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Matt Ross Receives Prize (with Viggo)


Source: Claudia Catalli.
Found By: ollie
003cacfp.jpg
© Getty.


Thanks to ollie for this short video of Matt (receiving his award) and Viggo onstage at Cannes.

Short video


© Video: Claudia Catalli. Images © Getty.

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Our Congratulations to Matt Ross!


Thanks to Iolanthe for the find. Matt Ross has won the Un Certain Regard Directors Prize at Cannes for Captain Fantastic. Fantastic news indeed!

Full details of all the prizes at the Festival de Cannes website here





Quote:

And from Variety ...

Best Director was presented to a film already established as a festival favorite: U.S. helmer Matt Ross' "Captain Fantastic" unspooled at Sundance in January, winning over audiences with its colorful story of a free-spirited widower (vibrantly played by Viggo Mortensen) determined to raise his children his own way. Ross took the stage with his leading man in tow, to a roar of approval from the gathered crowd in the festival's Debussy theater. "I couldn't have done this without [Viggo]," Ross said. "He's my collaborator."

© Variety. Images © Festival de Cannes.

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Viggo presents award at Cannes to Peter Suschitzky


Source: Angenieux.
Found By: ollie
Thanks to ollie for bringing this to us - David Cronenberg's long time Director of Photography receiving the Pierre Angénieux Excellens in Cinematography award yesterday:




You will find more about the award here.

Images © Pauline Maillet.

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Iolanthe's Quotable Viggo


Found By: Iolanthe

Captain Fantastic has taken the Cannes Film Festival by storm with a 10 minute standing ovation and the award of Best Director in Un Certain Regard for Matt Ross. What a tribute to the hard work and dedication of Matt and Viggo, and all those wonderful kids. Time to round up some of the very best comments coming out of Cannes this week.





It was the fifth, count 'em fifth , movie of the day for me here on this Tuesday in Cannes. I saw everything in languages ranging from Spanish (Almodovar's Julieta) to the Filipino's Tagalog (Mama Rosa) to Portugese (a delicious Sonia Braga in Aquarius) and Pete Hammond badge English channeled thru French director Olivier Assayas (Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper – and there were NO boos at my screening). All of these are official contenders in the main Cannes Competition. But it was in the lesser, but often more intriguing , Un Certain Regard sidebar that the best film of the day, maybe the festival, and maybe so far this year (at least for me) was unveiled to a packed crowd of adoring french – and other – moviegoers: Captain Fantastic.

Pete Hammond
Deadline.com
17 May 2016




'Captain Fantastic' is weird, warm, hilarious and moving, with the entire cast working together in harmony to form a cosy and engaging film. Matt Ross proves himself a director worthy of commendation with this film about love, loss and trying to do what's right for your family, even if it is not necessarily what is right for you.

Brogen Hayes
Movies.ie
17 May 2016




'[Viggo] is an extraordinary man, an extraordinary mind. He had many thoughts and notes — great insights — before shooting. And once filming, Viggo contributed an effortless simplicity and deep humanity that, I believe, elevated the film.'

Matt Ross
Cannes Festival
Eugénie Malinjod
20 May 2016




"We rented a hotel room for him, but he never stayed there. We just knew he was in the forest somewhere. That kind of commitment really shows in his work."

Producer Lynette Howell Taylor
Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




"When I was preparing for this role, I went back to where I used to live [in northern Idaho] and spent some time there. I ended up driving to Washington from Idaho in a pickup truck filled with all kinds of things I thought might be useful. It looked like something out of The Beverly Hillbillies when I arrived.

Viggo Mortensen
Cannes Press Kit
May 2016




The Lord of the Rings star shows a full complement of skills including driving family's bus, lighting a fire, playing guitar and rock-climbing.

"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016




As you might've guessed, he shines in Captain Fantastic. As is often the case with Mortensen, every beat of his character is fine-tuned so effortlessly. He's genuinely sincere and lovable, even if for much of the film you might find that his character's approach to parenting is absolutely clinically insane.

A Conversation with Matt Ross and Viggo Mortensen
Kee Chang
Anthem
20 May 2016




Magnetic, charming and funny, as well as tenacious and kind, Mortensen easily leads this cast to greatness.

Brogen Hayes
Movies.ie
17 May 2016




The actor delivers a rugged, raw, unguarded performance as the devoted father – his best turn for many years, and worthy of all of the praise that he's already receiving following the film's two festival bows.

Paul Heath
The Hollywood News
17 May 2016




As Ben, Mortensen... exudes warmth and intelligence from every pore.

Jo-Ann Titmarsh
HeyUGuys
17 May 2016




Captain Fantastic criticises both the flower child dream and the capitalist consumer society, using extreme examples of both to make its point very clear: a no-hunting-no-food way of life on one side, and multi-millionaire mansions on the other. The hippie dream comes to terms with American contemporary reality, but there is enough depth in the film to find fault with both lifestyles and recognise the problems inherent to both.

Jasmin Valjas
The Upcoming
17 May 2016




For audiences at the Cannes Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival (where it first premiered before landing in France), "Captain Fantastic" has resonated as a movie for its time: a heartfelt and comic exploration about whether our hyper-digital, cacophonous lives have strayed from important things.

Jake Coyle
Associated Press
18 May 2016




"It's one of those movies that has its finger on the pulse of what's happening, like American movies in the early seventies."

Viggo Mortensen Doesn't Need to Make Big Movies Anymore
Viggo Mortensen
Eric Kohn
Indiewire
17 May 2016




'....ultimately, it's not about these liberal, off-the-grid people you're going to follow through thick and thin. On many levels, the film is about communication. It's about being open to changing your mind about things and balancing things out as individuals. What does "Captain Fantastic" even mean? You might as well call it "The Perfect Dad." It's an ideal that you're never going to achieve because it's not possible. And yet, it doesn't mean you don't try.'

A Conversation with Matt Ross and Viggo Mortensen
Kee Chang
Anthem
20 May 2016




Some Golden Globe voters were at the premiere and it was thumbs up from at least one I spoke to. Although it is early, and the film needs to catch fire, there is indeed award potential here in some key categories including screenplay, and most definitely for Mortensen who has never been better.

Pete Hammond
Deadline.com
17 May 2016




"I couldn't have done this without [Viggo], he's my collaborator."

Matt Ross accepting his best director award
Cannes
21 May 2016



You will find all previous Quotables here.

© Viggo-Works/Iolanthe. Images © Bleecker Street.

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Captain Fantastic, interview with Matt Ross


Source: Cannes.
Found By: Lindi


Thanks to Lindi for the find. Matt has lovely things to say about Viggo.



Quote:
15cfps.jpg
© Bleecker Street.
Known for his performances as an actor, especially in Face/Off, American Psycho and Aviator, the American Matt Ross, stepped behind the camera in 2012 with 28 Hotel Rooms, and is in Cannes for the first time for Un Certain Regard with Captain Fantastic, starring Viggo Mortensen.

What inspired you to begin work on this film?

The genesis of Captain Fantastic was my having two children, making this the most personal story I've ever written. In this respect, the main character is my fantasy of myself and the film is aspirational. Every parent wants their child to have a happy, fulfilling life and wants to prepare their child for the challenges of life. Captain Fantastic is a dramatic, and sometimes comedic, exploration of this idea.

Ben Cash (Viggo Mortensen) is a man who has devoted his life to raising his kids: he gives up his professional career, moves his family a place where they can live in harmony with the natural world, and spends his every waking moment educating and training his kids, and doing everything in his power to prepare them for the "real world."

I want nothing more than to teach my kids everything I've learned about life, to help them navigate the world, to protect them. But to do this in the way the main character does it, to actually retreat from society and devote every waking moment to being a parent – perhaps there are costs there as well.

On some level, the film asks a very simple question, as a parent, where does one draw the line between doing too much and doing too little?



Tell us about your working method and the atmosphere on set. Any anecdotes to share?

Every film is different. I very much believe that the actors should be not required to deliver a "performance" between action and cut. Everything I do is about encouraging and creating an environment where exploration can flourish. I'd never turn the camera off, if I could. Filmmaking should be about carving, digging, not attempting to prop up some pre-conceived, dead object. I include the script, on some level, as well.

Filmmaking is collaborative, it's a group activity, not a solo endeavour. Everyone, technicians and actors alike, obliges my original intentions to expand and contract. Sometimes it's very difficult to retain your original intention. It's a balance, I suppose, of allowing some things to mutate and grow — and making sure others stay true to some part of the original intention, to the reason everyone signed up to make this particular story.

Each film demands its own working methods, but in general, I clear the set and ask the actors to fumble their way through the scene, find where they want to go, how they want to move. On this film, after the actors got comfortable, Stéphane Fontaine and I would discuss moments that needed to be accentuated, focused, and how best to do this. We'd shoot and this process of constant re-calibration would continue.



Tell us something about your actors.


I was blessed to be able to collaborate with Viggo Mortensen. He is an extraordinary man, an extraordinary mind. He had many thoughts and notes — great insights — before shooting. And once filming, Viggo contributed an effortless simplicity and deep humanity that, I believe, elevated the film.

Our central cast, apart from Viggo, is made up of children. We needed children who were physically fit, who sounded like they knew and understood the complicated concepts they describe in the story, who could sing, play musical instruments, speak foreign languages, rock climb, fight, hunt. The list went on and on.

I wanted to find special kids, kids with a special spirit. And I wanted to try to capture that. And so narrowing it down was brutal. Every child has something special.



What are your views on the state of the film industry in your country?


Honestly, I'm not discouraged at all. Digital technology has democratised the means of production, and to a degree, distribution as well. Making films has perhaps never been easier; excellent cameras are available and inexpensive. Independent film in the US is vibrant and thriving. Getting people to find and watch your films, however, is still difficult. The major studios in the US are primarily in the business of making spectacles for global audiences, though there are exceptions, of course. Honestly, the studio world is not one I know well, so I can't speak with an insider's perspective. Excellent films are still made within that model, but it appears to be harder and harder to make certain kinds of films there. But I think as long as filmmakers make films, there will be audiences who want to see them.

© Cannes Film Festival 2016. Images © Bleecker Street.


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Last edited: 28 June 2016 14:23:26