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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo




With all the recent Festivals I think it's time for a Quotable on Loin Des Hommes (Far from Men), and a round-up of some of the comments and reviews that have been coming out since August. Reading back over them all one thing is very clear and that's how this is so much a 'Viggo' film with its wide landscapes, inward and outward journeys and the bringing together of two very different people who have to learn to adapt and live together.






'I had dreamed of bringing Viggo Mortensen on board; his singularity made him the perfect fit for the role.'

Director David Oelhoffen
labiennale.org
21 August 2014




Q. Was the Camus story a strong influence on how you conceived of your character?

A. Both David and I referenced the story as much as possible. I have always admired Camus and thought he didn't get a fair deal from the left in France. History has proven him right; he spoke truth to power and paid a heavy price for it. He thought people should find a way to live together, whatever their differences of skin color or language. I think the character in the story in many ways represents who Camus might have become if he had stayed in Algeria.

Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Silcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"I think Camus would have been Daru -- his point of view in terms of violence, and his moral stance in this story, dealing with each situation in turn, and not having a blanket rule -- this is who I am, this is my point of view -- I deal with each person, each situation, and I don't always have an answer but I try to be honest with myself -- all of that is very much Camus."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




How long did it take you to master the French and Arabic?


I think I worked a lot. I worked for months and in Spain, where I live, I found someone who was from North Africa, and he helped me a lot. I looked at the whole script, and I made sure I could say it all in Arabic and made sure it was Arabic from that region.

Venice: Viggo Mortensen Talks Mastering New Languages
by Ariston Anderson
Hollywood Reporter
2 September 2014




"In a way, it ended up being more of a job to work on my French for the film, and change my accent, which was a bit Québécois. Before filming, I mostly worked on the Arabic because I had to learn that from scratch. I learned the basics before we started and we had an Algerian teacher who worked with both Reda and me on the set. There are differences between Algerian Arabic and other strands, so we had to be careful and accurate about that. I actually spoke a lot more Arabic in the film originally, but we cut quite a lot of crowd scenes to focus on the isolation and the two men."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Silcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




'Sometimes I asked people I met on the street or in the cafes about things that could help me to finish building the character in the film we are soon going to shoot in the Atlas mountains. Specific things about phrases or historical references in our script - trying out my very limited Arabic vocabulary, mixed with the French that I'm refining for the shoot - but in general just seeking out human contact, to go along touching, even if it was only ephemeral brushing against, the history of the many cultures that have passed through this city. The character that I'm going to play grew up here and I want to imagine his childhood and adolescence as best I can. I've always liked research like this, letting places, the weather, people and my own physical condition inform the adventure.'

Viggo on preparing to film while in Algiers
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




"...the landscape pushed us together, and we're really small... I like that David chose to do several shots where we're so small, that you really have to look, even on a big screen -- we're that tiny -- when we're leaving the school..."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




"It's a story that shows that people can overcome prejudices they didn't even know they had. Both men have to make an effort to understand something that they thought they knew and in the end they are more alike than different."

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




"The title applies to Daru at the beginning, to the way he lives, keeping away from people as a way to protect himself... but the story catches up with all of us. At the end of the film the title no longer applies to Daru, because he comes back to where people are, but rather to Mohammed, who goes into the unknown into the wilderness."

Viggo Mortensen
TIFF Q&A – transcribed by Topaz
14 September 2014




...from the first scenes of Viggo Mortensen, playing a teacher running a school and teaching local kids to read and write in 1954, you realize that he packs all the qualities of the archetypal strong and silent man as he has been constructed in the mythology of classic American westerns.

Flix
2 September 2014




Daru's war veteran turned pacifist has something of Henry Fonda's nobleness and Mortensen is one of the few actors working today (Mads Mikkelsen is another) who can make straightforward goodness into a rich and interesting character

John Bleasdale
Cine Vue
1 September 2014




...this is Mortensen's film. As with Lisandro Alonso's exquisite Jauja, which had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival back in May, Far from Men finds Mortensen inhabiting the kind of enigmatic, erudite character you wouldn't hesitate to follow under similar circumstances. In many ways it's one of his less conspicuous, more lived-in roles, although he is given the chance to add a couple of strings to his multilingual bow, confidently switching between Arabic and French.

Adam Woodward
Little White Lies
1 September 2014




Mortensen is eminently watchable as the craggy-faced Daru (it's a face that paints a thousand unknown memories)...

filmuforia
1 September 2014




The warm candle light extending rapid strokes of red and orange in the dark, as in a painting by Georges de La Tour, outlining Daru´s (Viggo Mortensen) chiselled and beautiful profile and that of his young and unpleasant (at least initially) guest Mohamed (Reda Kateb).

Alessia Pelonzi
Bad Taste – translated by Ollie
30 August 2014




'...it's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




You will find all previous Quotables
here.


© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Michael Crotto/One World Films.

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San Sebastian Jauja Interview


Source: San Sebastian Film Festival.
Found By: Chrissie


Thanks again to Chrissie ... The San Sebastian Film Festival have now uploaded the chat with Viggo and Lisandro to YouTube.





© San Sebastian Film Festival.

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Jauja at Ghent


Source: Ghent Film Festival.
Found By: Chrissie
jauja_poster.jpg
© 4L Productions.


Thanks again to Chrissie for bringing us this news.

Jauja's journey around the film festivals continues with the Ghent Film Festival.

Images © 4L Productions.

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Viggo Mortensen: “La gente no piensa en mí sólo como Aragorn”


Source: Fotogramas.
Found By: Chrissie

Thanks to Ollie for the find.


Quote:

Por Álex Montoya

Está agotado con los viajes y las leoninas obligaciones que la promoción de tres películas (¡¡¡tres!!!) al mismo tiempo: combinando entrevistas telefónicas en las que habla sobre el film francés 'Loin des hommes' y el estadounidense 'Captain Fantastic' con las de quienes cubrimos San Sebastián. Pero su aspecto es impecable, y su actitud… propia de la antiestrella, lo más alejado a un divo que probablemente exista en estos mundos del cine. Viggo Mortensen (Nueva York, 1957) presentó ayer 'Jauja' en la sección Horizontes Latinos. Ganadora del Premio FIPRESCI en Un Certain Regard en Cannes, la última película del argentino Lisandro Alonso nos hace viajar hasta la Patagonia de finales del siglo XIX y ofrece al espectador una experiencia estéticamente muy estimulante, aunque narrativamente algo desconcertante. El actor comparte un rato con FOTOGRAMAS y nos habla de su película, que llegará a las pantallas el próximo mes de diciembre, y de su gusto por la aventura y el juego de interpretar.

Menuda aventura, la de 'Jauja'…

Me gusta 'Jauja', es buena película: el desafío, la hoja de ruta, el guión, o más bien la idea de Lisandro… Soy amigo del coguionista (se refiere a Fabián Casas, poeta, escritor y compañero de Mortensen en el blog www.sobrevueloscuervos.com, donde hablan de filosofía, literatura, cine… y fútbol). Ya conocía el cine de Lisandro y me interesaba. Sabía que nunca trabajaba con actores, pero que en esta ocasión sí quería hacerlo. Y que tiene una mirada muy distinta, singular y hermosa. Me sumé y aporté todo lo que pude, y entre todos hemos logrado algo imprescindible a la hora de crear una obra, que es darle un valor universal desde el detalle, desde lo preciso.

Dice Lisandro Alonso que, durante el rodaje, a las 7.30 de la mañana ya le llamaba a la puerta para sugerirle ideas. ¿Es un actor intervencionista, que aporta ideas constantemente?

Sí, tienes una ventana limitada en el tiempo para contar algo que uno espera que perdure, y hay que aprovechar la oportunidad. Y con un director abierto, como Lisandro, es más fácil. Él puede aprovechar lo que le parezca. He trabajado con cineastas inseguros, que desconfían, rígidos, y hay que aguantarlos y cumplir con lo que quieren. Pero prefiero a los que escuchan, me divierto más. En cualquier caso, creo que lo importante para el actor es ser flexible. Hay intérpretes muy buenos, que se preparan muy bien técnicamente, por su cuenta, y que no van a cambiar. Creo que es una pena para ellos, se pierden lo más hermoso del oficio: jugar, estar abierto y dispuesto a responder ante lo que te ofrecen los demás. Es más divertido, y los regalos que te da la profesión no te llegan si no eres flexible.

'Jauja' es una muestra de esa voluntad de jugar, que a veces puede desconcertar a quienes sigan su carrera.

Yo no lo planeo, pero supongo que a veces he hecho elecciones profesionales desconcertantes. Nunca me he esforzado particularmente para cambiar de rumbo en cada película. Me gusta participar de aventuras como esta ('Jauja' se rodó en la Patagonia, con un equipo muy pequeño y prácticamente incomunicado), siempre me ha gustado viajar desde niño y me he acercado a culturas diferentes, que me han hecho más abierto. Y el actor que no es abierto, está muy limitado, porque hay que querer entender el punto de vista del personaje que interpretas, que a veces es muy distinta a la de uno. El trabajo del actor es mantener esa flexibilidad.

¿Es posible jugar como a usted le gusta en Hollywood?


En Estados Unidos se hace de todo. Aunque en el sistema de estudios es más complicado, porque tratan de contentar a la máxima cantidad de público posible y recaudar la mayor cantidad de dinero posible. Y complacer a tanta gente hace muy difícil hacer un producto singular que tenga profundidad y entidad. Quizás Cronenberg sea de los pocos que lo consiguen: tanto 'Promesas del Este' como 'Una historia de violencia' eran películas de estudio, pero con personalidad propia. David hace siempre la película que quiere hacer, cambiando de registros y géneros. Es posible, pero necesitas a un director con la fortaleza suficiente para mantener su mirada contra viento y marea.

Es curioso porque es todo lo contrario a una estrella, y ni siquiera en su filmografía hay demasiados títulos que pudieran etiquetarle así, pero el tratamiento que recibe en la calle sí es de estrella. La sombra de Aragorn es alargada…

Es normal, millones de personas vieron 'El Señor de los Anillos', una saga que me ha dado muchas oportunidades. De todos modos, hay un buen indicativo de cómo me ve la gente: cuando en un festival como este, por ejemplo, salgo a la calle y me dan fotos para firmar, me fijo en lo que hay. Y antes había más de Aragorn que ahora: la cosa ha cambiado, y encuentras de todo, desde fotos de 'Alatriste' a 'La carretera' o 'Appaloosa'. La gente no sólo piensa en mí como Aragorn, aunque soy consciente de que lo primero que piensan sí es en Aragorn.

© Fotogramas.

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Viggo at the San Sebastian Film Festival


Source: Sebastian Film Festival.
Found By: Hamster


Nice photos from the Festival Site found by Hamster.











Images © San Sebastian Film Festival. Photographer: Gari Garaialde.


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Last edited: 23 November 2014 15:51:59