene. Viggo turned a broken toe into a performance that's a great moment in the film."

Two Towers 'bloodier, more compelling'
New Zealand Herald
7 December 2002




"?I would say probably 95% of the work that you see as Viggo onscreen is completely computer generated, because he has a wooden leg and he can't run."

IGN Interviews Dominic Monaghan
December 2003




'We were dirty, freezing cold or dying of heat. We were really uncomfortable. That was the beauty of the project. I felt like it was true.'

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of the Rings: The Untold Story
By Ian Nathan
Empire
December 2004




"At midnight, a nine-page handwritten memo would come rattling through the fax from Viggo, outlining his thoughts about that day's work and the next few days to come. He would suggest passages from the book we should look at. This wasn't an exception - over 15 months it became the rule. In the small hours, it was actually comforting to know there was somebody else out there grappling with the same nightmare that we were."

Peter Jackson
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"It was sad and happy at the same time. Terrible and confusing. The end of such an adventure."

Viggo Mortensen on the last day of filming LOTR
Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen,
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




"I felt I had to do other things than just act,' he says. 'That's why The Lord of The Rings answered my desires. There was art, poetry and acting all in one role. Even if I live to be 100, I'll never forget the thrill and the memory."

Viggo Mortensen
I've Loved All My Leading Ladies
by Garth Pearce,
Now magazine, 2002




"We walked on a red carpet about four football fields long. All of a sudden, the sound of the crowd all blurred together. It was a perfect sunny day. It wasn't windy in a town that usually is windy. I looked up and saw people in every window in every house. Just the faces, how happy they were. I heard in my head a voice, my voice, saying, 'Remember this.' "

Viggo Mortensen on the ROTK Premier in NZ
It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today, 2003




"I heard Lord of the Rings win their first one and I thought, 'Well, I can lie here in the dark like an idiot, or I can go out and be a man and sit in the kitchen and watch it with everybody else."

Viggo Mortensen on trying to avoid the Oscars at a friend's house
David Letterman Show, 2004




"I think it's so powerful because aside from the great special effects, it's also very human. You can sense the values of the people involved, the group ethic, their imperfections, the emotions, exhaustion and commitment. In 20 or 30 years from now, some of the special effects will still hold up but what will always hold up is the intention, feel, emotion, commitment and that palpable intensity."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




"...you look back on these things 10 years later and ask yourself, 'Who had a major impact on me?' As an actor, it was Viggo. I was unpacking a load of boxes recently, recounting old memories, and I remembered how lucky I was that he was around me at that time."

Orlando Bloom
April 2011
Shortlist.com


Quotable Viggo: 1 September 2013

One of the things that fascinates me about Viggo is the way he seems able to play with time (wouldn't he make a great Doctor Who?). He is full of restless energy and drive, involved in a multitude of projects, yet no matter how much he does he seems to have endless time for everyone he meets, and comes across as both dynamic and seriously chilled at one and the same time. And the older he has become the more he seems able to balance both. I think it all comes down to how time is used and that phrase that he uses constantly: 'paying attention'. Viggo seems to me to be a man who packs life into every moment, but that doesn't always mean being busy. It's more a state of mind.



Ringsted Kongrescenter, Denmark - 1.29.09.
© Dagbladet Online.



"I think five minutes can be an eternity if it's well used, you know."

Viggo Mortensen
The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




Viggo Mortensen has earned a reputation for having endless energy, for being consummately curious. He drives himself hard in all aspects of his life... He is a connector, the agent who brings people and ideas and feelings together in ways that transcend customary forms of expression and measures of success.

Daniel F. Sullivan introducing Viggo
St. Lawrence University
March 1, 2003




"Certain people don't have a lazy bone in their body," says his good friend, producer Don Phillips. "Viggo is that kind of person who has to be continually on the move. He may sometimes bitch and moan about it, but he loves being busy."

Don Phillips, Producer
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




....despite his serene composure, you sense an invisible thread of unrest hanging off him, just waiting to be pulled. That unrest may be why he paints, writes and takes pictures, and a similar unrest drives his movie counterpart, Aragorn.

A Man Apart
By Ingrid Randoja
Famous, 2003




What is your biggest fear?

Not being honest with myself and not getting the most out of life. This is one of the reasons I stay very active, always doing things that interest me in the field of art, by editing books, writing, drawing, painting, photography?

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Interview: "This film has made me feel closer to my father"
By Laura Sacksville - translated by Ollie, Rio and Sage
Cuore
13 February 2010




"Life is so short! I tell myself frequently to "Go slow to go fast", to remind me to take my time in order to sample as many things as possible."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




"One of the best pieces of advice I ever got was from a horse master," he tells me. "He told me to go slow to go fast. I think that applies to everything in life. We live as though there aren't enough hours in the day but if we do each thing calmly and carefully we will get it done quicker and with much less stress."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




Mortensen is not what Tolkien's Treebeard would call "hasty."

After Aragorn
By Jeffrey Overstreet
ChristianityToday, 2004




The brevity of life and the importance of grasping the day are, one quickly learns, big themes for Mortensen. The sound of time's winged chariot is very loud in his ear, it seems, and the imperative to "use time well" crops up repeatedly in his conversation?

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




"Time passes, the world changes, people evolve and it's nice to stop every now and then and not do anything. I want to imagine things that interest me, to give myself time to get excited about something."

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm a guy who sticks his nose in everything"
By Stuart Gollum
Gala Magazine
30 August 2006




"We each have only a limited amount of time here. We have to do more with it - pay attention, explore, be open to all of life. Because we have only one chance, we have to make life seem longer than it really is."

Viggo Mortensen
I Still Ask Why
Dotson Rader
Parade magazine, 2004




"...I know I can't read all the books or watch all the movies in one lifetime." Does he find that frustrating? Mortensen fixes me with his intense blue gaze. "Mostly no," he says. "If we could run out of books and movies, then we would be bored."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




How long would he like to live?

"Forever." Without hesitation.

Really? Wouldn't you get bored?

"There's no excuse to be bored," Mortensen says. "Sad, yes. Angry, yes. Depressed, yes. Crazy, yes. But there is no excuse for boredom, ever."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine, January 2004




You are really fit. Are you worried about age?

"Not about age, I am 50 years old, but time worries me ever since I was a child. Sometimes I would wake up and think: what a pity, I'll die without being able to finish all the things I have to do in this life. That annoyed me. I'm not afraid of death; it is anger about the limits of time."

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
November 2008
Source: Vanity Fair (Spain)




With so many active interests, Mortensen admits he used to be impatient. "It felt unjust that we were given such a limited period on earth, but I don't feel that way any more. Maybe it's because I'm getting older, but I just figure, eh, what's your hurry?'"

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009

Quotable Viggo: 24 August 2013


Ah ? Method Acting. What is it? And does Viggo do it? It's a description that comes up a lot when people are talking about Viggo but, I've discovered, it's something very hard to define. Coming from one of Stanislavski's theories of 'theatrical truth' and put into practice by Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio, it's all about... um... becoming the character, drawing on the actor's imagination and personal experiences, living the role outside of performances, finding your motivation... isn't it?


[QUOTE]If one listens to either its critics or supporters Method Acting is described as a form of acting where the actor mystically 'becomes' the character or tries to somehow literally live the character in life. Like all clichés, both explanations are false. When Lee Strasberg defined what is popularly known as Method Acting he used a simple declarative sentence: "Method acting is what all actors have always done whenever they acted well." From the Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute [/QUOTE]
For a bit of fun I've divided the Quotes into those who think that Viggo is a Method Actor, those who see beyond the label (that would be Cronenberg, of course), and Viggo's own thoughts on his own work. And he should know.




Image Macall Polay.
© 2929/Dimension Films.



For


I have spent much time preparing for this moment. Mortensen is a devoted method actor and so, in his honour, I've been experimenting with method interviewing. Just as he immersed himself in cigars, antiquarian books and Viennese copperplate script in order to play Sigmund Freud in David Cronenberg's new film A Dangerous Method, I've been wallowing in Mortensen trivia.

Viggo Mortensen Interview
By Lucy Kellaway
Financial Times
10 February 2012




"He's a method actor like DeNiro and Daniel Day-Lewis," said producer Bob Weinstein, while relaxing on a banquette last night at SL in Manhattan's meatpacking district, where the after-party of the film's New York premiere was held last night.

Viggo Mortensen Looks On The Bright Side: "You Could Always Be Dead"
By Jeffrey Podolsky
Wall Street Journal
17 November 2009




Viggo Mortensen is a character actor at heart, he's a method, no-restraint genius who looks like a mechanic, crossed with zoo keeper, crossed with a brooding former model turned emotionally-tortured bad boy. I need to stop holding that against him. If not for my own credibility, so he won't steal my girlfriend and kill me with his bare hands in my sleep on his way to winning at least three Oscars before he's done.

20 Actors Who Deserve Your Support
By Josh
Cinema Blend
22 August 2010




"He's very intense. He's very Method. There's no stopping him. He was starving himself. He was going out, rolling in the snow and sleeping in his wardrobe and rubbing the dirt in his eyes and face, I mean, it's extraordinary. It makes the performance all that more incredible."

Hillcoat talking about Viggo
John Hillcoat Hits The Road
By Edward Douglas
Comingsoon.net
19 November 2009




... Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn seems to be accurately pacing his character's evolution from wary nomad to monarch. A gifted method actor, Mortensen is said to have travelled to the Waikato set in the horse float, with his horse. He also shunned motel comfort and chose to stay in rundown huts nearby, without electricity. The man IS Aragorn.

Gordon Campbell
Listener
October 21, 2000




'He's a method actor. He is able to scream loudly if he has to - just watch G.I. Jane. He's an excellent actor, but a shy actor'.

Michael Douglas
By Cindy Pearlman
The Chicago Sun-Times
1998




Mortensen downplays the Method-acting mind-meld rumors. "The truth is that we worked six days a week and 17 hours a day, and then rehearsals on Sunday. Basically, I was kind of in costume most of the time. It's not that I had nothing else to do and was running around as Aragorn in town."

It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyn
USA Today, 2003



Against



He's obsessive about his craft, but there's more to Viggo Mortensen than daffy Method acting...

Viggo Mortensen On 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




'He's a marvel. He's not a method actor; he's Viggo before and after you say "Cut." And yet he knows how to embody and inhabit his character and to become him.'

David Cronenberg
Q+A : David Cronenberg, Film Festival Preview
nowtoronto.com
30 Aug 2007




"?.it's not what you think when you think Method Acting. He didn't ask us to call him the character's name; after cut he's still Viggo, you can still joke with him. But he filled his trailer with Russian stuff and his apartment is covered with research materials, and he carries things on his body that remind him of the character. But it's all done in a very light way; it's not heavy, and it isn't silly. It's very natural and very organic."

David Cronenberg
FutureMovies.com
Coco Forsythe
19 October 2007




"he? takes the best out of Method and leaves the bullshit behind."

David Cronenberg
The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008



And what Viggo has to say


'I don't think there is any such thing as "Method Acting" because method is "what works," you know?'

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




People always call him a method actor, which winds him up. 'I have no idea what method actor means,' he says wearily. 'Okay, I know what they're driving at. That I'm obsessive preparing for roles.'

Stories of how far he'll go getting into character are legendary. For the record, he never slept with his sword filming 'LOTR' - though he did keep his costume on during filming to give it a lived-in feel. 'I try to research or make up for myself what happened in any character's life,' he explains. 'From when he was born until the first page of the script. I fill in the blanks.'

He stops to knock back the last of drop of espresso. 'And not to be underestimated in all this is showing up on time. And treat people like you'd like to be treated. Those are my methods. Show up on time and be nice.'

Viggo Mortensen: 'I'm obsessive preparing for roles'
Time Out
31 May 2013




"... the right method is whatever works for you. And what works for me on any given day is going to be different. It's going to depend on things like, does the director, or do the other people involved, want to rehearse? Do they believe in rehearsing? How do they rehearse? Do they like to improvise or not? How do they want to shoot the scene? Is it all one master, or is it bits and pieces? What kind of character am I playing? Does he talk a lot, or does he not talk much? Do people speak quickly? There are so many factors. If you have only one way of doing it, you're selling yourself short and depriving yourself of a fuller experience, and possibly of delivering better work to the director, to use as raw material in building a story."

Viggo Mortensen
Tasha Robinson,
The Onion
2004


Quotable Viggo: 18 August 2013

A couple of weeks ago I did a round-up of quotes about Todos Tenemos Un Plan, mainly because the release has been on-going over such a long period of time that I really wanted to re-visit the film and pull together all the more recent thoughts that had been expressed in interviews. The same applies to the reviews. So many have come out since I last did a review Quotable and ? in amongst some mixed reactions to the film - such good things have been said about Viggo's performance, that I think it's worth presenting them together in case you've missed any of them.



Image John Harris.
© 20th Century Fox/Haddock Films.



I already knew Mortensen as a versatile actor who could nail macho opacity ("Eastern Promises"), toxic alpha maleness ("G.I. Jane"), flamboyant, Method-flavored intensity ("The Indian Runner") and other spots on the Leading Man spectrum. But what he's doing here is even more impressive because it erases the memory of everything you've seen him do before. If he'd been credited with, "And Introducing Viggo Mortensen," I doubt anyone would have complained. It's a discovery performance that would have launched an unknown actor toward stardom, but it's being given by someone you've watched for years. Neat trick, that.

By Matt Zoller Seitz
rogerebert.com
16 March 2013




Mr. Mortensen, who grew up in Venezuela and Argentina and speaks a fine, mumbly Spanish, does an excellent, unflashy job of making the two brothers distinct. The dead-eyed Pedro has an extra layer of scruff that the sad-eyed Agustín can't approach, even with his beard and his dingy sweaters and flannels.

And Mr. Mortensen keeps you watching, even when the movie's storytelling underwhelms. But "Everybody Has a Plan" is less about story than about texture and atmosphere. They stay with you, as does the haunted visage of Agustín, drifting on the delta waters.

Rachel Saltz
New York Times
22 March 2013




A lesser actor would make the whole thing look gimmicky. Not Mortensen, who's fierce, totally immersed and utterly convincing as both brothers.

Cath Clarke
Time Out London
17 October 2012




Viggo Mortensen is one of those people. You probably sat near one in high school, or have one on your floor at work. Good looking, effortlessly talented across a range of fields, just so perfect at everything you want to run them down with your car.

Because he probably had time between art exhibitions, dashing off a book of poetry and ridding Middle Earth of Sauron, the man has managed to become fluent in more than a half-dozen languages.

He makes Spanish look effortless in this Argentinian film, where he plays twin brothers. Not can-you-direct-me-to-the-disco holiday Spanish, but that authentic, guttural Spanish that is spoken like machine-gun fire....

Mortensen is as good as expected, significantly different as the two brothers, and not just because one had a beard and coughs up blood while the other is clean-shaven.

Viggo entertains in evil twin role
Cris Kennedy
29 June 2013




... his performance is the riveting fulcrum that holds together a stately narrative and turns an intriguing premise into an impressively gripping fable.

Paul Fairclough
Little White Lies
1 June 2013




Mortensen is quite superb as the two chalk-and-cheese brothers.

Radio Times
1 June 2013




Evoking memories of things like A Simple Plan, Sommersby (and its progenitor The Return of Martin Guerre), Dead Ringers, TV's Dexter and fellow Argentine thriller The Aura, it begins with a jolting almost Lynchian shift between two "worlds" before the puzzle pieces slowly fall into place and the film's thrilling but taut sense of menace and danger kicks in. Surrounded by a fabulous collection of character actors with memorable phsyiogs, the eclectic actor not only proves his range but also his adeptness at Spanish (honed from spending half his childhood in Argentina while his father worked on chicken farms and ranches), as well as again proving his ability (previously best showcased in the likes of A History of Violence and Eastern Promises) to mix gentle grace with simmering violent tendencies.

James Croot
Stuff NZ
19 June 2013




Mortensen puts in a fine pair of performances in the lead roles, inhabiting Agustin with a nervous energy and Pedro with a sleaziness that allows him to play against himself effectively. This is rarely embraced as a gimmick, with the two characters only sharing one or two scenes, and allows the actor to show off quite a range.

Sam Faulkner
Screen Geek
17 October 2012




The atmosphere can be cut with a machete, but the plausibility resides in Mortensen's distinctive performances rather than in the narrative itself.

Philip French
The Observer
3 June 2013




Mortensen is brilliant in both roles, able to pull off gruff and taciturn as one twin (he is at his best in roles that require him to say little and feel a lot) and ultra conventional, pretending to be gruff and tactiturn, as the other.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




...the ever-impressive Mortensen grounds the intrigue in his dual personas, an achievement for the actor not in his convincing mastery of aptly mumbled Spanish (with La pistola de mi hermano and Alatriste also on his resume), but in the effortless variance he affords the two distinctive characters. As Agustín, he sulks with a restless loss of purpose; as Pedro, he inhabits the steeliness of confidence; as the former becomes the latter, he bridges the gap with moody, brooding intensity. Indeed, his is a performance that expands to fill the void left by the lightness of details, offering a lingering reminder of how little he has been seen on screen in recent years. His dominance may have not been the filmmaker's plan, but the feature is all the better for it.

Sarah Ward
Trespass Magazine
28 June 2013




It is his performance that really will keep you watching; he has always been an actor that demands your attention but this dual role heightens that further. He switches between the two brothers with total ease and it is fantastic to watch.

Helen Earnshaw
Femail First
31 May 2013




If you, for some reason, want to watch Viggo Mortensen watching Viggo Mortensen take a bath, then, my friend, your luck is in ? as the renowned star of The Lord of the Rings franchise turns in one of the finest performances of his career, taking on the role(s) of identical twins in Ana Piterbarg's intense, if somewhat unfulfilling drama Everybody Has a Plan.

Stefan Pape
Heyuguys.co.uk
28 May 2013




The problem there is the murder story isn't all that interesting and, in truth, Piterbarg doesn't seem all that interested in it either. What gets her attention, and what holds ours, is how great Mortensen is. He works hard to make it look effortless but it's hard playing three characters: Pedro, Agustin and Agustin-as-Pedro, which is different again.

After the intriguing opener the story just fades away. Mortensen's performance, however, might just be worthy of the admission price.

Gavin Burke
Entertainment.ie
14 May 2013




Mortensen is on top form - twice over - but while the noir mood gathers like a black cloud, the story frustrates.

Andrew Osmand
Empire Magazine
14 May 2013


Quotable Viggo: 4 August 2013

Todos Tenemos Un Plan is still opening in new places and gradually finding its audiences. Looking back over my quotes I realised that since the last Quotable I did on it, I've acquired a whole bunch of new, insightful comments - mainly from Viggo's many promotional interviews - on the filming process, the main themes which run through it, and the challenge of playing twins. This is, after all, the film where you get two Viggos for the price of one. Or ? going by the comments below ? even three!



© 20th Century Fox/Haddock Films.


"I'd always thought I'd love to be able to say I'm part of its movie history,"

Viggo talking about filming in Argentina
'If I think a film's beyond me ? that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




"I was raised in Argentina until I was 11 and now I go back there a lot, at least twice a year. It's a country where I feel very comfortable and it represents an important period in my life. There is a scene where someone shouts at Agustin when he is masquerading as Pedro: 'You will never be like Pedro. You will never be from here.' That had a real resonance for me. It made me think of my own experience. You can't really go back to where you came from. I don't think any of us can."

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




"What I liked right away, and continue to like very much, are the contradictions, the duality it has, not just between the twin brothers I play but also the scenery, the city, and the river."

Viggo Mortensen
Mortensen faces the "mental challenge" of playing both twin brothers in 'Todos tenemos un plan'
By - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zoe
Terra.es
9 August 2011




"Plans," shares Mortensen, "are like conscious dreams, longings, but they never come to be, and that has to do with the film being called that, but it doesn´t mean that they´ll be realised."

Viggo Mortensen Doubles As Twins In The Argentinean Todos Tenemos Un Plan
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Razón
5 September 2012




'Like a lot of unique movies, it took years to get together. Two or three years, probably. I kept working on her and said, "I want to be a producer. I've never done it before, but I want to do it." I wanted to make sure that whatever happened, her vision got to the screen. As a producer, I had a little more say, and I could say, "Well, let me see the script with subtitles and let me correct them."'

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




'It was a good decision to shoot in the winter because it gave character to the movie. But it put us under more pressure, too, because there were fewer hours of daylight. It was cold, and the weather was quite changeable. But it was beautiful.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




"It's like working with any creature ? horse, dog or bee. If you're calm you won't get kicked, bitten, or stung." Did he get stung? "No," he says with a small smile. "I was lucky. And I made my own honey. I've still got a couple of jars."

Viggo on working with bees
Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




'What was surprising ? and what probably distracted me from the fear of being stung ? was the noise. One bee buzzing close to your head is quite loud, but imagine thousands. Your world closes off and you become very focused on what you're doing, because you can't really hear what other people are saying.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




Was it a challenge to create those distinct personalities?

The most difficult thing was trying to act badly when Agustin is trying to impersonate Pedro. It's sort of an impossible task. He can't do it that well because he hasn't seen his brother in years and yet you're trying to do this in a way where you're not being overtly comical or exaggerating too much.

Viggo Mortensen Goes Back to His Roots for 'Everyone Has A Plan'
Staticmultimedia.com
19 April 2013




"These complicated men feel no great love for one another. But they both carry good and evil within themselves. That's why I needed Viggo to make them real....Viggo's talented and cultured, but he can also be brutal on screen. Without that quality this film would have flopped."

Ana Piterbarg
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013




EA: Do you relate more to Agustin or to Pedro?

VM: None of them, but while we were shooting, it would vary. If I was playing Agustín for a long time, I would miss Pedro. He was fun, he says what's on his mind and that makes him a very attractive character to play. But at the same time, it is a difficult person to see everyday or to live with. Then, If I was playing Pedro, I wanted to play Agustín and Ana agreed with me. I love them both very much. One character is more subtle than the other.

Viggo Mortensen Returns to his Roots with "Todos Tenemos Un Plan"
by Lydia Aquino
Entertainment Affair
2 April 2013




'The lie brings Augustín to the truth and the proximity to death, the possibility of death, brings him closer to life.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"The main character lives through a process opposite to that of the first Cronenberg films I made. But he becomes, as well, a third person who has nothing to do with who he was or with his brother. Suddenly he comes to terms with where he is, he likes the place and he doesn´t care whether he is called Pedro or Agustín."

Viggo Mortensen
Soledad Villamil - Viggo Mortensen: Brothers In Arms
By Nazareno Brega - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012




"There's a saying in Spanish: Without risk there's no glory," Mortensen explained. "You can live a safe little life, but if you don't take a chance once in a while you'll imprison yourself. That's the whole point of our movie."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013


Quotable Viggo: 28 July 2013

After the recent reminiscing from Milailoff about acting with Viggo on Leatherface: TCM 3, I thought I'd round up some of the comments from others who have taken a look back to their early days working with Viggo. Harlin and Penn took one look and just hoped he could act, Philip Ridley saw him as a 'kindred spirit' while Nicole Kidman saw him as the ideal 'Campion Man'.



© New Line Cinema.


Leatherface: TCM3

"He was very cool," Mihailoff says. "Let's face it: At the time, he wasn't 'Viggo Mortensen,' you know what I mean? He wasn't the star he is today for sure, but he was a very serious, intense guy. We only had a few scenes together, but I remember very distinctly what a good actor he was. When they give me the hotrod chainsaw in the movie [more on that a little later], I'm like a big kid at Christmas ? I can't believe it and I just keep swinging it around. And Viggo ?I saw this in the dailies afterwards ? Viggo ducks, and it wasn't rehearsed and it wasn't scripted. But it was very intelligent reaction to what I was doing."

R A Milailoff
'Texas Chainsaw Massacre': Leatherface actor R.A. Mihailoff by the numbers
By Matt Wake
AL.com
17 July 2013




Viggo, just like everyone else in the cast was always there, ready to go and had great ideas. Just a joy to work with, and I'm not just saying that. I can guarantee his approach to stuff now is exactly the same as it was then. He's just so committed and he's such a really good guy. All the family members were great.

Interview with Director Jeff Burr
Icons of Fright
by Robg. & Mike C
October 2011




Prison

Review Fix: What was it like to work with Lane Smith and a young Viggo Mortensen?

Harlin: It was great to work with both, Lane Smith and Viggo Mortensen..... I met with about 80 young Hollywood actors for Viggo's part. I couldn't find the one. I was looking for a young James Dean. Then, Viggo Mortensen walked into the room. I knew almost instantly that he was the one. There was such a charisma about him. I really thought that this film would make him a household name. Unfortunately, since the film wasn't really released theatrically, it took Viggo a little longer to get there, but he still got there eventually.

Review Fix Exclusive: Q & A With "Prison" Director Renny Harlin
Patrick Hickey Jr.
Review Fix
14 February 2013




I just looked at him and thought please let him know how to act. My mantra was that I wanted to find the next James Dean and he was awesome, very low key and on the spot I said this is our guy."


Director Renny Harlin
Daily Grindhouse
19 December 2011




Young Guns 11

"It's amazing what he brought to that role," Fusco says. "I remember I was in my hotel room in Santa Fe, and there's this knock on the door pretty late at night. I open it, and there was Viggo holding a rifle. He said, 'I got some ideas about the scope my character would have on his rifle. Do you have a minute?' He came in, and he sat down dead serious and showed me this conversion he'd done to an historically accurate scope. He said, 'With all the copper mining in these parts, I think it would be copper.' I remember thinking, 'Wow, this guy is serious. He's really got it.'"

John Fusco
Mandi Bierly
Entertainment Weekly
6 August 2010




Indian Runner

Around 1991 while the actor's career was languishing, he met Sean Penn who by chance had seen one of his films on a cable channel. 'Seeing his face and his expression, I knew it was him. I was praying for such a wonderful actor. I wasn't disappointed,'
Viggo Mortensen: The magician of The Lord of the Rings
by Aurelie Raya
Paris Match
Jan 8, 2004



"He was dazzlingly committed all the time. He literally brings the kitchen sink for a character," says Penn, who delighted in seeing Mortensen arrive on set each day with a "Santa Claus sack" full of various props he'd chosen. "He's an often solitary, very poetic creature, Viggo, and all of that worked [for the movie]."

History Teacher by Missy Schwartz
Entertainment Weekly
August 19, 2005




American Yakuza

I'm quite proud of this film. Although low-budget and a little uneven, this film and The Prophecy, in which Viggo also appeared, doing a memorable turn as "Lucifer", are the films I most often refer people to for examples of my work. And Viggo was truly outstanding to work with!...... I didn't need Lord of the Rings to know Viggo was a prince.

Richard Clabaugh, Cinematographer for American Yakuza
www.rclabaugh.com




Gimlet

"I sent him the script, he liked it and, only after adding a lot of riders and positive contributions and after hours talking about it, he accepted. He explores to the infinite, not only the character's emotions but also the wardrobe, all the things. He's so honest and generous..."

José Luis Acosta
Chiaroscuro: Viggo, Light And Dark
By Rocio Garcia
El Pais, Translated by Graciela, Remolina, Sage and Zooey
17 May 2009




The Passion of Darkly Noon


'Viggo is one of the few people I've worked with who, I feel, is a true kindred spirit. From the moment we first met - when I was casting The Reflecting Skin in Los Angeles - it was as if we'd known each other all our lives. He understands my work totally. By the time we were doing Darkly Noon I hardly had to give him a word of direction. He knew instinctively what I wanted.'

Philip Ridley at the Tokyo International Film Festival
From "The American Dreams: Two Screenplays by Philip Ridley'




For his role as a mute in 1995's The Passion of Darkly Noon, Mortensen remained silent throughout filming. "I only heard him speak after the shoot was over, and then only to say, 'Thanks everybody, so long.' He'd make clicking noises in the back of his throat to communicate," recalls costar Brendan Fraser. Mortensen refused to break character even to settle his hotel bill. "The concierge probably didn't speak English, and here's Viggo gesturing with his hands and pointing, scribbling on a pad. And I think Viggo eventually got 50% off the bill. If you know Viggo, it makes perfect sense. In a way, he transcends the acting."

Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




'All great artists reveal themselves more in their work than in interviews. Every time Viggo's in front of the camera or picks up a pen or a canvas or a camera, he's opening the door to his heart. This is where he's telling you the secrets of his life . . . Viggo cannot strike a fake note. I say with absolute experience that if he doesn't believe it, he won't do it.'

Philip Ridley, Director
The Reflecting Skin and The Passion of Darkly Noon
The Telegraph




Portrait of a Lady

"He's mysterious. He reminds me of Daniel Day-Lewis, who I'm working with now ? you know there's an enormous interior life." Kidman met Mortensen on Jane Campion's The Portrait of a Lady in 1996. "He was a little awkward, which was sweet. He has all that humor and bravado, but that gave him a fragility. Viggo's a Campion man. Her favourite men are Byron-esque."

Nicole Kidman
Beautiful Dreamer
By Holly Millea
Elle (U.S.)
October 2009




Witness

Anyone familiar with actor Viggo Mortensen's minuscule role in "Witness" will chuckle at how important he's become to the movie since. Mortensen, known the world wide over now for his heroic roles in the "Lord of the Rings" film trilogy, is interviewed as extensively as any of the major stars for the bonus features.

"I wondered what would happen to him," Weir muses about Mortensen.

Witness Special Collector's Edition Review
By Toni Ruberto
The Buffalo News, 9 Sept 2005

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Quotable Viggo: 21 July 2013

For those that like to neatly label creative people as an 'actor', 'artist', 'photographer', 'musician' or 'writer', Viggo presents a challenge. Surely only one thing can be a serious career, and everything else has to be dabbling? One thing I've always liked about Viggo is that he has always completely understood that creativity is a state of being. Being creative is what you are, not what you do. Trying to put a truly creative person in a box is impossible because they just can't see the sides.


In memory of our friend Peggy, all the photos I've chosen are by Deryck and taken at the various artistic events they shared.




© Deryck True. All Rights Reserved. Used by permission.


'A photo, a painting, a poem or music that we use to express our experience is not the main thing, but what you are expressing. How you sense the world around you is art in its own form. To stop for one silent moment and just see what happens.'

Viggo Mortensen
Margt til lista lagt article from Fréttablaðið
visir-is
Translated by Ragga
June 2008




'Inspiration is a notion, an impulse that has its own shape, before you stumble onto it. If you're in too much of a hurry, you try to tell it what it is, instead of having it tell you what it is. And I think if you do that, you're gonna miss out.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen ('80) Remembers
By Macreena A. Doyle
St. Lawrence University, 2003




'...if one can decide to become an actor, it's not the same for art - there is no starting point, it's there, in you, that's all."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002




'I've always loved the kind of isolation that comes from intensely devoting yourself to art forms like painting or poetry or whatever. That's also what makes being an actor so fulfilling in that you can share the creative process and get out of your own head.'

Viggo Mortensen Goes Back to His Roots for 'Everyone Has A Plan'
Staticmultimedia.com
19 April 2013




"Creative expression is social change. Wear your feelings on everything you do. It will help people open up their minds and see themselves and their communities in new ways."

Actor Viggo Mortensen urges expression
by Kaci Yoder
Desert Sun
7 July 2013




"People who are creators create," he says. "People say to me all the time, 'Why don't you just focus on one thing?' And I say, 'Why? Why just one thing? Why can't I do more? Who makes up these rules?"

Viggo Mortensen
Finding Viggo By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 200
4



'To be an artist is to remain conscious of your surroundings, and I believe that we all have that capacity. Children have it and, as they grow up, they lose it.'

Viggo Mortensen
I wouldn't look the Alatristes of today in the eye
By Oskar L. Belategui, translated for V-W by Margarita
Hoy Sociedad
3 September 2006




Asked about his favourite medium - photography, painting or writing - Viggo Mortensen says it's all part of the same continuum. "You ask the question, you investigate, you make that extra effort to be aware and express your reaction to your surroundings," he says. "Whether you paint or act or write, you're giving importance to a given moment, a place, an emotion, and you're communicating the discoveries you've made as you engage in that process. So in that sense, everything is connected."

Viggo Mortensen, Photographer
Massey University
2003




'I'd do it [acting]for myself anyway. Before I got into acting, I was interested in one way or another in photography or writing stories or poems or making drawings or something because I like doing it. That's who I am. That's my way of being in the world. I imagine I'll keep doing things that way. Who knows? Part of being in the world is being open to changing your mind. But so far, I haven't changed my mind about that. That's what makes me comfortable.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Sense of Finality
by Markus Tschiedert
Green Cine, 2003




He has mounted a half-dozen solo exhibitions in Cuba, Denmark, New York, and Los Angeles. His New York dealer, Robert Mann, says he had no idea who Mortensen was when he first met him four years ago.

"The Lord of the Rings wasn't out, and I was clueless about that part of his life' Mann says. "I saw the work and responded to it on its own merit. There's a lot of volatility to it, a lot of emotion, a lot of subtext and sensitivity." Mann says that, typically, celebrity art implies an underlying dilettantism. But Mortensen "is not a dabbler. I consider him a very lucky and talented person. Most artists are lucky to express themselves in one avenue."

Robert Mann, New York Gallerist
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"....he's incredibly gifted as a visual artist. He is a very multifaceted and slightly compulsive individual, constantly creating in every medium. His creative energy is boundless; I assume acting is another extension of that."

Robert Mann, New York Gallerist
In the Spotlight But Shining On Its Own - Celebrity Art
by Lisa Crawford Watson
Art Business News, 2001




?does he worry that people will just dismiss his eclectic works as mere half-arsed nixers of an over-indulged Hollywood star?

"I was drawing and painting and writing poems before I did acting, but people are going to make up their own minds about you anyway," he replies. "I feel it's personally a waste of time and inevitably a frustrating exercise to try to accommodate others all the time, or to try to please everyone.

Analysis of dream career
by Declan Cashin
Irish Examiner
15 February 2012

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Quotable Viggo: 13 July 2013


After hiding throughout May and June, the sun has finally come out in my corner of the UK and it's too hot today to even think. So what could be better than giving in to the silly season and having some fun. I've pulled together a bunch of oldie but goodie Viggo quips for us to enjoy. For some reason, horses and, of course, Cronenbeg figure rather a lot in the mix...




Colbert Report Appearance 9.12.2007.
© Comedy Central.



Q: Everybody has a plan. What´s yours?

A:. I actually don´t have one

"When I wake up I think of death"
By Karmentxu Marín - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais
9 September 2012




"I can talk on film," he quipped on the red carpet, poking fun at the many roles in which he is a man of few words.

Viggo accepting his Genie Award
Viggo Mortensen wins
CBC.ca
8 March 2012




"In the movie," said Cronenberg, "Viggo was wearing Armani. We don't allow him on the street like that, because he can't carry off the class when he's being himself."

Mortensen, director discuss their noirish
Eastern Promises
By Dixie Reid, Sacramento Bee,
12 September 2007




"It comes from a very good tailor in Boedo, in Buenos Aires. San Lorenzo de Almagro".

Viggo on being asked who tailored his Golden Globes suit
Mortensen highlights his Argentinian team at the Golden Globes
By E J Tamara - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Publimetro
16 January 2012




Following the press Q&A, as he left the stage, he paused, looked at the huge 'Viggo Mortensen' image on the screen behind him, and said, 'You spelled my name wrong?' There was a horrified moment as the organisers checked in panic ? then he smiled, 'No, just kidding?.'

Viggo after accepting the Coolidge Awardin Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




When I read interviews about History of Violence, the interviews really emphasized the degree to which you two collaborate. Tell me, how do you two work together?

DC:
It's a total lie. I do everything, Viggo does nothing. I do all the work. But he pays me to say that he does a lot of stuff.

VM: Also to say that I'm thoughtful and considerate.

Talking Eastern Promises with David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen
By Sara Maria Vizcarrondo
Rotten Tomatoes
12 September 2007




What was it that got you interested in A Dangerous Method? Was it mostly working again with Cronenberg, or the psychological theme ? Or both?

Firstly, working with David Cronenberg again. Secondly, the bait that David threw my way, in the form of an elaborate system of undergarments that Sigmund Freud was reputed to have employed on some of his summer excursions deep into the Alps. They included an elaborate system of miniaturised pulleys and wires that assisted in muscular stimulation for the steeper climbs. I was allowed to wear these undergarments in all scenes whether I was climbing or not.

Viggo Mortensen
Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




Viggo said that on the set Michael would hop around on one leg with a large red eyepatch to prepare for his scenes. What the hell was that about?


Yes, yes, I don't know what that was about. You'll have to talk to Michael about it to get the story. You have to understand that Viggo, being as playful as he is, could totally be making that up.

David Cronenberg
'A Dangerous Method' director David Cronenberg talks white-hot leading man, Michael Fassbender
by Chris Nashawaty
Entertainment Weekly
23 November 2011




"It is a Norwegian ghost story. It is called 'The Road to Resurrection.' I come back as a Viking ghost and he's in the Italian mob,"

Viggo plans a sequel to The Road with Kodi
'The Road' premieres at Venice
By Colleen Barry
Associated Press
3 September 2009




Mortensen arrives at the Stephen Cohen Gallery caked in mud, having just been riding T.J., who plays the title role in Hidalgo ?.and then washing him and giving him a conditioning treatment. "We don't do that all the time," Mortensen says. "He's not a pretty-boy horse."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Source: Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'...they're terrible at writing, but I look forward to seeing them soon.'

Viggo on his horses in New Zealand
'Ordinary guy' role a treat for Mortensen
By Russell Baillie
New Zealand Herald
March 18 2006




Viggo ? we hear you're a fan of horses. Is it true that you took some horses from Lord Of The Rings?

DC: But he's a horse thief, that's why he did that. He basically had sex with all the horses in the movie. That was his way of dealing with it.

VM: It wasn't great with every single one. But I did my best.

Cronenberg and Mortensen - Dangerous Minds
Shortlist.com
10 February 2012




"I'm hoping to shoot a movie with an elephant soon, and I've no idea where I'm going to put him."

Viggo asked about buying horses from his films
Long Live the King
By Paul Byrne
Wow.ie
April 2004




"We can do some doll therapy if anyone's interested?"

Viggo talking about 'Sigi' the Freud doll in San Lorenzo colours
at the Venice Film Festival ADM Press Conference
2 September 2011




Me: We have to talk about women, because you are the sexiest man alive.

Him: So there are a lot of dead men who are sexier?

Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish
By Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




SC: I read somewhere that you had the best walk. What's that about?

VM: Really? (Laughs) I don't know. How do you they know? I guess people are standing behind you. Yeah ... watching me walk. What's a good walk? I stay in a straight line, I think. That's a good thing to aim for.

Leggo My Viggo
By Suzan Colon
Jane magazine 1999

Quotable Viggo: 6 July 2013

Viggo said recently in his TiempoSur interview that there was very little he didn't like about being an actor and he regarded the profession as a privilege. This sent me back to my rather large collection of quotes about acting and I realised that, as always, he's had a lot to say about it over the last year. So I've brought them together for another Acting Quotable and included a very telling comment from Cronenberg which sums up Viggo's approach to his work.



In the dunes of La Loberia
Image Guadalupe Gaona.
© 4L Productions.



'There's very little that I don't like about being an actor, an artist. I think I'm very lucky to be able to make a living from this profession, and it's a privilege. I travel, I meet a great variety of people and landscapes, I continue learning from other points of view. Sometimes the amount of time it takes to promote the finished films, with a lot of interviews, photo sessions, can be a bit annoying, but I understand it and accept it as part of my job.'

Viggo Mortensen demonstrates to this newspaper that the great never lose their humility
By - translated by Ollie and Zoe
TiempoSur
9 June 2013




'My goal is just to make movies, whether they're big or small, that I'd like to see 10 years from now. That's sort of the way I gauge it.'

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




Viggo, what do you love most about acting?


The ongoing journey of it, and its unexpected consequences. It is hard to know at any given time if you are making the right decisions as an artist, but the surest way to stay in the moment and make progress in this moveable feast of a profession is to say "yes" as often as you can. As Yogi Berra once said: "If you come to a fork in the road, take it."

One-on-one interview with 'On the Road's' Viggo Mortensen
By Steven Lebowitz
Examiner.com
6 April 2013




"Acting is something that when it goes well it's the easiest and most enjoyable job you could imagine. But when it doesn't go well it's embarrassing and terrible and there's no way to solve a problem when you're in the middle of shooting a film."

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




'Working with fantasy is, in a certain way, a childish activity. However, 'it's childish behavior' is often said in a pejorative way. How many times have we heard that phrase? I think that it's something that doesn't have to be negative. Childish behavior? Yes, thanks! Me, I'm really interested in going to that extreme. Perhaps other actors aren't.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"Children are very good actors because they believe totally in what they're doing; they surrender themselves to it, without embarrassment, without fear; they dance, they sing, they do everything."

El mundo de Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez ? translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
15 march 2012




'Films are teamwork and there are actors who don't mind saying that the film was a piece of shit but I was just fine. I don't like that. If the film doesn't work, there's nothing. It's like saying, I'm the top scorer, but my team didn't make it to the final.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




'I don't think there is any such thing as "Method Acting" because method is "what works," you know?'

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




"I have all kinds of little rituals, when I'm getting ready", he confesses with a slightly embarrassed laugh. "Before takes I dress in my costume in exactly the same way every day. If I do it wrong, I will do it all over again. I always put on my clothes in a certain order with my left sock first. There are also objects that I always carry around."

Verdensborgeren
By Patricia Danaher
Ekko Magazine
Translated by Estel
May-August 2012




"I'm not trying to be Don Quixote and looking for movies that are impossible to be distributed," Mortensen said. "If I give you my word that I'll shoot a movie, I'll do it. A lot of actors commit to a project that's difficult to get financed and in the meantime get offered something else that's juicier and dump the other one. I stick with it."

Viggo Mortensen: Why Don't Spanish-Language Films Get Any Respect?
By Lucas Shaw
Yahoo Movies
23 March 2013




'I think everybody finds Viggo to be a bit of a mentor because he's becoming a kind of?and certainly this is nothing that he would want?but I think he's becoming a kind of iconic figure in terms of how you should be an actor. Just your demeanor, your seriousness, but your sense of humor and the kind of research you do and your professionalism, and your loyalty to the project and to the people who are creating the project.'

David Cronenberg
On the Analyst's Couch with David Cronenberg
Jenni Miller
GQ Magazine
21 November 2011




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




'There are many talented individuals in this art form, but if there is one thing I have learned during the thirty years that I have been working as an actor in the movies it is that there is always a surprise around the corner. Stories and performances you would not expect to work, full of moments of rare beauty, humor, and inspiration. As an audience member, every time the lights go down and the images begin to dance in front of me, I am hoping for that kind of story, those sorts of moments.'

One-on-one interview with 'On the Road's' Viggo Mortensen
By Steven Lebowitz
Examiner.com
6 April 2013

Quotable Viggo: 29 June 2013

Last week we had a lovely quote from Ed Asner at the AMFM Fest, revealing that Viggo was a 'Hero' of his. An interesting word which can mean a lot of different things. It can express admiration for how someone lives their personal or professional life, gratitude for unexpected help in a crisis, or it can describe a mythic character or the lead in a Hollywood film. You won't be surprised to discover that with Viggo the word gets applied in all of these contexts. I've been rummaging through the quotes I've collected and discovered the word comes up 143 times. So here is a selection of them, the only connection between them being that fact that there is a hero in there somewhere. Along the way, it's nice to know that Viggo has his heroes too, and they play for San Lorenzo.



© New Line Productions Inc.


Actor Ed Asner was introduced. He was there to laud Mortensen and promote the documentary "American Road" for which he served as narrator. With great sincerity, Asner confessed, "Viggo is a hero of mine."

Passion and Fearlessness Take Center Stage As Viggo Mortensen Receives The Dennis Hopper Award At The AMFM Fest
Gordy Grundy
Huffington Post
19 June 2013




Right now there is a resurgence of the hero but invested with those qualities we are most devoid of. Quite often, most of the time, they are fictional characters that have been wrongly embellished with those things we wanted to see. But at other times, occasionally, the flesh-and-blood hero emerges, stationed on a corner, wandering the streets or simply sharing fragments of his existence. Viggo Mortensen occupies that place of the ultimate present hero.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




Mortensen?who, in playing heroes light and dark, has effortlessly come to embody the best of Us?is soft spoken, loyal to a fault, brainy, literate, artistic, hunky, sensual, athletic and strong; he's the ultimate ideal of what a male heterosexual should be. The ladies and the gay men love him and pretty much everyone else does, too. I bet the guy even turns off his cell phone in movie theatres.

Movie review: The Road will rivet you
Marshall Fine
Huffington Post
25 November 2009




An old hand at heroes ("The Lord of the Rings") and enigmas ("Eastern Promises"), Mortensen delivers a performance of pure, agonized transparency.

Review of The Road
Amy Biancolli
San Francisco Chronicle
25 November 2009




Heroism is found in intimate human gestures ? and in Mortensen's soulful eyes.

Bruce Kirkland Alatriste DVD review
Toronto Sun
10 June 2010




Those who know him well insist that he's a simple man. Whether or not that's true, what's certain is that after repeatedly getting under the skin of assassins and other individuals tortured by life, Viggo Mortensen is the spitting image of a hero.

"I'm permanently dissatisfied."
by Amelia Enríquez
Lecturas Magazine
30 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita




It has always helped that he looks like a Round Table knight; parts abound for the handsome hero-rescuer waving a literal or metaphorical sword. In the business, he's that worldly poetic soul who can do credible justice to gangland Russian, Sioux, or Elvish dialects. That guy who looks great on a horse. That guy who never kills anyone who doesn't need killing.

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




'Viggo has a non-Hollywood heroic aspect to him, much like Russell Crowe. There are Hollywood heroes and there are non-Hollywood heroes, and the latter are a lot more interesting to me. They aren't as classically good-looking but can play troubled, flawed heroes. Aragorn thinks as much as he fights. Viggo has that dark, mysterious, quiet-man quality.'

Peter Jackson
Movieline Magazine




Says Bernard Hill, better known as King Theoden, "I read an article that said, 'Finally, someone's found the niche for Viggo Mortensen: the rugged hero who has a deep intellect and a great humanity. That's what Aragorn is, because Viggo has brought that to it. He's very like that as a human being."

It's Good to be "King"
by Susan Wloszczyna
USA Today
2003




"For me, Viggo is one of the heroes of the film and a personal hero, in that he's a great friend and someone I admire in his approach to making the film.'

Barrie Osborne (LOTR Producer)
Viggo Mortensen
by Desmond Sampson
Pavement #62, 2003




The very first moment he is glimpsed-silently sitting in the shadows inside the Prancing Pony inn, his eyes shielded by the hood of his cloak-signalled the arrival of a New Hollywood Hero, a dynamic man of mystery, action and romance.

The New Hollywood Male
By Charles Gant
Arena Homme Plus #18
December 2002




On one level, Aragorn is the heroic, archetype that you find in the [Nordic] sagas, but with the striking difference that he is a man who seems almost to have lost his tongue! In the sagas, the hero will brag about what he's going to do, do it and then brag about what he's done. Aragorn, in contrast, is a modern character with qualities more like those of the Samurai hero who must often learn difficult lessons and endure much hardship on his journey, and whose eventual triumph is usually as much in the service of society as it is for himself.

Viggo Mortensen
"Aspects of Aragorn", The Making of the Movie Trilogy




'It felt good to shed my hero's costume'

Viggo on playing Tom Stall in AHOV
The Anti-Hero
by Renaud Baronian
Metro 18 May 2005





Wherever there is a noble cause to defend, we see him, and that is not the product of my imagination but of such an obvious and truthful reality that it has a full name.

And those who stand involved in these matters of conscience know it perfectly, because he is a hero of our time in the broadest sense of the word, as well as a humanist.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno writing about Viggo
Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




One last thing that I wish to report is a small anecdote concerning someone. One of my charming girlfriends, attached to the press core assisting all of the DVDrama personel, yesterday was herself helped by a hero and not the least of which since it was Mr. Viggo Mortensen, alias the sensual Aragorn of the Lord of the Rings, about whom we are still having numerous fantasies since the first showing of Peter Jackson's trilogy. Present in Cannes to support David Cronenberg's film, A History of Violence, in which he proves once again his immensity talent, he went to the private evening gathering that followed the premiere screening, which was exactly where my girlfriend was, whose dress suddenly caught fire as she walked down the centre of an avenue edged with small candles. An accident which could have transformed itself very quickly into a catastrophe if the courageous Viggo hadn't intervened immediately, gently throwing himself on her to help extinguish the first flames that could have become a conflagration. Reassuring and concerned he next took lengthy care of her. After this summer the King of Tolkien, Viggo, is today the King of Cannes and I regret not being the one of whose dress caught fire!

Viggo the Hero
DVDrama, Cannes Film Festival Report
17 May 2005




"?these are my heroes. The one group of people or thing I support unconditionally. They can do no wrong,"

Viggo on San Lorenzo
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009

Quotable Viggo: 22 June 2013

When we think of awards for actors, it's the Oscar that springs to mind. But there are many kinds of awards that have come Viggo's way, and not all of them for acting. Viggo has won or been awarded quite a number of interesting accolades over the years and many, like the Dennis Lee Hopper Award, have meant a huge amount to him. Some recognise his film work, others recognise his other varied achievements - including being able to pronounce decent Russian! Here are just a few and I expect there are quite a number more that I've missed, including the Knight's Cross of the Order of Dannebrog where the only person I could find to quote was myself (I managed to resist). Who needs a little gold statuette when all of these show the huge regard in which he is held.



© Crystal Chatham/The Desert Sun


4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award


"This is a hell of an honor, especially because of what the festival is about. ...It couldn't be more meaningful to me."

Viggo Mortensen accepts award, talks lessons learned
AMFM 4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award
By Kaci Yoder
Desert Sun
17 June 2013




The Dennis Lee Hopper Award is a gorgeous hunk of metal. Camera lenses and spray cans form a spiky bronze sphere. It looks like a naval mine for visual artists. The bomb will look great on Viggo's mantle.

Passion and Fearlessness Take Center Stage As Viggo Mortensen Receives The Dennis Hopper Award At The AMFM Fest
Gordy Grundy
Huffington Post
19 June 2013




Mortensen appeared truly grateful for the award. He even confessed to being a little nervous. The award and Dennis Hopper meant a lot to him. Referring to the pomposity and "self-important crap" of the Academy Awards or the Nobel Peace Prize, he claimed, "This is the real deal. This (AMFM) festival will grow and grow."

Passion and Fearlessness Take Center Stage As Viggo Mortensen Receives The Dennis Hopper Award At The AMFM Fest
Gordy Grundy
Huffington Post
19 June 2013




Coolidge Award

"Well, I'm ambivalent about awards, because, as you say, there's a lot of them? but something like this is pretty unique and I have to say that one of the main reasons that I even tried my hand at being an actor was Meryl Streep," Mortensen said. "And I know that she was given this award and when I saw that I thought, well, it's a very prestigious award and the fact that she is one of the previous recipients, I'd be an idiot not to say yes. You know, what an honor, really."

Viggo on his Coolidge Award
The Coolidge: A Hub For Independent Film
by Jim Sullivan
Radio Boston
6 March 2012




Following the press Q&A, as he left the stage, he paused, looked at the huge 'Viggo Mortensen' image on the screen behind him, and said, 'You spelled my name wrong?' There was a horrified moment as the organisers checked in panic ? then he smiled, 'No, just kidding?.'

Viggo after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston

Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




'I'm not usually a suit person? You're lucky I'm wearing shoes!'

Viggo Q&A after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




Viggo Mortensen visited the Coolidge Corner Theatre yesterday to receive the 2012 Coolidge Award, which honors a film artist whose work "advances the spirit of original and challenging cinema." I would have just given him an award for being a total hot piece, but whatever.

Let's Get Viggo'd at The Coolidge
by Megan Johnson
Boston Herald Blog
6 March 2012




BIFA Award

I remember that in 2004, after The Lord of the Rings, you had been invited to join the Academy, but declined. Now, with Oscar buzz surrounding another performance, I'm sure a question will be whether or not you are amenable to awards, or do you share Marlon Brando's idea--

No, no. I mean, look, first of all, I haven't any--much of any--experience with that. I mean, I was pleasantly surprised to hear, a week or two ago, that I had won an award in England for the British Independent Film Award--Best Actor, you know, and against some really fine actors over there. And that was a very nice surprise. I couldn't go 'cause I was in New Mexico shooting Appaloosa; I would have gone had I been able to.

VIGGOOOOOAL!
andthewinneris.
20 December 2007




Genie Award


But during a night of metaphoric flag-waving, Viggo Mortensen stole the show by breaking out an actual flag during his acceptance speech for Best Supporting Actor for "A Dangerous Method." The die-hard Habs fan dedicated the award to his favourite team as he wrapped his newfound trophy in a Montreal Canadiens flag, all while the orchestra tried to play him off -- though maybe the conductor was a Leafs fan.

Viggo wins Genie Award
Moviefone Canada
By Rick Mele
9 March 2012




'I thank David Cronenberg' but I dedicate this award to the Montreal Canadiens. We'll be back next year with a vengeance. Thank you very much."

Viggo accepting his Genie Award
Global Edmonton
8 March 2012




....warmest regards to Viggo Mortensen for attending the awards. His star power actually helped keep the electricity in the building running.

Nick Flanagan
Live-ish from the Genie Awards
9 March 2012




Leon City and Province Gold Medal

"I have no words to thank the Leonese people for the so many loving gestures they are showing to me, not only the people from the city but also from the province," stated Viggo Mortensen some hours before the beginning of the events that will take place at the courtyard of the Palacio de los Guzmanes throughout this morning, on the occasion of the recognition that the institutions have granted to the American actor....

...The County Council document points out, amongst other things, thatViggo Mortensen "has hoisted the flag of the Leonese province on several occasions and has carried the name of León around the world. In the time he was shooting the film Alatriste he regularly visited some Leonese regions that he completely identifies with and where he feels more comfortable, according to what he reiteratively states. Valdeteja has been his most frequent destination for in this Leonese village he has placed the origin of the character he plays in the film, a village that has decided to name him Adopted Son". After reading these certificates and before going to a private reception, the Municipal Female Choir will sing the León anthem which will round off the touching ceremony.

Viggo Mortensen - "I have no words to thank the Leonese people for all the things they are doing for me"
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
Diario de León
13 October 2006




'Rolling R' award


"?This year, we're proud to acknowledge Mr. Mortensen, whose star turn in Eastern Promises is amazingly sensitive, multifaceted, and above all authentic. His character even speaks a specific old-school thief slang, and switches to Ukrainian when comforting a Ukrainian woman."

Russia Magazine awards Viggo with 'Rolling R' award
13 November 2007




Jameson Empire Icon Award


The Empire Icon award this year went to the disgustingly multitalented Viggo Mortensen, who speaks more languages than God, paints, writes poetry and still finds time to do a bit of acting.

Jameson Empire Award Winners Announced!
Helen O'Hara
Empire Online
30 March 2009




Drama-logue Critic's Award

He began acting in New York, studying with Warren Robertson. He appeared in several plays and movies, and eventually moved to Los Angeles, where his performance in Bent at the Coast Playhouse earned him a Drama-logue Critic's Award.

A History of Violence Press Kit 2
May 2005
Source: Cannes Film Festival Press Kit




Golden Boot Award

'Frank T. Hopkins was a half-Lakota Wyoming cowboy. He seems to have understood horses and he seems to have understood people, and did not appear to have had much use for disparaging any breed or race. Perhaps this was in part due to his own mixed ethnicity, which was and is far more common in the United States and in the world than many people seem to want to acknowledge. Hopkins was ahead of his time as a humane horse-trainer and endurance rider. He was also an example of what I have seen in cowboys (and cowgirls) I have met and admired among Argentines, Uruguyans, Moroccans, Algerians, Egyptians, the French, New Zealanders, Australians, Icelanders, Lakota, Blackfeet, Apache, Quebecois, and so on: a straightforward, open-minded, and ethical individual. I think it is a wonderful thing to see the apparent revival (again) of the "Western" genre in the movies, but it might be worth keeping in mind that neither cowboys nor stories in the "Western" genre are exclusively an area of expertise or solely of relevance to North Americans. Making "Westerns" can be as positive or negative, as universal or narrow-minded as the stories they portray. Making good "Westerns" can mean being on the right track, but, as Will Rogers said:

"Even if you are on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there."'

Viggo's Golden Boot Award Acceptance Speech
By Viggo Mortensen
11 August 2007



Quotable Viggo: 8 June 2013

Wherever Viggo goes, it goes too. Over the years it's fascinated journalists who can hardly resist mentioning it and never quite know what to make of it. The San Lorenzo flag? Nope. A little cup filled with something green and herby which Viggo swears by: yerba maté. Taking it strong and unsweetened, Viggo drinks gallons of it and credits it with keeping him energised and healthy. It kept him going (along with large amounts of chocolate) while filming The Road, and watching him jet all over world it does seem like it's his personal magic potion, seeing him through the rigours of endless travelling and interviews.



© TeleShow/Infobae.


The Argentinian. The cuervo. The Lord of the Rings. The one who teaches people to drink maté on million dollar sets.

The Habit Of Giving It All
By Juan Manuel Dominguez - translated by Ollie, Sage and Zooey
Perfil
20 June 2010




He smells of woodsmoke, as though he's just returned from some manly pursuit like chopping logs in a forest. Again, highly possible. He does have a home in the remote mountains of Idaho, surrounded by woods. In fact the scent is wafting from his cup of tea.

Viggo Mortensen is lord of all things
Chitra Ramaswamy
The Scotsman
24 May 2013




Sitting on the concrete and feeling the cool wind on our faces, Mortensen cradled his odd little cup of tea, a stone bowl with horse and snake etchings on the sides and a steel straw with a filter inside.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Jeffrey M Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
11 February 2004




Viggo arrived at our interview once again clutching his faberge egg-shaped mug...

Interview: Viggo Mortensen
Thomas Leupp
JoBlo
5 March 2004




He leans forward and presses his lips to the ornate little pipe protruding from the pot that sits before him on a saucer: it's maté, a rejuvenating South American tea that resembles wholegrain mustard from where I'm sitting. Then he lights another cigarette.

His appearance suggests a bohemian draft dodger. He is wearing jeans, and a beaten-up old khaki jacket over a black T-shirt; on one wrist hangs a blue plastic bangle. His armchair is pointed very deliberately toward the window, and he is drenched in the stark morning light. He is a tranquil presence, give or take the odd fit of throaty, convulsive laughter.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
By Ryan Gilbey
The Independent
14 December 2001




Dressed in an immaculately cut green suit, he enters the room carrying an odd apparatus, a brown earthenware bowl from which sticks a silver tube.... Discovering my interest, he politely offers a sip, but after sampling the drink I'd suggest that it is an acquired taste.

Comes A Horseman
Millar
Film Review (Special #51) Summer
2004




Viggo Mortensen is a simple person. All his belongings fit in a white plastic bag: three San Lorenzo shirts, a black one, a spare pair of pants, and a toothbrush. In the back pocket of his worn out jeans he carries a "bombilla". "You have to be prepared," he said. He sat in the back seat and prepared maté from his own thermos.

A Trip With Viggo Mortensen Through The Heart Of The Province
Robustiano Pinedo - translated by Graciela
El Tribuno Salta
14 May 2007




"Eastern Promises" finds Mortensen playing Nikolai Luzhin, a Russian ex-con tattooed from head to toe with elaborate designs detailing his every misdeed and prison stint. He puts out lit cigarettes on his tongue, can fight to the death while naked and has a knack for snipping the extremities off corpses to make them more portable.

So it's a little underwhelming when Mortensen walks in and starts bustling around, brewing up a pot of herbal tea and assembling a lovely plate of fresh berries.

Viggo's 'Promises'
By Sara Stewart
New York Post
26 Aug 2007




In his right hand, he is holding a cup with his favorite beverage: mate... The actor explains why he always behaves the same way, no matter where he is in the world. "In this business you're travelling half the time. Sometimes I feel like a world traveller who doesn't know where he'll sleep the next day. I am exaggerating a little, but I do value my habits, so I can quickly feel at home."

Viggo Mortensen Goes To Bed With A Shotgun
By - translated by Airwin
Algemeen Dagblad
27 April 2009




"I think it helps me stay active; for example, during the shooting of Alatriste and Lord Of The Rings, which were long shoots, I was the only one who never got sick, and I think it may be partly genetic, but I also think maté is very healthy."

Viggo Mortensen ZonaCinemania Interview
By - transcribed/translated by Graciela
ZonaCinemania
29 March 2007




"It's a ritual, like a peace pipe. People drink it all day..."

Viggo Mortensen Makes His Eastern Promises
By Brad Balfour
Times Square
18 September 2007




"It's true that they've checked my luggage more than once because of the yerba maté; they don't know what it is, it looks like a pipe. I once carried a kilo of yerba in a bag, and that was the problem... It looked like a kilo of something else!," commented this maté fan about the unpleasant moments he has had to go through when he has been held back at several airports.

A Hollywood Star in RSM
Translation by Graciela
Infobae.com
10 October 2008




It becomes clear precisely how much Mortensen values his work when I leave - or rather, after I have left. I'm crossing the hotel lobby when he appears out of nowhere, still barefoot, still nursing his pot of maté on its tiny saucer.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
By Ryan Gilbey
14 December 2001
The Independent




"It's not lawn clippings, I promise."

Viggo offering a journalist maté
Return Of The King Press Junket: Viggo Mortensen
By Nazz
Nazz
December 2003


Quotable Viggo: 1 June 2013

The first quote listed below (from a Guardian Interview given at last year's London Film Festival and published this week) was all too familiar. Interviewers get a lot, but they don't always get what they expect. Less an interview and more a guided ramble with Viggo into the extensive forests of his interests.


">www.viggo-works.com/webpageimages/epvinterview.jpg">
© Focus Features.


...he's a disconcerting interviewee. The conversation goes like this. I ask question A, expecting answer B. He listens carefully, considers, and gives me answer E, and then we find ourselves on point K, V, or Z.

'If I think a film's beyond me ? that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013




I've had four or five conversations with Mortensen over the years, and they've all followed the same pattern: He takes your measure for a minute or two, just to establish some basic comfort level and make sure he's not talking to a total idiot, and then it's hard to get the guy to shut up.

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




Mortensen may take a bit of warming up, but once he's off, he goes at it like a fire hose, frequently switching subjects in mid-sentence as a new thought strikes him. Looking through the transcript of our interview afterwards is like reading Molly Bloom's soliloquy at the end of Ulysses.

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




Ostensibly, Mortensen is in town to promote his role as a conflicted, compromised German professor in Good, a small-scale drama that ? in his words ? "needs all the support it can get". He could have got away with delivering the sales spiel. Instead, he's content to go lolloping off after his own train of thought and in the end, the best option is to give up and drift along for the ride. In Mortensen's view, the journey is always more entertaining than the destination anyway.

The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




If you were to analyse a Mortensen interview, you might conclude that Viggo is keen on deflection. He's certainly happier asking questions rather than answering them, and talking about his friends rather than his work in A Dangerous Method

Interview: Viggo Mortensen, actor
Scotsman.com
9 February 2012




Viggo Mortensen is, besides a great actor, an inexhaustible conversationalist, so full of curiosity that he doesn't hesitate to occasionally take the role of the interviewer.

The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




Mortensen speaks slowly and in each one of his answers it seems there are endless concepts that could need an extra explanation...

Viggo Mortensen tiene un plan
By Justina Berard
Vos/La Voz
25 May 2011




He spoke in a hushed, thoughtful tone and sounded very poetic in his speech patterns. Even when he wasn't saying much of anything I felt compelled to listen.

John Makarewicz
CHUD magazine 2004




He speaks with a softness and strength at the same time. The depth of his tenor and the thoughtful, unhurried way in which he expresses himself makes his words a visual, spoken poetry.

Native Voice Interview with Viggo
By Lise Balk King
Pine Ridge Reservation
South Dakota, December 2003




?the actor tends toward abstractions and diversions in conversation. Entire paragraphs can pass by without a concrete noun, but you don't mind because he's friendly and easygoing - a man with the attitude of a surfer, the eyes of a killer, and the brain of a slacker bookworm.

An actor lured by western promise
By Ty Burr
Boston Globe
September 28, 2008




He is sporting silky shoulder-length hair (an effeminate touch that is duly balanced by the hyper-masculinity of his granite-like jawline), wears a blue T-shirt and jeans, and speaks quietly and thoughtfully, and often at length, on every question, hammering his subject from all sides until it submits to the truth.

Viggo Mortensen v the apocalypse
By Kevin Maher
The Times
3 October 2009




Mortensen is nothing if not precise. A conversation with him tends to lead wherever he wants it to go. Try to ask a follow-up question or change the subject, and he'll gently, politely raise his voice and continue talking over you.

Rocky Road
By Ben Kenigsberg
Time Out Chicago
13 November 2009




VM is not one of that kind of actors where you insert a dime and then they jabber on for half an hour. Everything he says is well-considered, well-founded. No smart pop-quotes fly from his mouth.

The American Dane
by Susanne Johansson
Translation by Majken Steen Thomassen
Berlingske Tidende, 2001




?he's a soft spoken guy who can fill a digital recorder with wall-to-wall perspective.

Kris Tapley
In Contention
10 September 2009




An encounter with Viggo is sitting on a porch, drinking a bombilla of mate and watching time pass in such a way that every now and then new reflections, inquiries, ways of looking at things arise. It can take a whole season. Watching many skies pass by.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012



Quotable Viggo: 25 May 2013

This week it was announced that Viggo was being honoured with the 4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award. Viggo's long and creative friendship with Dennis Hopper started with The Indian Runner where, appropriately, it was one of Hopper's 1960's photos that originally defined Sean Penn's vision of Frank. Robert Galarza of AMFM Fest pointed out this week that Viggo and Hopper shared the same ability to allow creativity to flow through them, embracing art in all its forms. I don't think it would be too far-fetched to describe Hopper as Viggo's 'Muse' and a constant artistic support. The best friendships are those that challenge and draw the best out of us and over the years Hopper said some lovely things about his friend's art. They have always been amongst my most favourite quotes.



© Hexagon Films / Warner Bros.


"Dennis [Hopper] believed that to be an artist, you had to embrace all the arts. Viggo has his photography, painting, writing, poetry and philosophical musings in addition to his acting ability, and he has no great ego as an artist. He allows the art to move through him like a vessel, which is how Dennis saw the world."

Find 4 Change and AMFM Fest co-director Robert Galarza talking about Viggo being awarded the 4th Dennis Lee Hopper Award
The Wrap
23 May 2013




'Dennis is my friend. We met while working on a movie called "The Indian Runner" some twenty years ago. Short-lived friendships are mostly the norm in the movie business - it seems to go with the transient, stop-start nature of our jobs, the travelling, and the physical separations involved. There are people you get to know very well during a brief, intense period of work, and often do not see again for years as your individual careers and lives meander in their various directions. If and when you do see each other again you often find that what originally connected you so strongly has mostly withered away somehow. That did not happen with Dennis and me, and it has not been the case with his many other friends. We have continued to share a mutual curiosity about not only movie story-telling, but also in regard to photography, painting, and a generally artistic way of living life -- that is, an interest in remaining consistently present and open to all kinds of inspiration.'

Viggo's speech when Dennis received a star on Hollywood Boulevard
Viggo Honors Dennis Hopper
Perceval Press
26 March 2010




VM: What I find with poetry or painting or even acting is that mistakes can often be helpful. In the brief time I've been making paintings, I've ruined a lot of them by not knowing when to stop. But you just put it aside, and later when you come back to it maybe you remove one thing, or add something else, and all of a sudden it works, where before you were ready to burn it. Or maybe you look at it and realize it doesn't need anything at all.

DH:
You've got to take that chance, Viggo, or everything is preconceived and there's never any chance of doing something new.

VM: A lot of people make poetry or paintings or movies that way and it works. They make money and can even move people. It's not necessarily wrong, but I prefer to take the risk of ****ing it up.

DH: It's not necessarily wrong, but the person who takes a chance ends up...

VM: Learning more?

DH: And the possibility of doing something new. I really believe that 98 percent of creation is accident, one percent is intellect, and one percent is logic. You have to make the accidents work for you.

VM: If you can't surprise yourself, how are you going to surprise anyone else?"

Viggo From 5 to 7
By Dennis Hopper
Flaunt magazine
Venice, California 4 April 1999




"If Mortensen were locked in a box in a prison in total darkness, with no pens, no tools, no books," Hopper says, "he would make something amazing out of it."

Dennis Hopper
Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"Rainer Maria Rilke said something like, 'If you ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night, if it were denied you to create, would you truly die?'" Hopper says. "I know that Viggo has asked himself that question and his answer was 'Yes.'"

Dennis Hopper
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




"Viggo" says Dennis Hopper, "is a free spirit with no glint and affectation". Hopper is his friend. He says it is not an everyday thing to know somebody who might appear at your door in LA barefoot, and he appreciates that.

Viggo Mortensen
Bernd Volland Translated by JoannaP
Stern Speziel Biografie
April 2003




'Over at his place Sean had a really interesting book of photographs from the sixties by Dennis Hopper - just plain ordinary folks across the country. There was a picture of a guy at a diner, with his hair up in the air, wearing a white shirt with the cigarettes rolled up in the sleeve and a tattoo on his arm. And Sean said, 'That's Frank!' Then Sean calls me and says, 'I got the television on here, it's HBO, and there's a movie on called Fresh Horses, and there's this actor in it . . . '

Don Phillips on casting Viggo as Frank
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly
(UK: Faber and Faber, US: Canongate US, 2004)




'If you play a small part in a picture, it's nice to have a beginning, a middle and an end: that one had a middle and an end, and the end comes very quickly [laughs]. I remember rubbing the bar a lot. 'OK, yeah, better get this bar cleaned, man.' Then I give a little speech to Viggo's character. And then he kills me...'

Dennis Hopper talking about Indian Runner
When Viggo Met Sean
filminfocus.com
7 Sept 2007
Excerpted from Sean Penn: His Life and Times by Richard T. Kelly
(UK: Faber and Faber, US: Canongate US, 2004)




In a pivotal scene in The Indian Runner, Sean Penn's first film as a director, a character named Frank Roberts suddenly attacks a bartender played by Dennis Hopper, who is cleaning blood off the bar. Is the blood symbolic of something that triggers the attack? "No," says Viggo Mortensen, who plays the violent Frank. "It was Dennis's breath."

Tough Guy
Eliza Krause
23 September 1991




"Viggo is so minimal and so stoic. His performance in 'Eastern Promises' is one of the best I've seen all year.....Yes, I'm going to vote for Viggo."

Dennis Hopper speaking as an Academy voter
Variety Awards News
29 November 2007




"Why do you say that?", "Where did that come from?", "Who did it first?", "Why does it matter?", "Maybe I'm wrong.", "I love you." -- these are some of the phrases likely to come out of his mouth at any time. His candour and essential modesty inspire fearlessness in others.

Viggo talking about Dennis when he received a star on Hollywood Boulevard
Viggo Honors Dennis Hopper
Perceval Press
26 March 2010




Drawings from childhood, computer experiments, canvas, cloth, photographs, rub, scratch, splash, dash. Go for it Viggo.

Dennis Hopper
Introduction to Recent Forgeries
Smart Art Press 1998




DH: ....Not to change the subject, Viggo, but Diane Lane stars with you in A Walk on the Moon, doesn't she?

VM: Yes, she does. You worked with her on Rumblefish, didn't you?

DH: I certainly did. Sexiest woman on the planet.

VM: She's a wonderful actress-brave and honest.

DH: Good qualities in an actor as well as a human being.

VM: I wish I'd said that, Dennis.

DH:
Don't worry, Viggo - you will.

Viggo From 5 to 7
By Dennis Hopper
Flaunt magazine
Venice, California 4 April 1999

Quotable Viggo 19 May 2013

As Viggo features yet again in a best movie beard list, I decided it's definitely time I took another look at facial fuzz. Growing good facial fuzz counts among his many manly talents. He's sported the world's sexiest stubble, grown several terrifying moustaches, sprouted a grizzled mass as The Man (he even twinned it in TTUP), and a carefully trimmed affair as Freud. He was all dapper in Appaloosa, devilish in The Prophecy, and he's currently sporting a kind of moustachey-sideboardy-beardy thingy that still needs its own definition.



©4L Productions/20th Century Fox/Haddock Films/Hanway/Lago/
Matt Lankes/20th Century Fox/Estudios Picasso/Origen.



How many peculiar things would one need to add to Viggo Mortensen's face before he ceases to be hot?

On the Appaloosa moustache and goatee
Awards Daily
Ryan Adams
8 August 2008




As for Mr. Mortensen's look, the beard that was in the early stages on the Oscar red carpet is in full flower.

Filming wraps up on post-apocalyptic 'The Road'
By Barbara Vancher
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
24 April 2008




I know this might be a little "cliche" to say on this site, but honestly folks, how can anyone look at Viggo Mortensen's awesome beard and NOT want to build a hut in it?? I mean, even just for the summertimes, you know? Great man...even greater beard!!

Reaction to Viggo's 'Road' look at the Oscars
JoBlo.com
25 February 2008




Aragorn has the slinky swagger and dreamy stubble that make him look like a legend created by Tolkien, Sam Shepard and Ralph Lauren.

Return of the King Review
The New York Times
Triumph Tinged With Regret in Middle Earth
Elvis Mitchell
December 16, 2003




Corey, Triple M, Melbourne: Viggo you're now at the stage where you could get the majority of roles you wanted. You've had love scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow and now Liv Tyler. Is there anyone you aspire to have a love scene with, in the world?

Viggo: Gimli? That was cut from the movie - maybe it'll be in the extended version.

Nazz: I did hear about you and the bearded ladies.

Viggo: There was a very nice beard tugging moment between me and Sean, if they ever go back and make a more extended version. You can ask Sean about it. He may pretend not to remember. And there were bearded ladies on this production, quite a few.

Return Of The King Press Junket: Viggo Mortensen
By Nazz
December 2003




...the always-strong Viggo Mortensen got little recognition [for Appaloosa] for a nuanced supporting turn. With the moustache of the year (that should be an award), Mortensen turned a rather standard best-friend part into a quiet tour de force.

Oscar nominations 2009
Scott Taverner
martiniboys.com
January 2009




Mortensen, his eyes partly hidden under a round-brimmed hat, has a dandy's wide moustache and spadelike beard, and he cocks his head at odd angles and stares at Ed Harris's character as if he were a god in boots.

Appaloosa
Guns And Lovers
By David Denby
The New Yorker
29 September 2008




A face rendered (almost) unrecognizable with that distracting droop of a Wild West moustache, the familiar starburst cleft in his chin forested over by a neat beard. In his black skullcap and flannel shirt, jeans and dirt-caked Tasmanian sheep-station boots, Mortensen, 49, has the sullen affect of a man who's just found a ticket on his windshield.

The Great Dane
Phoebe Eaton
Men's Vogue
March 2008




Supping a herbal remedy from a mysterious brass pot that looks like it was stolen from Middle-earthy, while sporting a bushy moustache liable to make Bill the Butcher green with envy (for his next role as a Spanish soldier in Alatriste), Mortensen exudes a Zen-like calm.

"We're Animals Too, Y'Know?"
By James Mottram
Hotdog #67
September 2005




It is difficult to recognize the sexy star because of the mighty moustache that fills a lot of his face... "It took months to get it to the way it is now," he says laughing about his large moustache. "But as soon as I can, it will be removed!"

Viggo On His Way To Denmark
Billed-Bladet #24 - translated by Westfold
June 2005




Resembling Errol Flynn's Robin Hood, Alatriste boasts a moustache that serves as a lonely guy's double-edged sword: capable of seducing and persuading.

Alatriste: The Great Spanish Hero
By Carlos Maranon - translated by Margarita
Cinemania
September 2006




Mortensen, bearded, smudged, greasy-haired, has a primal, haggard beauty.

The Road Review
David Edelstein
New York Magazine
15 November 2009




"I like acting because it's a way to keep on playing. It lets me grow a beard and put on glasses, gain weight, put on a fake nose, speak with a certain accent - all to play Sigmund Freud. I don't look anything like Freud, but I did it very seriously and I also had fun."

El mundo de Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez ? translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
15 march 2012




When Claudia is away, Pedro, Agustín's twin, visits him. He is his antithesis. Pedro is a scruffy man sporting a beard. Agustín has begun to drink, to grow a beard and to let himself go in response to his wife leaving.

TTUP
I Know That You Know I Know
By Pablo O. Scholz - translated by Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012




'I literally would have to play one part for a few days, doing all those scenes, and then trim the beard and get the look of the other brother and then do the other side of it. That was a little strange...'

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon
20 March 2013




Mortensen sports some cool-looking facial hair in Appaloosa. But Viggo got his sarcasm on when asked "did you grow it yourself or was it a piece?"

"No, I had someone grow it for me," he replied. "There's a beard stubble farm, as it happens, just north of Sante Fe where they grow the best beard stubble in the world.... They use a rare ... kind of mountain goat turd they put on it and when it was ready, they knocked me out with some kind of weird peyote stuff and sewed it on."

Appaloosa: TIFF press conference diaries
by Mark Medley
National Post
September 05, 2008


Quotable Viggo: 11 May 2013

This week's Quotable is full of very, very long quotes because they are all favourite anecdotes. I make no apologies that some have appeared here before ? I love all of them and I'm pretty sure you do to. They are funny, quirky, inspiring and tell you pretty much everything you need to know about Viggo.



© New Line Productions Inc.


One last thing that I wish to report is a small anecdote concerning someone. One of my charming girlfriends, attached to the press core assisting all of the DVDrama personel, yesterday was herself helped by a hero and not the least of which since it was Mr. Viggo Mortensen, alias the sensual Aragorn of the Lord of the Rings, about whom we are still having numerous fantasies since the first showing of Peter Jackson's trilogy. Present in Cannes to support David Cronenberg's film, A History of Violence, in which he proves once again his immensity talent, he went to the private evening gathering that followed the premiere screening, which was exactly where my girlfriend was, whose dress suddenly caught fire as she walked down the centre of an avenue edged with small candles. An accident which could have transformed itself very quickly into a catastrophe if the courageous Viggo hadn't intervened immediately, gently throwing himself on her to help extinguish the first flames that could have become a conflagration. Reassuring and concerned he next took lengthy care of her. After this summer the King of Tolkien, Viggo, is today the King of Cannes and I regret not being the one of whose dress caught fire!

Viggo the Hero
DVDrama, Cannes Film Festival Report
17 May 2005




A really nice box-office clerk (I'm not naming names) at a downtown Madrid theatre discovers that Viggo Mortensen, whose girlfriend, a famous Spanish film star, was acting in a version (very poor, to be sure) of a famous play which was playing right there, has come to buy a ticket.

Quite possibly, Mortensen could have asked his partner for an invitation and that would have been that. Instead, he insisted on paying like any regular guy. The box-office clerk recognised him, and smiling, gave him a guest ticket. "How much do I owe you?" said Mortensen in his cheerful Argentinian accent. "No, no, nothing, you are invited," answered the box-office clerk. The Hollywood star thanks her cordially, goes, and ten minutes later returns with an ice cream for the box-office clerk! He insisted that she should take it, although she said she was on a diet, so he sweetened her afternoon. Anyway, when I grow up, I want to be Viggo Mortensen.

Where I said Viggo (Mortensen), I say Diego (Alatriste)
By Juan Luis Sánchez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Decine21.com
25 November 2011




I order a margarita. He orders a whiskey and a beer. The waiter sees a notepad on the table and his celebrity antennae pop up like Ray Walston's extraterrestrial ones in My Favorite Martian.

"So just who is interviewing who?" the waiter asks us. This is a formality. He's pretty sure that this is the guy from The Lord of the Rings. I start to reply, but Mortensen holds up his hand. "She has just set the world record for the longest distance windsurfed by a human being," he says, tilting his head in my direction.

"No!" the waiter gasps.

"She windsurfed from Hawaii to the mainland," he continues. "Sure, there was a boat that followed her, and she slept at night, but still. That's what, how many miles?" He looks at me.

"Um, thirty-seven hundred?" I say. I have no idea.

"And not even a man has done that yet," Mortensen tells the waiter. "Isn't that cool?"

The waiter asks me to sign a menu.

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
January 2004
Source: Vanity Fair magazine




In one take, Mortensen was battling an Uruk-Hai, a powerful and ferocious strain of orc, when a blade that was jutting from an extra's armour slashed into his face. "I thought, Oh my God, he's lost his face," recalls Perez, who then saw that the blade had somehow missed Mortensen's flesh but split his tooth - literally in half. "I said, 'You lost half a tooth.' And he looked at me and said, 'Look for it. You can stick it on with superglue.' And I said, 'No, come on, don't be silly, you can't.'" Mortensen finally relented and went to a dentist's office, still in full battle armour.

Filming the Battle of Helms Deep
The Hero Returns
By Tom Roston
Premiere
January 2003




Occasionally, people who walk by will do a double take - nah, that guy just looks like Viggo Mortensen. The real Viggo Mortensen wouldn't be hanging out on a bench with a camera, would he? But this is how he lives. He does not insulate himself from the world - just, maybe, from who he is rather than who he wants to be: himself.

Sitting casually, hanging out on the bench, seems ideal. But there is a problem. There are rats. Many of them. They are running back and forth between the bushes, over the footpath, and it is impossible to ignore them.

"Wow. They're bold," he says, incredulously. A couple of Brazilians pass by. "Hey - I could ask them who they played in the World Cup final."

He jumps up off the bench, leaving me alone with the vermin. As he stands chatting with the Brazilians, a small huddle forms around him. Next thing, he is posing, arms draped around them, for a photo. He looks back at me over his shoulder with an expression that says "Oops."

Minutes later, he returns. "Yeah, in the final it was Brazil against Holland. I didn't really give a sh** but I was rooting against Brazil - I grew up in Argentina." But Brazil has never met Holland in a World Cup final: it was the semifinal in 1994. No matter, he's still impressed by the rats.

"Whoa! Did you see that one? That was a rat-a-roo. Is it a herd of rats, a flock of rats? Maybe it's a swarm."

Another one tumbles past. "That one has a bad back. He's old - that's sad." Having a conversation about anything else proves impossible. "I don't remember seeing that many rats here," he says. "They're twice as big as the rats in Los Angeles. That one was like a possum'.

The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
30 November 2003




Viggo Mortensen's temporary headquarters during the Toronto Film Festival were bare except for one corner, where there was a sculpture assembled from a plastic grocery-store bag draped over a tripod.....While Mortensen used the restroom, I tried to decide if the bag-on-tripod sculpture was a comment on our throwaway culture or a meditation on the relationship between art and reality. Turns out it was his luggage.

"Want to see my luggage?" Mortensen asked, emerging from his hand-washing and following my gaze to the "sculpture." "Let's see what's in here," he added, removing underwear, several T-shirts - one with fishing records on it, another emblazoned with "Bring Our Troops Home" - and a United Nations flag from the bag. "I travel light."

Renaissance man jousts with career-changing role
By Chris Hewitt,
Twin Cities
28 September 2005




We wander our way to the Japanese garden, where the cherry blossoms bloom and sit on a steep grass bank. As is his wont wherever and whenever possible, Viggo wears no shoes. He spots an oval-headed balding man, with wisps of gray hair, walking with two younger women.

"Is that Arthur Miller?" he whispers. "Wait till we see his face."

We watch, and even before we see his face, we agree that there is something about the way this man walks that is not the way we somehow know Arthur Miller would walk. And the women are somehow not the women Arthur Miller would walk with in a Japanese garden.

"Let's just say it was," Viggo says, and by this I don't think for a moment he is suggesting that we should conspire to lie about it. Just that, with some willpower and a creative refusal to join the dots and draw a line we will no longer be able to cross, we can delay even this small disappointment and keep alive our moment in the park with Arthur Miller a little while longer.

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine, 2004




A few days later, as evening fell, he returned to Valdeteja bringing with him an enormous bag of goodies for the town's kids who by now know that Viggo never arrives empty-handed. There, in Anabel's bar, he resembled Jesus among the children. Scores of kids cavorted around him, watching eagerly as Viggo pulled out shirts from his bag, then candies, chocolates and caramels that he distributed like Santa Claus to each child, all under the astonished and pleased gazes of the customers who by now consider the 'American friend' as one of their own.

Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno
Diario de León
20 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Margarita

Quotable Viggo: 4 May 2013

After a particularly long and harsh winter here in the UK, spring has finally arrived. I've been putting on my walking boots, tramping around the local footpaths and thinking about Nature. So ? of course ? I had to do a Nature quotable. Viggo has often spoken about being at his happiest when outdoors following some trail, or just sitting and watching what's happening around him. His delight in the beauty of the Rio Negro has featured a lot in recent interviews about the film he is making with Lisandro Alonso. Nature refreshes him and also inspires his photography - in fact his whole Skovbo Exhibition was a paean to trees. And a Nature Quotable gives me one more chance to include my favourite LOTR anecdotes on the perils of wandering in the bush.



© Touchstone / Buena Vista Pictures.


"I have never been in a natural place and felt that that was a waste of time. I never have. And it's a relief. If I'm walking around a desert or whatever, every second is worthwhile."

Viggo Mortensen
The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times, 2003




'Mother Nature is the first school. She makes you wise if you watch her.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Multi-talented Hero
Dominical, by J. A. - translated for V-W by NacidaLibre
27 August 2006




'When I'm out in nature it can be an inspiration. If I am going through a rough period, if I just go out for a walk, on some level everything is all right because I'm here, do you know what I mean? That's my way of dealing with stress.'

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




"A change of light, a sunset, a sunrise. Things you may never see again. You grasp those moments. You don't see a bear in the wild and walk on, thinking: Oh, I'll see another bear. You just wait and watch."

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'There are images of forests, mountains and animals. Everything is connected. We are related to the animals and we are also in a way animals ourselves.'

Viggo on the sadanset exhibition
Kim Kastrup
Ekstra Bladet
16 October 2008




"Every tree is something special, just like people are. All different, but... I look at them as I look at people. I get along well with most trees. I don't get into arguments with them, and if I do it's probably my own fault. If I don't watch where I'm going when I'm in the forest, it comes back and smacks me in the nose, and I only have myself to blame."

RUV Interview
Skovbo Exhibition, Iceland
Translated by Mums
30 May 2008




What motivated you to participate [in El Camino Del Cóndor]?

I am interested in animals and natural areas. When I was a child in Argentina, our parents took my two brothers and I several times on trips to the south, and sometimes we spent Christmas camping in Patagonia, where the condors that we see in this film live. I love that part of the world, the flora and fauna of that region.

Viggo on narrating Christian Holler's El Camino Del Cóndor
Of Crows And Condors
Cristian H Savio - translated by Zooey and Ollie
El Argentino
16 December 2009




Your own history with nature had to have been important.

That's why I've always been attracted to characters like that. I have had many roles working on the water, in woods, in deserts, with animals. I'm always attracted to being in the country, nature, in places unspoiled by humans. If I'm in a natural area, I never think I'm wasting time, even if it rains or snows, even if it's very hot or cold, if it's day or night. On the other hand, when I'm in the city, as much as I like it, there are moments when I feel I'm wasting time, like in the middle of traffic. I think that maybe I could be fishing...

Viggo Mortensen: "We all act in every situation"
Diego Oscar Ramos - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Nueva
9 September 2012




Wandering around the gallery in bare feet sporting a Lord of the Rings shirt, Mortensen describes how one series of photographs on show were a bit of a fluke. Lost 1,2,3 and 4, he jokingly calls them, were taken when he was geographically challenged in the bush on the West Coast one night. The photographs were snapped so that the flash might give him light to get his bearings.

"I eventually had to lie down under a tree for a while till the moon came over me and I could figure out where I was."

Viggo Mortensen at the Massey exhibition, NZ.
Viggo Says Thanks in Pictures
by Bess Mason
Dominion Post, 2003




Several of Viggo Mortensen's different faces can be seen in his photos, some more recognisable than others. In front of the large photograph Topanga 7 where golden green light moves across a profile like it was a reflecting water surface, he says in perfect Danish:

'This self-portrait I shot with a slow shutter speed. That way I became part of nature. You can see the blue sky through the brim of the hat and there are plants in my face. With that technique you can become one with the surroundings - the house, the wall, or nature.'

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




Even Mortensen's memories of early childhood are deeply spiritual. He tells me about the time he crawled into the woods and fell asleep. "I was sleeping under a tree, and it was very peaceful," he says. "And then a dog started barking, and that's how my parents found me."

You are always escaping, I say.

Yeah, he says. He calls his mother - on my cell phone, because he doesn't have one - to double-check his recollection. "Hi, it's Viggo. Sorry to be calling so late," he says. "Oh shit. You're in the middle of it? That's funny. Is it the tape? [She was watching a tape of The Two Towers.] O.K., sorry, it's just a quick question and then I'll let you get back to what you're doing. Remember there were a couple of times I ran away? And the time the dog came and found me in the woods? How old was I then? About one and a half. O.K. But, anyway, the dog came and found me and I was sitting under a tree? Happy? Sleeping, right?"

Big look of consternation.

"I was sitting in the middle of the woods crying? I thought I was sleeping. Are you sure?"

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




"I'm an optimist. People are resourceful. I'd like to think ? you try to do the right thing and when you're really up against it, that in the end, you'll make the right choice, even if it's not the easy one. I'm optimistic about people and about the planet and about nature. I think it's resilient, like people are"

Viggo Mortensen sets the record straight about his acting career, 'The Road' and 'The Hobbit'
By Carla Hay
Examiner.com
25November 2009




When I ask him where he'd like to be if the end was near, Mortensen briefly waxes poetic.

"My first impulse is to say I want to be in nature," Mortensen says. "By the sea, on a mountain, in the woods. But on second thought, it doesn't really matter where you are ? it's how you are."

Viggo Mortensen travels the 'Road' not taken
By Joe Williams
STL Today
22 November 2009




'The consequences of human interference with Nature speak for themselves, and so do trees. We just need to listen a little more. God Fornojeise!'

Skovbo Exhibition Brochure
May/June 2008

Quotable Viggo: 13 April 2013

After years of resisting the pressures of modern technology, recent interviews with Viggo have shown that it has gradually crept up on him, as we can see from the progression of quotes below. He finally has a mobile phone and he has moved from exclusively using film for his photography, to shooting on film but then scanning negatives for printing digitally, and finally to mainly shooting digitally. But then ? when you are shooting digitally - is there still room for all those wonderful photographic accidents? Luckily he still has all his favourite old cameras to hand. Editing for Perceval Press, posting his Sobrevuelos and following San Lorenzo has forced him to use the computer but I'm betting he still doesn't watch much TV.



Images from the Set of TTUP.
© Haddock Films.



...not only does his house not contain a TV, but Mortensen's car has no CD player either, and he doesn't possess a mobile phone. He may very well be the only person in this LA hotel today who doesn't.

"I've chosen to live a certain way, and I don't want that to change," offers Mortensen by way of explanation. "I like being detached from the constant feed of phone calls and news and entertainment. So much of it is based on selling you something. If you turn on the television, if it's not the ads, it's somebody with an agenda, trying to get some political message across, or force some opinion on you. I know there are some good things on there too - The Simpsons, Sopranos, whatever - but I just feel my time is better spent reading a book, or drawing, just creating something."

Long Live the King
By Paul Byrne
Wow.ie
April 2004




He has arrived carrying a laptop computer, which he is immediately sheepish about. He is something of a Luddite. He likes to be barefoot, sometimes even at fancy Hollywood functions. Until recently, when he started watching soccer, the one television in his Venice, California, home, was used solely to play movies. He carries no mobile phone.

'I've been portrayed as a cell-phoneless savage,' he says, not unhappily. But today he has got something to show me: galleys of several books soon to be published by Perceval Press, a small company he owns. He flips open his PowerBook G4, shrugs, and says, 'Anybody can be co-opted.'

The Appealingly Weird World of Viggo Mortensen
By Amy Wallace
Esquire
March 2006




He has been a late convert to the wired world, only relatively recently starting to carry a mobile phone. 'It's antiquated, just a flip phone. I don't have a BlackBerry or whatever you call it. And there is something to be said for being isolated and out of phone range, because you can fall into a habit to such a degree that you don't even realise that you've lost something: silence.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




'You know, they have nice beds in this hotel. It's a nice change once in a while. Just like TV. I don't watch TV at home, but when I come to the hotel, it's like, all these pillows and TV! And it's like, this is great! God, why didn't I do this before, but every time, it lasts about 15 minutes before I get bored and switch off the TV.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Sense of Finality
By Markus Tschiedert
Green Cine, 2003




'I suppose I'm a private person; have been pretty much that way all along. I'm certainly not someone who can't sit for five minutes without calling someone or turning on the television set. I can entertain myself.'

Viggo Mortensen
A Visit With Viggo
By Marianne Love
Sandpoint magazine, 2004




Let´s continue with the list of your talents. You are a writer, poet, and still use pen and paper. Is that right?


"Absolutely. But partly I had to resign myself to the computer to facilitate and speed up the work of the editor."

Viggo Mortensen: "Do I look sexy?"
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia (Italy)
9 October 2012




How are you at finding your way around the internet?

I do understand why there are people who sit in front of a computer and stay there eight hours non-stop (chuckles). It´s dangerous. I think you also have to do some physical exercise. I get into what interests me culturally: history, politics, things. To compare, to have a better idea of what has happened in some country or in some artistic area. You can spend hours. It´s wonderful the things you can find.

1 Minuto.com with Viggo Mortensen
By - transcribed/translated by Ollie
RTVE
24 September 2012




"These days with the technology we've got, you know, on the laptop. I don't miss a single game and I try to follow everything that's happening closely."

Viggo Mortensen
'Return to Boedo' Chat on Radio Splendid
transcribed by Ollie and translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Radio Splendid
8 March 2012




SND:
You have made the point that your involvement with technology in photography is very limited. How much do you manipulated the images, in the darkroom or on computer for example?

VM:
Some images are altered , using double exposures and scratched negatives, or layering images in Photoshop.

SND:
So you're not against technology...

VM:
No, I'm just not that comfortable with it. My reticence, or low-level paranoia, is not based in any firm ideological opposition to it. I don't like the distraction, so I'm wary.

Things Are Weird Enough
By Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19
1999




"I will often choose a particular type of film and camera, knowing that these choices will usually affect the raw exposure that I have to work with, but then I just wait and watch and see what happens. I have shot very little digitally, but have nothing against doing more of it. I do like the vanishing look of grain, flares, accidents that teach me to look closer at what flows past us."

Viggo-Works Talks With Viggo
Viggo-Works
3 April 2007




"I've photographed a lot with Leica and Hasselblad cameras but last year I started using disposable cameras. They won't be available a short time from now so it was good to use the opportunity while I could and play with them. I often expose the pictures for a long time, shoot directly into the sun. A lot of interesting things happen when the light goes through these unclear plastic lenses. The photos become different. Sometimes I throw the cameras to the ground to loosen the lens a little bit, then interesting things happen. Then you check out the films and choose the best ones. I have an opinion of how I want them to be."

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




"I was used to printing my pictures in the traditional way, but now I use the more up-to-date and common medium, the digital one. But I have a great respect for the image: all my pictures are shot on film, then I scan the negative. Basically, you get the same result, but more quickly, and for me, when you publish books, it's very important. Today, the paper and the ink are so good that the picture keeps the black and the contrast very well. In conclusion, the quality is as good as the one from the traditional print, so why not?"

Viggo Mortensen, The Photographer Of Dreams
By Giovanni Valerio - translated by Cindalea
Panorama First
July 2008




And what do you usually photograph? Which camera do you prefer?

It depends on the time, on where I've been, on what I go looking for. I've photographed landscapes, I've done portraits, I've worked with Eastman and Graflex 8x10 and 4x5 inch cameras that are more than a hundred years old; with a Hasselblad 2¼ x 2¼ that I acquired 30 years ago, a fifteen year old 35mm Leica, and I also started working with a digital 35mm Canon three years ago.

Viggo Mortensen: "Sometimes I have thought that I´ve been an idiot to get into this theatrical challenge"
By Liz Perales - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Cultural
31 October 2011




"Recently, I'm doing digital photography almost exclusively."

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
20 Minutos
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
6 September 2012




'A warm hello to everybody who is reading and writing. This is a different world from ten years ago because of technology, but it's necessary to be careful because any communication can be used in a negative form. There are people who use the technological advances in communication to promote negative ideas, harmful efforts towards people, to sow doubt, separation among nations, racism, intolerance. So just because of the new technology and this communication we have to be careful, work honestly. Even if someone is in a good relationship with some people, family, society, we shouldn't lose our guard too much. You have to be honest with yourself, and communicate honestly. I don't want to be a drag. Thank you very much for the conversations tonight and have a good day.'

Web Chat with Viggo Mortensen
By - translated by Margarita
Reforma
18 November 2005

Quotable Viggo: 6 April 2013

In the WWD interview this week, Viggo said that the point of Todos Tenemos Un Plan was that to live a free life you have to take risks sometimes. It's easy to see why Viggo was drawn to this as he's never shied away from taking risks. Or more specifically, living an artistic life which combines a relish for the unexpected, facing challenges which are new or make him afraid, and following his own path regardless of pressures to play safe. This is probably why Oliver Lyttelton called him 'arguably the most unconventional, maverick A-list actor around'.



© 20th Century Fox/Haddock Films.


"There's a saying in Spanish: Without risk there's no glory," Mortensen explained. "You can live a safe little life, but if you don't take a chance once in a while you'll imprison yourself. That's the whole point of our movie."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen's New Plan
By Constance Droganes
WWD.com
26 March 2013




"In my life, I never did anything while weighing the effects of my actions. If you ask me what I'm planning for the next two years, I really don't know. Acting, writing, taking pictures or painting are all things which answer the necessity to express what I have inside me. And there is no preferential order among them, only chances that I try to take day by day."

A Latin Man Comes From The North
By Riccardo Romani - translated by Cindalea
GQ (Italy)
May 2007




"I don't have a five year plan or a five minute plan. For some people that does work. That's a safer way to do it, it's maybe more remunerative. You can make a fortune and be on the cover of every magazine or whatever, but that's probably a type of prison."

Viggo Mortensen
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today, 2001




"As always, I try to find something that's a good piece of writing, an interesting character, [and see] if there's a good director attached. If the other elements are good that's always extra, but it starts with the story being interesting and the character. Sometimes it's interesting but I'm not sure about it, and then you ask yourself why am I not sure about this? Is it because I'm afraid, because it's different, it's unknown? And then in which case maybe you should do it just for that reason."

Viggo Mortensen
A Fantastic Leap of Faith
by Brent Simon
Entertainment Today, 2001




"Say it's a good story and it's a character I could feasibly play, then the question is, is there something scary about it? Is there a risk that I might not be able to pull it off? If that's there, that's the final incentive because I think a little fear is healthy. It forces you to push yourself."

Viggo Mortensen: A Good Role
By Susan Griffin
Chester Chronicle
14 April 2009




What brought you to theatre?


"Fear. I've done theatre because it frightens me. I'm attracted to everything that frightens me. It's not like in film, where you do a take and then you can do another and another. Theatre is just one live take that lasts an hour and 40 minutes, depending on the performance. It's a new adventure every night. If you get off track, you have to see how to get back."

Viggo Mortensen: "I'm attracted to what scares me"
By Roció García - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El País
24 November 2011




"I find peace in Viggo´s eyes. Confronted with the giddiness of the text, you can take risks with him, walk the tightrope."

Carme Elías
Viggo Mortensen And Forgiveness
By Ulises Fuente - translated by Ollie and Rio
La Razón
1 November 2011




Having discussed the idea of directors becoming less interesting because of 'staying safe' strategies, it was wondered aloud whether some actors might have the same problem. "As you get older you get tired and it takes a lot to challenge yourself. But then it can be invigorating, probably rejuvenating," says Mortensen, enthusiastically.

Viggo's round-table at the Freud Museum
by Lucy Wiles
Felix Films
10 February 2012




Once again, Viggo Mortensen demonstrates he is a powerful actor willing to take risk (yes, I am referring to the fight scene).

Patrick Luce
Best DVDs of 2007
monstersandcritics.com
10 January 2008




"I knew Viggo Mortensen had a pretty new book out, and thought it might have something with the right kind of atmosphere. I needed something with horses, and most horse photographs are awful. I thought these would be good, and they were--so light and responsive, so far beyond mere composition. Even good photographers sometimes seem too calculated to me, like they're trying too hard. I love artists who are able to capture something unexpected, to allow mystery, to be led by feeling. Who take risks, invite surprise. Who are unpretentious."

Karen Fisher on using one of Viggo's photos from The Horse is Good as a cover for her book, A Sudden Country
ASuddenCountry.com
Q&A Session with author Karen Fisher




"As conscious an exercise as making these particular pictures was, there are accidents in the images - weird spots, unexpected areas of saturation and contrast variations - strange things that I couldn't see when shooting and still cannot really explain. The longer the exposure, the more room for surprises. I like the fact that even with a medium as supposedly controlled and predictable as photography is meant to be, there still is mystery in the results. You won't necessarily be sure what you will get, where you are going."

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




VM: "What I find with poetry or painting or even acting is that mistakes can often be helpful. In the brief time I've been making paintings, I've ruined a lot of them by not knowing when to stop. But you just put it aside, and later when you come back to it maybe you remove one thing, or add something else, and all of a sudden it works, where before you were ready to burn it. Or maybe you look at it and realize it doesn't need anything at all."

DH: "You've got to take that chance, Viggo, or everything is preconceived and there's never any chance of doing something new."

VM: "A lot of people make poetry or paintings or movies that way and it works. They make money and can even move people. It's not necessarily wrong, but I prefer to take the risk of f****** it up."

DH: "It's not necessarily wrong, but the person who takes a chance ends up... "

VM: "Learning more?"

DH: "And the possibility of doing something new. I really believe that 98 percent of creation is accident, one percent is intellect, and one percent is logic. You have to make the accidents work for you."

VM:
"If you can't surprise yourself, how are you going to surprise anyone else?"

Conversation between Dennis Hopper and Viggo
Viggo From 5 to 7
By Dennis Hopper
Flaunt magazine
Venice, California 4 April 1999




So does chance guide your life?


Like everybody's. What you hope for isn't worth anything. I complain and protest: my son has to go to school; I have to finish reading this book, go shopping, wash the dishes. Sometimes you have to skip those chores for a change. Not too long ago a friend visited me and asked if I was free to go to dinner. I had a lot of work: my publishing house takes a lot of my time. I was on the verge of saying no, but not sleeping enough one night isn't the end of the world. Sometimes, you have to say no. To trust in chance and in destiny, because it's the unpredictable, strange events that shape our lives. It's better to travel with hope than with the intention of reaching a specific destination.

"I wouldn't look the Alatristes of today in the eye"
By Oskar L. Belategui - translated by Margarita
Hoy Sociedad
3 September 2006


Quotable Viggo: 30 March 2013

The recent Telegraph interview mentioned Viggo running out into the foyer of his hotel in 'multicoloured striped socks'. I would bet my house on them being his blue and red San Lorenzo ones. Which brings us to the fact that San Lorenzo has been all over the news recently because it's other biggest fan, Pope Francis, has just taken cuervodom into the Vatican and left us wondering if, like Viggo, he wears his team shirt under his work clothes and also has the socks. About time, I thought, for another San Lorenzo quotable ? a mixture new quotes and old some old favourites.



© stella pictures


Wearing all manner of Buenos Aires and soccer trappings (socks, bracelet, and a San Lorenzo pin, plus a complete mate set and the sports section of The Nation on hand), Viggo Mortensen greeted the Argentinean press on his recent visit to Buenos Aires?.. He takes off his black boots and allows us to see the wide stripes on his socks in the colours of the team he loves.

Viggo Mortensen: The Biggest Soccer Fan In Hollywood
By Lorena García - translated by Margarita
La Nacion
16 November 2005




[He]?.wears a San Lorenzo shirt like it's tattooed on his skin.

"I feel honored to be able to give a hand to poets"
By - translated by Zooey and Sage
Pagina 12
14 August 2009




How would you define San Lorenzo fans?

Brothers, sisters - forever.

Viggo, A True Cuervo
La Revista de San Lorenzo
Translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
18 April 2010




'I have enough shirts to field a whole San Lorenzo team?'

Viggo Mortensen Q&A
By Richard Deitsch
Sports Illustrated magazine
5 August 2004
Sports Illustrated magazine




'Going to the airport last week, near Barcelona, someone stole my wallet with my license, bank and credit cards, CASLA membership card, family photos, a small antique medal, almost everything I need to travel. Fortunately, they didn't steal my passport. I went to the local police before catching my flight, the mossos d'esquadra as they call them in Catalonia, to let them know in case anyone finds anything and turns it in. They were very nice. They took down my information and told me that if anything turned up, they'd call me. I contacted the bank to cancel the cards, and got on the plane. Today, a couple of hours ago, when I was already getting over the incident, the mossos called me to tell me that they'd just found my wallet. They told me that unfortunately the only thing in the wallet was my membership card. This could be seen as an insult - that the thief didn't think that such a thing could have any value - or simply as a bit of luck, a good sign. In reality, I think the thief didn't have enough intelligence to understand that that card was the most important of all the things in the wallet. Next week they're going to give me the wallet and my card, and I'll give them my thanks. I'm going to be very happy.'

Piece of Luck
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
25 July 2012




"We had our chances, but things didn´t turn out for us as we would have liked.
I was furious, very depressed. I watched the match on my laptop, in the restaurant of a gas station near Boston, USA. People were staring at me, sitting there with my San Lorenzo shirt, behaving like a crazy man, talking to the little screen, shouting at the players."

Viggo on watching San Lorenzo lose
Knowing How To Lose
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
5 March 2012




"Unconditional love, unconditional loyalty, I don't feel those for any team, or any country or anything, only for San Lorenzo. Although they fail again and again, and only end up champions occasionally, although we have a glorious but hard, and sometimes tragic, history. I like how the San Lorenzo supporter behaves; I like their traditions. They have the best songs and are the most witty, and the other supporters recognize that. And besides, they sing non-stop; it doesn't matter if we're losing 0 to 7. San Lorenzo supporters have a very rich history, of endurance above all, and a special dignity."

El mundo de Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez ? translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
15 march 2012




"I'm spreading "the cuervo gospel" all over the world. That's not only my mission, but my career, that's my job. Cinema, poetry and all the rest are hobbies. Spreading the cuervo gospel, that's what I'm dedicated to..."

Viggo Mortensen
In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010




?.the Cuervo ambassador to the world.

Jorge Barros
San Lorenzo Supporters Subcommittee interview
Transcribed/translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
SCH tv
20 May 2011




'But now at least I won't have to work as hard to be an ambassador for San Lorenzo around the world. The pope is taking a big load off me. '

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




'I could care less about the Vatican but if you got to be pope, you might as well be a fan of San Lorenzo.'

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




Does this mean that San Lorenzo is now officially God's team?

Well... the good thing about it is I don't have to go around explaining to everybody what San Lorenzo is as much in my travels.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




"I never thought I´d write a column. I asked if I could write about anything and they said yes; then I accepted because I wanted to talk about life, about literature, about cinema, about many things, and not only soccer. Although some heavy things have appeared of late."

Viggo Mortensen on writing his San Lorenzo column
Soledad Villamil - Viggo Mortensen: Brothers In Arms
By Nazareno Brega - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012




?.if he were called to face the end of the world as we know it, he would do it with a t-shirt from his team pressed to his heart.

In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010

Quotable Viggo: 23 March 2013

Earlier in the week Chrissie posted an Indian Runner review that described Viggo's cheekbones as 'bacon-slicers', and I joked that I could do a whole Quotable on a similar theme. Well ? I thought I'd better meet my own challenge and prove it. Ignore all that stuff about him carrying his sword around with him in New Zealand and being a bit of a dab hand with a rapier, it's clear from all the comments below that Viggo could slice and dice just with his cheekbones. They certainly mesmerise interviewers and reviewers, who see them as inspiring awe in the form of 'razors', 'lemon-juicers' (I'm really not kidding), 'knife-sharpeners', 'arrowheads' and.... 'bookshelves'. You may never be able to look at Viggo's face again without wanting to dice vegetables or sort out your JRR Tolkien collection.



© Focus Features.


There is nothing fierce about him except his cheekbones.

The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
30 November 2003




Mortensen's combination of cheekbones and limpid-eyed sincerity has tended to inspire a slightly awestruck tone in journalists over the years.

Viggo Talks and Talks
The New York Times
02 December 2011




As Frankie, Mortensen has a plum role for an actor starting out and grabs it with both hands. Deploying that unsettling stare and those bacon-slicer cheekbones for the first time, he creates a memorably feral, seductive and unpredictable lost soul with a capacity to switch from charm to menace in an instant that brings to mind a young Kirk Douglas.

The Indian Runner (1991) Film Review
By Jeff Robson
Eye for Film
14 September 2011




Viggo Mortensen stacks his case and suit protector neatly in the corner of the room. The precision of the movement is entirely in keeping with an angular formation of razor cheekbones and sharp suit. We probably shouldn't be surprised the Danish-American-Argentine has this travelling thing down.

The Mad Men
Tara Brady
The Irish Times
10 February 2012




Mortensen's performance is astounding. Looking a lot more like Gollum than Aragorn, he's shaggily bearded, smeared in grime and shockingly thin, with cheekbones like lemon juicers and teeth like the visual aids in a school anti-smoking lecture?Viggo Mortensen gives a three-dimensional performance in 'The Road' that needs no 3D glasses.

Nicholas Barber
The Independent
10 January 2010




Have there ever been so many chiseled features on one big screen? You could sharpen knives with their stony cheekbones.

Reviewer talking about Appaloosa
New York Magazine
By Logan Hill
24 August 2008




He is not a man who can walk into a room unnoticed. His father, also called Viggo, is Danish, and Mortensen has inherited his northern European features - the bowed brow and arrowhead cheekbones.

Lone Star
By Peter Ross
Sunday Herald
Dorchester, UK
11 April 2004




Mr. Mortensen has bladelike, Slavic cheekbones, the most jutting movie chin since Kirk Douglas's and icy blue eyes that can seem soulful one minute and menacing the next. He also has a compact, chiseled physique that looks great adorned with Russian mob tattoos.

Big Gun Takes on the Apocalypse
Charles McGrath
New York Times
10 September 2009




It does not hurt that, alone among the multinational leads, he manages a persuasive Russian accent--nor that, with his extraordinary looks (those cheekbones could have been cut by a jeweler) and athlete's physique, he all but demands the camera's attention.

Reviewer talking about Eastern Promises
Christopher Orr
TNR Online




Viggo Mortensen is not about the words. He's about being... present. .......
......Mortensen's an actor I'm content just to watch: Those riven cheeks, taut against blade-sharp cheekbones, features that gift golden hour. He quietly inhabits the role of Frank Hopkins....

Ray Pride
Movie City News
Review Date: March 4, 2004




Viggo Mortensen is a serious and impassioned actor whose apparent severity extends to his Nordic features: he has hard blue eyes, and a pair of cheekbones that could double as bookshelves.

Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk, 2001




But even his fatigue did not disguise his almost unfair handsomeness, which manifested itself in extremely chiseled cheekbones and jaw, in silky hair that fell over his forehead, and in eyes of ice-blue. Sadly, the fetching stubble and flowing hairstyle that he wears as Aragorn were absent, along with the swashbuckling cloak, but you can't have everything.

The Man Who Would Just As Soon Not Be King
Sarah Lyall
New York Times
7 September 2003
New York Times




On Monday, Viggo Mortensen stood, somewhat nervously, in Brookline to collect the ninth annual Coolidge Award, an honor that has in previous years gone to Meryl Streep and Thelma Schoonmaker for contributions to film. At the Coolidge press conference, Mortensen appeared charismatic but enigmatic, a clear reflection of the stern commitment to authenticity and humility that garnered him the award. At the same time, however, Mortensen's high cheekbones shadowed twenty years off of his age and gleamed with Tolkien's same childish voracity to absorb and preserve the richness of humanity.

The Profundity of Viggo Mortensen
By Michela Smith
Daily Free Press
8 March 2012




DC: I don't think of you as an American. As I said when we did History Of
Violence, I could tell that you were actually Russian-it's obvious from your
cheekbones. I doubt that you'll be able to play any other kind of role now.
They'll say, "You can't cast Mortensen as an American - he's so foreign?..

- I thought it was incredibly bold of me to cast you as an American in
History Of Violence.

VM: Well, yeah, but it was a twisted view of America.

A Conversation Between David Cronenberg And Viggo Mortensen: The Interview
Transcribed by Patches
28 Sept 2007

Quotable Viggo: 16 March 2013

Being a bit short of time, this weeks' Quotable is dredged up from the depths where un-used quotes I've collected lurk, hoping to be noticed. We have a comment from Lisandro Alonso, a cry from the heart from a reporter who is NOT a football fan, thoughts from another on the real value of star power, some random questions and some thought-provoking answers.



© Javier Garcia Martino / Photogamma


'I don't see Viggo Mortensen as a Hollywood star. He is an extremely charismatic actor who doesn´t speak too much, he is all physicality. His acting gives priority to body-language and the gaze.'

Lisandro Alonso
When Viggo Mortensen films with Lisandro Alonso
Cahiers du Cinema ? translated by Ollie and Anavel
January 2013




....warmest regards to Viggo Mortensen for attending the awards. His star power actually helped keep the electricity in the building running.

Nick Flanagan
Live-ish from the Genie Awards
9 March 2012




"If you go out with a big bunch of people, in a big fancy car, then you're essentially still the face on the side of the bus and you're inviting attention. But I try to stay low-profile and keep moving. You just have to be more nimble."

Viggo on avoiding recognition
The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




Oh God,no! Viggo Mortensen is wearing the sweatshirt of San Lorenzo, the Argentine soccer team of which he is a big supporter. The effect is what I feared: all male journalists present at the meeting with the actor unleash questions about who will win this game, this season, the derby ... with the result that the first 20 minutes with one of the most fascinating men in the world are wasted with talk about sports!

Viggo Mortensen: "Do I look sexy?"
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




Q: You're known to be a rabid San Lorenzo supporter. Blue and red. Don't people mistakenly think you're for Barça?

A:
I'm an unconditional supporter. Yes, a few years ago they tried to beat me up at the Puerta del Sol because I was on my way to watch a San Lorenzo game wearing blue and red. I had to break one of the two bottles of wine that I was bringing to the party over one of their heads. By the way, we lost 1-7.

"When I wake up I think of death"
By Karmentxu Marín - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais
9 September 2012




What country is the real Viggo from?


"Regarding my emotions, my DNA and also my appearance, I would say they are 100 percent Northern European. But there's a part of me that makes me eat late at night, makes me lazy and accentuates my sense of humor. That part is tightly linked to Argentina."

By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




Which living person do you most despise?


I don't think it solves anything to despise.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
By Rosanna Greenstreet
The Guardian
2 January 2010




When asked what else he has no tolerance for, he says solidly: "Cruelty. Deliberately going out of your way when you have a choice to make someone feel bad."

The Brain Dane
By Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times, 2003




Do you have to have the last word in an argument?

Only if I get really incensed. It usually has to do with fairness, or if I feel I've been cornered or misrepresented, then I will lash out. It's good to have the presence of mind to say: 'Can I call you back? Let me take a break and go for a walk.' Always better.

Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




"I like to take care of my own problems, shoulder my responsibilities. I don't have a bevy of people assisting me and filtering what I hear or what I say. I'd rather be overworked and underslept and have a good idea of what's going on."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
by Neala Johnson
Herald Sun (Australia)
March 8 2007




What would surprise most people to learn about you?


Not sure. It might surprise me, too, I suppose.

ForePlay: Viggo Mortensen
ForeWord Magazine
17 January 2007




"I'm an optimist. People are resourceful. I'd like to think ? you try to do the right thing and when you're really up against it, that in the end, you'll make the right choice, even if it's not the easy one. I'm optimistic about people and about the planet and about nature. I think it's resilient, like people are"

Viggo Mortensen sets the record straight about his acting career, 'The Road' and 'The Hobbit'
By Carla Hay
Examiner.com
25November 2009




"Life is so short! I tell myself frequently to "Go slow to go fast", to remind me to take my time in order to sample as many things as possible."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen, Charming Free-spirit
by Manon Chevalier
ELLE Quebec
Translated for V-W by Chrissiejane
December 2008




How are you doing with sins?

Lately, quite well. You do what you can where you can. Without hurting anyone.

Do you think you'll go to hell?

Well, I like to travel.

"When I wake up I think of death"
By Karmentxu Marín - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais
9 September 2012

Quotable Viggo: 27 April 2013

In his March Sobrevuelos Viggo wrote about how much he enjoys flying and airports. That's lucky because it's an unavoidable part of his life, spending more of his time up in the air than most. He uses the time to prepare for roles, read, write and sometimes rest and sleep. It's a home from home where he'll watch football on his laptop (perhaps a bit too enthusiastically) and cause endless confusion at airport security with his passports and his yerba maté. He has even had his face on the side of an airplane. Could I possibly put together a whole Quotable about flying, I wondered. You bet!



ROTK: Wellington, NZ World Premiere - 12.01.03.
© Unknown.



'Since I grew up travelling a lot, flying is almost like being at home for me, and a plane is like my second mother.... I continue to enjoy watching people from everywhere walking through the terminals, waiting, looking for their gates - each person with their own destination, their dreams, their belongings, their preoccupations. And being in the sky during those hours when you feel as though you've escaped from linear time always seemed like an opportunity for reflection to me.'

Viggo Mortensen
Knowing How To Travel
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
30 March 2013




We human beings probably were not the first to see holes in the sky, to suppose that all that open space might be empty space. I am, however, the only person I know who has ever flown in seat 6-F of Iberia Flight 3166 at 18:58 hours Greenwich Mean Time, on the 27th June 2005, heading west by northwest over the English Channel, nearing Portsmouth. At approximately 30,000 feet we are invisible to the naked human eye watching from the ground, perceiving us as blue nothing.

Madrid to London to Connect to New York
By Viggo Mortensen
I Forget You For Ever
2006




And you've been sent a lot of screenplays.

It's hard for me right now because we've been doing promotion for months and I don't really have much time. You think, "Ok, on the airplane, I'll read this script." But the airplane's also the one place where I can rest. So I usually end up falling asleep.

A Sense of Finality
By Markus Tschiedert
Green Cine
17 December 2003




"It's true that they've checked my luggage more than once because of the yerba maté; they don't know what it is, it looks like a pipe. I once carried a kilo of yerba in a bag, and that was the problem... It looked like a kilo of something else!," commented this maté fan about the unpleasant moments he has had to go through when he has been held back at several airports.

A Hollywood Star in RSM
Translation by Graciela
Infobae.com
10 October 2008




"He is so kind and playful and funny off set. He's almost like a hippie. We picked him up at the airport one time, and he wasn't wearing shoes. I still have no idea how he got through the airport barefoot."

Fran Walsh
On 'The Road' And Off, Viggo Mortensen Walks The Walk
By Scott Bowles
USA Today
3 December 2009




Your face is on the side of an Air New Zealand plane - that must be pretty surreal.

I know, it's scary.

Our Kiss Was Just a kiss
by John Millar
Hot Stars
27 March 2004




'I have to tell you...what an awful combination it is to have a US passport and a Buenos Aires accent when you arrive at the Chile airport. A pretty long delay? my friends that had Spanish passports had already gone through (customs), and they were waiting? and the guy kept checking, very kindly, but he wasn't letting me go anywhere, and he talks to me in a pretty tortured English, and so I tell him: "I speak Spanish, you can talk to me in Spanish". And so he gave me a long look, and then I realized I had f***** up, really, because the combination of the accent and the passport? I was going straight to jail, or so it looked. And so another customs officer comes and says, "No, no, he is the Lord of the Rings", and so..."Welcome to Chile" and (pam, pam ? sound of passport getting stamped) "Here you go?go ahead"'.

Viggo on Radio Cooperativa, Chile
By - transcribed/translated by Graciela
Radio Cooperativa
27 March 2007




You know what? I'm not so interested in skydiving. I'm not sure why anyone wants to jump out of a plane that's working perfectly well.

The Last Word : Viggo Mortensen
Canadiens Magazine
8 December 2009




"I have written since I was a child. At six or seven, I did my first little stories. I talked about animals, kid things. At about 15, I started with poetry. I always write. In airplanes, in bed, in the bathtub."

"Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
By Eduardo Bejuk
Gente Magazine ? translated by Zooey
September 2009




'When 30 seconds of the 4 minutes added by the referee have passed, two security officials from the airport, grab me and move me away from my laptop, saying, "Sir, what is WRONG with you???" They look at my German friend but leave him alone. They separate me from the laptop and from the people. I´m still hearing the comments of those from Channel 7 on the Rojadirecta page, "...historic comeback...great victory..." The police ask me for my passport, my boarding card, they ask me a lot of things. I tell them there´s nothing wrong, that I´m sorry but I´m watching a soccer game and my team just scored a very important goal, that the game is almost over. While they ask me questions and look at my documents, I try to look over their shoulders at what is happening on the laptop, hoping that the game stays 3-2. It ends and I want to shout victory, but I know it´s not what I exactly require now with these two guys checking me out. Finally they let me go after warning me that if I start shouting again, they are not going to allow me to fly and are going to throw me out of the airport.'

Airport security get a taste of Viggo the football fan
They Want To Throw Me Out Of The Airport
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Club Atlético San Lorenzo de Almagro
28 May 2012




'Before Christmas, I picked [Henry] up at university in New York to visit my father. Suddenly I had this idea and asked him: "I've accumulated some air miles and we've got a few days left until Christmas Eve, so what do you think, should we take a quick flight to Buenos Aires? If we hurry, we can make the afternoon flight!" It was a close call, we took off in snow, left the plane at 38° degrees of heat in Buenos Aires and drove directly from the airport to the season's last match, which came down to the championship for San Lorenzo. The most important match of the whole year! But then San Lorenzo lost, and nobody left the stadium after the match, everyone stayed seated and cried. Me too, of course. It was highly emotional. And then Henry said to me: "You know, Dad, up to now, I was a follower of San Lorenzo. But now, after witnessing you here, I'm a true fan!"'.

Viggo Mortensen
Couch Hero
By Kurt Zechner - translated by Athelin
SKIP
September 2011




The following morning he flew towards Buenos Aires. At night, he left for the USA; he had to start working on the character of his next movie. "I'll come back," he said before taking the airport escalator. I began to lose sight of him. He had a bombilla in his back pocket, a white plastic bag, and a San Lorenzo flag wrapped around his shoulders.

A Trip With Viggo Mortensen Through The Heart Of The Province
By Robustiano Pinedo - translated by Graciela
Source: El Tribuno Salta
El Tribuno Salta
14 May 2007




I've been on hundreds of planes, spent thousands of hours between times and places. We will land, and I won't be done writing about this and maybe other things.

Madrid to London to Connect to New York
By Viggo Mortensen
I Forget You For Ever
2006

Quotable Viggo: 9 March 2013

We recently had the photo below as our Good Day Viggodom picture and I'm sure I'm not the only one fascinated by all that green scrawl. Viggo's notebooks are part of that 'inexhaustible supply of mulch' which feeds his research, poetry and even his paintings. When his backpack with three years' worth of journals inside was stolen from his car, we felt his loss. It inspired Viggo to write a paean to journal keeping in his Introduction to Best American Non-Required Reading. I've quoted a sizeable chunk of it below because all inveterate journal keepers know that journals deserve the honour. We can imagine the huge pleasure he had looking at Freud's notebooks in his Hampstead study and it's impossible to imagine Viggo without his own notebook somewhere close at hand, especially has he views his whole artistic life as a kind of diary.



© Focus Features


Before becoming an actor, he was a published poet, and he still carries a notebook wherever he goes 'just in case a moment presents itself to be stolen.'

The Appealingly Weird World of Viggo Mortensen
By Amy Wallace
Esquire
March 2006




Viggo extracts a big moleskin notebook from his backpack, like a naturalist's notebook, a logbook, in which he notes down his thoughts and everything that passes through his mind with a big, tangled handwriting like the rigging of a schooner.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




The backpack also contained a couple of journals, two screenplays, my passport, and two half-read books. The hardest losses were the stories and poems in the notebooks. I had been looking forward, in particular, to reviewing and fine-tuning hundreds of pages of, for me, uncharacteristically long and unguarded poetry that had been written during a series of very quiet nights spent in the Sahara Desert in late 2002. During that time, for various reasons, I had begun writing extended pieces using a lot of abstract imagery and fragmented recollections from my childhood, combined with the rush of sensory impressions I was receiving while living and working in Morocco. The thick white pages of the notebooks from that time were grimy, stained red from the dust near Ouarzazate, yellow from Erfoud and Merzouga, brown and gray from my hands and the ashes of campfires and cigarettes, dogeared, black with grease. They held sandstorms, camel gargles, vultures, Arabic songs, calls to prayer, prayer rugs, tea, coffee, tent flaps. They reeked of diesel, were alive with flies, fossils, heat waves, goats, soldiers, scorpions, unseen women, donkeys, date palms, doves, hawks, vipers, new or decaying gardens, graveyards, city walls, mosques, stables, wells, fortresses, and schools. This was the start of a long-overdue cataloging of buried memories of plants and their names, horses, car accidents, lightning, pet lizards, parts of arguments between my parents, ifinesses, sheep; of fish caught, lost, released, cleaned, cooked, spied in rivers, ponds, lakes, eaten, rotting, struggling, dying, or dead. In those notebooks could be found faces of teachers I've had, of policemen, children, and old people suffering, giggling, sleeping, or otherwise lingering in emergency rooms, bus stations, on street corners, walking or standing on traces of roads or tracks through harsh deserts, prairies, icescapes, or urban wastelands. Here were all the toy soldiers, ineffective windshield wipers, first tastes of chocolate, wine, asparagus, venison, trout, chalk, ants, a Big Mac, dirt, dandelion stem, unsweetened yerba maté, duck, beer, snow, blood...

Viggo Mortensen on his lost notebooks
Introduction to Best American Non-Required Reading
Houghton Mifflin, 2004




Patches of recorded feeling vanished, irretrievable. There is no point in trying to remember and rebuild the word houses, word hills, word dams, or word skeletons like some sort of archeology project. There may be pieces I recall or inadvertently retell, but every word will be new, will go somewhere, will die no matter what I might do to tame or hold it.

Viggo Mortensen on his lost notebooks
Introduction to Best American Non-Required Reading
Houghton Mifflin, 2004




We meet at a coffee house in Santa Monica, where he's already upstairs with a glass of iced coffee and a notebook. Beside him rests a box, overflowing with sheets of rumpled paper and picture frames, much like one would find in an attic, or on the neglected shelves of Christmas decorations (his manager had asked me if he could make a contribution to the magazine, to which I gave an unqualified "yes").

"I don't know what you're looking for," he says, "but I brought a few things to show you."

Viggo's Box
By Craig Clevenger
Fond Affexxions #5, Winter Thaw 1995




And Viggo Mortensen pulls a notebook from his bag. The poets look at it. Because poets always look. And they see. At the table are Fabián Casas, Damian Ríos and Gabriela Bejerman, three of the 22 Argentine poets in the Anthology of New Argentine Poetry, the brand new book from Perceval Press, Viggo Mortensen's publishing house... "There it is; it's called 'Matinee'," he says. And he reads it.

Viggo Mortensen: "Writing and acting are like being a kid again"
Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Zooey
Gente
25 August 2009




Never without his camera, he snapped away at branches, sky, ice and snow while he talked, stopping only to ask a question, write something in his journal or point out deer tracks and places where beavers had gnawed through trees. Nearly every step seemed to elicit a memory, of some youthful mischief with a friend, a favored fishing or skiing spot from years ago, a conversation with a former neighbor.

Viggo Mortensen ('80) Remembers: A Walk Down Memory Lane (Literally) with the Photographer, Poet and Actor
Macreena A. Doyle
St. Lawrence University, Canton NY February 2003




He'd visited the Freud museum in Hampstead before, but for the purposes of our interview we were allowed behind the velvet ropes and into Freud's study, right next to the famous couch. Viggo was clearly unsettled by such close contact with Freud's personal artefacts, and affected some shivers of recognition as he pored over Freud's notebook which sits on his desk, a pair of fold-up pince-nez placed neatly beside it.

Viggo's Freudian Slip
By Jason Solomons
The Observer
5 February 2012




I spent a lot of time and effort in the following weeks scouring my part of town, looking through trash cans and alleyways, offering no-questions-asked rewards, doing anything I could think of to find what was irreplaceable for me and probably completely useless to whoever had stolen it. Finally, I let most of it go, knowing I would never be able to recreate what had been written far from home in that exhausted but uniquely productive state of mind.

Viggo Mortensen on his lost notebooks
Introduction to Best American Non-Required Reading
Houghton Mifflin, 2004




"To me the movies that I'm in or a painting or a drawing or a poem that I've made, a photograph, they are all journals in a way, a living diary," said Mortensen. "Everything's about that, valuing what's been and where I am now based on the accumulation of those experiences."

Viggo Mortensen On 'The Road' And The Importance Of Human Connections
By Todd Hill
Staten Island Advance
27 November 2009

Quotable Viggo: 2 March 2012

You're bound to have noticed from all the activity on our Other Movies thread that Prison has come out on Blu-ray and has garnered a lot of quite favourable reviews from horror buffs. It's nice to see some recognition for a film that is ? I think ? a lot better than you expect it to be. It also has a young, gorgeous Viggo in early 'moody bad boy' mode. Did I mention you can watch that on Blu-ray? Thanks to advancing technology I now have enough quotes for a whole Prison Quotable and, in case you've missed the best of the reviews, I've gathered them together here for you. It's also an excuse to use the Goatherding quote one more time. I tried to leave it out, honest I did, .... but I couldn't. Prison just wouldn't be complete without it.



© Empire Pictures.


Prison deserves props for being much smarter (and more dignified) than most of us expect a B-movie to be.

Prison Review
By John W Bowen
Classic Horror
7 April 2001




Before Viggo Mortensen became Aragorn and before Renny Harlin became known for helming such flashily forgettable action fare as The Long Kiss Goodnight and Driven, the two made sweet incarcerated horror music together with the aptly named Prison (1988). Well, not that sweet, but Prison does have the dubious distinction of being one of Harlin's best as well as the finest film to come out of the late '80s trend of the return of the vengeful executed (remember Wes Craven's Shocker?).

Haunted Prison
Independent Film Channel
30 October 2007




... I met with about 80 young Hollywood actors for Viggo's part. I couldn't find the one. I was looking for a young James Dean. Then, Viggo Mortensen walked into the room. I knew almost instantly that he was the one. There was such a charisma about him. I really thought that this film would make him a household name. Unfortunately, since the film wasn't really released theatrically, it took Viggo a little longer to get there, but he still got there eventually.

Review Fix Exclusive: Q & A With "Prison" Director Renny Harlin
Patrick Hickey Jr.
Review Fix
14 February 2013




"I just looked at him and thought please let him know how to act..."

Director Renny Harlin
Daily Grindhouse
19 December 2011




"Viggo had already been in Witness and one or two other things. He was definitely somebody that people were keeping an eye on and what have you. He was this striking looking guy and he really was a good guy and still is. He's just a very nice person. But boy he really brought up the smoldering intensity right away. That was terrific."

Screenwriter Courtney Joyner
Late night classics ? Prison
Jason Bene
Killerfilm.com
2 June 2010




'It was a real low budget horror exploitation thing. The cast was a bunch of people [who were] New York stage actors. For that kind of movie, it was a pretty experienced group of actors; good actors got those parts. So, I was surrounded by people who really knew what they were doing, which was nice. It was fun to work with them. I mean, the story was what it was. It was a horror movie and it was on the cheap side and all that, but Renny Hahn had a certain amount of visual flair. Other that,I don't know if it stands out any more than the other movies at this time. I liked the location, I liked Wyoming.'

Viggo talking about Prison
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
By Carnell
March 1999




PRISON is pretty remarkable on a lot of levels; it also features Viggo Mortensen in one of his first feature film roles. I know it's cliché to say an actor has intensity but I think PRISON is one of his more intense roles. There is a scene in the prison yard when he's going toe-to-toe with a prisoner who's trying to run the yard that is just cool as hell. His performance actually in EASTERN PROMISES kind of reminds me of PRISON because in both films he uses his eyes so much.

Daily Grindhouse
19 December 2011




This was an early role for Mortensen, who would go on to fame in The Lord of the Rings, Eastern Promises and The Road, among other films. It's interesting to watch him here as he channels a James Dean vibe, with his wedge-cut hair and sulky, almost shy delivery. He rises to the occasion when the dramatic scenes demand it, but for much of the movie his presence borders on the self-effacing, in contrast to his later work.

David Maine
Popmatters.com
20 February 2013




Mortensen, who can count PRISON as his first starring role, is equally great as the "strong silent" con who has no problem threatening to tear the dick off of his ward's biggest, baddest rapist in the middle of the yard. It's not a showy perfomance (particularly when you put it into context with the rest of Viggo's career, TEXAS CHAINSAW III included), but it's enough to keep the film anchored and give the audience a formidable anti-hero to root for once Forsythe's ghost begins wreaking havoc.

Jacob Knight
Veryaware.com
22 February 2013




Viggo Mortensen is something of a find as Burke, an inmate apparently bred on James Dean and Montgomery Clift films. All the supporting roles are solid as well. As for the Spirit of Forsythe, he's not just another masked menace or a flesh-rotted presence, but more of a malevolent specter à la The Keep. When his hell breaks loose, it's quite chilling.

Source: Hollibonitos
Starblog.com




Mortensen shows good leading man chops well before Hollywood took notice of him...

Shlockmania Blu-ray review
18 February 2013



Viggo Mortensen, in an early role before stardom, offers a strong-willed, no-frills performance that suits the character wonderfully.

Martin Liebman
Blu-ray.com
2 February 2013




This was Mortensen's first lead role, too, but he delivers with a calm and extremely cool persona who holds his own against the more traditional thugs.

By Rob Hunter
filmschoolrejects Blu-ray review
16 February 2013




Even though Mortensen is the lead he really doesn't say too much but his character just has this strong silent presence and he takes care of business.

Alienbee.net Blu-ray review
13 February 2013




Prison features a strong cast of recognizable actors, many of whom were at the start of their careers. Viggo Mortensen (The Prophecy) has enjoyed the most success and it is easy to recognize his talent in this early piece. His performance is subtle as a short-time convict gradually pushed into the role of reluctant hero.

Horrortalk.com Blu-ray review
19 February 2013




"After this movie wraps, I'm thinking of going into goatherding, like my mother and her mother before her."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Prison'
Prison Press Kit Biography, 1988

Quotable Viggo: 23 February 2013

A word popped up in an interview recently that got my quotable senses twitching: Renaissance. 'There's that word again', I thought. Viggo has been called a 'Renaissance Man' more times than I've had hot dinners. It's even been in the title of a fair number of interviews by journalists obviously overwhelmed by the sheer amount of stuff he does. Below is just the tiny tip of the 'Renaissance' Iceberg.



St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY February 2003.
© St. Lawrence University.



?the very definition of a 21st century Renaissance Man.

Validation for Viggo
Filmstew
Richard Horgan
22 January 2008




As we've reported to you before, Viggo is a very, very colorful character. He's a renaissance man (although he hates it if you call him that)...

Goin' Fishin' with Viggo Mortensen
By Lynn Barker
Teen Hollywood
28 September 2005




Charismatic and with a prolific renaissance spirit...

"I love leading an itinerant life"
By P. S. - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Luz
September 2012




The inveterate actor, whose self-taught, renaissance-man leanings have the reputation of being based on actual talent...

Leave It To Viggo
By Susan Perry
Black Book
1999




To say that Viggo Mortensen is a Renaissance Man would probably be an understatement.

Celebrity Artist - Viggo Mortensen
By Ken Hall
Art & Frame Review
May 2002




"He's a complete Renaissance man. He can do it all, and very well."

Elijah Wood
Mortensen is an artist three times over
Kelly Carter
USA Today
8 February 2002




In real life, actor Viggo Mortensen really has the soul of a renaissance man.

"If I have a day off, I'm not at a Hollywood party. I'm not the type of actor who lives in the press. I'd rather be home in shorts and a T-shirt surrounded by paint brushes, a blank canvas and have a few candles burning as the day fades into the night," he says.

"I think our true occupation as human beings is to learn as much as possible about life and ourselves," he adds. "You find those answers in the quiet moments."

Superstar Viggo's A Serious Soul At Heart
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun-Times
9 September 2007




...it's not easy being a Renaissance man when you've got hordes of fans, a publicity campaign to support and a family to attend to.

Viggo Mortensen: Hunky star finds an unlikely kindred spirit in David Cronenberg
By Wendy Banks
NOW
8 September 2005




The multi-talented Mortensen, a Renaissance man if ever there was one, needs as many waking hours as he can get to accommodate his cultural activities in the fields of art, poetry and music, not to mention his acting work - he stars in three vastly different films due for release in the next few months.

Viggo Mortensen looks beyond Hollywood
Telegraph.co.uk
25 September 2008




During down time between filming love scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow in "A Perfect Murder," Mortensen kept his leading lady entertained by serenading her with Spanish songs. (His original paintings also made it into the film.) So it's a little surprising when, during the middle of an interview, he singsongs,

"Clap on, clap off."

"Whatever happened to those things?" said Mortensen, 40, laughing. "That was a good commercial. All my references are outdated because I don't watch television anymore. But I remember that one." Mortensen can be forgiven for not watching much TV--the busy Renaissance man just doesn't have the time.

Sensitive Side of Psycho
Jae-Ha Kim
Chicago Sun Times
16 December 1998




Nikolai is flawlessly performed by the ingenious Renaissance man Viggo Mortensen.

Borscht, Baddies, BadAss
Emiliano Garcia-Sarnoff
Santa Fe Reporter
3 October 2007




His face is granite, and built on the most imposing jawline in the business since Kirk Douglas, but his eyes are soft and expressive, nervous even. He speaks quietly, often just above a whisper, and over the course of our interview he will convey the impression of a Zen-like renaissance man, a poet, a painter and a musician who fell into acting and could just as easily fall out of it again.

Viggo Mortensen: first Good - and then goodbye?
Kevin Maher
The Times
2 April 2009
The Times




"He's a Renaissance man. He paints, he acts, he writes poetry, you could bounce a quarter off of him and he cooks the way our mothers cook -- from scratch."

Mark Ordesky
Valiant Effort: A Late Substitution, Viggo Mortensen Dived into Rings.
By Irene Lacher
LA Times
21 December 2002




Unlike many actors who essentially play themselves in every role, Viggo Mortensen is developing a reputation for diversity.

The US-born renaissance man has published nine volumes of poetry, is an avid photographer, and his abstract paintings have been hung in galleries worldwide. Then there's his discography - 15 or so albums, generally of ambient music, featuring spoken word and poetry.

While some artists with this much output may be driven by ego, there was no trace of it during Mortensen's visit to Sydney yesterday to promote his latest film, Good. "You open one door, then another, then another," he said.

Renaissance Man Mortensen Arrives With Good Advice
By Ian Cuthbertson
The Australian
24 March 2009




"A human always has some secret," he says. "Something we keep for ourselves, something the audience wants to know about. It's what creates the dramatic tension." He pauses to consider his answer, suggesting that no moment is wasted. Every experience on or off screen will probably surface in a new character, piece of music or poem. Probably while riding a horse. Danny DeVito, it's time to step aside. We have a new renaissance man.

The Renaissance Man
Colin Fraser
SX
8 April 2009




"Viggo is a really nice guy, he's really bright, and he's a bit of a renaissance man. He paints, writes poetry and takes photos and speaks at least three languages. He's very generous and really was involved in this film. He likes to talk about it and make sure we're on the same page. I've enjoyed sharing time with him very much."

Ed Harris
Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit




Viggo speaks softly. He's especially reluctant to speak about himself. In fact, most information about the mega-star in his bulky press packet comes from colleagues or from journalists' observations during time spent with the Hollywood hunk whom most term a 'Renaissance Man.' This humble being of limitless interests is not reluctant, however, to reflect on his experiences, his passions or his observations of the world around him.

A Visit With Viggo
By Marianne Love
Sandpoint magazine Winter Edition
2004




This 44-year-old renaissance man, whom I encounter while he's pacing a hotel suite pondering various eating options, isn't just unaware of or indifferent to his appeal; he seems truly baffled by it.

Super Natural
Anna David
Daily Telegraph
30 November 2002




Q: Poet, musician, painter, photographer. Do you feel like a Renaissance man, or is it better not to exaggerate?

A: Better not to. I think I'm a restless guy. And not much more

"When I wake up I think of death"
By Karmentxu Marín - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais
9 September 2012

Quotable Viggo: 17 February 2013

In last week's The Road Quotable we looked at how the film was cast and how Viggo approached playing the character of The Man. But both on screen and off, this was a journey taken by two people. And all the filming and acting difficulties faced by Viggo were also faced by Kodi ? a huge challenge for a young actor and one which Viggo did everything in his power to make easier, sharing jokes, football, and probably a lot of chocolate as well as they battled the cold and wet.



Image Macall Polay.
© 2929/Dimension Films.


"...it was a chamber of horrors. But, I was on the journey together with Kodi."

Interview: Viggo Mortensen Travels THE ROAD
Christina Radish
IESB.net
9 November 2009




"It's an extreme version of what every half-way decent parent goes through, worrying about their children's well-being, that they will grow up to be adults and take care of themselves, so you can leave the world knowing your kids are going to be safe. It's more extreme here, but it's the same worry. If I go, this kid is completely alone. It's every parent's nightmare."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: A Man Apart
Dave Calhoun
AnOther Man
Issue 7 Autumn/Winter 2008




The comradeship between you two is obvious on the screen.


It is, isn't it? I think it shows, too, that you feel we have that complicity, that true relationship. Those are things that can't be faked. We became good friends very quickly and I came to love him as much as my own son. The truth is that he didn't just remind me a lot of my son when he was that age; he also made me remember my own childhood, the way I had of seeing things.

Viggo Mortensen: "As an actor, you must have some fear in order to learn"
By Desirée de Fez - translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Sage
El Periodico
31 January 2010




"The first week or so we shot some pretty emotional scenes and that really made us bond. He's such a beautiful boy with such a beautiful presence, and his heart and soul is in this movie. Our combined heart. It sounds really sappy but it's true."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen talks about finding hope in 'The Road' and if he'll do 'The Hobbit'
by Keith Staskiewicz
Entertainment Weekly
25 November 2009




One aspect of his performance in 'The Road' that stands out is just how convincingly he cries. It feels genuine, as if he's going a step further than just holding up some shallots to his eyes and trying to picture the family dog being taken around the back of the barn and shot. 'A lot of it was down to Kodi Smit-McPhee... The relationship I have with the boy is so intense that I didn't need to visualise anything other than what was in the film itself: it was sad and real enough for me.'

Viggo Mortensen on 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




Smit-McPhee began to cry while shooting one scene because the weather was so biting and cold.

"He didn't say anything. He's such a professional," says Hillcoat. "He just kept saying the words. Viggo kept going. When I called 'cut' and looked at what we got on film it was amazing. Viggo just kept holding Kodi as he stood there crying. That moment captured an incredible bond between these two people."

John Hillcoat
Hard road to TIFF for Viggo Mortensen and kid co-star
By Constance Droganes
CTV.ca
14 September 2009




While waiting [for a shot to be set up], Mr. Mortensen came back and fretfully studied the monitor. Kodi, meanwhile, dug for sand beetles, showing an especially plump one to Mr. Mortensen.

"Looks like good eatin'," Mr. Mortensen said, and it wasn't entirely clear whether he was joking or talking as a man who was supposed to be starving.

At World's End, Honing a Father-Son Dynamic
By Charles McGrath
New York Times
May 27, 2008




"He's very in the moment, definitely, right in the moment. When you see me running with him, and he's holding my hand and I trip over and all that, it's totally real. I was falling into thorns and stuff -- Aah! Aah! -- and he just drags me up and puts me on his shoulder. I'm like, Oh, my God."

Kodi Smit-McPhee
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Grown Man in an Era of Boys'
Jay A. Fernandez
Risky Biz
12 September 2009




Burnt and sinewy in each scene, he registers a liquid panic in every glance at the woods and a sort of angry regret in every peek at the boy. Mortensen is a different filthy man in each function of fatherhood. You recognize them all, without voice-over, without undue exposition. He still cares. And it hurts more than ever to care.

The Road Is the Most Important Movie of the Year
By Tom Chiarella
Esquire Magazine
12 May 2009




"Everything depends on reaching the coast. And we get there and it's just as bad or worse. It's just as cold. There's just as little food. Just as little shelter or safety, and you can just quit and not even reflect on that, or you can just realize that the thing we kept looking for, which, in fact, we can be grateful for that illusion, because it got us there. It drove us on. It was just that. An illusion. What we're looking for, we always had and still have it. It's each other. Our both being alive. And taking care of each other. That's the thing. That's the most important."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen Hits The Road
by Jenna Busch
The Huffington Post
12 November 2009




'My favourite line of the film happens to be in voiceover, where [my character] says that by the end, the boy has helped him accept his fate and accept the way things are and appreciate life. He says, "If I were God, I would make the world just so, and no different."'

Viggo Mortensen
Against all odds
Melora Koepke
Hour.ca
12 November 2009




"Not many child actors could do what he did every day. Just on a technical level, he reacted the way a veteran actor would, seizing on an obstacle and befriending it. I told him, 'You're doing things that are revolutionary ? things that Brando and Montgomery Clift did.' He said, 'Who's Montgomery Clift?' "

Viggo talking about Kodi Smit-McPhee
Big Gun Takes on the Apocalypse
Charles McGrath
New York Times
10 September 2009




"These characters, the father and his son, in spite of seeming to be very cold, in fact, beneath the rags they wear, happen to have San Lorenzo t-shirts," says the actor, and laughs.

Viggo talking about The Road
In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010




Reporter: You both had to go to some tough emotional places in this movie. How did you turn that off once the take was done?

Mortensen: He'd tell me I sucked.

Smit-McPhee:
Then he went back to his room and had a cry.

[I]Viggo and Kodi joking around at the Toronto Film Festival
Where 'Road' takes them
By Jen Chaney
The Washington Post

Quotable Viggo: 10 February 2013

The world didn't end on 22 December 2012 (I'm sure you noticed), but one thing that kept endlessly popping up in the media's fascination with possible apocalypse was The Road. It got mentioned almost as much as when the film actually came out. Mainly as everyone's favourite film guide on how to behave if the world ends not with a bang, but a whimper. Who knew the Mayans would be boosting an overlooked masterclass in acting, total commitment and dedicated production, by running out of calendar days? So this week and next week I'll be looking back down The Road. The film, and Viggo, more than deserves it.



Image Macall Polay.
© 2929/Dimension Films.


Before accepting the role, he was coming out of two solid years of non-stop intense work and had sworn to take a rest. He had arranged a series of exhibitions of his photography, but as soon as Hillcoat got him to read the script of The Road, he understood that he could not refuse the role.

Premier Magazine
By Gérard Delorme
June 2008
Translated by Chrissiejane




"We took a shot with Viggo as opposed to bigger box-office stars. In large part, he's the right choice because, as good as he is, he's still untapped."

John Hillcoat
The Road Is the Most Important Movie of the Year
By Tom Chiarella
Esquire Magazine
12 May 2009




"With Viggo, there's something slightly elusive about him, and he has quite a wide range, and yet, also, there's this real physicality about him. And there's this tenderness. And his face also reminded me of Grapes of Wrath, the Dorothea Lange photos of the Great Depression, Midwest people struggling with the collapse of the environment and the economy."

On The Road with Viggo and Kodi:
By Jay Stone
Canada.com
18 November 2009




"I got the role and was in the middle of shooting "Appaloosa" and at the same time, somehow promoting on evenings and weekends "Eastern Promises" and then surprisingly being nominated for awards and also having to travel to places. The day before we started shooting, I was at the Oscars, you know? Which is why I had that beard. It was kind of stressful. But that stress put me at a fragile place to begin with which probably helped me, just take that leap that I was going to have to take one way or another."

It's really about the here and now
By Gina Piccalo
Access Atlanta
26 November 2009




Mortensen felt drained after reading both the book and script in the same day. "Yeah, I was worthless that day," admitted Mortensen. "I was at my mother's house, actually, visiting her and she said, 'So, what do you want to do for dinner?' 'Dinner?' I said, 'How can I eat now?'"

Viggo Mortensen Talks About 'The Road'
Rebecca Murray
About.com
23 November 2009




What did you learn from your discussion with the book's author, Cormac McCarthy?


I talked to him one long time before shooting on the phone. We basically talked about his kid and my kid and being dads. I had tons of notes and questions to ask him. I was ready to pick his brain. At the end of the conversation, he asked me, "Do you have any specific questions about the book?" I had 50,000 post-it notes in the book and not one but two pens in case it ran out of ink. I mean I was ready. But I said "Nah, I don't really" because I realized the conversation we had was all I need to get going. His book and his words are so heartfelt and so free of any gimmickry. He just transcends cultures and languages.

Viggo on The Road
By Cindy Pearlman
Chicago Sun Times
22 November 2009




While he was on a tour doing publicity for another movie, Mortensen would sneak off and talk to homeless people, whose survival-oriented existence paralleled that of his character. "Every major city around the world, there are people that live outside, and they have the same concerns as our characters," he said. "How am I going to get food? How am I going to stay dry? How am I going to keep people from stealing my stuff or hurting me? You can't get any more basic than that."

Viggo Mortensen: 'Road' Warrior
Mortensen talks about playing a father in the post-apocalyptic 'The Road.'
By Sam Adams
18 November 2009




"What I've seen with Viggo is that he is able to use the environment more so than any other actor I've worked with before to put him where he needs to be emotionally?.And maybe it's pouring down rain, and he'll walk away from umbrellas, raincoats. He'll walk away from any tent that's being offered or any blanket to be intentionally cold and wet, and it seems to take him to a place that's quite remarkable."

Simmons (producer)
Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




"Viggo emptied himself out, always. He'd be exhausted at the end of a hard day. He gives everything."

Javier Aguirresarobe
Diary of The Road's Shooting
By Javier Aguirresarobe - translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio, Sage and Zooey
Esquire (Spain)
January 2010




"He is able to reflect struggle without even speaking, and I knew we needed someone who would not hold back."

John Hillcoat
No Country for Any man
Telegraph Magazine
January 2010




"I felt like I had a burden that I had not had before on an emotional level, this turbulence under the surface, of how I was going to make this believable."

Viggo Mortensen
The Road's Viggo Mortensen survives post-apocalyptic tale
By Elisa Osegueda
Fandango.com
29 November 2009




"It was a hell of a thing for him to undertake, because there's nowhere to hide."

Hillcoat talking about Viggo
John Hillcoat Hits The Road
By Edward Douglas
Comingsoon.net
19 November 2009




"It's true that when you're traveling through these suffering landscapes, these devastating landscapes, it's so real, and it was definitely cold, and we were definitely wet. Everything was so real visually and physically for us that we could not be anywhere else other than at that level. We had to reach that somehow in terms of our emotions and our relationship. It had to be credible, and I think it was a great help to us."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Hits The Road
By Roger Durling
Santa Barbara Independent
22 November 2009




"When I looked at the movie for the first time, we were sitting next to each other in Venice, I was shocked sometimes. It's beyond the makeup; there's something in our faces that's more lean, more suffering, beyond what I thought was happening. And I think that has to do with committing mentally and emotionally to the material."

Viggo Mortensen sets the record straight about his acting career, 'The Road' and 'The Hobbit'
By Carla Hay
Examiner.com
25November 2009




Thank you Viggo Mortensen for accepting the lead role. I have trust that you will dominate the atomic wasteland of your surroundings.

Movieweb.com
B Alan Orange
22 January 2008



Quotable Viggo: 2 February 2013

Although Viggo does so many different things it makes you dizzy, his main job is still acting and it's always good to return to the reasons for the choices he makes, what he enjoys about acting and what the challenges can be. So here is a selection of acting quotes, some new and some quite old but all well worth re-visiting for the insights they give.



© Focus Features


"I never stopped traveling through countries and characters; this is my job."

By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




Film reconciles the sprawl of his interests: philosophy, history, psychology, photography, music. Sure, it's an odd business, with plenty of pitfalls, but he thinks he has a pretty healthy take on it. "But then," he says, "if I had a really healthy attitude, I wouldn't be in the industry at all. So I must be somewhat contaminated."

'My mother is very happy about it'
By Harriet Lane
The Guardian
February 22, 2008




"I'm glad when people like the work I've done and a little recognition is not a bad thing. The only problem is when you're recognized a lot. Then you can't sit at a table or walk down the street without people looking at you. I want to be the one looking at people. That's my research. I live to be a fly on the wall, soaking up everything and anything."

Superstar Viggo's a serious soul at heart
by Cindy Pearlman,
Chicago Sun Times
9 Sept 2007




The profession of actor continues to please you?

"When it works, acting is the easiest and most fun job in the world. When everything goes wrong, it can become the most embarrassing and humiliating. And there, unfortunately, no one can help you."

By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




"It's a paradox that to do good work you have to trust other actors and directors and sometimes I made mistakes in trusting too much. It's sometimes been the case that when I saw the completed movie there wasn't much intelligence in editing the movie and I made a mistake in giving the director too much material and sometimes too many takes done in different styles. I think I've learned more from my mistakes than from things that turned out well."

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




"When I have to do different accents in English, regional accents of the United States or of other countries, or put an accent on top of an English accent, like Russian, it's not that hard for me. It´s work you have to do and you have to prepare well. In Spanish, I´m less flexible, and I think it´s because it was my first language, or the one that marked my childhood most. I´ve shot in Spain and I had to think much more about the accent; it took me a bit more to get adapted then because I had not lived in that country before. But everything can be learned and be done well with time and patience."

Viggo Mortensen - Todos Tenemos Un Plan Production Notes
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Todos Tenemos Un Plan website (Spain)
July 2012




"I like acting because it's a way to keep on playing. It lets me grow a beard and put on glasses, gain weight, put on a fake nose, speak with a certain accent - all to play Sigmund Freud. I don't look anything like Freud, but I did it very seriously and I also had fun. It's a more advanced, detailed, more consistent and prolonged way of doing the same thing I did at the age of five, when I was imagining that I was Martín Fierro."

El mundo de Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez ? translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
15 march 2012




"...the one thing I always do, and I've always done from the beginning instinctively - because it's interesting, and it's the fun part, regardless of how the shoot goes, or what the result is of the movie - I can always count on the benefits of asking the question: "What happened between the cradle and page one for this character?" And that answer is endless, you know? It's as big an answer and as complicated and layered an answer as you want it to be. And I never stop working at that."

Viggo Mortensen
VIGGOOOOOAL!
Scott Feinberg's awards season analysis
andthewinneris.blog.com
20 December 2007




"If I've learned anything these past years it's that everyone is in some way your superior. Every movie I've made has confirmed the fact that this is a team sport."

AFI Fest: Viggo and The Road
The Bloggomist: The Local Boy
Evil Monito Magazine
17 November 2009




"I could have done one big-studio movie after another if the goal was to stay as visible as possible, to make as much money as possible. I guess, because of my temperament, I didn't want to. I wouldn't have been telling good stories. The challenge would have always been to try not to make a total ass of myself, even though I knew the story was really stupid."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




"Good luck talking someone into that: ' History of Violence , The Road ? that guy? Forget it.'"

Viggo after the interviewer suggests a comedy
On the Road, signs of the apocalypse hit home
Johanna Schneller
Globe and Mail
27 November 200
9



"I've always avoided playing the hunk in the movies that I make," says Mortensen, "because that can limit your career so much. It's very rare too that the dashing leading man is a very interesting one, so that was another reason to avoid that route."

Incredible Hunk
by Paul Byrne
Wow! Cinema, 2001




"As an actor, whether you're well-known or not, the only real power you have is to say no, thank you. There are more things to say no, thank you to if you're in a movie that does as well as Lord of the Rings."

Viggo Mortensen, Actor, poet, photographer
Philip Matthews
New Zealand Listener
March 18-24 2006




"I've been told I've "arrived' so many times I don't know where I ever went..."

Viggo Mortensen
Mooning Over Viggo Mortensen
by Stephen Schaefer
USA Today 1999

[B][COLOR="#FFFF00"]

Quotable Viggo: 27 January 2013

'The river. The Paraná River. The turbulent Mortensen River' - The recent Esquire Interview compared Viggo's life to a river in a long, extended metaphor, which got me thinking how often real watery encounters come up in Viggo's life. A star swimmer at school and a keen fisherman, he's also taken the plunge more than once on screen. In fact, wherever there's a river, the ocean or a pool, Viggo is either throwing himself into it, plunging under waterfalls, photographing it, or fishing something out.



© New Line Productions Inc/Miramax Films/Village Roadshow/
20th Century Fox/Haddock Films/20th Century Fox Espana



Agustín reaches the true essence of his brother (Pedro) much more now that he´s dead than before, when he was alive. Embodying him in front of everybody, he´s closer to his brother but also closer to himself. Finally he opens his eyes and accepts what he is and where he is and that river of his childhood. That river, that childhood he had left behind. That is very beautiful. Everything is very beautiful.

River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




If you could begin again as if you were another person, as in the film, what would that new beginning be like?

Swimming leisurely under an autumn sun, without paying much attention to either the temperature of the water or the air.

Viggo Mortensen: "If I'm lost, it's because that's how I want it."
By Juan Luis Álvarez - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
La Vanguardia
9 September 2012




How was it to jump in the ocean?

It was very cold. I asked for another take, but they were terrified. They didn't want me to. They had ambulances. The water was 41 degrees Fahrenheit, and the wind was just really blowing. The air temperature was the same, but because there was howling wind, I was practically frozen. I think the air was probably freezing. It was so extreme. They had an ambulance and they had all these heaters on, and I just sat in there with a bathrobe and said, "Just tell me when you're rolling. I'm just going to run out and go."

Viggo talking about The Road
Interview: Viggo Mortensen Travels THE ROAD
Christina Radish
IESB.net
9 November 2009




"The waterfall was the coldest thing I've ever swam," said Smit-McPhee, who noted that, luckily, the production had brought in a "portable Jacuzzi" to warm the actors back up. After two takes, though, Smit-McPhee had had enough. "Seriously, that was it. And I said, 'I'm not doing it.' And then Viggo came. He just jumped in the water like it was nothing."

Filming The Road
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Grown Man in an Era of Boys'
Jay A. Fernandez
Risky Biz
12 September 2009




Mortensen... fell head-over-reel in love with New Zealand because he's a keen angler. He particularly enjoyed wandering off into the wilds, looking for remote rivers to do a spot of fly-fishing. "There are some streams where the fishing's so good, I wouldn't tell you about them," he grins.

Viggo Mortensen
By Desmond Sampson
New York City, NY
Pavement #62, Summer 2003-2004




"We were on the Greenstone, the river that flows into Lake Wakatipu, and I was being filmed floating down the river. I went off course. I got caught in a current, and I got stuck at the bottom. I had the sword and the cloak and all the wool and the boots. That was one time I was really scared. I was just about on the verge of passing out. I guess I must've kicked against a rock because I kicked out of the current and popped up."

Viggo Mortensen Interview
Tim Wilson
Metro
December 2003




"Some supposedly great stars doubt you and call you and say. 'Man, what are you doing?!' But Viggo went for the kill. He was the first one to throw himself into the cold water, into a filthy mud puddle, and the rest followed him."

Agustín Díaz Yanes talking about filming Alatriste
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




'If Viggo and I convince people we're enjoying every second of that encounter we've really done our job as actors. It was freezing in that river. The water was filled with debris and cigarette butts and the rocks were covered in little worms.'

Diane Lane on the 'A Walk on the Moon' Waterfall scene
Calgary Sun
10 April 1999




Bloom tells a story that occurred when the Rings crew returned to New Zealand in the summer of 2002 for sound dubbing and pickups for The Two Towers. "I flew over just to visit Viggo," says Bloom, who had heard that Mortensen was organising a reunion dinner. He, Mortensen and Henry, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler (who plays Arwen), and members of the crew took a bus to the countryside. After dinner, Bloom and Henry went for a walk and noticed how beautifully the moon was shining on a nearby river.

"We ran back and said, 'Everyone's got to see this.'" Bloom recalls. "I was having a Viggo moment - running out, getting people to come and check out the moon." Some decided to wade into the river, but Mortensen suggested the more perilous task of crossing the river. "I'm like, '**** off,' and he says, 'Come on.' So were barefoot, waist-high in water, walking on these little rocks to get to the other side and I'm doing it because I'm an idiot and I'm following his lead. Because he's an idiot. And because he's amazing," Bloom laughs. "I can't believe how much this is going to make it sound like I'm in love with the guy."

Orlando Bloom
The Hero Returns
by Tom Roston
Premiere 2003




'?when you are wandering in a hardwood or in the mountains or stand in a big, cold, mirroring lake, fishing. Then you are close to being happy - and what more can a man want.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
August 2001
Source: M/S (Danish magazine)




ST: I was trying to figure out the process for those [photography] flares. I thought that burn came from the development process.

VM: No, it was in the camera. The wiring that advanced the film and activated the flash got messed up. I was fishing and dropped the camera and it got wet. When it dried out, it started doing that. I shot a roll, saw it and thought, "Oh, shit." But when I looked at them, I thought that some of them looked kind of interesting. So on the next roll, I tried moving the wire all the way to one side and the flares would go to that side. Then I moved it to the middle, the right, and on the bottom and shot maybe eight rolls of film before it stopped working altogether.

Discussing photography
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
By Scott Thill
20 September 2002
Source: Morphizm




'When he was a child he went to Tigre to fish.'

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012




'We lived in Buenos Aires, but most of all in the Chaco, where I learned to ride with my three brothers. My father, who is Danish and a farmer, would take us fishing and hunting. I shot a rifle for the first time when I was three years old. It's one of my first memories. He took me duck hunting, didn't have any luck, and when we were leaving I think that to amuse himself he asked me whether I wanted to kill a duck. It was dark and he said, "You're going to hear the flock pass over us. That's when you shoot.' He held me in his arms, if not the rifle would have made me go flying. The flock flew overhead, I shot and a dead bird fell out of the sky. My father was so shocked that he didn't stop me when I went into the lake to get the dead duck. It was very cold. He noticed, followed me shouting, and pulled me out of the water. We walked for a couple of kilometers. I remember I was trembling, soaking, and carrying the duck. I didn't want to let it go for anything in the world. At a nearby house, a family lit a stove and then dried my body a little; my clothes were soaking. My father carried me almost naked, wrapped in a towel. When we arrived home, my mom didn't understand at all. "Why is the baby blue?'

The Late Show with David Letterman
November 2005




Best sporting event you've attended?

The 1972 Olympics in Munich. I didn't have tickets, but there was a huge glass wall at the swimming hall, and me and some other kids illicitly climbed up to the glass to watch. I saw Mark Spitz and Gary Hall Sr. Since I swam it was amazing.

Viggo Mortensen Q&A
By Richard Deitsch
Sports Illustrated magazine
5 August 2004

Quotable Viggo: 19 January 2013

The last time I did a round-up of On the Road reviews was in May last year, when the film premiered in Cannes. Since then the film has opened somewhat sporadically, garnering an on-going stream of reviews along the way. The film has sharply divided critics, but Viggo's performance of Old Bull Lee has had almost universal praise. Because of the lengthy release period, I thought it would be helpful to now pull together the best of these post-Cannes comments to remind us that you could stick Viggo onscreen for less time than it takes to make a spaghetti bolognaise, and he'd still mesmerise everyone.



© MK2 Productions.


Supporting characters stun: Viggo Mortensen giving his usual all and total depth to a few minor scenes, Amy Adams coming a little unhinged, Kirsten Dunst breaking your heart.

Fred Topal
Crave online
7 September 2012




Even though the Beats were expert at perpetuating their own PR (so much of their work is about how great they all are) they were, you know, just guys. Young guys who thought they knew a lot more about life than they actually did. (That is, except for the spaced-out sage William Burroughs, played for marvelous laughs in quick scenes by Viggo Mortensen).

Jordan Hoffman
Film.com
7 September 2012




Viggo Mortensen's trigger-happy junkie Old Bull Lee (aka William Burroughs) is another high.

James Mottram
Total Film
2 October 2012




Amongst the colourful characters encountered during the trio's several journeys is the William Burroughs-inspired, morphine-addicted Old Bull Lee (a gleefully entertaining performance from Viggo Mortensen) and his brittle wife (Amy Adams) who will all be immortalised in the thinly disguised fiction Sal will ultimately write.

Mark Naglazas
West Australian
29 September 2012




The encounters with Old Bull (Viggo Mortensen) provide some of the most enjoyable moments where a faint echo of Kerouac's typewriter can be heard invoking the spirit of a generation in search of life that both embraced and defied the American dream.

Joe Walsh
Cine Vue
10 October 2012




The supporting cast is tremendous: Kristen Stewart's restless child-bride, Viggo Mortensen's Burroughs surrogate and Kirsten Dunst's trapped Camille all make vivid impressions, as does Tom Sturridge's funny, lonely Carlo (the Ginsberg figure).

Tim Robey
The Telegraph
11 October 2012




...but it's Viggo Mortensen who steals not only his scenes but the film, with a brilliantly unhinged performance as Old Bull Lee, Kerouac's pseudonym for writer William Burroughs.

Sophie Mayer
BFI.org
12 October 2012




Show- stealer Viggo Mortensen channels William Burroughs with relish.

Tara Brady
The Irish Times
12 October 2012




Mortensen steals the show with a perfect Bill Burroughs drawl....

Jonathan Romney
The Independent
14 October 2012




In a brilliant cameo, Mortensen gets Burroughs's flat, wry voice exactly right as he denounces Moriarty as psychotic, exposes how the English translation of Voyage au bout de la nuit bowdlerises Céline's original, and hilariously demonstrates his version of Wilhelm Reich's ludicrous, once fashionable orgone boxes for the control of psychic energy.

Philip French
The Observer
14 October 2012




Viggo Mortensen plays Old Bull Lee (Kerouac's fictional version of William S. Burroughs) with more depth and deftness than any other actor in the film...

'Prospero'
The Economist
24 October 2012




One could watch an entire movie of Viggo Mortensen playing Bull, a sharp-dressed heroin addict who nods off with his child in his arms and strips off his clothes to get in an orgone accumulator he built in his backyard.

Jenni Miller
Hollywood.com
10 December 2012




Hedlund is a naturally raspy Minnesotan, so when the two meet up with Viggo Mortensen as Bull Lee (aka William S. Burroughs; the names in the largely nonfictional novel were changed, Kerouac said, for legal reasons), the dialogue scenes become a gravelly voice competition. Mortensen, unsurprisingly, wins.

David Haglund
Slate
20 December 2012




The real Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs (played here by Viggo Mortensen as "Old Bull Lee") lived long enough to become vivid figures in their own right in documentaries and performances of their work, so portraying them onscreen is no easy feat. Kudos to Sturridge and Mortensen, then, for avoiding caricature.

The Chicago Tribune
21 December 2012




And Viggo Mortensen (as the Burroughs surrogate) does an uncanny job of reproducing Burroughs' well-known voice, while capturing the whole of the character as well as (or better than) Peter Weller in "Naked Lunch." Very little of the book's humor comes across on screen, and Mortensen manages to provide what little there is.


Andy Klein
Glendale News
5 January 2013




Viggo Mortensen's Old Bull Lee is perfect in his grizzly, strung-out-on-heroin brand of isolation.

Julien Hawthorne
Colombia Spectator
13 January 2013




Of those men, all the Beat icons, only Viggo Mortensen's William Burroughs makes a strong impression, albeit only fleetingly in a brief cameo. Unlike the others, Burroughs is a stay-at-home fellow at this point, but what a home (a crumbling abode in the Louisiana bayou) and what a fellow (by turns brilliantly incisive and demonstrably unhinged). Again, the balance inadvertently shifts ? we'd rather forego the highway to stick with William and his William Tell act.

Rick Groen
Globe and Mail
18 January 2013


Quotable Viggo: 12 January 2013

Quotable Quiz Answers


Here are the answers to last week's New Year Quiz. I hope you all enjoyed guessing and managed to get at least a few of them!



© New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers



Which film?


"I like the movie because it's not a clean story. All the characters are frustrated and resentful people." ? Viggo

Answer: Todos Tenemos Un Plan

Viggo Mortensen's Plan
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais Semanal
16 September 2012




Mortensen gives a wonderfully subtle comic performance.

Answer: A Dangerous Method
Steve Vineberg
Critics at Large
27 February 2012




"...I just looked at him and thought please let him know how to act. My mantra was that I wanted to find the next James Dean and he was awesome, very low key and on the spot I said this is our guy."

Answer: Prison
Director Renny Harlin
Daily Grindhouse
19 December 2011




Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave...

Answer: Daylight

Shaun Munro
BluRay review
Obsessed with Film
Feb 2011




"My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth." - Viggo

Answer: Crimson Tide
Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




Who said


"He's a little obsessed. He's a little bit of a perfectionist, but then so am I so that's ok!"

Answer: Ana Piterbarg
Still Waters Run Deep
by Shelley Marsden
Film Juice
27 October 2012




"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."

Answer: David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




"I really liked him, and I thought the two of us wouldn't have to try to create some history. I figured if he wanted to do it - if he responded to the material - then he would immediately understand what this was between these guys without us having to talk about for hours on end,"

Answer: Ed Harris
Appaloosa
Globe and Mail
22 September 2008




"The night before he arrived, I spent hours Wikipedia-ing Jean-Paul Sartre and others just in case he threw me a curveball."

Answer: Sam Riley
Why Kristen Stewart Slashed Her $20 Million Paycheck, Plus More Making 'On the Road' Stories
By Stephen Galloway
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 2012




"Viggo Mortensen -- he is the most beautiful man in the world! He is! He's just like, wow! He's such a special dude."

Answer: Michael Fassbender
Michael Fassbender, future superstar
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
8 March 2011




Who or what is Viggo referring to?


Yes, I still do. And when I do, people are surprised to receive them. It's becoming rare. Almost exotic. But I like it, yes.

Answer: Writing letters
Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir ? translated by Dom
4 September 2011




"A bond that has pushed me to give my utmost."

Answer: Viggo talking about Cronenberg
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine ? translated by Ollie
September 2011




'...they're terrible at writing, but I look forward to seeing them soon.'

Answer: Viggo on his horses in New Zealand
'Ordinary guy' role a treat for Mortensen
By Russell Baillie
New Zealand Herald
March 18 2006




"Perhaps it has something to do with a sort of incurable, persistent nosiness."

Answer: Taking so many photos
Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
by Natalie Dodecker
American Photo magazine 2000





"Let's just say I'm not as good as the hobbits."

Answer: Surfing
Chairman Of The Sword
By Liane Bonin
Entertainment Weekly
10 December 2003




Missing Word


David and I wrote 20-30 emails just about cigars.

Viggo Mortensen
How Viggo Mortensen Got Inside Sigmund Freud's Head
By Rachel Dodes
The Wall Street Journal: Speakeasy
18 November 2011




"There's no better thing as I'm concerned in my profession than to be called reliable."

Let's Get Viggo'd at The Coolidge
by Megan Johnson
Boston Herald Blog
6 March 2012




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




"I like to write and paint and make music and go walking on my own and garden. In fact, gardening is probably what I enjoy doing more than anything else."

Viggo Mortensen on 'A Dangerous Method'
By John Preston
Seven Magazine
The Telegraph
11 February 2012




If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say can do better.

The Man Who Would Be King
By Nick Dent
December 2001
Black & White magazine, #58




He stashes chocolate on his person like a marsupial.

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




"After this movie wraps, I'm thinking of going into goatherding, like my mother and her mother before her."

Viggo Mortensen on 'Prison'
Prison Press Kit Biography, 1988




"I haven't done theatre in 20 years, and that terrifies me more than death."

Viggo Mortensen: first Good - and then goodbye?
By Kevin Maher
The Times
2 April 2009

Quotable Viggo: 6 January 2013

It's 2013! For those of you that think the Millennium wasn't so long ago - yup, it really is - and it's time for my New Year Quiz. Some of them are easy and some of them are tricksy, and all will test whether you have been paying attention or not over these last Viggo-filled years. As usual there is no prize ? this is just for fun. Enjoy guessing the answers but please don't post them so others can have fun too. Next week I'll reveal all, and if you got them right let us know!



© New Line Cinema


Which film?


1) "I like the movie because it's not a clean story. All the characters are frustrated and resentful people." ? Viggo



2) Mortensen gives a wonderfully subtle comic performance.



3) "...I just looked at him and thought please let him know how to act. My mantra was that I wanted to find the next James Dean and he was awesome, very low key and on the spot I said this is our guy."



4) Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave...



5) "My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth." - Viggo



Who said?


1) "He's a little obsessed. He's a little bit of a perfectionist, but then so am I so that's ok!"



2) "Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient! And he's got a great chin."



3) "I really liked him, and I thought the two of us wouldn't have to try to create some history. I figured if he wanted to do it - if he responded to the material - then he would immediately understand what this was between these guys without us having to talk about for hours on end,"



4) "The night before he arrived, I spent hours Wikipedia-ing Jean-Paul Sartre and others just in case he threw me a curveball."



5) "Viggo Mortensen -- he is the most beautiful man in the world! He is! He's just like, wow! He's such a special dude."



Who or what is Viggo referring to?


1) "Yes, I still do. And when I do, people are surprised to receive them. It's becoming rare. Almost exotic. But I like it, yes."



2) "A bond that has pushed me to give my utmost."



3) '...they're terrible at writing, but I look forward to seeing them soon.'



4) "Perhaps it has something to do with a sort of incurable, persistent nosiness."



5) "Let's just say I'm not as good as the hobbits."



Missing Word


1) "David and I wrote 20-30 emails just about ......"



2) "There's no better thing as I'm concerned in my profession than to be called ........"



3) Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the ...... ..... of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.



4) "I like to write and paint and make music and go walking on my own and garden. In fact, ......... is probably what I enjoy doing more than anything else."



5) If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say ... .. ......



6) He stashes chocolate on his person like a .........



7) "After this movie wraps, I'm thinking of going into ..........., like my mother and her mother before her."



8) "I haven't done ....... in 20 years, and that terrifies me more than death."

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Last edited: 21 December 2013 17:56:53

Source: https://www.viggo-works.com/?page=2925