Quotable Viggo 2017

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Quotable Viggo: 25 June 2017

As Riv has named this Alatriste week there's no need to tell you what this week's Quotable is about! Remember those heady days of intrigue, battles, capes, swords and that amazing moustache? Of Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno's wonderful articles for Diario de León which he always took the trouble to share with us? And how we followed the Captain through the heat and dust and fell in love with Spain? Wasn't it all wonderful?



© 20th Century Fox/Estudios Picasso


The protagonist of this franchise is perhaps the least dashing, most enigmatic hero ever to rattle a rapier. Alatriste speaks little, drinks alone, dresses badly and blunders into traps set by more cunning adversaries. But he is fearless, deadly with a blade and, beneath his armored persona, stubbornly loyal.

The Pen and the Sword
By Donald Morrison
Time Europe
29 May 2006




"I liked the script a lot, and if you really want me to play this character, and it turns out that this can be done, it would be an honour for me, I'd like it." That was the simple and firm answer that the New York actor Viggo Mortensen gave the director Agustín Díaz Yanes when the latter offered him the part of Alatriste, the wicked soldier of the convulsed Spanish XVII century, created by Arturo Pérez-Reverte.

The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García - translated by Paddy
El País Semanal
6 August 2006




CK: What did Viggo Mortensen provide the film with?

ADY: Everything; absolutely everything. In Spain, because of the tradition of our cinema, we don't have action heroes, and Viggo combines an impressive physique (that "exact image of the weary hero" that Arturo wanted) with the fact of being a spectacular actor of action films. He's an extraordinary actor in dialogue, in everything...he has that combination that it's so difficult to find here. Viggo has been the vital centre of the film. The title of the movie is Alatriste! His experience, his help and his advice have also been very important.

Action, history...and skilled swordsmen
By Andrés Rubin de Celis - translated by Paddy
Citizen K Espana
July 2006




CC: Which part of the novel was the most difficult to turn into a film?

ADY: What I was most scared of, but then it wasn't difficult, were the swords and the action, but via Viggo we brought in Bob Anderson. He taught us how to do it and we weren't afraid anymore.

Capitán Alatriste - in conversation with Agustín Díaz Yanes
By Ignacio Saldaña - translated by Paddy
Comunicación Cultural
25 July 2006




I went to the Prado Museum, which I had visited many times, but now I saw the paintings in a different light, searching for the character, so I'd call Tano (the director) at 2 am and tell him, "listen, I found this painting by Góngora". Viggo makes a face and changes his voice to imitate Díaz Yanes: 'Okay, let me explain it to you. You're an idiot.' But nothing. I saw the characters in those paintings."

Viggo Mortensen
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




"I know that my character is bitter and upset. He has good things within him, but it is difficult to find them."

Viggo Mortensen
The Soul of Viggo (El Alama de Viggo)
By Miguel Juan Payan -translated by Chrissie
Accion magazine
April 2005



"Some supposedly great stars doubt you and call you and say. 'Man, what are you doing?!' But Viggo went for the kill. He was the first one to throw himself into the cold water, into a filthy mud puddle, and the rest followed him."

Agustín Díaz Yanes
The Lord of Simplicity
By Ernesto Garratt Vines - translated by Margarita
Wikén - El Mercurio
30 March 2007




'When you are used to filming in the U.S., the way things are done in Spain may feel like a great chaos, because there is a more relaxed atmosphere. But you soon realize that it is something that has to do with the culture, and I loved it!'

Viggo Mortensen
Top Men - Viggo Mortensen, Glamour Magazine,
August 2006
Translated for V-W by Graciela




Viggo Mortensen plays his character to perfection. He submerges himself in Alatriste and his terse, murmured and yet sonorous speech is that of one who knows words are extraneous when swords meet. His clear gaze, firm and serene, his calm, fluid gestures and that loyal spirit he has toward his comrades in arms, serve better than any narrative to tell the story of a man who knows irrevocably what his destiny will be, but still keeps hope alive for a future day when Spain will see better times and break free of the agonized struggles it is presently enmeshed in.

Diego Alatriste y Tenorio - Hero or villain?
By Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Margarita
Diario de León
29 August 2006




"He is Alatriste, the one I thought, the one I wrote! He's almost the one from the drawings!"

Pérez-Reverte
A Look of His Own
By Juan Cruz, El País Semanal, 6 August 2006
Translated for V-W by Paddy




Among clouds of dust and in the middle of a group of officers I see the Captain's gallant figure, leant on the musket fork, without the hat on his head, while smoking with pleasure his umpteenth cigarette of the morning. He doesn't speak. He looks at the crowd with half-closed eyes, and stays imperturbable exhaling puffs of smoke. Heat is crushing.

Reunion with Alatriste in Uclés
Diario de León
by Miguel Ángel Nepomuceno - translated by Paddy
26 June 2005




The final sequence of the film was being shot, because it is in Rocroi that the final square made up of veterans from the Old Cartagena regiment makes a stand and the story of Captain Alatriste ends. I was behind the cameras, a privileged spectator watching hundreds of riders charge again and again against the loyal Spanish infantry and Viggo in the front line, his head uncovered and sword in hand, defending his life and that of his comrades. "He truly believes he is Diego Alatriste," Agustín Díaz Yanes told me between takes. "Actors are all a strange breed," he added, "but this one is a special case."

Viggo, The Captain
By Arturo Pérez-Reverte - translated by Elessars Queen and Astarloa
El Semanal, Diario de León
20 July 2005




"We were enormously lucky with the appearance of Viggo Mortensen; it could be no one else! Even Arturo took things from Viggo for the next novel. That´s where we succeeded with the followers... Viggo was so extraordinary that he surpassed everything that Arturo, and obviously I, could have thought. His physical presence on screen is tremendous, " he says emphatically."

Diaz Yanes
The Biography of Captain Alatriste
By Jose Edurado Arenas - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
ABC.es
6 June 2010




That hero will have Viggo Mortensen's face forever. Challenging and tender. Big blue eyes and proud look.

The Court of Alatriste
By Rocío García
El País Semanal - Translated for V-W by Paddy
6 August 2006

Quotable Viggo: 17 June 2017

In my last Quotable I looked at why Directors have picked Viggo for various parts. This week I'm turning it around the other way with insights as to why Viggo has chosen to take certain roles. And it's not always for the reasons you might expect…



© Gregory Widen.


Loin des Hommes

...the producer happened to have seen me on YouTube speaking French to introduce Guy Lafleur at the centennial for the Montreal Canadiens. And the producer said, "Look, I'm producing an adaptation of an Albert Camus story, could you do a whole movie in French?" And I said, "Well, I can try, but why don't you send me the story and see if I like it?" And I loved it. I wasn't looking to do something in French or Arabic.

Viggo Mortensen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen
By Eric Benson
Grantland.com
19 March 2015



Todos Tenemos Un Plan


"I gave her my address, she sent [the script to me, it surprised me. I liked the script very much. It was a strange story, but strange in a very positive way, because it's very original. It's a very original thriller. What I liked immediately and what I continue to like a lot are the contradictions, the dualities that it contains, not only between the two twin brothers that I play, but also the landscapes, the city and the river, and all the characters have certain contradictions."

Viggo Mortensen
Todos Tenemos Un Plan Press Conference
By - transcribed and translated by Rio, Zoe and Ollie
La Metro Television
9 August 2011



On The Road

"When I read the book, the last person I'd have seen myself playing would have been the Burroughs character. I was a little surprised. But it was just when I was finishing A Dangerous Method, and I thought, 'Don't forget, you were surprised at David's idea of you playing Freud too.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Mortensen slipped into Freud role
By Jim Slotek
Toronto Sun
6 January 2012



A Dangerous Method

'I accepted the challenge because I trusted David. The last thing he wants to do is miscast his movies, when it's someone like me who's his friend. He thought I could do it and didn't let go of the idea, so I thought there must be something to it.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: 'A Dangerous Method' Taught Me How to Talk in a Movie
By Michael Hogan
Moviefone
23 November 2011



"The scrip of A Dangerous Method written by Christopher Hampton ( from his play) enchanted me from the first reading. During the filming, like Michael (Fassbender) and Keira (Knightley, involved with Jung and studying with Freud), I was completely trapped by the emotional and complicated human relationships in the film. Bodies and thoughts, words and life choices are interwoven, although the latter are "contaminated" by the social conventions."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: Interpreting the soul of Freud
By Giovanna Grassi
Sette Magazine – translated by Ollie
September 2011



The Road

Is it true that you almost turned down The Road?

Yes, I was very tired, and I did not want to accept the role unless I felt I was capable of giving it my best. But then I changed my mind because the story was really good and the topic is one everybody can relate to. Besides, my being exhausted fit the role perfectly. It is about a man who, in some sense, is dying of exhaustion, so the result was very interesting.

Viggo Mortensen Under The Spotlight
Selecciones Magazine
March 2009
Translated for V-W by Graciela



Good

"I was starting out in acting 25 years ago, and was in London on what was only my second audition," he recalls. "I didn't get the part, but while I was there I saw a play Good with Alan Howard, and it made a strong impression. When the opportunity to play the role on film came along, I thought it an interesting way to make a circle out of the experience some quarter century later."

Viggo Mortensen
Emmanuel Levy
Emmanuel Levy.com
24 November 2008



Alatriste

"I liked the plot as a tale, as a story. And it captivated me. So I decided to do it, against everyone and against everything."

Viggo Mortensen
The filming of Alatriste, by Jesús Martin
Acción Magazine July, 2006
Translated by Paddy for V-W



A History of Violence


"I thought it was interesting, but most directors would make an exploitation movie out of it and it might have been interesting to look at, but not very thought-provoking. Obviously, he makes thought-provoking movies, so I wondered why he wanted to do this one. I asked him immediately. He gave -- and continues to give -- interesting answers."

Viggo Mortensen
American brutality
Globe and Mail Cannes Review
by Liam Lacey
May 17 2005



The Lord of the Rings


"I guess in the end I did it because I would feel that I had been chicken shit really. I had to leave the next day, so I'm on the plane reading, looking at this gigantic book and thinking, 'What the hell have I done?"

Viggo Mortensen
The Man Who Would Be King
by Nick Dent
Black & White magazine
2001



Psycho


"....when I met Gus [Van Sant] for the first time to discuss the part, my first question was:"why do you want to remake that movie; it was a perfectly good movie the first time round?" So I wasn't inclined to do it, but he simply said that it might be fun."

Viggo Mortensen
Uncut
November 2007



The Prophecy

His participation in this movie was agreed at a moment's notice. It went all so quickly that he read the script while flying out to Arizona, where the scenes in which Mortensen appears were shot. "I accepted, in part because I had always wanted to work with Christopher Walken," the actor says while sitting on the sofa's edge. His face lights up when saying Walken's name. It's evident that Christopher Walken is a cult actor for many young actors nowadays. "I would do any movie with him, no matter what [it was]."

On "The Prophecy'
Viggo Mortensen: A Very Devilish Devil In The Prophecy
by Ferran Viladevall
La Opinión 1995



American Yakuza

One of my favourite movies of yours is American Yakuza. What drew you to that part and can you share any stories on making it?

I was quite broke and needed a job.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012



The Indian Runner

[Penn] sent me the script and I was instantly hooked. At the start, I preferred the character which was finally played by David Morse. Mine was just described as "the baddy'. But I said to myself that, behind the slightly too obvious behaviour of Frank Roberts, there had to be a really complex reason. The filming was extremely interesting ... The more so because Sean was very involved.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen: The Soul of a Warrior
by Juliette Michaud
Studio Magazine
December 2002



Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3


'I was visiting a friend in Los Angeles and he had a part in the third. "We need a man. Wasn't that something for you?', he asked. Why not? I had seen the original 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre', and I thought there was something about it - in spite of everything. I hoped the third would contain the same. But the movie company got cold feet and cut away the most terrifying and gruesome scenes, and it ended up being a rather incoherent movie.'

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
2001

Quotable Viggo: 3 May 2017

With Viggo now in talks for two new films (I have all my fingers and toes crossed) I thought I'd take a look at Directors and casting. We all know the stories that have been told about how Viggo ended up cast as Aragorn in The Lord of the Rings. It was a mixture of an initial casting error, some insightful suggestions from the production team, luck, and a son who was a huge fan of the books. But I'm going to look at the films that came afterwards, what drew all the directors that followed to Viggo? Lucky David Cronenberg, who knows a 'full symphony orchestra' when he sees it, gets three goes at enlightening us.



© Focus Features.


Matt Ross – Captain Fantastic

Viggo was cast first. He was my first choice for the part and we sent him the script. He read it and we met.

Viggo is highly selective and his dedication to storytelling is unparalleled. He's a rare artist. He acts, writes, paints, he's an accomplished musician who makes CDs. The list goes one. So he looks at the big picture, in deep and profound ways. And when he commits, he really commits, not just to the doing, but also to the selling of the film. Which can go on for a long time and is exhausting.

Matt Ross may play a greedy tech titan in 'Silicon Valley,' but in Berkeley he's just a regular guy
Frances Dinkelspiel
15 April 2015



Director David Oelhoffen - Loin des Hommes

'I had dreamed of bringing Viggo Mortensen on board; his singularity made him the perfect fit for the role.'

Director David Oelhoffen - Loin des Hommes
labiennale.org
21 August 2014



Lisandro Alonso - Jauja

'I had seen him only once at the Toronto Festival many years ago. We exchanged two or three words and he gave me a San Lorenzo pin - he's always going around giving people those things. I liked him very much; right then I realized that we could treat one another as equals. He's an actor I love, among other things for the way in which he transmits emotions physically, gesturally. He's not an actor who's usually given great lines of dialogue, but you see him, for example, in the final scene of History of Violence, David Cronenberg's film, and you realize how incredible his work is, the things you can read in his face.'

"It´s a mixture of spaces, times and languages."
By Diego Brodersen - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Pagina 12



Hossein Amini – Two Faces of January

'I just tried for so long and just couldn't get anyone to finance the movie or be interested in kind of, you know, exploring it, and the moment Viggo read the script and was interested in doing it; it's amazing how suddenly people start kind of saying, "Oh, well we're interested in doing it," because if it's a business decision then they can. Suddenly, there's foreign sales and they can sell the idea. It suddenly [went] from "this is too dark," "the characters are [too] unlikable and complicated,"- it was suddenly, "Well it's Viggo."'

Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
By Robyn Candyce
Moviehole
24 September 2014



Ana Piterbarg - Todos Tenemos Un Plan

What was it that drew you to Viggo. Why was he right for the role?

I think he one of the best actors in the world. In his body of work he plays such a range of different characters that I knew that he could play the two diverse roles in this movie. He is a well-travelled and cultured person as well as being sensitive he can be brutal at the same time.

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012



David Cronenberg – A Dangerous Method

'I wanted to show another Freud, not the strict looking grandfather we all know, but someone in his fifties who, it's said, was handsome, funny and charismatic. How was I not to think of Viggo?'

David Cronenberg: "Nunca he ido a terapia, pero me parece una situación fascinante"
Rafa Vidiella
20minutos.es
3 November 2011



John Hillcoat – The Road

"The interesting thing about picking an actor for a movie is, you want to try to surpass the audience's knowledge or expectations of what that actor's about. We took a shot with Viggo as opposed to bigger box-office stars. In large part, he's the right choice because, as good as he is, he's still untapped."

The Road Is the Most Important Movie of the Year
By Tom Chiarella
Esquire Magazine
12 May 2009



Ed Harris - Appaloosa

"I wanted the guy who I could ride next to on a horse for ten hours and never say a word and feel totally comfortable, and I figured he'd be the guy. He's the only man I wanted to play the role."

TIFF: Riding Into Appaloosa with Ed Harrs, Renee Zellweger, Viggo Mortensen, and Jeremy Irons
By Jordan Riefe
The Dead Bolt
13 September 2008



Vicente Amorim - Good

Viggo Mortensen is an extraordinary actor. I had seen him in A History Of Violence, directed by David Cronenberg, in which he plays a man haunted by ghosts from his past. In Good he is a mirror image of it, his character is becoming the ghost he will be. He has the perfect biotype to play a German. He has a sweet kind of masculinity, almost fragile and these characteristics are very important to convince the audience about his choices, even though these choices will take him to an abyss.

Rede CBN radio interview
Translated by Claudia
3 June 2006



David Cronenberg – Eastern Promises

'I admit I was looking for something I could do with Viggo. A director has a strange relationship with his actors, because after the actor has gone on to his next movie, you're in the editing room living with him every day, dreaming about him and hearing his voice. I had always thought he had a very Russian, Slavic look. And when I read the script I thought, "This is a role made in heaven for Viggo."'

Q+A : David Cronenberg, Film Festival Preview
nowtoronto.com
30 Aug 2007



Agustín Diaz-Yanes - Alatriste

"...he's got the age, professionalism, look, body and he's one of the few action heroes in modern cinema."

Viggo Mortensen Will Be A Splendid Captain
by Gontzal Díez
The Truth of Murcail
Feb 19 2004



David Cronenberg, - A History of Violence

"Viggo's my kind of actor," smiles Cronenberg, who likes to work with actors who are not just leading men, but also character actors. "First of all they tend not to be afraid because they're not trying to protect some image they see of themselves as traditional leading men, but also it gives them a much bigger palette to paint from because they have all kinds of edges. I need a kind of eccentricity that is more typical of a character actor than a leading man, and yet still has a leading man presence and charisma."

"Viggo was perfect. He is not only a charismatic leading man, but the combination of other qualities made me feel he had the depth to play a very complex role."

Cannes Film Festival 2005 Press Kit


Joe Johnston - Hidalgo

"I saw this picture with Diane Lane called A Walk on the Moon. And there was something about his performance in that film that told me that this guy could be Frank Hopkins. I hadn't seen the first Lord of the Rings before we cast him, but I figured anybody that could sell blouses to Diane Lane out of a truck could do anything."

Joe Johnston - Hidalgo
Staci Layne Wilson
American Western Magazine
March 2004

Quotable Viggo: 28 May 2017

Seeing the lovely photo of Viggo as a boy posted by Chrissie last week, I really had to do a childhood quotable. Viggo had a more adventurous childhood than most and one that has deeply shaped his life giving him an enduring love of travel, Argentina, wild places and photography. Though hopefully not the ass end of dragons…



© Viggo Mortensen


The eldest of three brothers, Viggo was born in New York in 1958 and given his father's name. Viggo is, he says, considered in contemporary Denmark to be a slightly archaic, eccentric name for a young man. "It would be like being called Herbert…"

The Rebel King
By Chris Heath
GQ magazine
April 2004




"…I was always running away. I did that a lot. [Another time] when I was a child, about two-and-a-half, I crawled out of bed and across the road and crawled into someone's house on a Sunday morning. I was in the kitchen playing with all the pots and pans, and they called my parents, who had been calling the police. I think they said: 'You are missing someone, and he is here playing with our kitchen knives.'"

Viggo Mortensen
Sympathy for the devil
By Chrissy Iley
The Observer
19 April 2009




'One day when I was about 6 years old, I read my first comic without help. I was in sick in bed one stormy Buenos Aires afternoon. There alone, while the rain ticked against the window, I browsed my little treasure, admiring the drawings thoroughly, when suddenly I realized that I understood, more or less, what those "little balloons" were saying. I went back to the first page and began to read. It took a tremendous amount of effort and I don't know how much time - an hour or more, I suppose - but I read and understood the whole comic. When I got to the end, I was surprised and proud. And then I got angry because I knew that it wasn't the end of the story. It never is the end with comics. Like the story of this world; things never end. That comic was a copy of Batman from 1964 in which "The Green Lantern" appeared.'

Viggo Mortensen
Sobrevuelos Column
CASLA
Translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
5 January 2013




When Viggo was 7, his parents sent him to boarding school in Argentina. "It was a strict school, isolated in the foothills of the mountains," he said. "Other than holidays, I really didn't see my parents. The other kids were miserable, always crying or wetting their beds. But I was pretty self-sufficient. So I guess it must have suited me."

Back in the saddle 'Rings' hero Mortensen is riding high with 'Hidalgo'
By Nancy Mills
Daily News
25 February 2004




'According to my mother I never went anywhere as a child without a pencil, and I drew all the time. Recently she gave me a notebook with some of my old drawings. I especially noticed one I drew when I was 7 - it was rather wild. On the top it said: 'Little Red Riding Hood', and then there were a lot of oil colours mixed together, almost abstract. I really liked it. But across the drawing it said with a red pen - and underlined: VERY BAD! Some teachers still think that is motivating...'

Viggo from Hollywood
By Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
August 2001




"Every once in a while you do something really dumb when you're a kid and you realize when you're an adult that that's dangerous, but.. you know.. There was one time when I was coming home at the end of the day, going through the paddocks, and you open the gates from horseback, and the last gate I was about to grab the latch and there was this beautiful, beautiful snake wrapped around it..it was orange and black and white stripes. And I thought 'I'm going to take this home and show it to my family'. And I tried to grab it and he tried to get me. And I like whacked it just to stun it and I grabbed it by the neck and opened the gate and got through, closed it and said "Dad, dad, look what I got." And he freaked out, cos it was a Coral snake, which if you get bit I think two minutes, three minutes, you're dead."

Viggo Mortensen
David Letterman Show, 2004



As an 8-year-old, Mortensen played "the ass end of a dragon" in a school play…

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"I remember trying out for a play once in junior high school, and as soon as the audition started, they said 'Speak up! Speak up!' And I just stopped and took off. I wasn't really cut out for it."

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Trip
by Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39, 2002




I was 11 when we moved back to the States. I couldn't believe the swear words, the slang, the music - all the kids were into Blue Oyster Cult and Grand Funk Railroad. I was a closet Carpenters fan. I'd sing 'Top of the World' to myself on the way to school, but when I got close to campus I'd shut up.

The Hot New 39-Year-Old
By Dennis Hensley
Movieline magazine, 1998




"Within a month or two, I knew all the swear words."

Viggo Mortensen on leaving South America
I've taken on too much...
By James Mottram, The Independent / UK.
23 October 2007




.... "my brothers and I spoke only Spanish. But you quickly adapt. I somewhat replaced it with French. We were not that far from Quebec, so I [replaced] my football team with the Montreal Canadians hockey team, which has the same colours".

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




…as an adolescent, he felt comfortable behind the lens of a camera. Mortensen says he started taking pictures as a teenager, although he wasn't "really serious about it." For him, the camera not only offered a sense of control over his surroundings but a kind of veil to help him feel invisible from a world he found both intimidating and inspiring.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
October 2003




"I didn't have friends when I was little that I know now - there wasn't any sense of continuity like that," Mortensen says. "But I got to see a lot of things and learn a lot of things. And I learned to rely on my imagination, and on myself."

Finding Viggo
By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




'Now I see things in hindsight and what I learned in those years is what has made me who I am today. And, even though I recognize that I'm a rather strange guy, I don't think the end result has been so bad.'

Viggo Mortensen on growing up in Argentina
"I'm permanently dissatisfied"
By Amelia Enríquez - translated for V-W by Margarita
30 August 2006

Quotable Viggo: 21 May 2017

I've put together a light-hearted Quotable for you this week with a lot of old favourites, all of which are a little offbeat, quirky, amusing and very, very Viggo.



© Besiktas JK.


When asked why he always sports [San Lorenzo] gear during interviews (today it's a pullover with their logos) he jokes, "mind control."

Viggo does 'Good'
Mortensen shows us his softer side
by Tina Chadha
Metro New York
9 January 2009




'Ridley Scott's filming George Orwell's Animal Farm and I'm playing the goat...'

Viggo on being asked if he's grown his beard for a new role
BBC Breakfast Television
13 May 2014




'I'm not usually a suit person… You're lucky I'm wearing shoes!'

Viggo Q&A after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




PA: If you were a flower, viggo, what kind would you be?

VM: Today, I'd be one of those spiky little red bottlebrush trees.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




Me: We have to talk about women, because you are the sexiest man alive.

Him: So there are a lot of dead men who are sexier?

Eats Roadkill, Speaks Danish
By Amy Wallace
Esquire magazine
March 2006




"I like to live dangerously. Last night I was quietly at home, cooking a meal of chicken, onions and garlic, Cuban style, and then here I am today facing a pack of journalists."

Viggo Mortensen Talks About "Jauja" and "Far from Men"
By Martin Dale
Variety
7 December 2014




"We can do some doll therapy if anyone's interested…"

Viggo talking about 'Sigi' the Freud doll in San Lorenzo colours
at the Venice Film Festival ADM Press Conference
2 September 2011




You looked sexy in The Lord Of The Rings...what's your favourite costume?

My birthday suit.

Now that is sexy, no wonder women love you...

If you say so.

60 Seconds With...Viggo Mortensen
Elle
December 2005




"Thank God for special effects, makeup the voice dubbing and all that. They completely replaced Kodi, thank God! We had Andy Serkis do it."

Viggo Mortensen sets the record straight about his acting career, 'The Road' and 'The Hobbit'
By Carla Hay
Examiner.com
25November 2009




Corey, Triple M, Melbourne: Viggo you're now at the stage where you could get the majority of roles you wanted. You've had love scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow and now Liv Tyler. Is there anyone you aspire to have a love scene with, in the world?

Viggo: Gimli? That was cut from the movie - maybe it'll be in the extended version.

Return Of The King Press Junket: Viggo Mortensen
By Nazz
December 2003
Source: Nazz




When I ask him for his favourite joke he responds with a rare one-word answer: "Me".

A History of Defiance
Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




Following the press Q&A, as he left the stage, he paused, looked at the huge 'Viggo Mortensen' image on the screen behind him, and said, 'You spelled my name wrong…' There was a horrified moment as the organisers checked in panic – then he smiled, 'No, just kidding….'

Viggo after accepting the Coolidge Award in Boston
Greendragon posting on TORn
6 March 2012




Hi Viggo, aside from knowing your lines, what's the most important thing you do to prepare yourself before you go in front of camera?

Breathe.

Empire On-line Web Chat
31 January 2012




When you were a kid, what'd you want to be when you grew up?

A crow was probably what I wanted to be most of all.

Really? Why is that? What is it about crows?

They're survivors. They can live anywhere. They're very self-sufficient. They're very resourceful. They're adaptable.

That sounds like you.

Yeah!

Viggo Mortensen: Making peace with the camera
By Tracy Smith
CBS
11 December 2016

Quotable Viggo: 14 May 2017

With the Two Cuervos sharing poety together in Barcelona, I just had to do a Quotable on their other great passion - San Lorenzo de Almargro. We know Viggo 'wears a San Lorenzo shirt like it's tattooed on his skin' and I'm sure Fabian does too. Cuervos heart and soul, here's a tribute to El Ciclon and it's fans.



© Stella Pictures.


....the Cuervo ambassador to the world.

Jorge Barros
San Lorenzo Supporters Subcommittee interview
Transcribed/translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
SCH tv
20 May 2011




A global star since his turn in Lord of the Rings, he could easily lay claim to the title Lord of the Nuevo Gasometro, the stadium home of Argentinian side San Lorenzo de Almagro.

Fans in high places
FIFA
20 February 2009




'Although they fail again and again, and only end up champions occasionally, although we have a glorious but hard, and sometimes tragic, history, I like how the San Lorenzo supporter behaves; I like their traditions. They have the best songs and are the most witty, and the other supporters recognize that. And besides, they sing non-stop; it doesn't matter if we're losing 0 to 7. San Lorenzo supporters have a very rich history, of endurance above all, and a special dignity.'

The World of Viggo Mortensen
By Manuel Martínez Torres - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire Latinoamerica
March 2012




How would you define San Lorenzo fans?


Brothers, sisters - forever.

Viggo, A True Cuervo
La Revista de San Lorenzo
Translation by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
14 May 2010



Brother Cuervo. I'm going to call you repeatedly during the match. I asked to be free during these two historic hours for our club, the 90 minutes and what could come afterward. They've allowed me to escape from work to shut myself in with the laptop, the candles, t-shirts, flags, medals, little lucky stones and pieces of paper and the hopes of my whole life. I love you.


Viggo Mortensen
The Past Is In Everything
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 August 2014




…he went to the seats for the away team where he watched the match just like any other "cuervo", under the sun and with very high temperatures. Although he had been offered a much more comfortable seat in the local area, he chose to be with the San Lorenzo fans, even though that meant bearing the scorching December sun.

Viggo, a true cuervo
Translation by Graciela
Simplemente San Lorenzo
15 December 2008




He arrived in time for the 102nd birthday of the club, on Holy Thursday, fulfilling one of his dreams: to inaugurate a chapel a few meters from the field. It was his gift (one of many), out of his own pocket, one more irrefutable proof of his love/madness/fanaticism for the colors blue and red. For many, an exaggeration, a mystery, a disproportionate devotion. For others, a distinctive hallmark of his Argentinianism and a proof that genuine love, loyal and eternal, finds in soccer a beautiful excuse for expressing itself.

Viggo Mortensen - "Above all, I'm a Cuervo... And a greater pride does not exist"
By Eduardo Bejuk - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zooey
Gente
April 2010




What do you remember of the first time you saw San Lorenzo play live in a stadium?


That we lost... but that the passion, the unconditional support of the fans, the non-stop singing, were exactly what I had always imagined and felt. Every time I go to a match I get excited and enjoy myself just as much, no matter what happens soccerwise. As the song says "... it´s a feeling you carry deep inside.."

Viggo, A True Cuervo
La Revista de San Lorenzo
Translation by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zooey
14 May 2010




'I ran from one side of my hotel room to the other, jumping and shouting like a man possessed. I opened the window and shouted the goal at the crescent moon.'

Viggo Mortensen in Algiers watching San Lorenzo
For It To Rain
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
19 October 2013




Go San Lorenzo! My membership card says "supporter from another country", but I am not a supporter from another country; that does not describe me properly… I am a "local" supporter, [a supporter] from the bottom of my heart, from a heart that is ours, that belongs to all the "cuervos", in the past, in the present and for ever.

Viggo's speech
100th year San Lorenzo celebration
Buenos Aires
Translated by Silver
2 April 2008




Excuse the daring but, sincerely, did you come to Argentina for the screening of Alatriste or to watch a San Lorenzo game?


To screen Alatriste...

You mean that wholeheartedly?

Well. El Ciclon (San Lorenzo de Almagro's nickname) and the heart are pretty close to each other…

"Now Even My Son Wants To Get To Know Argentina"
By - translated by Margarita
Gente
3 April 2007




CUERVO, WE ARE CHAMPIONS!!!
I woke up with my clothes on, my head wrapped in a flag with the image of Pope Francis, as if it was some sort of turban, and the TV full blast showing The Mummy with Boris Karloff, but we are still champions!

Viggo Mortensen
In This Heat
By Viggo Mortensen and Fabián Casas - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Sobrevueloscuervos.com
18 December 2013




....if he were called to face the end of the world as we know it, he would do it with a t-shirt from his team pressed to his heart.

In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010


Quotable Viggo: 6 May 2017

It's wonderful news that Viggo will be at the Barcelona Poetry Festival on the 12th of May, reciting poetry with his great friend Fabián Casas. Viggo has a long history of poetry readings with several recitals at Beyond Baroque and other venues. He's recorded his poetry on CDs, often to an improvised musical accompaniment, and has also read other poets' works including Eliot's masterpiece, The Waste Land, at the British Library (also recorded for Touch Press). I love the fact that he carries a notebook wherever he goes 'just in case a moment presents itself to be stolen.'



Poetry Reading and Book Signing - Odense, Denmark 2003
© Chrissie.



'It is important to protect living poetry, which is also why I participate as often as I can in public readings."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




"Exene... encouraged me to recite my poems in public. At the beginning the idea was totally worrying for me. But something happens when you are faced with an audience. No matter whether you present photographs, pictures, movies or poems to other people, it's worth it because you always learn something."

Viggo Mortensen
Two-Men Show
By Silvia Feist - translated by Always Smiling and Doreen
Vogue Deutsch
November 2005




"As an actor you're always reading someone else's words, and then what you do gets edited. So there's several screens through which you're speaking, if at all. As a poet, it's your words."

In The Navy
By Joy Ray
Detour
September 1997




….if you´ve written a poem and you read it, you don´t know what will happen. Something changes between my mouth and the eyes and ears of those who are there reading or listening to my words, my little story. Something changes between writing it and pronouncing the words. I don´t know what the reader receives. There´s no net. For that reason, I'm responsible for what I´ve written and for how I read it.

Viggo Mortensen - All of Us are Mestizos
by Carlos Shilling – translated by Ollie, Remolina, Rio and Zoe
LaVoz
November 2010




On record, Mortensen's speaking voice--especially in Spanish--actually is more melodic and alluring than his singing. Confident and clear, he draws listeners in as he spins tales of deceit and humor.

Sensitive Side of Psycho
By Jae-Ha Kim
Chicago Sun Times
16 December 1998




Mortensen began the evening by lighting a candle and quoting a phrase by poet S.A. Griffin. 'We are here for the sweet stigmata of the poem. And here's the news.' The breathless, packed room received the news, and it was clear from the moment Viggo spoke that this was poetry's night.

Three Fools poetry reading
National Poetry Month Starts At Beyond Baroque With Three April Fools
By Philomene Long, Poet Laureate of Venice
Santa Monica Mirror
27 April 2006




"The success of the Lord of the Rings trilogy changed the deal a little. Before then, when I put on a poetry reading, there would just be a circle of my friends around me. Now there are hundreds of inquisitive strangers. If fame can make an under-appreciated art better known, it's perfect!

Viggo Mortensen
Grazia Magazine
Translated by Chrissiejane
December 2009




'It's great if someone who never would've gone to a poetry reading goes to one because they're thinking, "Oh, that actor guy's doing it – it'll probably be shit, but we should go and see it anyway!"'

Viggo Mortensen on 'The Road'
By David Jenkins
Time Out
7 January 2010




If they come and hear the poems and they have a reaction pro or con, and there's a connection made between me and them - then who cares?"

The Brain Dane
by Ariel Leve
The Sunday Times
2003




...he begins reading. He's nervous. "I don't slur when I read other people's stuff," he jokes, and the crowd laughs indulgently. But he soldiers on, losing himself in the rhythm of his words.

They were always giving birth, always pregnant, always taking ****ing for granted. They were not being brave when they dug up the skulls of their past lovers in the middle of the night and painted them for use as Jack O'Lanterns. It was summer and they were crazy about each other.
("Hallowe'en" 1990)

Maybe it's the visceral attack of his writing, or the R-rated shock of hearing Aragorn cuss, but the audience's attention never wavers.

Midnight Special poetry reading
Viggo Trip
By Liane Bonin
Flaunt magazine #39
November 2002




'A lot of people that were here tonight said something about their writing, but were too embarrassed by it. And I'd ask them about what they write and encourage them to pursue it. People sometimes seem to feel that poetry is just this little thing you do privately, like your diary. But in reality it's something that you can work at in many ways, that you can share, that you can take as far as you like.'

Viggo Mortensen at the Midnight Special reading
A Religious Moment Where Something Might Happen
by Scott Thill
Morphizm 2002


Quotable Viggo: 29 April 2017

Short, pithy and to the point, these one sentence comments say it all, although I've been very generous to Matt Ross at the end and allowed him two… :wink:.



© Madame Figaro.


They don't make them like Viggo Mortensen anymore.

A Reader interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Ben Olson
Sandpoint Reader
13 January 2017




Is Viggo Mortensen the most interesting man in the world?

Viggo Mortensen: Still here, still fantastic
The Film Experience
By Nathaniel Rogers
24 April 2016




He's constitutionally incapable of creative blockage.

True Colors
By Margot Dougherty
Los Angeles Magazine
1998




Viggo Mortensen is, besides a great actor, an inexhaustible conversationalist, so full of curiosity that he doesn't hesitate to occasionally take the role of the interviewer.

The Dark Side Of The Hero
By Walder & Castro - translated by Graciela, Remolina and Zooey
Marie Claire (Spain)
June 2009




Actor, poet, photographer, musician and always exquisitely provocative.

Mortensen Code
By Sol Alonso - translated by Remolina
Vanity Fair (Spain)
November 2008




Mortensen is a matinee idol with a philosopher's soul — Jean-Jacques Rousseau trapped in the body of Rudolph Valentino.

Viggo Mortenson is complicated
By Micjelle Devereaux
San Francisco Bay Guardian
12 September 2007




His work is a trace of his own adventure, lived openly and exploratively, with curiosity and a constant sense of surprise.

Kevin Power
Viggo Mortensen: A Life Tracking Itself
Singlanguage 2002




'It's difficult for things to go wrong when you work with Viggo Mortensen.'

David Oelhoffen
Q&A: Viggo Mortensen and David Oelhoffen on 'Loin Des Hommes'
By Roslyn Sulcas
New York Times
26 August 2014




When the elements, the weather and the terrain get tough, Viggo gets going.

Interview with Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Contender
Emmanuellevy.com
3 September 2009




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




Viggo Mortensen is a study in contradictions: rugged and undeniably virile, and yet thoroughly and irresistibly sensitive.

Interview: Viggo Mortensen
By Todd Gilchrist
Cinematical
26 November 2009




He has that incurable, unbearable, enigmatic eroticism of a three in the morning dream you've just awakened from.

Talking With Viggo
George Magazine
1999




He never had Champagne dreams and caviar wishes.

Viggo Talks and Talks
By Zoe Heller
T Magazine
2 December 2011




If fame came with a report card, Viggo's would say can do better.

The Man Who Would Be King
By Nick Dent
December 2001
Black & White magazine, #58




Viggo Mortensen is not about the words. He's about being... present. .......

Ray Pride
Movie City News
4 March 2004




Mortensen is not what Tolkien's Treebeard would call "hasty."

After Aragorn
By Jeffrey Overstreet
ChristianityToday
2004




Is there a language Viggo Mortensen doesn't speak?

Jill Lawless
Associated Press
2 September 2014




He's like a one-man United Nations.

The 100 Sexiest Movie Stars
Empire Magazine
October 2013




Trying to describe his movie career is like finding your way in a Middle-eastern medina.

Viggo from Hollywood
by Poul Hoi
M/S (Danish magazine)
2001




"Viggo's cheap, he's available and he's obedient... and he's got a great chin."

David Cronenberg
Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




The man has never disappointed us.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




"Doesn't everybody want to be Viggo Mortensen? I do!"

Matt Ross
Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen & Family
by Christine Westwood
FilmInk
11 June 2016



Quotable Viggo: 22 April 2017

Hey, I like to be topical so while the focus is on the Argentinian Film Industry, let's revisit one of Viggo's Argentinian films, Todos Tenemos Un Plan which Viggo not only acted in but also produced. And not only produced, but starred in twice as brothers Augustin and Pedro, in which he was 'on top form - twice over' (Empire Magazine). What's not to love about seeing a double Viggo? Or even triple as we also had Viggo as Augustin pretending to be Pedro…



© 20th Century Fox/Haddock Films.


"I always dreamt of shooting in Argentina. Since I´ve began acting, long before returning to the country after living 25 years out of it, I wanted to return to make a film."

Viggo Mortensen
Soledad Villamil - Viggo Mortensen: Brothers In Arms
By Nazareno Brega - translated by Ollie and Zoe
Clarin
29 August 2012




What was it that drew you to Viggo. Why was he right for the role?

I think he one of the best actors in the world. In his body of work he plays such a range of different characters that I knew that he could play the two diverse roles in this movie. He is a well travelled and cultured person as well as being sensitive he can be brutal at the same time.

Ana Piterbarg talks Tigre and Viggo with The Fan Carpet's Holly Patrick for Everybody Has a Plan at the 56th LFF
By Holly Patrick
Fancarpet
20 October 2012




'Like a lot of unique movies, it took years to get together. Two or three years, probably. I kept working on her and said, "I want to be a producer. I've never done it before, but I want to do it." I wanted to make sure that whatever happened, her vision got to the screen. As a producer, I had a little more say, and I could say, "Well, let me see the script with subtitles and let me correct them." '

Viggo Mortensen: Lay off the pope
By Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
20 March 2013




"I like the movie because it's not a clean story. All the characters are frustrated and resentful people."

Viggo Mortensen's Plan
By Viggo Mortensen - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
El Pais Semanal
16 September 2012




"With the entry of Viggo, what wasn't viable became possible,"

Vanessa Ragone, producer.
Local filmmakers use Hollywood stars as lure
By Charles Newbery
Variety
15 May 201
1



Because I was raised here, there are a lot of memories. I look around and the way people speak, talking to the crew each day, it's as if I were with my people, It was very special for me to be able to work in Argentina again and reconnect with the way of life here and with the people.

Viggo Mortensen: "It's my nature to do a lot"
By covermg.com
10 July 2012




"The first day, Viggo arrived and hung up a San Lorenzo pennant. That´s the way it started, little by little, and then he brought a pennant from Tigre and later the one from Boca. In the end, he filled the entire wall with jerseys from all the teams from Argentina, but also from Real Madrid, Barcelona and Uruguay. And this has been the only thing that succeeded in uniting everybody."

Javier Godino
Mortensen faces the "mental challenge" of playing both twin brothers in 'Todos tenemos un plan'
By - translated by Ollie, Rio, Sage and Zoe
Terra.es
9 August 2011




'It freed me to be able to act in Spanish, speaking more or less as I normally do. I'm not saying that I speak the same way for Pedro and Agustín. Neither of the two speaks exactly as I do, but I had the measure...I know the accents of Pedro and Agustín; I grew up with those accents. It was something immediate.'

Viggo Mortensen - Todos Tenemos Un Plan Production Notes
By - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Todos Tenemos Un Plan website (Spain)
July 2012




What's Viggo like to work with, honestly?

He's a little obsessed. He's a little bit of a perfectionist, but then so am I so that's ok!

Ana Piterbarg
Still Waters Run Deep
by Shelley Marsden
Film Juice
27 October 2012




One of the skills he had to learn for the film was beekeeping. 'We got to make honey,' he says, smiling. 'I have one jar left. It's pretty good. What was surprising – and what probably distracted me from the fear of being stung – was the noise. One bee buzzing close to your head is quite loud, but imagine thousands. Your world closes off and you become very focused on what you're doing, because you can't really hear what other people are saying.'

Viggo Mortensen's grand plan
Telegraph Men's Style Magazine
By Sheryl Garratt
26 March 2013




If you, for some reason, want to watch Viggo Mortensen watching Viggo Mortensen take a bath, then, my friend, your luck is in – as the renowned star of The Lord of the Rings franchise turns in one of the finest performances of his career…

Stefan Pape
Heyuguys.co.uk
28 May 2013




... how often do you get to kill yourself in a movie? I assume that's not very often.

Mortensen: (laughs) No, it was fun. What I like doing is to create that grey area of why do each of them do what they do? Why do they react in the way that they do? It's not all explained to you. I think it's a believable way to behave, but it leaves you with some questions

Interview: Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan
By Edward Douglas
Comingsoon.net
20 March 2013




'Agustín reaches the true essence of his brother (Pedro) much more now that he´s dead than before, when he was alive. Embodying him in front of everybody, he´s closer to his brother but also closer to himself. Finally he opens his eyes and accepts what he is and where he is and that river of his childhood. That river, that childhood he had left behind.'

Viggo Mortensen
River Mortensen
By Ramón Raboiras - translated by Ollie, Rio and Zoe
Esquire
September 2012




"I'd always thought I'd love to be able to say I'm part of its movie history,"

Viggo talking about filming in Argentina
'If I think a film's beyond me – that's a good sign'
Imogen Tilden
The Guardian
28 May 2013


Quotable Viggo: 8 April 2017

After this week's Exhibition themed 'Good Day Viggodom's' I'm still in exhibition mode with a quotable based around Viggo's photography. He has described his photography as 'part of my dream, of the way I exist and act in the world'. If so it is a magical dream full at wonder at life's idiosyncrasies and attention to its smallest details. Long may he keep sharing that dream with us.



Sådanset Exhibit Press Event - Roskilde, Denmark 2008
© Rex Features.



He has mounted a half-dozen solo exhibitions in Cuba, Denmark, New York, and Los Angeles. His New York dealer, Robert Mann, says he had no idea who Mortensen was when he first met him four years ago.

"The Lord of the Rings wasn't out, and I was clueless about that part of his life' Mann says. "I saw the work and responded to it on its own merit. There's a lot of volatility to it, a lot of emotion, a lot of subtext and sensitivity." Mann says that, typically, celebrity art implies an underlying dilettantism. But Mortensen "is not a dabbler. I consider him a very lucky and talented person. Most artists are lucky to express themselves in one avenue."

Robert Mann, New York Gallerist
Finding Viggo By Alex Kuczynski
Vanity Fair magazine
January 2004




Mortensen's photography is decidedly low-tech, utterly spontaneous, and free of preconception, employing no staged lighting or posing. He literally takes pictures of what is right in front of him. But there is certainly saturation to his colors and a mystique to the content which captures the sometimes obscure significance in the ordinary moments pictured. Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19
1999




'Two years ago, I spent a few days in Montana with Viggo while he was shooting Hidalgo, and I swear he was never without a camera. One moment he was slamming on the brakes to photograph a horse on a hill, and the next, he was slowing down to take a picture of a cloud. Viggo's a passionate guy…'

Senior Premier Editor Tom Roston
Editorial
Premiere
November 2004




I must admit that I didn't recognise him. In the middle of a not yet finished exhibition a young blond man is standing who, after shaking my hand and mumbling something as a greeting, seems relieved to have a practical task: to get me a glass of water. He brings it to me with all the hidden greatness that makes him as perfect as he is in the role of Aragorn.

…Viggo Mortensen was bare-footed, with loose dark pants and a large shirt that makes him look both small and newly awakened. His left hand is decorated with stuff to remember and phone numbers all the way up his arm and a stubborn bit of tape has attached itself to his sleeve.

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




'I take pictures at the edges of the things happening. So many strange things happen. I know lots of artists change reality, change the motif, to make it stranger but I don't think that is needed at all. Reality is very strange in and of itself.'

Caught In His Own Picture
By Trine Ross - translated by Rebekka
Politiken
28 June 2003




…there is certainly saturation to his colors and a mystique to the content which captures the sometimes obscure significance in the ordinary moments pictured. Mortensen's stills are often as much a question as they are an answer.

Things Are Weird Enough
by Shana Nys Dambrot
Juxtapoz magazine #19
1999




Not everything's a masterpiece, of course, not by a long shot. But when Mortensen's good, when he's firing on all cylinders, he has the ability to produce some truly breathtaking images. According to Dennis Hopper, it's because Mortensen's instincts "come from the right place, from the subconscious."

Whether he's shooting around the fringes of a set or among the people who populate his personal life, Mortensen's best photographs capture the partial, the fleeting and the unnoticed with surprising ease. One critic described them as "perfectly colloquial." In other words, he makes great snapshots.

The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life
2003




'I decided to take photos of trees for this show because there are no trees in Iceland. I decided to bring trees to Iceland.'

Viggo Mortensen on the Skovbo Exhibition
Capable Of Many Things
By Hanna Björk Valsdóttir - translated by Ragga
30 May 2008
Source: Fréttablaðið




He got the idea for the [sadanset] exhibition while he was looking at pictures and discovered that two of them sort of continued in each other. He got interested and the next 14 days he worked his way through a pile of pictures to find photos that could continue the horizon-line and make the puzzle more complete. Also five pictures from one of Mortensen's earlier books raised his interest. The five photos are very similar, but originate from different continents. The pictures show, according to the artist, that people and landscapes are connected.

From movies to photos
Jyllandsposten
Jette Hansen
19 October 2008




"Some of the pictures are good, even if they stand alone. Others are not that interesting" he judges. He continues "But it is the Whole, that is important to me."

Viggo talking about sadanset
From movies to photos
Jyllandsposten
Jette Hansen
19 October 2008




Mortensen's photographs are humbling and a bar artists should hope to achieve themselves after thirty plus-years of photographing.

Jaxon House Rocks With Perceval Press Artists: Newsom, Milstein, Bryce, Mortensen
by Kriss Perras
PCH Press
18 June 2006




Viggo Mortensen's photographs can be explained as poetic; sometimes the focus is shallow, a lot of movement, light sometimes leaks into the pictures and makes weird influences.

Dreaming About Telling Stories
By Einar Fal Ingolfsson - translated by Rosen and Ragga
Morgunblaðið
29 May 2008




So how good a photographer is he? I've looked at two of Mortensen's books and from that evidence I would hazard the opinion that he is very good indeed.

Mark Power
The Salt Mine
3 September 2008




'Some of the photos are bit blurry though, Viggo, so perhaps you should buy yourself a tripod...

Peter Jackson at the "For Wellington' opening, Massey University
Stars Come Out For Exhibition Launch
Massey University
1st Dec 2003


Quotable Viggo: 2 April 2017

The recent comments about Miyelo, Viggo's wonderful exhibition and book based on the Lakota Ghost Dance, got me reminiscing about the amazingly creative response Viggo had to his time playing Frank Hopkins in Hidalgo. I think that if I could go back in time and visit one of Viggo's past exhibitions, Miyelo would be have to be the one. I want to see those photos BIG!



© Viggo Mortensen


As Hopkins in Hidalgo, as part of the team that worked to portray the Ghost Dance and subsequent Wounded Knee massacre, and as someone taking the opportunity to be outspoken about the personal and cultural consequences of the troubled history, Mortensen is a rare bridge. Viggo Mortensen the ikce wicasa (common man) can be trusted not to give out under the weight of the responsibility.

Native Voice Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King,
Pine Ridge Reservation
South Dakota
December 2003




"…days after he was cast he called me and said, 'Who do you know on Pine Ridge reservation and can I go there?' Within a week he was out with these Lakota horsemen and riding with them, and on a long ride to Wounded Knee."

John Fusco
IGN gets the behind-the-action goods from the director, writer and star of Hidalgo.
By Jeff Otto, IGN
March 04, 2004




'All that time I was in Morocco it was neat. We'd be out there in the desert. Everyone else would drive the hour, hour and a half back to town where the hotel was, and I'd stay out in the trailer on the set, alone. The dust would settle and it was quiet. It would get dark and I would wash up, make myself some food or whatever and put on these tapes and a bunch CDs that I got from people and different places like Prairie Edge. I'd play these tapes and songs, ceremonial songs, and I'd have the door open in the trailer and I'd be out in the desert, in the middle of the Sahara. I'd be like singing Lakota songs out there - it was cool! I knew I had to come back here.'

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004




"The dance had been performed once before in South Dakota, and now we were in the middle of the California desert trying it again, as a sort of mirage, a distorted memory. Just as they had done for the Wounded Knee reenactment, the dancers took their responsibilities in the ritual very seriously; there was an atmosphere that was created through the sheer earnestness of their effort. It transcended anything else that was going on with regard to the filming of the scene. When the dancers had finished and it became my turn to be filmed observing the dance, a pair of dust devils and weird crosswinds suddenly blew in on what had been a completely still day. As soon as the last take of the scene had been shot, the winds instantly and completely ceased, leaving everyone and everything calm and silent for several moments."

Viggo Mortensen on the Ghost Dance
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




Viggo, a renowned still photographer, had forgotten his camera that day and asked our unit stills photographer, Richard Cartwright, if he might borrow a camera and some color neg film. The unit photographer gave Viggo his Hasselblad panoramic camera... the 15 perf 35mm version. Viggo snaked around the set with the shutter open and he was amazing to watch. His movements were very similar to that of the Native American Ghost Dancers and he captured these incredible handheld abstract time exposures. Absolutely amazing.

Shelly Johnson, Hidalgo cinematographer
Instagram
23 March 2017




'When you have these figures, these humans, moving,' says Mortensen of his surreal technique, 'you can see the echoes of their movements, their residue as they're moving through the frame ... It makes their presence sometimes so thin that they become one with the landscape, one with the air.'

Seeing Ghosts
By Lonny Pugh
Movieline Magazine
November 2003




"In taking the pictures, I wanted to join in rather than observe from a distance. Or at least to take pictures in the spirit of the event itself."

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




"It's rather unusual for a Hollywood movie to address the Indian question, and in particular the Sioux culture, with this much respect. That made me realise this would be a rather unique film. And I have tried to 'capture' this 'ghost dance' as a nebulous memory, an ephemeral dream."

Viggo Mortensen
A Year in the Life of Viggo Mortensen
by Sophie Benamon
Studio Magazine, 2003




"I wondered how one would use a still camera to represent images of the ephemeral dancers in wide-open, empty landscape - how the ghosts of Ghost Dancers might look. So I really approached it as an exercise… I shot the one roll of film at different settings, with increasingly longer exposures. The sun was very bright, so I was hoping to get one interesting image from the roll. Luckily, this was one of those rare situations where intentionally doing "the wrong thing" with the camera worked in an interesting way. As conscious an exercise as making these particular pictures was, there are accidents in the images - weird spots, unexpected areas of saturation and contrast variations - strange things that I couldn't see when shooting and still cannot really explain."

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
The Man Who Would be King
By Scott Thill
Salon.com, 2003




'Digging up these people and these memories and sharing it, is a big deal. It's not just, 'Hey I got to be in a movie.' I didn't meet anyone that was an extra at The Wounded Knee set that seemed to be 'Hey, I'm just in a movie.''

Viggo Mortensen
An Interview with Viggo
by Lise Balk King and Frank J King
Native Voice
January 2004




When I arrive at the gallery [for the Miyelo Exhibition], I see the show is entirely composed of marvelously printed images from the ghost dance... amazingly saturated and 8 feet wide. Stunning! At the show, I run into Richard, who loaned Viggo his camera to shoot these same stills. I ask him; "Did Viggo borrow only one roll of film?" Yes... only a single roll. Well, the show was comprised of 16 photographs that were double wide (15 perfs instead of 7) which meant that the collection represented nearly every photo that Viggo shot that day. 16 of the 18 total exposures from the single film roll. Mind blowing.

Shelly Johnson, Hidalgo cinematographer, on the Miyelo Exhibition
Instagram
23 March 2017




'It is perhaps our most successful marrying of text, imagery and design. It worked out really well, so it feels like it was supposed to turn out that way.'

Viggo Mortensen on Miyelo
"Life's Too Short to Do All This Work and Not Do It Right": An Interview with Viggo Mortensen
By Scott Thill
Morphizm.com
6 April 2004

Quotable Viggo: 25 March 2017

Well, here are the results of last week's mini-quiz. Hope you had fun guessing the answers. Anyone get all of the right? If so, you are definitely a Viggo Uber-Fan!



© Miramax Films / Village Roadshow.


Find the missing words and the film:

A Walk on the Moon:


...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker Blouse Man and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).

Liz W Garcia
HitFix
13 July 2015

Jauja:

The film is also thrillingly beautiful, and graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing horse manure.

Farran Smith Nehme
New York Post
18 March 2015

Carlito's Way:

I don't have much screen time in the movie, but during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies. And I also learned to do everything from a wheelchair, including cooking and washing the dishes afterwards.

Q&A with Viggo Mortensen
Sara Stewart
New York Post
December 2008

Alatriste:

"From the first moment you start to see the film, you realize that Viggo is not playing a Spaniard, the thing is that he is a Spaniard."

Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Mano a Mano
XL Semanal, 20 August 2006
Translation for V-W by Paddy

Eastern Promises:


"It was like some creeping disease, you wake up one morning and everyone is speaking Russian."

Festwatch
Globe and Mail
10 Sept 2007

Juaja:

Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful whiskers.

Viggo Mortensen shows his independent side
by Demetrios Matheou
Herald Scotland
4 March 2015

The Prophecy:

Ah...that was fun, but difficult, because the truth is that I couldn't prepare the role the way that I usually do...going to Lucifer's house or meeting him or meeting his family. But I think that we all have a dark side and so I had to think a little bit about that.

"If they give me a Salvadorian script, I'm game."
By Isabela Vides - translated by Margarita
7 March 2007
Source: La Prensa Grafica

The Road:

"These characters, in spite of seeming to be very cold, in fact, beneath the rags they wear San Lorenzo t-shirts," says the actor, and laughs.

Viggo talking about The Road
In The Name Of The Father
By Natalia Trzenko - translated by Ollie and Zooey
La Nacion
22 June 2010

Captain Fantastic:

"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little vertigo," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."

Viggo Mortensen is a marvel in 'Captain Fantastic'
Bryan Alexander
USA Today
19 May 2016


What film is this and what is he talking about?

"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge. Then we made the decision that he should walk around with it everywhere." 8 Gauge Shotgun – Appaloosa

Viggo Mortensen on the eight-gauge shotgun
Mortensen delves into America's cowboy mentality
By Katherine Monk
Canwest News Service
7 September 2008


...It's deafening. It's kind of shocking at first, but then it's strangely soothing. It's so overwhelming that it puts you into this place where you're very focused, unless you freak out and run away. But I had a good teacher. Bees – Todos Tenemos un Plan

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Beekeeping, and The Hobbit
By Bilge Ebiri
Vulture.com
22 March 2013



"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk." Viggo's Action figure – The Lord of the Rings

Viggo Mortensen on his LOTR action figure
Viggo Mortensen: A Method Actor in Middle-Earth
by Ryan Gilbey
The Independent.uk, 2001



"He said 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' " Locust - Hidalgo

Joe Johnston on filming Hidalgo
A Man of Many Parts
Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post, 2004



What is he not as good at?

'Let's just say I'm not as good as the hobbits.' Surfing

Chairman Of The Sword
By Liane Bonin
Entertainment Weekly
10 December 2003



And finally, which film it this?


…to my absolute amazement, it features Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave, though still giving the film's best performance by miles… Daylight

Shaun Munro
BluRay review
Obsessed with Film
Feb 2011

Quotable Viggo: 18 March 2017

OK – things are very quiet here at the moment so here are a few teasers to keep things ticking over. Some of the questions are easy and some might prove a little bit harder! This is just for fun so if you think you know the answers, keep it to yourself so others have a chance to guess too, and I'll post the correct answers next week. Of course, you will all do amazingly well because you are all experts :D.



© Focus Features

Find the missing words and the film:

...no man other than Viggo Mortensen could carry the moniker ****** *** and retain the sort of paint-peeling smoldering sexuality that he wields throughout this film (to say nothing of his nuanced, stunning performance, which I guess I'm saying next to nothing about. But don't we all assume such a performance from Viggo?).



The film is also thrillingly beautiful, and graced with Mortensen, who seizes the imagination even when he's sniffing ***** ******.



I don't have much screen time in the movie, but during the preparation of my character I listened to thousands of hours of salsa music from the early seventies. And I also learned to do everything from a **********, including cooking and washing the dishes afterwards.



"From the first moment you start to see the film, you realize that Viggo is not playing a ********, the thing is that he is a ********."



"It was like some creeping disease, you wake up one morning and everyone is speaking *******."



Few stars of his stature would consider such a low-budget arthouse film in a foreign language - let alone co-produce it, be able to act in both Spanish and Danish, and be prepared to sport such spectacularly awful ********.



Ah...that was fun, but difficult, because the truth is that I couldn't prepare the role the way that I usually do...going to *******'* house or meeting him or meeting his family. But I think that we all have a dark side and so I had to think a little bit about that.



"These characters, in spite of seeming to be very cold, in fact, beneath the rags they wear *** ******* *-******," says the actor, and laughs.



"To be honest about the climbing scenes, I have a little ******," says Mortensen. "It gets me. I'm glad I look like I'm comfortable."



What film is this and what is he talking about?



"It was so big, I didn't know at first if I could walk around with it in the movie because it was so huge. Then we made the decision that he should walk around with it everywhere."



...It's deafening. It's kind of shocking at first, but then it's strangely soothing. It's so overwhelming that it puts you into this place where you're very focused, unless you freak out and run away. But I had a good teacher.



"Is it horrible?" he winces. "Does it look like me? As long as it doesn't look like me, then there's no voodoo risk."



"He said 'You know, I can eat a live one.' I said, 'Let's eat all the fake ones first. If we run out, you can eat a live one.' "



What is he not as good at?


"Let's just say I'm not as good as the hobbits."



And finally, which film it this?

…to my absolute amazement, it features Viggo Mortensen in a pre-Rings role, sporting a profoundly ridiculous blond weave, though still giving the film's best performance by miles…

Quotable Viggo: 11 March 2017

Despite us lighting a forest of karma candles, Viggo didn't walk away with the Oscar. But one day he will – how can he not? Because we are not alone in thinking he is one of the greatest actors working today. So here I'm presenting the evidence. All are familiar quotes (and many are old favourites of mine), but they cheer me up and I hope they'll cheer you up too. Power to Viggo, stick it to the Oscars!



© Bleecker Street.


Viggo Mortensen is one of the greatest actors working today. Of that, I have no doubt.

Talking with Viggo Mortensen and Matt Ross of Captain Fantastic
Silverscreenriot.com
Matt Oakes
22 June 2016




Here is a handsome, photogenic, intelligent, multi-lingual actor who has simply refused to be typecast in specific kinds of genres and roles and/or to become a bankable Hollywood star, even though he had all the ingredients for that position two decades ago.

Cannes Film Fest 2016: Captain Fantastic–Viggo Mortensen Dominates Eccentric Tale of Nature Vs. Civilization
Emanuellevy.com
8 May 2016




Mortensen, perhaps the only actor alive who could play Sigmund Freud, William Burroughs and a Middle-earth king...

Uday Bhatia
Live Mint
11 September 2015




"There is a depth to his art that I greatly admire. Any film he's in is a film I want to see. He's one of the greats. Getting to collaborate with him on Captain Fantastic is quite literally the best thing that's happened to me since my wife asked me to marry her."

Matt Ross
Viggo Mortensen To Star In Electric City's 'Captain Fantastic'
By Mike Fleming Jnr
Deadline.com
20 February 2014




'Working with Viggo was really special, he's an amazing human being, and obviously a brilliant actor…'

Michael Fassbender
Sam Adams
AVClub.com
8 March 2011




...one of the great little pleasures of cinema in our day - seeing Mortensen tilt his head and sketch a knowing half smile with the corner of his mouth.

Manu Yáñez
Fotograma
13 August 2014




I really can't say enough about the work Viggo Mortensen. He's able to give this character so much life that you're under his spell..

Joey Magidson
awardscircuit.com




Philip Seymour Hoffman, certainly one of the great actors of our time, told us in a Venetian hallway of the Hotel Excelsior how he regarded Viggo Mortensen as one of the masters of the profession. A point of view that is totally shared.

Viggo Mortensen in the Shoes of Dr. Freud
By Nicolas Crousse
Le Soir – translated by Dom
4 September 2011




'…I saw "Eastern Promises," in which Viggo Mortensen is giving one of the great, great powerful screen performances. It's absolutely amazing.'

Geoffrey Rush at the Toronto Film Festival
Geoffrey Rush Revisits The Golden Age
By Edward Douglas, Coming soon.net
5 Oct 2007




'To me, there's a lack of self-consciousness to the great actors. I think the performance of Viggo Mortensen in Eastern Promises is brilliant: he's living the guy's life on screen and you can't take your eyes off him. It's the same with Marlon Brando. You might not know why you're drawn to him, but you are.'

Actor Richard Jenkins commenting on Viggo
Metrolife film
29 June 200
8



Viggo is one of the pillars supporting The Road. I´d say he is everything. I have seldom seen an actor so dedicated, so ambitious and so ready for his work. Mortensen immersed himself in the project to the extent of giving all. He placed inconceivable demands on himself. After every take he would look me in the eyes and say: Have we got it? He's been a lesson in professionalism and comradeship.

Javier Aguirresarobe (cinematographer)
On the Road with Javier Aguirresarobe
by Blanca J de la Hoz
Fotogramas
February 2010




In Viggo Mortensen, Hillcoat is working with one of the current cinema's great quiet everymen, and if anyone can make the novel's stolid, unnamed hero empathic and emotionally alive on screen whilst remaining loyal to the novel's aesthetic minimalism, it's this immensely physical, restrained performer.

Kris Tapley
InContention.com
August 2009




Mortensen is long overdue for an Oscar win and if this film doesn't earn him that honor, there really is little justice (or sense) in the Academy voting system. Hearing the cast and crew talk about the actor's strict dedication to the part is downright inspiring.

Kofi Outlaw, 'The Road'
Screenrant
24 November 2009




…the ever-flawless Viggo Mortensen.

Jesse Hawthorne Ficks
San Francisco Bay Guardian
26 September 2011




"Viggo's an artist," said a movie exec and Mortensen fan during the Toronto fest. The way he said it underlined "artist."

Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post Film Critic
September 2007




Mortensen is one of the most diverse, least mannered but most overlooked actors working in Hollywood...

Emanuel Levy
emanuellevy.com
1 Sept 2007




Fantastic performance from Viggo Mortensen... he is absolutely a brilliant actor, he is the Robert de Niro of his generation, the Marlon Brando of his generation, the man is a genius.

Mark Kermode, A History of Violence
BBC Radio Five Live
30 September 2005




He's the kind of star directors dream about: professional, playful and eager to make a movie that doesn't wrap itself up in a neat pre-digested bow.

Viggo Mortensen on Everybody Has a Plan, Argentine Popes and His Beloved San Lorenzo
John Lopez
Huffington Post
21 March 2013




'I would want to watch Viggo Mortensen in any language.

Sanford Panitch, President of Fox International
Fox International Acquires Worldwide Rights To Viggo Mortensen-Starrer 'Everybody Has A Plan'
By Mike Fleming
Deadline.com
5 May 2011




'There are actors whose performances come as light emanating from the screen. Then there's Mortensen. His effect is gravitational. It draws you closer, inward.'

Actor Geoffrey Rush after seeing the film at Tiff
Naked Viggo Mortensen: artist at work
By Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post Film Critic




'When it comes to cutting an effortless master like Viggo Mortensen, what can I say besides you're just trying to pick the best of the best and make sure it all hangs together in the right way. He makes it look easy.'

Interview with Joseph Krings, Editor of "Captain Fantastic"
Manhatten Edit Workshop blog
20 July 2016




Viggo Mortensen, however, is that rare American actor who is both muscular and humane, tough and sensitive, fighter and lover. He seduces us with a threat of danger, his chiseled Nordic physique and stunning blue eyes. Never over the top, for Mortensen, less is more. His performances are slow reveals of hidden information and emotion.

Viggo Mortensen Talks The Road
By Anne Thompson
Indie Wire
13 September 2009




Viggo Mortensen has so much on-screen magnetism, he'll probably destroy the credit cards of anyone sitting in the first 10 rows.

Wallace Bain
Santa Cruz Sentinel
25 January 2012




"Viggo is just... a great actor."

David Cronenberg interview, by Moriarty
Ain't it Cool News
November 6th, 2005


Quotable Viggo: 19 February 2017

A week from now Viggo will once again be walking down the Oscar red carpet. The last time we were here was for Eastern Promises at the 2008 Oscars (was it really nearly 10 years ago?) after his stunning performance as the complex and troubled Nikolai. His preparation for the film was extreme and detailed, as always, vanishing into Russia, introducing Cronenberg to the culture of Vory tattoos, fighting in the buff in a tiled bathhouse. Nobody does it like Viggo. As Zack Sharf of Indiwire said this week, 'Power to Viggo, stick it to the Oscars!'



© Focus Features.


In 2007 (when he was nearly 50), Viggo Mortensen showed not just one of the great bodies in modern film, but naked commitment to one of the screen's most uncompromising fight scenes. He was playing a Russian gangster living in London, speaking very good Russian, and acting as cool and sultry as Brando. There's a scene in that film, Eastern Promises, where his character, Nikolai, stubs a cigarette out on his own tongue. At that moment, all was made clear: Mortensen was an old-fashioned star, as confident and as taciturn as Gary Cooper.

Viggo Mortensen
By David Thomson
The Guardian,
10 April 2009




'I admit I was looking for something I could do with Viggo. A director has a strange relationship with his actors, because after the actor has gone on to his next movie, you're in the editing room living with him every day, dreaming about him and hearing his voice. I had always thought he had a very Russian, Slavic look. And when I read the script I thought, "This is a role made in heaven for Viggo."'

David Cronenberg
Q+A : David Cronenberg, Film Festival Preview
nowtoronto.com
30 Aug 2007




"You say, 'Well, where's Viggo today?' " says David Cronenberg, recalling the conversation that happened more than once on the London shoot, last year, of the exceptionally fine new thriller, Eastern Promises. "And they say, 'Oh, he's in St. Petersburg.'

"And you say, 'What!? I thought he was at the hotel.' "

Star's Eastern Immersion Impresses His Director
By Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
16 September 2007




"I know everyone was a little bit worried because I disappeared for two weeks. They said I should have someone go with me into the underworld, but the whole point of me of going was not to get a filtered version of what Russians do and what they're like. "I just wanted to draw my own conclusions."

Viggo on his trip to Russia
Contactmusic.com
13 Sept 2007




"It's a complete transformation from the inside out. He played two characters really in A History of Violence, and I saw traces of neither of them in his portrayal of Nikolai."

David Cronenberg
Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007




"You would think, 'Of course Cronenberg was drawn in by the tattooing,' but it was almost not there," says the director. "In the original script, tattooing was just alluded to. Viggo discovered a set of books called Russian Criminal Tattoo and a doc called Mark of Cain, which was about the tattooing subculture in Russian prisons, and when I saw them my mind was blown completely."

Ties that bind
by Melora Koepke, Hour CA
13 Sept 2007




When he appears, getting out of a black limo, in front of a Russian bath situated in a small London street, I can't recognise him. The actor is one those perfectionists who works on his roles to obsession… He is so scary that all the clients from a bar ran away in a panic the minute they noticed the tattoos on his hands.

Cronenberg and the Russian Godfather
By Serge Grunberg - translated by Celine
Studio, May 2007




"Some of the tattoos were humorous - and some were quite poetic. On the instep of my right foot, one said 'Where are you going?' On the instep of the other foot, another said 'What the hell do you care?"

Viggo Mortensen
Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007




"We were shooting in London and my hotel room had a 24 hour Russian channel, so I just left it on all the time. I watched movies, variety shows, very strange soap operas…."

Viggo Mortensen
By Natasha Stoynoff, People Magazine
1 October 2007




Any clip from the bath house scene would make the best darned Oscar clip ever.

Daniel Feinberg
zap2it.com
23 December 2007




"Viggo blew me away on a daily basis..…He spent time in Russia and every day he would come to the set with something interesting: a piece of writing or a Russian chocolate or a photo album. I think he stayed in character pretty much the whole time. And that's great. It really helped me… I saw Viggo yesterday for the first time since we finished the film and it was like a whole different person. I almost didn't recognise him."

Naomi Watts
Matt Mueller, Total Film
October 2007




Nikolai's charming nickname is "The Undertaker." Around the set, his squared-off Dracula pompadour acquired a nickname, too: "The Soviet Bloc."

The Great Dane
Men's Vogue
By Phoebe Eaton
March 2008




It's a watershed role for Mortensen and, such is the commitment he offers, it's not too rash to compare his performance to Robert De Niro's Oscar-winning turn as the young Don Corleone in The Godfather Part II.

I've taken on too much...
by James Mottram, The Independent / UK.
23 October 2007




"To me it's a movie about kindness and compassion and self-sacrifice," he said. "Nikolai is a man who holds hope and compassion next to his despair and fear. In this increasingly complicated and confusing world, there are people even in the darkest realms who will nonetheless do the right thing.

"Just because it is the right thing."

Viggo Mortensen
A Violent Tour De Force
By Robert W Butler
Kansas City Star
15 September 2007




"I wrote the lines but the heart and soul of Nikolai is really from Viggo."

Scriptwriter Steven Knight
Eastern Promises Production Notes
Focus Features
20 August 2007


Quotable Viggo: 14 January 2017

This week's Quotable is all about roads, real and metaphorical. There are real journeys on tarmac and along trails, and then there are those inner journeys that run parallel. The journeys within journeys. The ones that really count. As the recent 'Road Rules' article that Inlander published a couple of days ago points out, Viggo is an expert journeyer.



© Bleecker Street.


For the recent Esquire cover story on Mortensen, the actor/artist/poet picked up his interviewer at the airport and proceeded to take her on a road trip to his childhood home in upstate New York. This wasn't out of the ordinary for him. Not only has he taken many solo road trips throughout his 58 years, Mortensen also takes to the road in many of his films. Obviously, there's LOTR, but there's also the postapocalyptic The Road, as well as a film version of Jack Kerouac's On the Road, and then his most recent film Captain Fantastic, where he takes his brood of children raised in the wilderness of the Pacific Northwest on a cross-country road trip for their mother's funeral. Clearly, in both art and life Mortensen, isn't afraid of the journey ahead.

Road Rules
By Laura Johnson
Inlander
12 January 2017




"I never stopped traveling through countries and characters; this is my job."

Viggo Mortensen
By Simona Coppa - translated by Ollie
Grazia
9 October 2012




In Mortensen's view, the journey is always more entertaining than the destination anyway.

The happy trails of Viggo Mortensen
Xan Brooks
The Guardian
18 April 2009




'I travel a lot because I'm interested in knowing how the rest of the world lives. I love to learn about other cultures, to submerge myself in them, to learn of points of view that are different from mine.'

Viggo Mortensen
"I'm a guy who sticks his nose in everything"
By Stuart Gollum, Gala Magazine
30 August 2006




"I was 20 years old, I was travelling in the north of Norway," he recalls, like an old war veteran. Trying to go "as far up as possible," young Mortensen got lost, survived by lighting a fire and being rescued by the inhabitants of the region, the Samis, a native people of Finno-Ougric descent. "They sheltered me in exchange for work. Afterwards they tried to convince me to spend the winter there. They offered me a big coat and kilos of meat. And when I said no, they offered me a small fat girl of about 16. Maybe I should have stayed. It would have been an interesting experience.

Lost in La Pampa
By Pierre Boisson - translated by Ollie
So Film #10 (France)
May 2013




'In October, I got caught in a snowstorm in Lapland. I lost the trail and had to find some place to hide. I was out there on my own for a couple of days. I was worried but managed to find shelter and make a fire. It's really not about where you are, but how you are. I can get annoyed or say, "OK, this is where I am. I don't have any choice at the moment. Let's make the most of it."'

Viggo Mortensen's Travelling Life
By Nick McGrath
The Telegraph
10 April 2015




"Traveling is probably the number one most effective anti-war weapon there is. I've been to Tehran, for example. I happened to go to the city park there, and played a game of pick-up soccer with some Iranian men. I saw the sun come up and go down in Tehran, I saw the mountains, old people, dogs, pigeons, hospitals, things you can find anywhere in the world. It's much less likely that you're going to convince me that they are just this thing, that we must bomb Iran. I probably wouldn't agree that we should bomb anyplace, but those are people. Those are plants, those are animals. The weather changes there. People get up, they eat, they live, they die. It's much less likely when you know a place, you know?"

Viggo Mortensen on "Good"
By Aaron Hillis
IFC.com
31 December 2008




"You say, 'Well, where's Viggo today?' " says David Cronenberg, recalling the conversation that happened more than once on the London shoot, last year, of the exceptionally fine new thriller, Eastern Promises. "And they say, 'Oh, he's in St. Petersburg.'

"And you say, 'What!? I thought he was at the hotel.' "

Star's Eastern Immersion Impresses His Director
By Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
16 September 2007




On a coast-to-coast road trip when Henry was 11, Mortensen says, his son made a homemade map ahead of time to chart their itinerary, a map Mortensen has kept. "Instead of a little under 3,000 miles, it looked like it was going to be 16,000 or so, a kind of insane cardiogram, you know?" he laughs. "It took us the time it took us."

A History Of Defiance
By Daniel Mirth
Men's Journal
October 2009




The story of Hidalgo, as told in John Fusco's script, mixes historical details with a heavy dose of myth and speculation. Mortensen spells out the familiar pattern: A hero's character is determined not by whether or not he is triumphant, but by the choices he makes during a dangerous journey or a strenuous race. "To complete the cycle in the classic hero journey, there is one more step: What does that person (or group of persons) do with what they've learned from the experience?"

After Aragorn
By Jeffrey Overstreet
Seattle, WA 5 March 2004
Source: ChristianityToday.com




"You must make the difference between loneliness and isolation: between the two, I see a road that can take me farther than I would dare imagine. And wherever this leads me, I still want to take it!"

"You must read Camus if you're plugged in"
By Cécile Lecoultre - translated by Donna Marie
24 Heures
27 January 2015




Viggo, what do you love most about acting?

The ongoing journey of it, and its unexpected consequences. It is hard to know at any given time if you are making the right decisions as an artist, but the surest way to stay in the moment and make progress in this moveable feast of a profession is to say "yes" as often as you can. As Yogi Berra once said: "If you come to a fork in the road, take it."

One-on-one interview with 'On the Road's' Viggo Mortensen
By Steven Lebowitz
Examiner.com
6 April 2013




"I think it was Robert Louis Stevenson who said this," Mortensen says, "it was about meandering through a career, or the arts in general, without seeming to have a deliberate plan. He said, 'To travel hopefully is better than to arrive, and the true success is in the labor.' That's a great line, 'To travel hopefully.' That's what I'd like to do."

Viggo Mortensen
The Other Side of Viggo Mortensen
By Paul Young
Variety Life, 2003


Quotable Viggo 8 January 2016

The Golden Globes are tonight and both Viggo and Denzel Washington are up for the Best Actor Award. Both appeared together in Tony Scott's Crimson Tide in 1995. They will, I expect, have some serious catching up to do when they meet as a lot has happened since they did both the ironing together on the USS Alabama. Crimson Tide is a great submarine movie rammed with terrific acting, and a look back at it is long overdue, although quotes are pretty thin on the ground! But diligent research has turned up a few new ones and even a couple of unexpected Aragorn connections. The quotable concludes with Viggo's beautiful tribute to the wonderful James Gandolfini.


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© Hollywood Pictures


'My character is an average person in an extraordinary situation who has to make difficult decisions. It was nice to play a guy with a job and a family, rather than a guy with a big axe to grind. And scary too, because in a role like that you have to fit in, whereas you don't if you play a sociopath. In this role, I couldn't hide behind violence or fake teeth.'

Viggo Mortensen on Crimson Tide
Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




'Watching Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington was pretty interesting; to be at several scenes when they're arguing in speeches and stuff. I'd say that's fun to watch those actors go at it like a sporting event and I had a front row seat. '

Viggo Mortensen on Crimson Tide
The Fire That Fuels an Artist's Heart
by Carnell, Carpe Noctem magazine #15
1999




PA: Now, convince me you love Tony Scott more than I do, because I don't believe it's possible.

VM: You said you loved him so I was favorably disposed toward him. It's not a coincidence that all the fellas look so nice in their snug khaki uniforms in Crimson Tide, because in the rehearsal period, he paid out of pocket for all of us to get liposuction.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 199
5



Despite an overload of technical terms, this film still managed to capture my attention and interest with a plausible situation, credible actors (Mortensen rocks!), an environment about which I knew very little and spitlets of comic relief.

Michael Schiffer
JoBlo.com Movie Reviews
October 12, 1999




BE: Are you familiar with the cast lists that have been circulating on the Internet for years, where fans submit their ideal casts for a movie version? I'll read you some of the ones they've thought about for Aragorn. David Hasselhoff.

VM: Umm, okay.

BE: Elvis, in the all-musical version.

VM: Oh, wow!

BE:
Keanu Reeves.

VM:
(Silence)

BE:
Denzel Washington.

VM:
I could see Denzel doing that, actually. I worked with him on Crimson Tide. I see him having those heroic qualities.

Veni, Vidi, Viggo
By Bilge Ebiri
Yahoo Internet Life magazine
23 November 2001




In the movie, he is caught between a rock and hard place in the deadly confrontation between Hackman and Washington. Mortensen offers a restrained, dignified and incredible solid performance: the voice of reason in the power play of the two main characters.

The Guy Can't Help It
By Manuela Cerri Goren
L'Uomo Vogue #270
April 1996




In Tony Scott's searing post-Cold War thriller Crimson Tide, Viggo Mortensen gives a superbly taut performance as a nuclear-submarine weapons lieutenant - the only officer who knows the missile code - caught in a power showdown between hawkish captain Gene Hackman and by-the-book commander Denzel Washington. It's a rare studio role for the Danish New Yorker, who selects his parts with no concern for celeb kudos and has consequently retained the saturnine edge he showed in films like The Reflecting Skin and The Indian Runner.

Interview with Patricia Arquette
Interview magazine, 1995




The submarine drama, which opens today, has everything you could want from an action thriller and a few other things you usually can't hope to expect: an excellent script, first-rate performances and a story that has more to do with individuals than explosions.

Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle 1995




Although considerably more literate and intelligent than most of Jerry Bruckheimer's productions, Crimson Tide still shows off a few of the producers standard trademarks: the slick visual stylings of Tony Scott, the rousing musical score of Hans Zimmer, and a character actor ensemble that's just a joy to sift through. Sweating inside the Alabama's belly you'll find Viggo Mortensen, James Gandolfini, Rick Schroeder, George Dzundza, Matt Craven, Danny Nucci, Lillo Brancato, Steve Zahn, and Ryan Phillippe ... plus there's a great little cameo by Daniel von Bargen as a mad Russian and another one by Jason Robards as an ultra-high ranking Naval official. I've said it a thousand times, and I'll say it again: Bruckheimer knows good actors.

Scott Weinberg
DVD Talk
2006



For Mark Ordesky, there was only one contender for the role of Aragorn-Viggo Mortensen: "My wife had seen Viggo in Crimson Tide and pushed me and harangued me to track him down and meet with him. Viggo doesn't 'do lunch' with Hollywood 'suits,' but eventually I got to meet with him and afterward told Peter that I was passionate about finding an opportunity to work with Viggo."

The Making of the Movie Trilogy



Viggo's words to James Gandolfini

Thank you, friend. You were an ideal acting partner and a man of your word. You blew all of us away on your first day of work on "Crimson Tide" in that confrontation scene with Denzel Washington . You played your part to perfection, so intensely that Denzel, who'd by then more than proved himself to be a very fine actor, lost his bearings for a moment. Your performance seemed so real, your make-believe antagonism so true-to-life, that we all lost our bearings. The electric energy you brought to that scene revolutionised the set, and upped the stakes for Tony Scott and all of us involved in that production. You gave us a creative wake-up call, and inspired us all to do our very best. I have enjoyed watching your remarkable work all these years since that shoot, and am sorry, like everyone else in our profession, that I will not get to see any more characters constructed by you. We have your outstanding work to remember you by, and the good example you set as a person. Good luck. Travel well. Love, Viggo.

20 June 2013
Perceval Press
20 June 2013


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